The Shrine

Architect's rendering of the Shrine as viewed from the entrance.

Architect’s rendering of the Shrine as viewed from the entrance.

In the very late 90s my angel came to me in a vision and took me into the mountains. From the sky, high above a very distinctive mountain, we looked down upon a great courtyard and shrine nestled below the eastern face of the mountain. He gently led me down into the entrance and we walked up. Coming in, I was enthralled by the view as you walked up the steps to the entrance. The mountain had a distinctive peak and, on either side, a couple of ridges that felt like shoulders to the peak. Mimicking it was the church in the distance, with a tall central spire/peak and two subordinate spires on either side. I thought that this was a place of epiphany, where heaven and earth meet. The mountain is God’s majestic creation and mirroring it was man’s creation of the Shrine – reaching up to God’s creation. Having straddled two worlds all my life, I had the joyful sense that this was home for me.

As we went through the entrance, a great crowd had gathered in the long courtyard on this sunny, mild day. My angel gave me to know that this was the day of dedication of this Shrine. To my surprise, presiding over the ceremonies was one of my priests – Fr. M, wearing a pale yellow vestment with an intricate, elegant design.. And I knew this was in the future, for though Fr. M still had a baby face, his black hair was perfectly white now. It gave him an air of distinction without robbing him of any of his joyful enthusiasm. Also sitting near the dais was my 12-year-old son, now a lanky early middle-aged man. As soon as Fr. M began to speak, my angel took me to tour the inside of the church and through some of the substantial buildings on either side of the courtyard and little chapels and shrines to various saints. It was breathtaking.

At my next visit with Fr. M, I told him of this, describing it in much detail – and particularly the mountain, which I was certain was in the Rockies somewhere. He was both moved and surprised. He told me he often ran retreats at a place called St. Malo’s near Denver that sounded very much like what I was describing AND he told me that his order was involved in long-range planning to build a great Shrine in North America. And in fact, my first director had been the initiating force behind those nascent plans. I told him that the Shrine I saw would be the place of pilgrimage for after the Storm – to which people from around the world would come to give thanks for our rescue. For the record, I wrote him a letter describing it and making some (very primitive) drawings of what I saw.

For reasons more complicated than I want to elaborate on, for almost a decade I refused to look at any pictures of the mountain he was talking about. During that time, he and some others proposed alternate sites to me. There was a big interest in doing it near Los Angeles. For each of these, I simply told everyone that the site for THE Shrine was to be in the Rockies. They could build any shrine they wanted elsewhere, but for THE Shrine, I knew definitively it would be in the Rockies. I did not know for sure it would be at this site, for I had never looked at it, but it was the only one that those in the know considered a possibility.

Side view of the Shrine and its buildings which enclose the courtyard.

Side view of the Shrine and its buildings which enclose the courtyard.

One of the arguments advanced against it was that this site was very remote and difficult to get to – that a Los Angeles site would be much more accessible. I told them that the world after the Storm would be very different; that people would not be so eager for the easy way and quick gratification. In fact, they would want a sense of pilgrimage when they came to give thanks, however they came – so that would be a feature of the Colorado site, not a defect. It was also argued that St. Malo’s already had an active retreat center, so it was unavailable anyway. I replied that I had never looked at it, so that may be…but that I knew the mountain and would recognize it immediately – and that it was in the Rockies. If it was at the spot of St. Malo’s, God would carve out a way.

And so it went for about a decade. Then, in early 2008, Fr. M called me. He was chaplain of an Opus Dei house at a major American University. A man who had been an undergrad there (I’ll call him Todd, though that is not his real name) was now coming back for the equivalent of his Ph.D. in architecture – called a terminal project. They had spoken of the Shrine and the man was so taken with it that he wanted to do the initial design as his terminal project. Fr. M asked if it was okay to give him my phone number. That was just fine.

A view of the central Church at the Shrine.

A view of the central Church at the Shrine.

Todd and I talked at length several times. I sent him as good a description as I could (lengthy, anyway) and drew a few more primitive pictures. We traded several phone calls to clarify different issues. Then he told me he was going to go to Europe for six months to study the various styles involved. I gulped. I don’t mind taking responsibility for what I report from my visitations, but I knew that now I had to get online and actually look at Mt. Meeker. I couldn’t risk letting Todd go off to Europe and have to tell him later that that was not the site or the mountain. So I went online to look it up. It packed an emotional wallop I cannot quite describe when I first looked at it and saw, in this world, the distinctive mountain I had first been shown in the vision a decade earlier. I was in tears. I got another surprise. I had read an article on a lovely stone chapel in Colorado, the Chapel of St. Catherine of Sienna a year or so earlier.

The Stone Chapel of St. Catherine of Sienna, built on a rock, at St. Malo's.

The Stone Chapel of St. Catherine of Sienna, built on a rock, at St. Malo’s.

I thought it so beautiful I made it the screensaver on my computer. I had no idea it was actually at the foot of Mt. Meeker and at the entrance to the site of what will one day be the Shrine – because the picture I had did not have Meeker in the background. But I was relieved. Everyone knew how dicey it is to work from visions, but at least within the context of what I saw, I now was content that I had sent Todd barking up the right tree, anyway.

When he returned, Todd and I swapped emails…he sent me some first drawings. I had seen a kind of spire – actually more like an elongated pyramid atop the churches in my vision. He had drawn domes. I didn’t fuss over that. He liked the domes – and they were beautiful. But when he sent me an aerial view of the courtyard and grounds it was way too square and boxy. It had to be elongated like a rectangle. He told me that the elevations of the grounds there made that very difficult, maybe impossible. On that point, I told him there was no ambiguity on what I saw and he really needed to work it to solve the problem. Several weeks later, he sent me a note that he had done it – and told me that the effect would be exactly as I had first described to him; visitors coming up the stairs into the entrance would be greeted with a breathtaking view of the domes mirroring the mountains behind them. Along with the note was an attachment of the new drawing. The emotional impact when I opened the new drawing was as great as when I first looked at a photo of Mt. Meeker, itself. What he had drawn was exactly what I had seen, from exactly the same perspective, when Gabriel had first taken me down for the dedication. Again, I was in tears.

This is the final aerial drawing the architect sent to me. It took my breath away, for this is how I first was shown the Shrine a decade earlier.

This is the final aerial drawing the architect sent to me. It took my breath away, for this is how I first was shown the Shrine a decade earlier.

I was dazzled some months later to learn that Todd got highest marks for his project – and, in fact, won the award for best Classical Design of the year. He did a beautiful job – and there were a lot of difficulties inherent to that ground. When finished, it will be the largest Shrine on the North American continent.

In the spring of 2010 I began planning for a walking pilgrimage across the country. The Lord told me we were about to enter the fulness of the Storm – and this was to be my final preparation. As I have said elsewhere, I did not understand this plan at all. I was almost indignant. My response to the Lord was something like this: “You have been telling me all my life a great Storm is going to come upon the world. Now you are telling me we are at the border of it – and your plan for me is to take an extended hike?!” I pointed out that, though I hide it well, I am neurologically crippled. He just smiled – and I just obeyed, projecting absolute confidence outwardly while wondering privately. I came to see it actually was the perfect plan – and why God’s wisdom and ways are so much greater than ours. I will discuss that another time. The pilgrimage was not for the Shrine: rather, it was throwing myself on a radical dependence on God and as an offering for our poor, bleeding world. But what else could be the destination than the future site of the Shrine? Besides, I had been directed that my public work of proclaiming God’s message for the Storm must begin from Colorado, near the site of the Shrine.

While I was walking, one of my priests called to tell me that the Retreat Center at St. Malo’s had burned down – that was on November 14, 2011. One building was completely destroyed and the other so badly damaged by smoke, it might have to come down. We both wondered about this. The argument that there was already an active center there got a lot weaker. I kept walking.

On July 8, 2012, I saw Mt. Meeker for the first time in this life. It was from quite a distance – and I did not know that that is what I saw until the next day. I had made camp near a reservoir in Loveland, Colorado. I was excited because, after walking for ages in the high plains, this was the first day I could see the mountains in the distance. Looking west by southwest across the reservoir, the sun set brilliantly behind the highest of the peaks I could see. I snapped a picture of the sight, which I reprint here. You can’t actually see Mt. Meeker in the photo – it is obscured by the brilliant light of the setting sun. I eagerly called Fr. M and told him I was finally in sight of the mountains – and of the brilliant sunset I had just seen and snapped with the camera. He told me it was possible, given the direction I was describing, that that was Mt. Meeker. There was a welcome center in Loveland. I walked there the next day and struck up a conversation with the volunteer manning the desk. When I pointed to a peak and asked him if he knew what mountain that was, he said, “Oh, that’s Meeker.”

My first sighting of Mt. Meeker on this side of the veil. You can't really see it in this picture I took at dusk looking west across a reservoir in Loveland, Colorado. The sunset at the peak was stunning, but it obscured the peak in my photo.

My first sighting of Mt. Meeker on this side of the veil. You can’t really see it in this picture I took at dusk looking west across a reservoir in Loveland, Colorado. The sunset at the peak was stunning, but it obscured the peak in my photo.

I had always planned to go into the mountain for a Novena at the same time I did my annual August Novena to Our Lady of Fatima – which would be from Aug. 13 to 21. My son flew out to visit with me the last week before I went into the mountain. We went to visit the site, which was breathtaking. I befriended the caretaker there and told him what I would be doing. While I was there with my son a few days before I would go into the mountain, I did a little trumpet fanfare at the base of the site (Prepare the Way from Godspell) and my son got a video of it here. Yeah, I know I cracked a note in the middle. On the last leg of my journey, I did that fanfare once a day. In the midst of my Novena, I went up from my campsite deep into the mountain – and did that fanfare every hour. On one occasion, the noise of the trumpet helped persuade a bear to stay on his side of the ravine I passed.

On the day of that preliminary visit, the caretaker and a woman who sometimes volunteered there offered to show me the John Paul II trail. I asked what it was. For those of you who remember St. John Paul’s visit to Denver for World Youth Day in 1993, you may remember he went walking in the mountains one day. I remembered the news photos from the time, but I did not know until this day that he had gone into the mountain right behind St. Malo’s where I would go into the mountain. Then I got another surprise to discover that the day he went walking up that trail was August 13, 1993 – precisely 19 years before the day I would make my way into the mountain for nine days from the same trail. I was getting a few goosebumps.

St. John Paul arriving at Mt. Meeker on Aug. 13, 1993. I was 19 years behind him.

St. John Paul arriving at Mt. Meeker on Aug. 13, 1993. I was 19 years behind him.

For the nine days I spent in the mountain, I ate trail mix, cheese and crackers, and some fudge and maple candies that some ladies had given me. I refreshed my water bottles from the nearby stream each day. Once, three bears came by my tent just before dusk. I lay very quietly, hoping they would go away. They did. It was nine days of intensive prayer and reflection. I read mainly from Catherine Doherty’s books on Poustinia, the desert and pilgrim spirituality of old Mother Russia.

The hermitess Sr. Lucille who ran the poustinia retreats in the mountains. I stayed with her for three days after I came out of my mountain.

The hermitess Sr. Lucille who ran the poustinia retreats in the mountains. I stayed with her for three days after I came out of my mountain.

When I came out of the mountain, the caretaker drove me to nearby Estes Park where I ate at a McDonalds…had three big burgers (I was tired of trail mix!). Sister Lucille, the hermitess who ran the poustinia cabins way up in a mountain about nine miles east of Estes Park, had told me she would come off the mountain and get me when I came out of my mountain so we could visit for a few days. I stayed in one of the poustinia cabins by her and we visited for three days.

The poustinia cabin I stayed in for three days after coming out of the mountain. A section of this photo is what is the banner photo atop this website.

The poustinia cabin I stayed in for three days after coming out of the mountain. A section of this photo is what is the banner photo atop this website.

Sometime after I had gone back to normal life, I got word that they were seriously considering rebuilding the retreat center at St. Malo’s. I had told the appropriate officials what was needed there – and told them it would be best that construction begin before the fullness of the Storm that it might be a sign of hope even as the Storm got more violent – a sort of act of faith writ large. But few took me seriously – and the ones who did were not in a situation to decide. They wanted to rebuild.

Last September came the devastating floods in Colorado that made international news, wiping out bridges, completely isolating entire small towns. The epicenter of it was at Mt. Meeker. Massive rock and mud slides wiped away much of the forest where I had made camp, and remade the landscape of the entire site. It was incredible devastation. But while this wiped out remaining hopes of rebuilding the retreat center, the statue of the Virgin Mary at the property was untouched – as was the simple rustic marker for the St. John Paul II trail, though boulders and whole uprooted trees came pouring through on either side of it. I know I put up this video of the television story about it just a few days ago, but it is worth a repeat.

People often ask me what the status of the Shrine is. Nothing is going on now in this world. (Update – they are planning to turn one of the surviving ancillary buildings into a museum now, but there are no current plans for the place where the Shrine will be). The retreat center is gone and will not return. It would have been better to get started. But I know what God intends there – as I have known since 1998. And despite so many good people telling me why it could not be, every time someone has tried to commit the land to something long-term and permanent that is not the Shrine, God has intervened. I don’t trouble any officials about it any more. I have done my duty. Whatever they think, this Shrine will be built there – and it will be ready for dedication within two more decades. I expect to be gone by then. If you’re still around, I hope you will come out for the dedication – and say a little prayer for me as you give thanks for the Triumph of the Immaculate Heart.. Funny thing, no matter what man plans, in the end, God always gets His way.

 

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
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85 Responses to The Shrine

  1. Barb says:

    Looks beautiful! If it be God’s will, I would love to see it someday…

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Jacqueline Flipper says:

    Oh, my word!!!! Denver, Pope John Paul II, the mountains, Katherine Dougherty, Fatima,…….Holy Ground…… singing that song at the spring at Mother Cabrini Shrine, Cherry Creek State Park, Milly, the understanding about “refuge” beginning to form,

    ….I have goosebumps. I wish I could remember every minute of that pilgrimage. What a blessing and I thank God for it and for you, who made it possible. Too much to absorb. Thank you!!! L, JC

    Liked by 2 people

    • Audie says:

      Yes, this is so beautiful. I was expecting a different ending, but I’m finding “my” endings could never come close to what God has planned. Am learning, but a tad slower than most.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Becky-TN says:

    Oh Charlie,

    The Shrine is breathtaking. I hope and pray my family and I make it through to attend the dedication and if not, God willing, we all will be in Heaven smiling and praying and giving praise and thanks to God!

    I really don’t know how or what to ask, or what to write. After reading earlier your suggestion to one of the posters to go back and read some of your Facebook posts, I decided to go myself and read this evening. I’ve read a good bit of the posts, esp. Those from 2012/2013. Tears fall and a sense of reality sets in. For honestly, I can’t deny my part (my sin) that helped cause where we are now and will be. I am a cradle Catholic who unfortunately didn’t live that Faith well for the 1st 26 years of my life. But then in 2000, I had a conversion experience. Quite frankly, I think it was my “Illumination of Conscience” so to speak. My life changed and I’ve never been the same. I thank God! This is the thing, Charlie. I can’t go back to that person I was. To that life I lived. And reading that those who are devout will fall into apostasy. Turn their backs. That frightens me!!! I know I’m a sinner and I’m weak. Charlie, I can’t go back there. Living a life so deep in blackness. While I know I had to make that choice to accept His mercy 14 years ago, I don’t want to lose it out of fear.

    What do we tell our children, Charlie? How do we tell them? In my heart, I believe you are telling the truth. And my husband and I have seen things, by the grace of God, for what they are. I can’t wrap my head around it. All I know is I don’t want to deny Him. Pray for me.

    God Bless,

    Becky-TN

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      Oh dear Becky…we all have pasts – and the past is just a bucket of ashes. I know we spend our whole lives prone to certain temptations. Ehhh. I was talking with one of my priests…noted that I have been celibate for 10 years now. Sometimes it was close – and it has been a bit ragged around the edges at times. The first few years, I worried a lot about stumbling. I told my priest I pray that I never stumble – that I remain celibate unless the unlikely event of a new marriage comes. But I told him I no longer feared stumbling. Not that I couldn’t…I might – and certainly, if I got too proud God would probably let me just to bring me down a peg or two. But if I stumbled, I would just get right back up and start anew. You can’t worry about the bad things you might do. Just turn your face resolutely to God – knowing full well that you will stumble in some ways. He’ll help pick you up and set you on course when you do – as long as you don’t let guilt ( a sometimes perverse form of pride) keep you from turning to Him.

      Just take your children with you on your way. Don’t worry what to tell them. If you have your face turned toward God, it’s not a big issue. Now the people who are in complete denial, what are THEY going to tell their children? For whether people believe or don’t the Storm still comes. And do not forget…it pleased God that the little souls who are children today should be part of those who live to give witness to what we were, what the Storm was, and how it helped remake us to what we should be. So tell your children that God has chosen them to see one of the greatest adventures of all time – and to live to tell about it so that people do not again fall into the sort of evil that draws forth a Storm. They are a cloud of witnesses to generations yet to come…and so they are mightily blessed.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Becky-TN says:

        Thank you for your comforting words, Charlie.

        I have been pondering them all day. And you are right, what in the world am I afraid of….God, in His goodness, has been sending us the grace to recognize what is coming. I truly need to pray more for those who will not know what to do when all falls apart.

        While I know God has put me and my family here at this time in History, reading it the way you wrote it above is well really, really humbling!!! But, it really does all need to happen. I always say a prayer “Lord, save us from ourselves – we don’t know what we’re doing!”

        Thank you, Charlie.

        Liked by 1 person

        • June1 says:

          Becky!!! Look what I came across (or really, what God placed in our laps): http://www.ncregister.com/blog/simcha-fisher/catholics-with-a-past/

          I love Simcha Fisher… 😀 (She just announced she’s expecting Blessing #10!! Wow!)

          Like

        • Bob says:

          Becky, sounds like you are doing some things with the help of grace to avoid falling. Since you are worried that it may happen that is sometimes a good thing as long as we trust more in Divine Mercy and worry less. As the satan likes to tempt people to think a fall is a “small thing and besides God is so merciful” a healthy realization of sin is a good thing, as long as we trust in God for His help. And for any that may have fallen remember that the satan will then act as the accuser to remind us of how miserable, undeserving of grace and mercy we are and at those times it is good to ponder the greatness of God’s mercy, and to quickly come back to receive mercy and forgiveness and to confess if we are Catholic.

          Liked by 2 people

      • “And do not forget…it pleased God that the little souls who are children today should be part of those who live to give witness to what we were, what the Storm was, and how it helped remake us to what we should be. So tell your children that God has chosen them to see one of the greatest adventures of all time – and to live to tell about it so that people do not again fall into the sort of evil that draws forth a Storm. They are a cloud of witnesses to generations yet to come…and so they are mightily blessed.”

        So beautiful, so true.

        I often think that I was born in the wrong era. God reminded me that He knew what He was about, and we who are here now, are meant to be here. Our children, how blessed they are to live though this and see the rescue first hand. To think of them, at 90, teaching their great grandchildren of the storm, and the rescue, and how to live rightly before God.

        Liked by 3 people

  4. Colleen DeRose says:

    Amazing. For many reasons. Didn’t sister Lucille die not too long ago? There is a lay evangelist in my state who has been preparing to build a training monastery for people to carry the Gospel out. I suggested he look at sister Lucille s property when a friend told me she (or the owner of the property) died. Sorry, this might sound disjointed but your story had much confirmation in it for me and I’m reflecting on it rather rapidly.

    Like

  5. Lucy says:

    Dear Charlie,
    Thank you for sharing these words and images of the Shrine. (As well as the flooding footage from the previous post) . Looking at the pictures, I thought about the other recent disaster to the area, in the form of fires. Then and now, I have been praying and recalling my childhood memories of summer after summer at “The Y” in Estes Park. Such blessed, holy ground ! I had no idea what a gift it was to be there each year. The chipmunks. The humming birds. The ice-cold water and the big boulders, and how a kid could produce that incredibly loud, hollow “clack” sound, you know the one that happens when you throw one rock upon another into a Rocky Mountain stream ? And during the rest of the year, the Lord graciously allowed me to live in the Texas Hill Country, swimming in the crystal-cool waters of the Comal River, literally teeming with life back then …not so very long ago ! Today, there is only Schlitterbahn and hardly any fish left. Lord, what have we done to Your Creation, the holiest of holy grounds that were no-doubt considered like veritable Cathedrals for the Native tribes of Texas ( I also think of Enchanted Rock not far from Fredericksburg) ) thousands of years ago : hills, flowing streams and lakes, spring-fed rivers, woods, endless caverns and every sort of plant or wild-life one could imagine ? One day, the Lord WILL RESTORE it… when I say that it is not just a vague hope , but it is a certain conviction. Just like the certain conviction you have about that Shrine…
    And as I read your entry just now on the flooding in Colorado, I also thought of Revelation 12 and how perfectly it is depicted in these recent images : ” And when the dragon saw that he had been thrown down to earth, he pursued the woman who had borne the male child. But the woman was given the two wings of the great eagle that she might fly from the serpent into the wilderness, to the place where she is to be nourished for a time, and times, and half a time. The serpent poured water like a river out of his mouth after the woman, to sweep her away with the flood. But the earth came to the help of the woman, and the earth opened its mouth and swallowed the river which the dragon had poured from his mouth. Then the dragon was angry with the woman , and went off to make war on the rest of her offspring, on those who keep the commandments of God and bear testimony to Jesus. And he stood on the sand of the sea”. And so, here we are in that suspended sense of time right now, standing on “the edge” , somewhere between land and sea, just at the very cusp of it all… Do we even realize how intensely precious are these final instants of repose before the Final Confrontation ? Truly, we must give thanks to Our Lord and Creator for His Tender Mercies, He who is so slow to anger, and so quick to pardon ! His Justice is waiting…but only for the sake of His Mercy.
    After Mass this morning, the Lord gave me Malachi 3 and 4 and to read, as a strong echo from last week’s Word of Isaiah 9 ( I had not yet read Pelianito’s parallel entry on the same theme , also from today) : “The people who walked in darkness have seen a great light; those who dwelt in a land of deep darkness, on them has light shined”… ” The Lord has sent a word against Jacob, and it will light upon Israel; and all the people will know…for wickedness burns like a fire, it consumes briers and thorns…through the wrath of the Lord of hosts the land is burned, and the people are like fuel for the fire”… And Malachi : ” For behold , the day comes, burning like an oven, when all the arrogant and all evildoers will be stubble; the day that comes shall burn them up…but for you who fear my name the sun of righteousness shall rise, with healing in its wings. You shall go forth leaping like calves from the stall..” This too, is the Mercy of God and something we must never forget : the image of St Catherine’s that stands ever yet in spite of the raging waters that wanted to destroy it ! Our Lord can and will suspend natural law around the places and peoples of His choosing. Just like it says in the Wisdom of Solomon chapter 19, even the elemental forces of nature, whether they are fire or water or something else, know how to transform their strength in order to preserve Creation according to the Father’s Perfect Will. The Refuges are such places, and nothing can stop God’s Plan to preserve or build them. Charlie, I bought a painting at a junk-shop in a little village on the Loir river in France last summer. As far as I can tell, it sure looks like Mount Meeker to me, and that spot is indeed just waiting for the Shrine to be nestled right in there in between the surrounding mountains, like a gleaming gem ! I can imagine how hard it is for you to look at the artist’s renderings , no matter how skillful they are, because they will never SPARKLE like the buildings you saw in your vision. I believe that the Shrine really will sparkle… and also produce something like a melodious hum ! I have seen the Glory of the Restoration ,after the Fire, and it will be unfathomable in beauty . The Church and ALL of Creation. The Storm WILL bring all things down to their very foundations. The Fire WILL purge the earth entirely. The Lord WILL preserve His Own, meaning those who fear Him. (There are vast multitudes of souls who fear the Lord, although they do not yet know His Holy Name) And the the Lord WILL restore and rebuild everything upon His Four Pillars : Nature. Grace. Justice . Mercy. The Lord says to us now : BEHOLD, I WILL MAKE ALL THINGS NEW ! TRUST IN ME ! TRUST IN MY MERCY ! AMEN ! The Spirit and the Bride say: COME LORD ! COME !

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Wow, Lucy, wow. I especially was struck by the extensions from Revelations 12 – that whole Chapter is very important to me. The woman cloaked with the sun, of course is Mary in the image of Our Lady of Tepeyac. And yet, it has not occurred to me that the flood there was the veritable image of the water spewing from the dragon’s mouth in Revelation – and at the very time that society has decided to make war upon all of Our Lady’s offspring. Wow. Thank you for making that connection for me.

      Liked by 3 people

    • June1 says:

      Lucy, do you think you could post a link to a picture of the painting you bought? Kind of curious… 🙂

      Like

    • Beckita says:

      So inspiring, Lucy! Thank you so much.

      Like

  6. Charlene edwards says:

    Dear Charlie

    This beatiful article. Has given me so much Peace this early am. And a Hope and Faith to Trust To carried into my very busy work day. Thankyou and God bless your day.
    Charlene

    Liked by 1 person

  7. donna269 says:

    Charlie:
    In 2008, we took our last family vacation together to Estes Park. My sons were 17 and 22 at the time….We hiked as a family. One day, we took a trip outside the park and came upon the Chapel of St Catherine’s. I was overwhelmed by it’s beauty. We pulled into the parking lot and I took multiple photos of this gorgeous place. My children were used to mom stopping at every church we passed. I ran to the door but the church was closed at the time. I sat on the grounds and it felt like the most gorgeous, peace filled place in the world. Whenever I showed people the photos, they commented HOW BEAUTIFUL…..I think I was meant to stop there and see this place of refuge. We live in NJ and that was our only trip to Colorado. The Blessed Mother brought me there for a reason….After reading your article I now know why! God is GOOD always.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. ann says:

    Charlie–what a beautiful hopeful post. To me, St Catherine’s Chapel is our visible symbol of the Holy Catholic Church herself–and Our Lord’s words about building our house on rock and it stands even amidst the rains and the floods. thank you for the news report and for the trumpet fanfare. As long as I’m thanking, thank you for this web site! To add to Charlene, God bless your day!
    Becky, I know exactly what you’re saying and what you’re going through. When I first received the grace to come back to Jesus and the Church (and we’re talking many years ago now, praise God) I told Him on that Good Friday as I sat in the pew of the old stone church of this little village where I then lived, “hang on to me Jesus. Don’t let go of me. You know how I am.” And I can tell you Our Lord answers that prayer! I have often left Him, I’m sad to say, on my journey, but He has always–always–brought me back. He is faithful even if we aren’t. So now I pray like you, “don’t let me lose You, don’t let me deny You, don’t let me crash and burn because of cowardice” and I think He is always reminding me “I will never leave you nor forsake you”–Just keep saying the powerful short prayer “Jesus I trust in You” and keep hoping in Him. Scripture tells us over and over again, “No one who hopes in Me is disappointed” God bless.

    Liked by 2 people

    • charliej373 says:

      The story of how that site was chosen for the Stone Chapel is a marvelous one, too. A missionary priest, Fr. Joseph Bosetti, had been looking for and praying about a suitable site for a chapel. He was camped nearby one night and saw a Meteor hit in the night. The next day he went looking for remnants of the meteor. He found some on the rock – and so trusting to divine guidance the rock was the site. The church is built right atop the rock…and seems to meld with it.

      One fellow I am close with had doubted things I had to say, but he and his fiancé visited this site with me once. Old “Doubting Thomas” went exploring on his own for a bit and came back white-faced. Shaken, he said while he was walking, a powerful voice spoke and said, “From this mountain I will renew the faith of the world.” That was two years ago – and he has been steady and faithful ever since. For me, it evoked thoughts of, “On this rock I shall build My Church.”

      Liked by 3 people

      • Nancy says:

        Charlie, were you given the name of the shrine (though it looks like a basilica or a temple)?
        So beautiful I would love to make a pilgrimage even though it hasn’t been built yet. Perhaps the body of Christ needs to come first and the building later.

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          Nancy, as I mentioned, my first spiritual director was the original animating force behind the Shrine. He intended for it to be to “Mary, Mother of Fairest Love” and he wrote a beautiful prayer devotion to her. Had it been started when I was pushing the various authorities involved to get moving, I have no doubt that would have been the name. Now I am not sure. Certainly, rescue will come from Our Lady the Immaculate Conception and it will be the Triumph of the Immaculate Heart. Conversion of the world during the Storm will have come through the guidance of Our Lady of Tepeyac. (For those of you who are not Catholic whose eyes are glazing over at all these titles, they are not different people – just different aspects of the Virgin – just as I am, at the same time, a father, a son, a worker, a friend, while remaining the same person). I rather think Mary, Mother of Fairest Love covers all these things rather nicely – for in the end, it is all about love. But there is a season and a rhythm to things and if the initiative is not seized in the proper season, none of God’s intention is lost, but some of ours are.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Audie says:

            Just have to jump in with another comment on how Charlie writes about what I need at the right time. Was praying the Rosary today and was thinking about Our Lady of Tepeyac. I had always wondered, but never asked before, why all the names for Mary. Thank you, Charlie! Amazed at how all this is teaching me, in so many different ways. Must be part of the preparation!

            Liked by 1 person

      • janet333 says:

        “,,..and it will be ready for dedication within two more decades.”

        Is it going to take that long to build it Charlie?

        Like

  9. Barb says:

    Once again, a beautiful post and beautiful comments. Last night as I was praying my rosary, the Sorrowful Mysteries, I started with The Agony in the Garden, and it struck me that we are privileged in these times to be living the Agony in the Garden with our dear Lord a bit. We know that difficult times are coming just like our Lord knew his Passion was coming. He was so afraid that he sweated blood and at times, we too can feel afraid; but He is with us, understanding our fear, and He will comfort us. What a privilege for us to be able “to spend an hour with Him” to comfort Him in His agony and to let Him comfort us.

    Liked by 2 people

    • charliej373 says:

      What a lovely comment, Barb! I firmly believe that when we live a period of sorrows and suffering well, it is the one time we are able to console the suffering Christ, who we always need and ask to console us. He is our Brother in truth!

      Like

  10. Lucy says:

    /Users/Home/Desktop/albert-bierstadt-estes-park-colorado-1869.jpg

    Hi June1 ! Well , this painting of Estes Park (if the link works!) is pretty similar in feel. It is from 1869 and mine is from an unknown artist painted in 1966. I sure wish I could just walk over to the wall and take a photo of the one I bought, but I am presently in Texas and the painting is at my home in France (called Ker Fatima !) . This said, I will see who can help out over there with that virtually minor logistics issue !
    You know, we are so blessed to have technology available still, when it is there to give Glory to God, like this awesome blog of Charlie’s, and many others. What it has enabled is for a meeting of minds and hearts to happen, for us to gather as Family right here from time to time. The Communion of Saints is that very sense of Family in Christ , yet we cannot see or know our brothers and sisters in such a tangible way as this. In my case, the sense of solitude or isolation had been very heavy until the internet allowed for us to “meet in the clearing” , as Mark Mallett wrote last month. As a result of that blog entry, I am so very grateful that the Lord has connected me with other voices of prophetic brothers and sisters, and many precious souls that I would never have met or known living in France. Que Dieu la Trinite Sainte vous benisse, dans le Coeur Immacule et Douloureux de Marie !

    Liked by 2 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Ah Lucy…pour Noel, je chante toujours, “Un flambeau, Jeanette Isabelle; un flambeau, courons au berceau. C’est Jesus, maintenant le matin, le Christ est ne, Marie apelle; ah, ah, que la mere est belle; ah, ah que L’Enfant est beau!

      I know the third line is wrong, but I like my way better. For you English only types (and I am close – though I used to speak French fluently, it is pretty fractured now) the song is: Bring a torch, Jeanette, Isabelle! Bring a torch, to the stable run. Christ is born. Tell the folk of the village. Jesus is born and Mary’s calling. Ah! Ah! beautiful is the Mother! Ah! Ah! beautiful is her child. For my third line I replace “Tell the folk of the village” with “Now comes the morning”

      Liked by 4 people

  11. M.P. says:

    Being about your age, Charlie, I have to wonder if I will live to see that Shrine but of course would need to live through the Purification first. It certainly shall be marvelous! Have been to St. Catherine’s and even to Lucille’s who was a very great and holy lady who certainly knew how to recount a story.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      The first thing I noticed when I went to visit Lucille in the mountain the first time was this Icon of Our Lady of the New Advent.
      Our Lady of the New Advent

      I had come, during my pilgrimage, to understand the Storm as actually being a New Advent. In the first Advent, the world was pointed forward to Christ. In this Advent, we are pointed back to Him. Another emotional impact.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Janet says:

    Thank you so much for this Charlie and all who have posted. I have been greatly edified and find my self. Your mission is bearing fruit everywhere Charlie! Praised be Jesus and Mary!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Mary Randy says:

    Beautiful! It’s as if this shrine mirrors a building in heaven, Charlie. There’s just something about it. I couldn’t get the thought of Ezekiel 43 out of my mind when I looked at it:
    Then he led me to the gate, the gate facing toward the east; 2 and behold, the glory of the God of Israel was coming from the way of the east. And His voice was like the sound of many waters; and the earth shone with His glory. 3 And it was like the appearance of the vision which I saw, like the vision which I saw when [a]He came to destroy the city. And the visions were like the vision which I saw by the river Chebar; and I fell on my face. 4 And the glory of the Lord came into the house by the way of the gate facing toward the east. 5 And the Spirit lifted me up and brought me into the inner court; and behold, the glory of the Lord filled the house. 6 Then I heard one speaking to me from the house, while a man was standing beside me. 7 He said to me, “Son of man, this is the place of My throne and the place of the soles of My feet, where I will dwell among the sons of Israel forever.
    It fascinated me that it will be below the eastern face of the mountain as well. Churches and shrines are often built facing east as an eschatological sign of hope pointing to Christ’s return. Solomon’s temple faced east as well.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Anne says:

    Beautiful icon! Yes, we are all in labour of childbirth, united with Our Lady giving birth. A new era comes!
    Also anyone who has read Lord of the Flies ….William Golding. ….. Similarities of descent into chaos and then rescue.
    come Holy Spirit come and renew the ace of the earth .

    Like

  15. Scott S says:

    Thanks for the post Charlie. My wife and 4 children were in Estes Park 2 years ago. A man named Don, who I found out was a fallen away Catholic, told me about St. Malo’s and encouraged me to visit.

    We drove there one evening but the church was already closed so we couldn’t go in. The beauty of the outside of the church with the mountain behind it was amazing. The top of the mountain was shrouded in a cloud with the rays of the sun to the west shining through if my memory serves me correctly. I also remember that it reminded me of Moses being on the mountain with God.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Sue says:

    Oh Glory! The Shrine is beautiful, as befits the house of God! So many of the churches in the town where I live (and there are several catholic churches) have all the aesthetic appeal of a Morton shed. I think a place of worship ought to reflect the beauty and majesty of our faith, and though it may be uncharitable, I tend to think that mediocrity of our modern churches mirrors a remarkable lack of reverence. I made this comment to a local sister, who told me “What does that matter? God is everywhere.” I stubbornly cling to my insistence that it DOES matter.

    And in response to your reply on another thread, the Narnia series was one of my favorite set of books as a kid, although I did not read them in the light of faith. I recently bought the whole set to add to my library for my grandchildren when they get older, so it will be fun to revisit. Thank you!

    Finally, a funny story about my only visit to Estes Park. I missed the lovely St.Catherine’s shrine, (my host, a friend was doing the driving) but nonetheless it was a wonderful visit. While I was buying souvenirs for my kids, one vendor was selling woven Navaho blankets for cheap, so I congratulated myself on this great buy, being on a tight budget. Turns out, the local Walmart in my Minnesota town sold the same blanket, for the same price! So there IS a sucker born every minute!

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Ha, Sue, I burst out laughing at your comment on modern Church architecture. The problem with modern church architecture is not that it is modern, but that so much of it divorced itself from beauty, majesty and aesthetics altogether. You really would think you were going into an old Soviet Post Office the way some of these things are built. Every generation should build upon the legacy of the giants who went before them – so that our faith and both its internal and external expressions are ever fresh and new, drawing wonder and awe. My favorite photo of my son was snapped candidly while he was in St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome during World Youth Day 2000. The look of awe-filled wonder on his dazzled face was a joy to behold. You are right; the local sister is born.

      As for the Navajo blanket, I still think you got a bargain. If it was priced as low as you would have gotten at Walmart it is much more striking to be able to show guests the lovely Navajo blanket you got in Estes Park, way up in the mountains of Colorado, than to say, “Yeah, this was on sale at Walmart.”

      Liked by 3 people

    • SusanMI says:

      Hello Sue and Charlie, after reading your comments about the less than inspiring modern churches, I had to include this link that my husband and I had a great laugh a few weeks back. It is a parody interview with fictional Polish priest, Fr. Pileov Ash and Deacon Offring who are suspects accused of burning down 17 of the 18 most ugliest Catholic churches. And, yes, these truly are actual Catholic churches. I don’t know, Sue, maybe one of these is in your hometown! The link is appropriate and tasteful. Too bad we can’t say the same for the churches!

      https://faithinourfamilies.com/2015/05/10/catholic-priest-denies-burning-down-17-of-the-ugliest-churches-ever-built/

      The drawings for the Shrine are just beautiful! So grand, majestic – perfect to honor the Triumph of the Immaculate Heart of Our Lady. God willing, I pray our family will be able join in the glory of the Dedication!

      Liked by 2 people

      • SusanMI says:

        Good evening, to all here, after reflecting a bit more this morning, I thought I had better comment further on the parody interview I mentioned above. Our community here has grown so much since I have regularly commented, I wanted to clarify, just in case any offense was taken. Anywhere our Lord resides in the most Blessed Sacrament is truly worthy of our honor and praise. After all, God chose to the most humble of conditions for His Divine Son to enter into our humanity. I’m sorry if the parody offended anyone and I didn’t intend any disrespect to our Lord or the faithful that that may worship at the churches mentioned in the article.
        Still, the question remains, “What on earth were they thinking!?”

        Peter Kreeft, in his book Jesus Shock, comments on Beauty and how it is one of the three foods of the soul, along with Truth and Goodness. These three attract our heart to holiness. Christianity has throughout the ages, as Kreeft notes, “produced the world’s most beautiful and arresting art” and has erected the most magnificent cathedrals that make our hearts and spirit soar. Contrast with today, he writes, “Our world is rich, efficient, powerful, clever, knowledgeable– and ugly. We live in strip malls and hide beauty away in museums, instead of living in the museums and hiding away the ugliness.”

        The parody of the article is precisely that Christianty built these magnificent structures, as Kreeft puts it, “not to house man worshipping, but Christ worshipped.” So many churches over the last 60 years were built for efficiency and utility, not beauty.

        If it be God’s will, I cannot wait to gaze in awe at the beauty of the Shrine on the majestic Mt. Meeker. I first visited Colorado when I was 19 and my, then fiancée, was stationed at Lowry Air Force Base in Denver. I was entirely captivated and marveled at the beauty of the Rockies. That was then, now I realize that what really captivated my heart was the beauty of Christ, adorning His creation. That, and my future husband, of course. 😉

        Liked by 3 people

  17. Neal says:

    Hi Charlie, I had a dream about you two nights ago. It was probably nothing more than subconscious winning lottery ticket desires or wishful thinking that I can contribute to building your dream but I figured that I’d share. The dream was brief, but it started at the onset of the economic collapse. One of my investments, instead of tanking like most everything else, went up so unbelievably high to the point that I had over a billion dollars. The first thing I did was contact you and I flew out to Colorado immediately. We started buying building supplies and stone for the shrine and stored it in warehouses. We knew we had to work quickly since the value wouldn’t last for long.

    Since I have a very low net worth this seems ridiculous but hopefully someone else (like all the many worldwide billionaires reading your site 🙂 will contact you to make it happen sooner rather than later!

    Liked by 2 people

  18. E. Allison says:

    Charlie, my family and I were in Colorado in Sept of 2010, and we happened upon the chapel ‘on the rock’. It is a beautiful place and Mt Meeker is quite impressive. The chapel was closed when we were there, so we walked around a bit outside and took pictures. It was a pleasant sunny afternoon as I recall. I remember seeing the sign at the trail head noting that PJP2 had hiked there. I hope and pray I get to see the shrine when it is complete! I will be an old man by then for sure.

    We were in Colorado to see how my wife liked it there. We were considering buying land to create an off grid homestead. In the end we decided that we needed a place with more water and ended up buying in KY. I have worried for a long time that I would not have sufficient time to get there and get set up before the collapse. The plan is to get the land paid off first and we’re still working on that. I have known it’s coming for a long time. Years ago, I read a wonderful book by Desmond Birch called, “Trial, Tribulation and Triumph; Before, During and After Anti-Christ”. It is an encyclopedic work written in 1996 (I think) that had a profound effect on my spiritual life. It chronicles Church approved prophecy and private revelation, along side of scripture and Tradition, concerning the end times. One of the prophecies (I do not remember by whom) stated that near the beginning of the chastisement, civil war would break out in France and Italy at almost the same time. I was of the opinion that only a total worldwide economic collapse could precipitate such a thing. The state of affairs since financial collapse in 2008 has only strengthened that opinion. You don’t need to be an economist or a seer to see what’s coming.

    God Bless you Charlie. Please pray for me and my family. I have a daughter with cerebral palsy. She is on seizure medication daily, which no doubt will become unavailable post collapse. Stocking up now is not an option as it is over $500 for a 90 day supply. I will add you to my prayer list as well.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Thank you, E. Glad you saw the site at Mt. Meeker. I have prayed for your daughter and family, committing her to the care of the Archangel, Gabriel. May God richly bless you all and make you a profound sign of hope in times of trial.

      Like

  19. MaryE says:

    Charlie, I have been following your website since early last fall and today was the first time I heard about the Shrine. It was so fascinating and the fact that we can see Mt. Meeker from our house made us feel so privileged. So, we got in the car and drove up there to see the condition of the land now. Flood damage is still there but St.. Catherine’s chapel receives many visitors. And the lilacs are just now in bloom.
    Thank you SO much for following the Lord and for sharing your journey with us. We would also be so grateful to attend your meeting if you have one in the Northern Colorado area.
    Blessings on your way!

    Like

  20. Mary says:

    Charlie, I am so amazed! I’ve been reading Mark Mallett for quite awhile. From there I just started reading your posts recently and happened upon the Birmingham video.( I don’t usually watch videos, but I was drawn) I related so much to what you were saying! I am a mom of nine mostly grown kids. We homeschooled mostly because of concerns about our Catholic Faith. Me, I seem to learn the messy way. It has been the school of humiliation, but also a school of beautiful miracles when I let God take over the mess. I am grateful! BUT, here is something else that keels me over about all of this. I saw that photo of the shrine of St Catherine and thought, Gee, that looks like the church we visited the one time I’ve ever been out West. My two sisters were there with me and we were delighted to see where John Paul II had been and to be in the chapel. My goddaughter was getting married and our sister flew us out there. I was so scared to fly. I was ready to kiss the ground like our Holy Father 🙂 I just can’t believe we have had the blessing to see this holy place! God is so good and kind! When we were there how very beautiful it was! God bless you, Charlie, and thank you for what you are doing for everyone. We have been expecting God to take action for a very long time. We also came to pretty much the same conclusions as to what we should do. We’re just praying for the grace as we go. We have God and our families and neighbors. Cor Unum. One heart! please,God. It seems the video is spreading everywhere. I’ve been trying to do my share of getting it out there. Love and prayers! Mary

    Liked by 5 people

  21. Mary C Pearson says:

    We spoke at Isle. This story is extremely cool. Thank you for your concern for us all.

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Mary Pearson says:

    Reading my Catholic daily Bible I was struck by the “towers” text. Had never noticed this was a prephecy of great joy rather than apocalyptic doom. (Isaiah 30 26). I imagine this is something you already knew.

    Like

  23. Ava Eadie says:

    Thank you for suggesting I read about the Shrine, Charlie. You are correct, that is a very interesting story.

    Like

  24. Pingback: The Shrine Revisited | The Next Right Step

  25. The location of the shrine there seems so fitting. I spent 2 summers at Camp San Malo in the early 60’s, before it was converted to a retreat center. The camp was run by priests and seminarians who taught us a lot about growing up. Those were the best summers of my life, always with Mt. Meeker looking over us. It reminded me of a giant armchair, God’s armchair, a very distinct and welcoming mountain unlike Long’s Peak behind it. We began each day with mass at the chapel on the rock, summoned by one of the campers pulling the rope of the 12″ bell. An idyllic and holy place that begs for a shrine. I am so glad to have stumbled on your site. Thanks.

    Liked by 5 people

  26. Pingback: A Recap on The Shrine | The Next Right Step

  27. Tom says:

    Hi Charlie,
    Can I humbly request that you put a little grotto somewhere within this shrine, As Our Blessed Lady loves Grotto’s?
    I pray I will see this shrine filled with many pilgrims honouring the Mother of God. Praying in the Divine Will for this intention. God Bless Tom

    Liked by 2 people

  28. RJW says:

    Awe yes, my husband and son and I were there!!! We traveled to Colorado last October to bring love and encouragement to my brother, who is fighting a battle with cancer and a very dear friend, who also suffered and bravely fought his battle with cancer for 15 years;we received the sad news that he received the last rites and died a week after we returned home. God was good to allow us one last wonderful visit with this dear man.
    To ease our own troubled hearts we took to the moutains and made the journey to Estes Park. I will never forget the moment we rounded the curve and beheld the
    the Stone Chapel of St. Catherine of Sienna. It seemed so unbelievable, beautiful yet heartbreaking that the doors were closed. We spent a long time there and I must say that while we saw a great deal of wonderful things in Colorado, that Chapel stole my heart.
    Charlie this would be a perfect place for your Church. My picture is an image of the Cathedral.

    Liked by 4 people

  29. Rayann says:

    Hi Charlie, I found your site shortly after you posted this the first time although I have never commented before. St Malo’s had a special place in our hearts and I was so sad when it burned down but I guessed God had a reason for allowing it. My family used to stay there when we went to Colorado each year and both of my sons lived and worked there at various times after being introduced to it by my daughter who had moved to Denver. My youngest son joined the community that lived there and is in Rome studying for the priesthood. My oldest son got married in the St Catherine chapel. Anyway, it is a breathtaking place and I can’t imagine a more majestic place for a shrine. I will never see it but it would so neat for my kids to be able to return there some day. I love your comment that people after the storm won’t always be wanting to do things the easiest way. What a breath of fresh air that we will return to sanity and be willing to take more time and effort to do things that are really meaningful. Thanks for all your posts. They have helped me to keep perspective on what is going on in the world and not worry so much. God knows what He is doing! Yea, I already know that but in the midst of the storm, I no doubt will need to be reminded over and over because sometimes it isn’t going to feel that way!

    Liked by 5 people

  30. colleendrose says:

    This particular post has stirred me since you first posted it ,Charlie….other information had come to me at the time and I wondered if it might become a place some AZ people could use as a community place for training lay evangelists…probably not. I had heard that sister Lucille had died and wondered if the property might be available for that use. Then you came into the picture and this site of the shrine seemed amazing…that God would put together the preliminary parts of its development seemed such confirmation. And so, I’ve been wanting to visit the area and now will do so next weekend while on retreat at the Mother Cabrini shrine. Just my own little pilgrimage of faith and confidence in God’s plan.

    Liked by 3 people

  31. PRIVERS@YAHOO.COM says:

    Charlie,
    OMG, gasped when I saw the shrine, because I was thinking of something like a statue. Wow, am I out of it or what? It’s breathtakingly beautiful. But, I have a question. Is this Catholic? If you can’t share, I understand, but I’m curious to know if we are still going to be Catholic after the storm. I heard you say that protestants will come home and it will be like a family reunion. The shrine is a dedication to the Blessed Mother, I just cannot imagine how protestants are going to “come around”. Will the joining of Catholics and protestants become a different “church”? . I read all of your posts. I can’t wait to see everyday if you have posted something new. I have nothing “profound” to share like so many others, but I do believe you and am acknowledging God and praying for God to lead me in the next right step.

    Forgive me if i am out of bounds with my question. There is so much you cannot share and I understand.

    Anything, anything at all, I would be most appreciaive.

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      Of course it is Catholic. I have spoken of this often. Our Protestant brethren will regain the unity and foundation they forfeited at the separation, but we will regain some important charisms we have so neglected as to have functionally lost – but which are vibrant in some Protestant faith communities. Already, there is quietly a renewed interest and affection for Mary in more than a few Protestant faith communities. But think of this…we are going into the greatest crisis in the history of the world and, in the end, we will be visibly and miraculously rescued by the hand of Our Lady – sent to do so by Our Lord specifically so that all know how much He honors her and will us to honor her, too. Surely you do not think faithful Protestants are so pigheaded and vain that they will reject Our Lord when He shows them that He honors her and intends them to do the same. It will be a joyful reunion for all of us.

      Liked by 2 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Also, Privers, you might enjoy this piece I did sometime back on Mary and the Saints – for Protestants.

      Liked by 1 person

  32. Pingback: At Sea | The Next Right Step

  33. Roland Rodriguez says:

    Dear Charley,

    I have been reading your blogs intermittently since I heard you on the Patrick Madrid Show September 2015. Last week I forwarded one of your messages to my oldest daughter, Michelle because, as a writer, I thought she would appreciate your writing style (I was wrong, she thought it was too scholarly), but more importantly, because she needs to be reassured that God will not let her down if she remains faithful to Him. She must not lose hope.

    January of 2015 her husband Casey, a 27-year-old (at the time) non-smoker, was diagnosed with stage 3B lung cancer. Zoey, their daughter and my only grand baby was only 7 months old. Michelle was raised Catholic, but after entering college began to question some Catholic teachings. Casey was raised Lutheran and although both believe in God, they have struggled with where and how to worship Him.

    Casey’s battle with cancer has had its ups and downs (mostly downs). Late last year they discovered and treated a brain tumor. A few months later it appeared to be shrinking, but early this year it began to grow again and was now accompanied by two smaller tumors. They soon treated the new ones with radiation and the brain surgeon recommended surgically removing the first one. About a month ago they met with the brain surgeon to review everything and schedule the surgery, but after learning that Casey’s oncologist had recently switched him to a new cancer medicine, he decided to wait a month to see if it would do the job.

    A couple of weeks ago Michelle and Casey left Zoey with Gramma and Papa so that they could relax in the mountains of Colorado for a week. On Sunday, June 12th, the Lord’s day, Michelle sent me the following message accompanied by three pictures: “We found this chapel on our way up the mountain in Estes Park. It was so beautiful! It’s called Camp St. Malo.” She later told me that she felt called to stop on the way back to pray before the altar which she did.

    Last Monday Casey had a PET/CT scan and MRI. Tuesday the oncologist told them that the cancer had spread to Casey’s right lung. All I could say when they called to give me the news was to trust God and keep praying. My eyes are welling up as I write this.

    Now you can better appreciate why last Wednesday, after reading your blog about being true, not just right, I forwarded it to Michelle. Thursday, I decided to brush up on your story and your mission so I could be prepared for when she called asking questions about this “pretentious” man. I landed on this page and was beside myself when I saw the picture of the Chapel of St. Catherine of Sienna. I asked myself, “Is it really the same chapel?” I pulled up the picture she sent me and It was.

    I cannot describe the joy and excitement I felt as I realized that God was not only listening to our prayers; He was speaking to us. I sent Michelle and Casey a link to this page and said “Coincidence? I will call you.” Neither she nor Casey answered their phones. I couldn’t contain myself. I had to share the story with someone so I told Sam, who works with me. He too was amazed. He smiled and thanked me for sharing. I called Casey again and this time he answered. He and Michelle were in the car on the way back from their appointment with the brain surgeon who had just told them that the brain tumors had virtually disappeared. Praise God!

    Both Michelle and Casey recognize this as divine intervention. She said that after praying at the Chapel of St. Catherine of Sienna she felt called to come back to the Church. I understand that this can be a process but I thank God that yesterday she celebrated mass with us in Fort Worth. She, Casey, and Zoey came to Fort Worth to attend a fundraiser for Sharon, a dear friend of ours who was diagnosed with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s disease) last year and whose condition is quickly deteriorating.

    I will continue to pray the rosary to our blessed Mother every night for Casey, Michelle, Sharon and her musically talented husband Jack who is dealing with multiple sclerosis, and for my other daughters who also struggle with their faith.

    Thank you so much for your ministry and may God bless you.

    Liked by 6 people

    • charliej373 says:

      God bless you and your entire family, Roland, and thanks for sharing this inspiring story. AS for your daughter’s initial reaction to my style, I have plagued with that all my life. Intellectuals and semi-intellectuals think only they get me. One of my now best friends, a prominent lawyer, was among them until decades ago, he was at a dinner where the governor spoke…and the table of dear older ladies next to him could only talk excitedly about me being at the dinner. He changed his mind about the scope of who I was reaching – and introduced himself with that story.

      May the Lord keep all of your family in the cradle of His bosom.

      Liked by 3 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      Roland, that you for sharing your heart-warming witness of faith in your precious family. You and your intentions are in my prayers.

      Liked by 1 person

  34. Pingback: Back on the Road, and a Reprise of the Shrine | The Next Right Step

  35. Our Lady of Renaissance at Les Deux Oreilles

    Like

  36. SteveBC says:

    The first time I read this, I appear to have missed the timing, that it would be completed by the early 2030s, apparently. I’ll be in my early 80s, so I may be both able and willing to visit the Shrine around the time it is dedicated. That would really be something.

    Liked by 5 people

  37. Pingback: New Winds, New Waves, Same Barque of Safety | The Next Right Step

  38. Jos Collin says:

    Do you remember having seen a pipe organ at the Shrine and what it looked like?

    Like

  39. Pingback: A Decisive Conundrum | The Next Right Step

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