In Thanksgiving

The 'First' Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone.

I am thankful for the little community that has grown up here. Kind of surprised, too. Though I ran a couple of test posts back in January, I didn’t start putting up regular posts here until March. Now I would feel a little lost without this virtual home.

It amazes me what high quality commenters I have gotten at the site on a regular basis, people I learn from. We have people from a lot of different viewpoints, too. Oh, I get a few cranks from time to time and those who just want to vent anger. The surprise has been how few they are. Having written for secular publications with a decent audience, too, you get a lot of trolls, who just say provocative things or offer explanations about how rotten you are without offering anything constructive at all. If it is reasonably civil and has some point, other than that I’m just a rotten guy, I put it up. The startling thing is that, based on the size of the audience, it is only about a tenth of what I am accustomed to seeing.

I always worry about the unabashed critics, though – that maybe I dismiss what I should listen or respond to. But if you get caught up in that, you spend all your time with people who have nothing positive to offer and start short-shrifting the people who are getting something out of it and do offer real hope and insight. Still, you worry that some might be really sincere people who just can’t express their legitimate concerns in a constructive way – and that you might be missing something important. Fortunately, the regulars here have gotten very good about offering correctives when things seem like they might be going astray, occasionally in comments, sometimes in emails. That’s good, for that is what family does for each other. We have become a sort of online family of followers of Christ. For the critics who don’t have anything I think of St. Augustine’s insight about such things: “Just as you are, so also do others appear to you.” While that dictum makes me sad for the interior life of those few who have little but sneers and snarls to offer, it makes me rejoice for the many who have charity, vigorous points of view, and ultimately affection for each other here.

It is heartening that, in a world where comment sections are largely a toxic insult-fest, here I think we all learn from each other, reason together, and grow a little closer to truth, broadening both our understanding for each other and our points of view while keeping to Christ and Our Lady. Yeah, we thunk each other upside the head every now and again, but that is what families do, too, and then move on. We kind of stumble forward together.

I am thankful for my extended family, both those who are blood relatives and the great network of friends. I am grateful for my friend Bob, in Colorado, who gives me a place in his basement to work and live out of; my friends Brad and Lisa, who provide me with a good, old truck to make the rounds in. (Lisa’s Dad is in very bad health right now, prayers would be much appreciated). I am grateful for the folks who are putting together the prayer groups that are built on simplicity and going forth to be a sign of hope to others. I am thankful for my friends at Mother Cabrini Shrine in Golden and those at St. Joan of Arc Parish in Arvada.

But I am particularly thankful for the virtual parish that has arisen here at this website. (Hee hee, we have a multitude of priests, religious and yes, even a few bishops among us watching over us all). Today, I offer up the Prayer of Miraculous Trust for us all, asking the Lord to send St. John Bosco to comfort and to guide us through the Storm, bringing us safely through the two great pillars of Mary and the Eucharist into port.

Over at the Peppy Prepper, my old friend John McConnell put up some of the more basic things you can do to get prepared for times of trouble. You ought to check it out if that is one of your priorities. I am thankful for all of the people who are, with great generosity, preparing to help people in times of need.

Happy Thanksgiving, my friends. See you Friday.

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
This entry was posted in Conversion, Family, Solidarity and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

113 Responses to In Thanksgiving

  1. Noreen says:

    Happy Thanksgiving Charlie and to all the “family” here! You are all such a gift and I give thanks for you always.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Irish7 says:

    Happy Thanksgiving Charlie and friends! I too am grateful for the wisdom, encouragement and generosity of spirit shared here. Thank you for the prayer today Charlie. I’ll add some for us all too. ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Fran says:

    Happy Thanksgiving to you too, Charlie! I too have so much to be grateful for, including my friends here. God is so good. I will pray for you, and all here at mass this morning.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. BC says:

    Happy Thanksgiving to Charlie and all. I don’t comment much, but I am thankful for this site. God’s Blessings upon all of you and your loved ones this day and always!

    Liked by 2 people

    • audiemarie2014 says:

      Happy Thanksgiving to you, Charlie, and all here. I am thankful for this site, as you’ve given me hope and I consider you all a gift from God. God bless you.

      Liked by 2 people

      • the phoenix says:

        And thank you, audiemarie2014, for the encouragement and support you show by liking so many of my comments … I notice and it’s appreciated. I hope to see more of your posts so I can respond to you in words. 🙂

        It looks like I would have to change my name to register here and get the ability to like things, (which would mean having all kinds of numbers after my name) so at this time I would like to say how much I appreciate reading and like all the posts here. I would love to join in more … one challenge is that by the time I get home from work, it seems like I’m coming in late to the party and would often end up making posts that look like “me too” because all the good stuff has already been said.

        Liked by 3 people

        • charliej373 says:

          Ahh, don’t worry about it Phoenix…seems like I remember somebody in authority saying that the first shall be last and the last shall be first…

          Me last! 😉

          Liked by 2 people

          • the phoenix says:

            What an excellent way of looking at things, Charlie, … and so true! Come to think of it, there are many indeed who would prefer to have the last word. Anyways, the good thing is that there are so many people here who do come up with such eloquent posts (including both yours and the comments that follow) at all hours that you can always count on an interesting and informative read.

            Liked by 1 person

      • ellenchris says:

        Audiemarie — I am thankful that you take the time to register your “likes” for my and other people’s posts. It is good to know that someone actually took the time to read what you took the time to write. May I invite us all to try to add more “likes” (if you are set up to do that) when we read each other’s posts so that we can all get a sense of being read — even if we don’t always have comments. Joy to all today and always.

        Liked by 4 people

        • the phoenix says:

          Hi ellenchris, You are one of those people whose posts resonate with me, and since I agree, find myself at a loss to add anything because it’s been said so well the first time. Hail and well met!

          Liked by 2 people

        • audiemarie2014 says:

          Thank you, Phoenix and Ellenchris, for the kind comments. I love Thanksgiving! Last night, as I was saying my prayers, I asked how I could experience the joy of our Faith so that I could pass it onto others. I felt the answer I was given was to be grateful and aware of my many blessings. It was a great day with my family, but, sadly, I was the only one out of mostly Catholics who made the sign of the cross before and after the prayer of thanksgiving, which did not mention God. It was surprising, and my Protestant husband noticed it too. It was like the others were uncomfortable with my doing that. Yet, there were many blessings today and it was a good day. God bless you all.

          Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            The family I was with today has seven children, wonderfully lively and enthusiastic kids. After dinner, we did a family Rosary. What a delight. The wonder of a family Rosary with young children is not how elegantly it is done, but that it is done at all. You did it. It is enough – and will not be without effect.

            Liked by 1 person

          • the phoenix says:

            Definitely audiemarie2014, When you are filled with gratitude, that will radiate out to others … people will see it! Good for you for being a witness in your own home … it is definitely so needed nowadays. Being the only Catholic in a houseful of Protestants yesterday, while I prayed with them “in Jesus’ name” instead of making the sign of the cross, I did mention the Catholic Mass, the handshake of peace, and guardian angels while we were faith-sharing and explaining what we were grateful for in our faith walk, because what else can I honestly share except being myself?

            Liked by 1 person

          • the phoenix says:

            And Charlie, as for the family Rosary with children, I’ll never forget the one we said at my Irish aunt’s cottage (in the USA) with my grandparents and my sister. I was about six or seven years old, and we were doing fine until the peacefulness of the moment inspired in me a grand, unstoppable laugh attack, and soon enough, my sister joined in. My good grandparents started to get a disciplinary look in their eyes, when my aunt smiled and joyfully said, “Let them laugh, they’re children! Let’s all take a laugh break for a few minutes, and then continue on!’ Much wisdom there, and after a few minutes, the Rosary continued on all the way through peacefully enough.

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            When my kids were little, they had a hard time remembering which mystery was which, but my daughter always gave it a game try. I loved when I asked her what the Fourth Glorious Mystery was and she confidently pronounced that it was, “The Declension.”

            Liked by 1 person

        • Irish7 says:

          @ellenchris, I responded to you very belatedly and fear you didn’t see it. It is the last comment under Cardinal Omalley Musings. I have been wondering if you got an ok report from your doctor.

          Liked by 2 people

  5. Lois says:

    You are indeed a gift to us from God and I am so grateful. How can I get information on the prayers groups. I am in a prayer group but would like to add your guidelines etc. God Bless and Happy Thanksgiving. Lois

    Liked by 3 people

  6. Kathy D. says:

    Happy Thanksgiving, Charlie! In addition to being thankful for my family, I am thankful that I found you and your website. You have given me good information and reassurance. I just hope that when the storm hits I remember what I have learned from you and your commenters. I imagine the internet will not be available at that time to look for support and advice! I am alone in my faith in my family, like many others. I pray that they will return to God and that maybe I can be of some help to them if I am allowed to stick around! God’s will be done!

    Liked by 3 people

  7. shjihmhs says:

    Charlie – I became aware of your website from a friend. I thank God for that friend and I thank God for having led me to your site! Have a very Happy Thanksgiving and may God bless you always.

    Liked by 3 people

  8. Patricia says:

    Happy Thanksgiving Charlie and to all !!!!

    Liked by 3 people

  9. Mick says:

    Happy Thanksgiving, Charlie–and to everybody else here (even those who don’t live in the USA and therefore aren’t having Thanksgiving Day today)! Thank you, God, for all of your gifts and blessings. Please help all of us in Charlie’s “family” to be able to meet and hang out in heaven someday.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Connie says:

      May God Bless Us All , Each and Everyone- Happy Thanks giving! Mick, I was just thinking the same, hope we all get to hug each others and hangout in Heaven! Charlie been praying for you and Kim- I will lift up Lisa’s Dad too.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Lily Malakooti says:

    Thank you for helping us all! Many many of us here in northern virginia find it very difficult to store much food etc. we all used to do that only to have to give it all away or unfortunately discard it due to it’s shelf life . We are trusting in Divine Providence and still, of course, using the common sense God gives us. Happy thanksgiving to you!!!

    Lily

    Liked by 3 people

  11. Barbara Dore says:

    Praised be to God for ever

    Liked by 3 people

  12. SteveBC says:

    I would also like to wish everyone here a Happy Thanksgiving, as well as express my appreciation for all the effort, thought, and care that everyone has put into creating such a lively and unusually worthwhile place for us all to gather and help each other. I have benefitted considerably and am grateful to all of you.

    In particular, I want to thank you, Charlie, for without you to work so hard at developing this community, it would not exist in this wonderful state of give and take. Further, I want you to know that your advice to trust God, take the next right step, and be a sign of hope to others has not only helped me profoundly but has given me something simple and concrete to pass to others, several of whom have already expressed their appreciation for your advice. So like ripples in a pond, the effects of your work and care are slowly but surely spreading.

    Happy Thanksgiving, everyone! 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  13. Chris says:

    Happy Thanksgiving to you Charlie and to all of you wonderful people out there whose love, support and thoughtful commentary have given me so much comfort in the storm.

    Liked by 3 people

  14. Maureen says:

    Happy Thanksgiving, Charlie, and to all who follow his blog. I am learning so much from all of you, especially in the area of trust. I’ve never been good at trusting in the Lord but with Charlie’s guidance and input from this community, I am definitely making progress. Thank you and may God bless all of you on is day of Thansgiving.

    Liked by 3 people

  15. Alex ireton says:

    HAPPY THANKSGIVING EVERYONE. Charlie, you give a lot to this family, thank you.

    Liked by 3 people

  16. the phoenix says:

    Happy Thanksgiving to Charlie and to everyone here!

    I too feel very blessed to have found this safe Catholic haven on the internet, and include you all in my daily Rosary.

    I am also grateful that I have a place to go this Thanksgiving … for the third year in a row, a Protestant co-worker of mine has graciously invited me into her home to share this prayerful holiday filled with gratitude, fine conversation, and food, with her family.

    I do pray every day for my family. Am still feeling very much like Joseph with the coat of many colors as far as family is concerned, so meanwhile I am thankful that the Lord has provided me with somewhere to belong today, where there will be an atmosphere of peace and acceptance.

    And now I should get back to the kitchen to check on the creamed spinach that I’m bringing to dinner! 🙂

    Liked by 5 people

  17. patrick says:

    Dear Jesus, Mercy! Have Mercy on us oh Lord according to to the multitude of thy tender mercies. Thank you for all graces past, present and future. Lord cause thy face to shine upon all the unknown hero’s of our age! Thank you for them.

    Liked by 4 people

  18. marie says:

    Ditto to ALL of the above (particularly to kathy d’s comment) and happy Thanksgiving from Denmark! ☺

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Have some of whatever that strange stuff you eat for us, today 😉

      Liked by 2 people

      • ellenchris says:

        Lutefisk? Or is that Sweden. . . or Iceland? Anyway — happier with turkey 😉

        Liked by 1 person

        • charliej373 says:

          Yeah, I thought of Lutefisk, but figured I might be making an embarrassing faux pas. In my family through marriage we have Japanese, Latin Americans, Black, Indian…we’re kind of like a one-family U.N. (without the corruption). I once said I am perfectly happy – until somebody insists I eat a Thanksgiving eel. There I will draw the line.

          Liked by 2 people

          • marie says:

            Man, what a reunion we’re all going to have in Charlie’s Pub when we get to the other side, please God ☺. Danes eat herring – lots of it! By the way, I cooked turkey for our dinner tonight, just so I could join in the fun 🙂

            Liked by 3 people

          • D Shea says:

            Herring & eel .. Yuk!! ;-( I don’t like Scotch, Coffee or water dwelling varmints. I’m not so crazy about Turkey since I was a Turkey Hanger at a Ralston Purina Plant one college Summer job back in 69. If you ate a Honey Suckle White Turkey that Thanksgiving or Christmas it may have been one of my business associates 😉 I’m sure glad Jews and Muslims don’t eat Pork ’cause that means all the more for me!!
            Sooooie Pigs! Razorbacks!! Beat Missouri!

            Liked by 2 people

        • Mona says:

          In Norway they eat lutefisk (lutefish). It is a old way to prepear fish. (May be it could be a way to preserve fish in the storm) I do not know how.
          25 years or so I sat in a airport shuttle on my way to Kennedy Airport. We talked a little and a man could hear on my dialect that I was a Norwegian. He asked me abaut Lutefisk. I hade and have not ever tasted it, but it is on every modern Christmas Meny in Norway these days. But I live in Denmark so I do not attend these partys.

          Ellen!
          I do read all your posts and all others. Every day. Your replays and others are so knowageble and intelligent. As as a European protestenat I am learning, and it is difficult too, for me in a foreign language to express my self as freely and easy as I want.

          I will try to be able to like comments.

          I want to send love, warm thaughts and prayers to you all in my lovely extended family of Christ. Thank you Charly for yor big work on saving souls.
          Mona from Denmark

          Liked by 4 people

          • ellenchris says:

            Thanks Mona. One of my cousins married a Norwegian guy. My aunts and uncles used to dance at the Sons of Norway Hall in Brooklyn, NY. We are all “cousins” in some way.

            Liked by 1 person

          • audiemarie2014 says:

            Mona, my husband is a Protestant of Norwegian and German heritage and I tasted my first lutefisk when we were first married in ND. It was different, but alright too! When we lived in the Caribbean, salt fish was big, and I had to try that, along with goat and shark. I think it’s all good depending on how it’s prepared. We had lefse today at my brother’s home. Is lefse popular there too?

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            I had lutefisk once. Maybe it was not very good lutefisk but based on what I had, I would have to say that if that was all we would have to eat during the Storm, I won’t make it.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Bob says:

            A day late but as God blessed me with a small doe this year my wife and I had a lunch before the main family gathering and we had deer tenderloin. It was good with current jelly and all. I understand venison was a prominent item on the first thanksgiving in America along with the traditional turkey, clams and eels. So here are several other options for next years dinner if we are not busy sheltering from the storm. Eels are a bit hard to come by though, although my dad once caught several and we cooked them. They taste a bit like catfish.

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            I told you, Bob…I draw the line at a Thanksgiving eel. Some things are just a bridge too far. 😦

            Liked by 1 person

          • Mona says:

            Audiemarie – in Norway we eat several differen lefses. Some are sweet spread whith butter, sugar, zinnamon and may be other thing. Some are not sweet and can be wrapped around a sausage whith mustard and ketchup for instance. Lefse is a flat bread baked on pans and is a wery old way of baking soft bread in Norway. It can be wery thin as a pancace an a bit thicker. It could be a good way during the storm to get bread. I think after this discussion that it will be a good idé to by some books whith old reccipies.

            In Denmark many olderly people love to eat eel. We part them in 10 cm long peaces and roll them in flour whith salt and pepper and fry them on a pan.
            Mona from Denmark

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            All right, all right…I’ll try the eel. But I’m still not having it for Thanksgiving.

            Liked by 1 person

  19. Bob says:

    Gos bless all. May God be thanked praised and honored forever. And may we continue to learn to surrender to God to receive the graces we will all need for the storms we will face both individually and communally. Thanks Charlie.

    Liked by 3 people

  20. radiclaudio says:

    Happiest of Thanksgivings to Charlie and my virtual TNRS family in Christ here on Charlie ‘ s blog. May the love of God reign in our hearts forever! Rich

    Liked by 4 people

  21. CathyG says:

    I, too, am thankful for finding you, Charlie! Happy Thanksgiving!

    Liked by 3 people

  22. Tom says:

    I am very thankful for you, Charlie, and pray that God continues to bless you each and every day. Happy Thanksgiving 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  23. Diane says:

    Amen to all you said. I just returned from mass & tears flowed from my eyes from my heart. Good and gracious God protect us and hold us close to you heart. Happy Thanksgiving .

    Liked by 3 people

  24. ellenchris says:

    Thankful for everyone here, and for Charlie’s kindness in keeping it all going. Many blessings of joy and gratitude to each and every one here, with love and prayers.

    Liked by 2 people

  25. joanp62 says:

    Happy Thanksgiving, Charlie. God Bless.

    Liked by 2 people

  26. Observer says:

    Happy Thanksgiving to you, Charlie, and all who come here in one way or another! Prayers for the intentions of all and esp. for all those who are suffering esp. with chronic pain who may want to join in more than they are able. They are in the more important “business” of offering pain for the salvation of souls. And prayers for all for whom the holidays are sad. May others accompany them and give them hope. God bless us while we trust in His higher and greater plans. Thanks be to Him.

    Liked by 3 people

  27. Elizabeth K. says:

    Happy Thanksgiving, Charlie and everyone!

    Liked by 3 people

  28. kathy kalina says:

    I am incredibly thankful for this community, and the work Charlie does to keep the discourse civil. Lack of charity is particularly easy to fall into on the internet, and it jangles my soul. I can always count on finding important things to ponder and peace when I visit here.

    Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!!!

    Liked by 4 people

  29. Annie Halsey says:

    I am thankful for finding this site 6 days ago, and thankful for all the insights and encouragement from all the commenters. As so many of you have said, I don’t feel quite so alone any more.

    Liked by 3 people

  30. Mary Watts says:

    Beautiful post thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Barb says:

    Happy Thanksgiving Charlie and to all the wonderful “family” here. I don’t comment often but I read everyday and I’m grateful for all of you.
    My husband and I were talking today how grateful we are just to be able to celebrate another wonderful Thanksgiving Day and how much more grateful we are now everyday for the things we’ve taken somewhat for granted for so long….plentiful food, running water, electricity, a warm home, and being able to practice our faith. What wonderful blessings they are!
    I will remember all of you in my rosary today. =)

    Liked by 3 people

  32. Carmel says:

    From Australia, comes best wishes and prayers for A blessed and peace filled Thanksgiving to all those celebrating in the USA. Charlie, your efforts are greatly appreciated. And I thank God for this virtual family. (Btw I don’t know how to do the “like” thing but know that I read and reflect on everything that people write.)

    Liked by 3 people

  33. malachi99 says:

    Dear Charlie and friends,

    A happy and blessed thanksgiving to you all. My whiskey cupboard is dry so I toasted a hot chocolate by the fire in your honour 🙂

    God bless,

    JPW

    Liked by 3 people

  34. jmhem5 says:

    Much thankfulness for Charlie and you all!

    John in Bloomington -Normal, Illinois

    Liked by 2 people

  35. Joanne says:

    God’s blessings upon you Charlie and all here. This blog has truly been a great gift and I thank you for persevering. I like the Providential and generous basement/truck living description. You are living the “true” dream! God Bless and keep you in His care!

    Liked by 2 people

  36. donna269 says:

    Happy Thanksgiving Family…..especially to you Charlie, our most gracious host….Just finished our dinner dishes. We had my husband’s family and at Christmas my family……phew, whirlwind of a day but God is good and the turkey was moist and cooked to perfection. So grateful to have each and every member here to discuss and share feelings of a Christian moving through an imperfect world and trying to keep my calm and faith……hugs to all!

    Liked by 2 people

  37. mary ann says:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141126132639.htm happy thanksgiving….if you could have this, would you?

    Like

  38. jaykay says:

    Charlie, sincere thanks for your witness since I was “led” here through Mark Mallett whose blog I have been following lo these many years, having been “led” to him via Michael Brown. Mark’s book “The Final Confrontation” is a must for a sound guide through the end times confusion. I would urge all to read it – clears up a lot of the crazy stuff that’s out there in a cool and lucid way. And fascinating details of the tilma of Juan Diego as well – the image of N.
    S. de Guadelupe/Tepeyac. Spirit Daily has a great front-page article on the likely first Mass on your great continent as well, to which we in the “old world” owe so much. Blessings to you all from Ireland. JK.

    Liked by 2 people

  39. Happy Thanksgiving to Charlie and to everyone here! From the southern hemisphere. today is the Feast of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal here. One of my favorite! God bless you all!

    Liked by 2 people

  40. Bonnie C says:

    Happy Thanksgiving and blessings from my home to Charlie and all. Thanking God for the grace of a peaceful, “normal” Thanksgiving in my neck of the woods. Hope yours was too.

    Liked by 2 people

  41. Nancy says:

    I want to thank God for all the men and women who ever served this country and especially all who gave the last full measure. They are on my heart this Thanksgiving and without them our world would not look as it does. May God shower us with the graces of courage and sacrifice so we may not be a disappointment to their memory.

    Liked by 3 people

  42. Happy Thankgiving Charlie! Thank you for all you do here. It is hard work I know….but I appreciate it so much. I Have learned alot. God bless you!

    Thank you!!!!

    Liked by 2 people

  43. anaverena1 says:

    Happy Thanksgiving to Charlie and all readers – not currently celebrated in the Middle East but who knows what the future may bring. Just wondering, Charlie, if there might ever be a time when we could all meet on a pilgrimage / prayer meeting of some kind? It would be great to put faces to names. God bless.

    Liked by 2 people

  44. Observer says:

    Charlie, I hope you don’t mind but since it’s the day AFTER Thanksgiving now might I add something of a “musing” here as well?!

    Early on in Pope Francis’ pontificate I noticed he mentioned a particular book about the “end times” that he himself meditated on and noted as one of his favorite books: “The Lord of the World” by Robert Hugh Benson I have since read the book myself and, although rather British in method and futuristic approach, I see it in the line of thought from over 100 years ago of Vladimir Sergeivich Soloviev on the Antichrist. A lecture on this great Russian philosopher was given by Cardinal Biffi back in 2009 and both JPII and Benedict considered this man’s thought something to be considered…esp. as to how the 20th century unfolded quite like his predictions.

    Anyway, today there is this rather interesting article by Fr. Dwight Longenecker:
    When It Comes to Talking About the End Times, Francis is No Shrinking Violet

    In the article Father mentions again this favorite book and how the Pope’s recent speeches on the topic of end times fall into line:

    http://www.aleteia.org/en/religion/article/when-it-comes-to-talking-about-the-end-times-francis-is-no-shrinking-violet-5903967431163904

    Again, Charlie, please do what you will with this esp. if you think it falls out of your desired trend of exchange here. Just thought I’d mention it in case anyone else had seen this direction of our Pope for these times, esp. since he does seem to be “leading the flock through these hard times in some kind of preparation”. Thanks

    Liked by 2 people

    • charliej373 says:

      I appreciate you adding it, Observer. I certainly think this Pope knows what his mission is and is determined to live it to the best of his ability. He is the Pope of the Storm. This is good stuff in helping to illuminate the Pope’s thinking – and gives some clues as to why he acts as he does. I think there is something mysterious in the way anyone with an authentic and profound mission acts. It offends both the conventional and also those who understand and fear it – and I have good reason to believe satan’s minions profoundly fear that this Pope will fully and completely live his mission. Thank you.

      Liked by 3 people

    • the phoenix says:

      Hi Observer, I’ve read “The Lord of the World” by Robert Hugh Benson twice, and find it very interesting that this is one of Pope Francis’ favorite books. Thanks for bringing this up. I think you can see this direction in the Pope’s canonization of the six new saints in India and Italy who dedicated their lives to helping the poor. It looks like I may need to read the book again in order to see the parallels you mention more clearly.

      Liked by 2 people

    • NancyA says:

      I just finished Benson’s _Lord of the World_ a couple of days ago.. amazed at the prophetic insights… I kept marveling that it was written well before the falling apart of Europe into the world wars, and before much of what he described was in any way common. Before Fatima. Yet, here we are, living that. As well read as our Pope surely must be, I was feeling surprised he’d call it his favorite. Makes me ponder…

      Liked by 1 person

      • NancyA says:

        Oh shoot! ( do wish there was an edit button! Lol) that wasn’t meant to be my point. What I wanted to do is to thank Observer for that link. I’ll be anxious to read it when I’m through reading this post’s comments. Thanks!

        Like

        • jaykay says:

          Amazing to think that it was written before flight was a reality, not to mention aerial bombing of cities, which became a reality only 20 years later with the German raids on London. And then, of course, the second War with its atrocities, unthinkable in his time. Or maybe, if not unthinkable, certainly unfeasible. Progressing to the possible destruction of civilisation by atomic means in under 50 years later. I love his book, because it shows how our basic nature never changes despite our humanistic rulers’ view that we have “evolved” unto a civilisation of tolerance and enlightenment and that religion stuff is just, like, so, demodé. Not that I have any time for rubbish like the Tarot but there’s one card called “The Fool” that shows a man in fancy garb dancing on the edge of the precipice. Just about where our Western civilisation is now, if you ask me. He’s being egged-on by a devil. Yup.

          Liked by 1 person

      • ann says:

        Nancy, I’ve been a fan of Msgr. Benson for years. Check out his other novels. They are marvelous! The Mirror of Shalott, The Winnowing Fan, Loneliness–many others. all first rate and spiritually astounding. Some of them are incredibly cheap to download for e-readers, like 99 cents a book.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Mick says:

          Ann, Nancy, and Jaykay, have you read Msgr. R. H. Benson’s children’s books? They are excellent. I have three of them: Old Testament Rhymes, An Alphabet of Saints, and A Child’s Rule of Life. It’s too bad they’re so hard to find.

          Liked by 1 person

          • ann says:

            Thanks, Mick. I’ll look into it. I have loved everything I’ve read by Msgr RH Benson. I ask him sometimes to pray for us and then I pray for him (just in case…but pretty sure he doesn’t need prayer):-)

            Liked by 1 person

          • Mick says:

            Old Testament Rhymes is out of print, which is sad because it’s my favorite book of the three. I looked high and low, and the cheapest copy I have found is on abebooks.com and is $46 with the shipping. Thankfully, A Child’s Rule of Life and An Alphabet of Saints are still in print for the time being. Neumann Press (neumann.benedictpress.com) has them for $19.95 and $10.17 (sale price), respectively. Both are hardcover, and both are beautifully illustrated. We’ve had our copies of the three books for 17 years, and they are still in great shape. They were definitely worth the investment.

            Liked by 1 person

    • Bonnie C says:

      Maybe I’m off the mark, but, when I saw Pope Francis greeting the people without the “Popemobile” and embracing the crowds with joy and affection and enthusiasm, I had the thought that he “knows” his part in these times and since he knows his mission, he acknowledges God, takes the next right step, and is a sign of hope (and courage) to his little flock. We need this so much.

      Liked by 1 person

  45. Happy Thanksgiving, everyone! A day late (but not a dollar short since I never shop on Black Friday…lol).

    As far as eel goes for Thankgiving?

    Ooops, let me rephrase that: as far as eating eel goes PERIOD?

    Not in this lifetime! (And I have no plan on ever eating these words either, storm or no storm! Some creatures are best left alone, methinks. Eel and anything that vaguely resembles a snake are on my “heck no you lie they don’t taste like chicken” list.)

    Liked by 1 person

  46. ellenchris says:

    Okay, can’t hold out any longer on the eel thing. (Just got back home from buying altar linens on — of all things — a Black Friday sale at a church goods store).

    I love fish, especially flounder. Many years ago I was served a lovely plate of sweet flaky white fish in a light, crispy batter coating. “This is the best flounder I have ever had.” I said. And the hostess replied, “Oh, that’s not flounder — that’s eel.” What puts people off is the thought of a sinister, slimy, snaky thing on a plate. If it is served well, it is delightful and delicious and not scary looking at all. Bon Apetit! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  47. Bev says:

    I have read every comment here – as I always do. I also go back a couple of days later, because there are always some, like I am tonight, late in adding a comment. Each person’s addition is so important that I don’t want to ever miss any of them. (And I STILL don’t know how to do “likes”.)

    My heart echos every comment, the thanksgiving to God and Charlie who has made this possible, for the joy, gratefulness, and hearts reaching out to hearts across land and sea. It’s a bit overwhelming to read down a hundred entries, and absorb not just the messages, but the caring and love that they contain.

    It makes me think of a small poem I read a long time ago. I think that it applies in this situation although Charlie’s obedience to Our Eternal God has made our learning and joy possible:

    What made us friends in the long ago, when first we met?
    Well, I think I know.
    The best in me and the best in you
    found each other because they knew
    That always and always since life began
    Our being friends was part of God’s plan

    To everyone who reads or comments on Charlie’s gift to us = A Happy Thanksgiving.
    Since this blog IS God’s plan, then the poem is true, even if we have met more recently.
    Now to scan up and click on the added websites which are always part of the fun..

    Liked by 2 people

  48. Mick says:

    I happened upon these two videos today. I’d like to share them because they show another gentleman who took the next right step for 86 years–and who used all the amazing gifts that God gave him, while living with the challenge of cerebral palsy. Anybody who might need a little lift today, please watch these videos (the first one is about 4 minutes; the second one is about 12).


    I don’t want to spoil the treat, but it must have been a real joy and honor to know this man. May he interceded for us all.

    Liked by 1 person

  49. Mary A says:

    Charlie, I posted a link about research that may have found an off-switch for chronic neurological pain. I hope it eventually helps you and others, but I did wonder if you would do it were it available.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Oh, I certainly support the research and would encourage anyone so affected to take advantage of it.

      I regard my own disability as kind of God’s leash. When I went out on my pilgrimage – and even before – I threw myself on a radical dependence on God and a willingness to accept whatever comes. I even had my priest/director/confessor stop praying for my healing, instead just for God’s will in my life. He finally agreed after giving me a permanent dispensation from kneeling because of the pain it causes (which I occasionally take advantage of – and always when at confession with him). I only take aspirin or Tylenol for the pain…though I confess I have sometimes accepted something stronger when visiting family. It is nice to deaden the pain to a low rumble every once in a while. But this reliance is for me. So no, I don’t think I would take personal advantage of it – but only for the same reason I took no weapons for protection on my pilgrimage.

      Right or wrong, I believe I have work appointed by God and surrender myself to His care in a very radical way as part of that. This is a perfectly reasonable question, but I think I have spoken too much of the internal working of my process of discerning and embarking on the work today. It would be better, I think, just to keep the details of that between God, my directors and me in the future.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s