Musings – The Second Day of Christmas

Let Us Adore Him - by Jon McNaughton. (One of my favorite modern Nativity paintings)

Let Us Adore Him – by Jon McNaughton. (One of my favorite modern Nativity paintings)

“The people in darkness have seen a great light…” – Isaiah 9:2

I had a lovely Christmas Day. Spent the early part of it with some friends, then had a little problem with my neurological disorder and came home to stay much of the time since then in and out of bed quietly. I watched a few schmaltzy Christmas Movies. One of my secrets is I love the sort of formulaic schmaltz the Hallmark Channel puts out at Christmas – but try not to let too many people know it. Guess the secret is out now. I don’t go for it much of any time the rest of the year (though I am fond of some of the better chick flicks…You’ve Got Mail, Notting Hill, Roman Holiday. My son said I was the perfect movie Dad growing up – I gave him a taste for action adventure when he was with the boys, a taste for chick flicks when he was on a date, and a love of the classics any time). So I had a lovely, if not terribly active, Christmas Day. Thank you for all your Christmas wishes and may God bless you and keep you throughout the year.

*********

In 2013 we saw the visible beginning of collapse, as social, economic and security systems throughout the globe were eaten away. In 2014 we saw the consequences of the loss of these systems…as riotings and wars erupted throughout the globe. This year we will see how meaningless time is to God as things follow on each other at unbelievable and shocking speed. Both bad things and good things. Gird your loins, acknowledge God, take the next right step, be a sign of hope to those around you, and be deliberate and steady.

*********

A little piece from that fabulous Christian writer from the middle of the last century, C.S. Lewis. I think it marvelously appropriate to this season and to what lies before us:

“When human souls have become as perfect in voluntary obedience as the inanimate creation is in its lifeless obedience, then they will put on its glory, or rather that greater glory of which Nature is only the first sketch. For you must not think that I am putting forward any heathen fancy of being absorbed into Nature. Nature is mortal; we shall outlive her. When all the suns and nebulae have passed away, each one of you will still be alive. Nature is only the image, the symbol; but it is the symbol Scripture invites me to use. We are summoned to pass in through Nature, beyond her, into that splendour which she fitfully reflects.

“And in there, in beyond Nature, we shall eat of the tree of life. At present, if we are reborn in Christ, the spirit in us lives directly on God; but the mind and, still more, the body receives life from Him at a thousand removes—through our ancestors, through our food, through the elements. The faint, far-off results of those energies which God’s creative rapture implanted in matter when He made the worlds are what we now call physical pleasures; and even thus filtered, they are too much for our present management. What would it be to taste at the fountainhead that stream of which even these lower reaches prove so intoxicating? Yet that, I believe, is what lies before us. The whole man is to drink joy from the fountain of joy. As St. Augustine said, the rapture of the saved soul will “flow over” into the glorified body.”

*********

I have a faithful reader in Garabandal, Spain, who has been in communication with me since last summer. She has been kind enough to offer prayers up on my behalf in that wonderful, blessed little town. She and her husband, to prepare for the times, are moving all to a spot able to act as refuge (also in Garabandal). She mentioned to me that they want to sell three flats and a little plot of land in the town to help finance stocking up their refuge. So if you have ever had a hankering to get a place in Garabandal, drop me an email at chrljhnstn@gmail.com and I will forward it on to her. After I forward your message, I will have no further involvement. I have no interest, financial or otherwise in it, but I figured I would pass it on at her request.

*********

Early this month the Taming the Wolf Institute had a particularly poignant piece on what we face as we go through this Christmas Season – and what so many of our brothers and sisters throughout the world face. I think this post by Lindsay Stone is well worth contemplating.

*********

The British Catholic Herald published a marvelous piece on a homily by Bishop Mark Davies of Shrewsbury. In his homily, he decimated the late John Lennon’s popular song, “Imagine.” The song celebrated all the

Bishop Mark Davies, Shrewsbury, England.

Bishop Mark Davies, Shrewsbury, England.

wonderful things that would follow if we would all embrace atheism. It has a marvelous tune, but I loathed it when I was a young fellow.

The fact is, the “isms” of the 20th Century butchered more people than all the religious wars of history combined. In fact, the atheist regimes of the Soviet Union and of Communist China each murdered more people than all the religious wars of history combined. And don’t even get me started on Nazi Germany, the only functionally pagan state in modern history.

Lennon encourages us to “Imagine…there is no heaven or hell.” Both Joe Stalin and Mao tse-Tung did. May we never have a repeat of that sort of toxic imagination.

*********

Finally, in the last month we have had visited here from over 70 countries throughout the world. I have gotten used to having a substantial contingent from Denmark checking in every day. It tickles me, though, that we regularly get visitors here from Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Israel. Russia grows slowly but steadily – and a contingent that is rising slowly but steadily is from Malta, with over a hundred visits the last month. We have never, however, had a visit from either China or North Korea.

Since so many of you either know English to read this – or use a translation program – I figured I would link to this little chart to wish you a Merry Christmas in your own language.

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
This entry was posted in Musings, Prophecy, The Storm and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

99 Responses to Musings – The Second Day of Christmas

  1. N. Wright says:

    Merry Christmas Charlie, from Moncton, NB, Canada!

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Yay, Moncton, where things roll uphill and the Bay of Fundy empties out regularly. (Don’t camp there, though…it fills up again with the tides, but you can get a lot of clams for a bake out there…or at least you could 40 years ago.)

      Like

      • Judy says:

        You talk about a refuge being prepared by someone in or around Garabandal, Spain. Since none of us knows what sites will be flooded with troubles first (nor in what manner), how can one possibly choose a site for a refuge? However, I have to admit that Garabandal seems like a very good place! I have not figured out what my role will be on the coming Storm. I am already dealing with several storms, so I do not have much time to think about it, and I think that a lot of people are in this same situation. I already have my hands full, I am not sleeping well (due to side effect of medication) and tend to tire easily due to illness. The little confirmations I receive from Jesus (or Our Lady) give me a lot of peace and comfort. I just keep praying and taking the next right step in the here and now. The present time provides all the troubles I can handle, so I do not know what to think about the future. I certainly cannot move anywhere since there are so many people that need me right where I am in the here and now. I have been picking up some extra food, and praying, but that is all I can seem to manage. I am putting all my trust in Jesus and Our Blessed Mother. If I am meant to be here, then they will show me the way, and if not, then I will be going Home.

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          Not to worry, Judy. I understand. I take no steps for preparation. I will go where I am led when I am led there, trusting that God will do the leading – and I will do everything I can in the moment to live my faith and witness well. One thing that might console you is to think that, those who have the most experience dealing with storms probably have a leg up in dealing with the big one.

          Like

          • Judy says:

            One of my doctor’s recently asked me: ‘If science were able to genetically change you and make you young again and well, wouldn’t that be a wonderful thing?” (I am paraphrasing). I think that he was very surprised when I replied, “No, I think that there is something so much better on the Other Side. I certainly do not want to go backwards!”

            Liked by 2 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Once asked a similar question I chuckled and said I would love to have my moving parts running smoothly again with no pain, but if I had to go through all the angst and stupidity of youth again I would rather just muddle on.

            Liked by 4 people

  2. N. Wright says:

    Charlie, you wrote: “This year we will see how meaningless time is to God as things follow on each other at unbelievable and shocking speed. Both bad things and good things. Gird your loins, acknowledge God, take the next right step, be a sign of hope to those around you, and be deliberate and steady.” I see a similar thought in what was said in “Locutions to the World’, just this week. http://www.locutions.org/2014/12/1-today-vanishing-into-tomorrow/

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Mack says:

    That is a wonderful painting! I especially like St Joseph because he looks so manly. This Christmas I enjoyed the beautiful Mass, etc., but I couldn’t help thinking that perhaps next year it won’t even be possible to go to Mass. I also read Pelianito’s blog, and in a message some time back it said to go to the sacraments often “while you can.” Sounds ominous! However I am not going to worry about it but just entrust everything to Our Lord and his mother. Your 3-step program is very practical and down to earth.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Judy says:

      I have always wondered why we have not been told much about Joseph, Our Lady’s earthly husband. The New Testament does not have much to say about him.

      Like

  4. Regarding John Lennon and his dreadful lyrics for “Imagine” … I must inform you before going any further that from time to time I have dreams I remember very vividly. They are different from other dreams which for the most part I rarely can recall.

    It was early 2005 and I was reading something in one of those Catholic gazettes that had arrived in the mail a few days earlier. In one of the news, a Catholic visionary — I believe she was one of the Medjugorje group — mentioned that John Lennon appeared to her in a vision, desperately asking for three Holy Masses for he was in great pain. Being one of the Beatles generation I remembered all the happy times I had enjoying their music. My youth was rather sad as I grew up in a very abusive family — Beatles’ music coming on the radio was one of the few bright and happy things I remember from those otherwise dark times — I continued opening the mail and there was a card from the fathers at Holy Hill. It was a nice card and they only asked that one filled the name of a deceased person to request continuous Masses for the repose of their soul. I filled the name “John Winston Lennon” and added “George Harrison” who had died of cancer just a few years before, in 2001. I placed a $20 bill inside the card, a stamp on the envelope and there it went to the Shrine of Our Blessed Mother at Holy Hill in Hubertus, Wisconsin. I completely forgot about that and never gave it another thought. In my mind it was a way to say “thank you” to those guys for the joy they had given me in my time of need.

    Forward to 2009. I had just moved to a new home and had just finished setting up the place. Tired as I was I had some Campbell soup for dinner. I quickly fell deep asleep and I had the following dream:

    I was at a taxi stop at Heathrow Airport in London ready to fetch a cab. I got in the cab and a very smiling driver said: “they are waiting for you” — we got on our way towards London in what seemed to be a lovely, sunny autumn day. After driving through London we got to the entrance of the Blackfriars Underground Station. Not far from the station there was a cream colored building where we stopped. The driver told me “I will wait here for you.” I opened the front door of the building that led to another door atop a set of long white stairs. I rang a bell and John Lennon opened the door smiling. He looked exactly as he looked around 1965 and was completely dressed in white, even his shoes were white leather shoes. I followed him in to a living room completely decorated in white where there was a low table where tea was served. We sat on some comfortable armchairs and had tea. I do not remember what we talked about but we talked for a considerable time. While we were there someone walked by an adjacent corridor. He was George, he was not dressed in white but had rather shabby clothes and was carrying a tray with a teapot and cups. He seemed to be happy, said hello and smiled before continuing on his way. At that time I felt it was time to go, I bid good bye to John and descended the stairs. The taxi was waiting for me there. I got in the car and the driver said “we will be there in a blink” with a heavy cockney accent.

    At that point I awoke and immediately remembered the card I had sent to Holly Hill. I told this strange story to a priest, and older Jesuit I know, and he said “they just came to say thank you.” I really hope he is right. I am under the impression that today John Lennon is writing music very different than that dreadful “Imagine” (he had a few that were worse.) One day I’ll know for sure.

    Liked by 5 people

    • the phoenix says:

      This sounds very comforting, Carlos Caso-Rosendi! A call for us to keep hoping and praying for Divine Mercy to touch souls in purgatory, no matter who.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Bev says:

      Guess what my husband’s favorite song was from the time he first heard it. I absolutely could not understand why he liked it. Anyway, when he left here, I was holding one hand, and he took Jesus’s outreaching hand, and went.
      Your comment made me think of all the people we should have masses for. Known and unknown. I often look at the obituaries in the paper. Most people just have a celebration of life, no service upon request. I always pray for them.

      Liked by 4 people

      • donna269 says:

        are you MM Bev? I am so confused 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Bev says:

          Yup. That’s me. You think your confused! One day I did something really weird because I ended up with another name and then I realized (brilliantly, if I do say so myself) that the second line for commenting had the name used that appeared. I figured I would just simplify things by just putting up “Bev” after removing the other name. So it’s me. In living purple, I think. Good guess. I thought people would just guess because my comments usually leave a bit to be desired and are sometimes weird. But now I’m not a “mystery” any more. Ah well.

          Liked by 5 people

      • The music is not bad but the lyrics are. While living in the US I was faintly connected to the New York pop music scene. Someone back then told me that John experienced a conversion several months before he died. I was told John was watching the Oral Roberts show on TV and when invited, he approached the TV set and placing his hands on it, crying he asked Jesus to forgive his sins. This was not referred to me by a believer but by a rather astonished musician who could not understand why John changed. In fact his killer said something to the effect that Lennon was “a traitor” who was going back to God and family values. Ten years after writing “Imagine” with that “no religion too” line, Lennon wrote this to his son Sean:
        Before you go to sleep
        Say a little prayer
        Every day in every way
        It’s getting better and better

        That seems to give a bit of credence to the story I heard about Lennon having accepted Jesus Christ months before being assassinated.

        Liked by 5 people

    • Judy says:

      I have always intensely disliked the song, Imagine, by John Lennon. Even before I developed a much more mature faith, my instincts told me that it presented a totally false and dangerous idea. I have argued with Catholic friends about this song. I am always surprised how some of them embraced John Lennon, really fell in love and awe of him, and still remember his birthday in celebration of his life. We are all flawed. However, this song was so popular that I think it did a lot of damage.

      Liked by 2 people

      • charliej373 says:

        I agree, Judy. I loved the rich melody – as did many of my friends. But listening to the lyrics I was appalled at the dangerously false message in it. Fortunately, my friends had me to argue against the lyrics while enjoying the melody with them.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Bob says:

        During the late 60s and early 70s when my mind was drug fogged to the extreme I was in that mindset and I later remembered that idealistic utopian view we had of love and peace and while following the piper had several experiences of false peace while high on Hallucinogens. And so felt a sort of nostalgia for the simple dreams we had then of that false peace and I enjoyed that song for the melody and the memories before I had let them go. And isn’t it ironic that the sign of that false peace we sought was with the “Cross of Nero” that famous so called peace sign with a down turned cross with the arms broken downward . And what were the sacraments of that movement? Drugs, sex and rock in roll!

        Liked by 1 person

    • N. Wright says:

      Maria Simma, whom the souls from purgatory visited while she was alive, says in her book “Get us out of Here”, that John Lennon along with JFK are in Heaven.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Carlos, reading this only now. What a stunning sharing!! And reading it on a day for me when the Holy Souls of Purgatory has been a light shining from morning.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Kathy AE says:

    Charlie, thank you for the link to Lindsay Stone. As we get more details and information about the persecutions by Isis and other groups, it has occurred to me often that the Church is gaining many new martyrs. Not only should we pray for our persecuted brothers and sisters, but we can also pray TO those we absolutely know to be saints. “Four little martyrs of Isis, pray for us!”

    Liked by 2 people

  6. Diane says:

    Merry Christmas from Miami – once again you touch my heart – God’s wonderful blessings on all of you – what a gift you give us. Thank you. Love. I love.j

    Liked by 1 person

  7. the phoenix says:

    I hope you’re feeling better today, Charlie. As for time speeding up this coming year, someone on another forum just sent me a message with the wish that God bless me “spiritually and temporarily in 2015” … a timely typo perhaps. In any case, I know the person meant well. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      My great-grandmother once asked us if we believed in the abdominal. I was baffled at what she meant…and finally, suggesting I was dull-witted, she said, “You mean you have never heard of the abdominal snowman?” I managed to run off into the woods back of her house before I busted out laughing. The adults around me already thought me a smarty-pants…wouldn’t do to have such an open display of mirth in front of one.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Bonnie C says:

        This kills! I’m sure it was a deep belly laugh with tears and bent over. You took me with you! Haha!

        Like

      • Mrs Malaprop! Around 1982 while riding the bus in East Boston: two girls descend holding hands. There was snow all over and they probably held each others hand to avoid slipping and falling. There were two older Italian ladies sitting up front. As they watched the girls holding hands, one of them whispered (audibly) “May be they’re Lebanese.” =:o)

        Liked by 1 person

    • NancyA says:

      Oh my gosh, you two!! How I needed a true moment of laughter this day! Thank you!

      Liked by 2 people

  8. Michael Goodreau says:

    Sorry, I forgot to wish you, Charlie, and everyone here; A Merry Christmas! In my joy I was distracted… Thank you for everything you do , Charlie!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Denmomof3 says:

    Charlie, Merry Christmas from Mora, New Mexico (Northern NM). I have been reading your articles for several months and I appreciate everything you do and everything you say. May God Bless you and your loved ones.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      I had surprisingly good cover along the Rio Grande River while I was in Albuquerque, which was otherwise the toughest city on my pilgrimage in which to find cover to make camp. Even the woods along the river were sparse, but there was one amazingly sheltered enclave that was just the right size. Glad to have you here Den mom.

      Like

  10. Bobby says:

    Gird your loins, acknowledge God, take the next right step, be a sign of hope to those around you, and be deliberate and steady.

    Love this quote – sounds like something St Paul would have written.

    It is time to read the life of St Paul who survived affliction, starvation, persecution, hardship for the sake of the Gospel. We are all soon going to experience hardship like no other generation. Please, God I will be up for the challenge.

    Like

  11. donna269 says:

    Merry Christmas to Charlie and friends. Charlie, I am sorry you had a bout on Christmas day but glad you are better. I have a confession to make….I had NO idea Imagine was a song about Atheism…I am such a dope. Now that you say it, sure, no heaven or hell….what else would it be. I am so dense. I will NOW read the Bishop’s article on it. It is such a beautifully, melodic piece….but boy was I duped! Thanks for the heads up….God bless family on TNRS!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Maryj says:

    On the second day of Christmas my true Love gave to me….Charlie I wrote you in the blog post “lord of the fleas” that we were on a journey through cancer this Christmas season with my husband. He has had surgery, and we had to make the trip back to the Mayo Clinic on Christmas day for his follow up on December 26. On Christmas night I stood ,in a dark parking lot of an empty hotel ,and looked up into the sky that had been covered for days in grey clouds..One star shone through the clouds very brightly. It warmed my heart! We received fabulous news the next morning that the cancer was gone, he is completely free of it. A very emotional time for both of us. If you’ve never been to the Mayo Clinic, there is a very large marble covered Rotunda at the entry to the building. A beautiful grand piano is played daily by volunteers and the sound can be heard throughout many floors of the building. As we were waiting in this area with many people who are in cancer treatment the piano player started playing, on a floor three stories above the piano we heard a voice.. it was a elderly man, probably in his late 80’s…he began to sing..he was a tenor…”Oh Holy Night, the stars are brightly shining….” In my heart I knew it was an Angel we were hearing! I don’t have to “Imagine”…I know there is a Heaven. Thank you Charlie for the prayers..they were heard and answered. Jesus is Lord!

    Liked by 5 people

  13. Barbara Dore says:

    Last night, I had a dream about Fatima…happy one! many , many people were happy. I think there was something good about Fatima shrine, but i still do not know what it was? I was shocked to see so many people. They looked very happy. I sensed that something big and good is happening in Fatima Shrine. I woke up. very strange dream. I never go to Fatima and I wonder if it is a call from Our Lady of Fatima that I should go there? Difficult to know?

    Liked by 1 person

  14. mll says:

    Merry Christmas to all! Thanks for such wonderful, insightful postings and comments. Charlie, was wondering if you had any thoughts on, or if you’ve read the books by Jonathan Cahn, “The Harbinger” and most recent book, “The Mystery of the Shemitah”?

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Thank you, mll. I have read “The Harbinger” by Jonathan Cahn. It had some profound insights, but I was unimpressed with the supposed breathtaking way he tried to force everything to fit exactly. If he would have stayed with the profound insights he had instead of trying to pretend it had a precision it did not, I would have found it far more impressive. Three quick examples…

      1) He puts great emphasis on our supposed defiance after 9-11 by our repeated statements that “We will rebuild,” which supposedly matches prophecy exactly. It would be more impressive if it were not for the fact that almost every society in history, when faced with a major attack that destroyed buildings, said they would rebuild. It is about as startling as prophesying that someone coming down to breakfast will say, “Good morning.”

      2) Since he can’t quite get the cedar he wants to fulfill his prophecy, he defines any conifer as a cedar. Well, yes, if we pretend any conifer is a cedar it fits, but if we define an orange road cone as a cedar it would fit, too.

      3) In order to put the right words into the “leader of all the people,” he finds that John Edwards, a failed and soon disgraced candidate for vice-president said them. Sorry, Edwards was not “the leader of all the people.” Better fit than if he had to drill down to a Mariposa County Supervisor – but not much.

      That said, he had many startling parallels and insights…a lot of round pegs that fit precisely into round holes. That was impressive. But his relentless pounding of square pegs into some of those round holes and insistence that the reader pretend they were precisely fitted round pegs left me much less impressed than I could have been by his efforts.

      Liked by 3 people

      • I agree with you on “The Harbinger.” It would have been better to leave the whole thing opened to reflection while pointing at the mysterious coincidences that seem to suggest a pattern, instead of trying to “close” the pattern by himself. Some of the prophetic “bookends” are simply organic, they are not part of a symmetric machine although they have a kind of symmetry. Our faces are symmetrical but not mirror-like, that is what I call an “organic symmetry” that many times appears in divine prophecy. That kind of symmetry invites us to grow in wisdom, a simple Cartesian symmetry would be a simple formula easily reduced to a procedure once decoded.

        A few days ago I was reading Genesis 2 and found so many things pointing to a future redemption of the human race in the very creation of man. Yet those counterpoints are not exact reverses of each other; something grows, the image suggests a growth in glory. With God the wine reserved for last is best. In the Harbinger basic image we see God talking to a nation whose founders freely decided to trust their future to God. The very foundation of the United States is an act of faith and humility but if something went wrong in the Garden of Eden… something inevitably had to go wrong with the imperfect efforts of imperfect men navigating the uncharted waters of history. We have come to this moment and we will experience a harrowing purification. The good news is, the nation that will emerge from those terrifying trials is going to be closer to God that ever before. Ronald Reagan said that the best days of America were ahead of us, i venture to say that was not his idea but something that the Spirit suggested him to say. The Harbinger fails at times to put the accent on hope. God is in charge, He is our friend. We will walk though the valley of death but we should not fear because He is with us. Our founding Fathers trusted the future of the nation to their Creator and they will not be disappointed.

        Liked by 4 people

        • Judy says:

          I have read the Harbinger as well and it is certainly true that it does not leave one with much hope. As for the United States, I have no idea what the future holds. I do believe that Reagan was a very spiritual man, especially after he was shot, though he did not associate himself with one church. I would like to believe the United States will survive and return to its spiritual, Judeo-Christian roots…but a lot of its institutions have been corrupted and it may just crumble like many of the other world powers of the past. However, there are still many Americans who believe that Jesus Christ is The Lord and Savior in the United States even though some do not practice their faith as they should. I was surprised to read not long ago that Europeans find it amusing that we often still search for the moral compass of a man when we consider him / her for office. It is possible that this little spark that remains in America may become a great bonfire of faith when it is needed the most. That would certainly be a wonder to behold!

          Liked by 2 people

      • Kris says:

        Wanted to say I have read the Harbinger and his new book, The secret of the Shemitah. Interesting on both. I will tell you, I was very glad he clearly stated that ONLY Isreal was required to live by the Shemitah. Although we also practice this relationship with Christ and the church in our own way. The great difference is that the special relationship with Isreal was unique to history. Yet we as a country have been blessed in our own way and have also flung it back into the face of God. So although many correlations that are drawn are certainly thought provoking, I do not hold that they are quite like what happened to Isreal. But I find so much of the bible, like the tower of Babel to be so fitting for us today. We have given ourselves a name, arrogant, and will build our world without God. We will use technology to be in control of life and have no need for the creator in the mystery of life. So how will God reduce us to babbling to take away what we think is our strength? That will be the most surprising event/s. St. Terese of the child Jesus taught us to be little. See Christ in the pots and pans. Love (truly) in everything we do. Do the next right thing, Trust. Merry Christmas

        Liked by 1 person

      • Kent4 says:

        Charlie thanks for clarifying Cahns work.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Patrick says:

        Just wonderful

        Like

      • Patrick says:

        Think your correct Charlie….sometimes I been in the situation where I tried too hard to convince and looked bad at it. He could be in the right vein though.

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          Let there be no mistake, Patrick, I think he IS in the right vein. I just think he sapped a lot of credibility by trying to force a lot of important things that do not hold up to scrutiny…and that his case would have been more convincing if he had not shown himself so eager to find facts to support his supposition instead of humbly following where the facts that do not need “bolstering” already led.

          Like

  15. Donette says:

    What a beautiful expression of God’s Great Act, “God’s Creative Rapture.” Thank you. I will incorporate those words in my prayers.
    Fiat!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. shjihmhs says:

    Charlie – the quote you used of C S Lewis was awesome! How beautifully he stated what our existence is all about. I probably will never meet you in this life, but I sure hope to seek you out and shake your hand when we pass over to the other side. Merry Christmas and thank you for being here for those of us who need your “calm and reassuring” voice. God bless!

    Liked by 2 people

  17. JEM says:

    Merry Christmas, Charlie and to all on this site 🙂 I don’t know if you remember me, but sometime back in October (?) I had just read The Great Shaking Commences and wrote to ask you how I would I be able to get in contact or be with my children if the storm began. One family is at Fort Carson, one at Fort Bragg and the third in Birmingham, AL (we are in Georgia). You told me that there was no guarantee, not for me, or for yourself, or anyone that they would be able to gather with family. At first I was rather upset at the thought of not being near them or help them during the storm, but began to realize that Our Father who loves and cares for us all, would take care of the details. I have to say that He provided us a wonderful opportunity to all be together this Christmas! I bought candles at our church gift shop and had Father bless them. I also bought little Holy Water bottles and filled them. I gave each family their “storm kit” (they all have rosaries) and we talked about getting supplies together for an emergency. My husband and I are so thankful for this gift from God, I just thought I would share this happy event. Charlie thank you so much for your writings, and I want to thank all who comment below each article. God Bless all of you 🙂 Julie

    Liked by 2 people

    • charliej373 says:

      I am so glad for you, Julie! I was so thrilled to get to visit with my son and granddaughter this Christmas season. When you know you cannot be sure of how many you will get before it is deep strife, you cherish them all the more – and give God great thanks for the little caress He gives you through these visits. Oh, how I hope to come out the other end of this Storm with a joyful reunion with all those I love. But I don’t presume anything, rather cherish what I get. I am so glad you got that joy this Christmas.

      Liked by 2 people

  18. Katherine Bailey says:

    Hello Charlie; I would like to thank you for your perseverance, despite your physical setbacks, you soldier on with this important work for the Lord that brings awareness, challenge and often consolation. Just knowing that we are a community and can “voice” our concerns in these times and also edify and pray for each other or be “gently corrected” if in error, is a great Christmas gift. I would like to share my experience at morning Mass on St. Stephen’s day. I love to arrive early and have private time with Jesus to prepare my heart and mind and then move right into Liturgy of the Hours with a small group before Mass begins. I sensed that this was to be a special experience when time just seemed to stop and every word of prayer took on a new meaning as we progressed through the familiar readings in “slow motion”. This continued throughout the Mass as well. What is usually a hurried morning period of about 40 minutes, became a profound spiritual experience of inordinate grace and left me awash in peace which lingers still (all in the same timeframe). Not sure if anyone else experienced this that morning, but, I feel that this was a gift of consolation before the Storm comes roaring through . God Bless you and all my brothers and sisters in Christ.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Hopenjoy says:

      Like Katherine Bailey wrote, I too felt like time this week has stretched and extended in calmness and peacefulness, like a special Christmas blessing…I have felt like “treasuring the ordinary” such as being able to attend Mass, enjoying a cup of coffee as I read my Bible and pray in the mornings, relaxing with family over the holidays, appreciating such mundane, taken-for-granted gifts as flush toilets and electricity, a good nights’ sleep, and safety as I travel about or go shopping.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Crystal says:

        Love your name Hopenjoy! I had been wondering what this Christmas would be like, as Charlie had commented that 2013 would be our last “traditional” Christmas. This year, I treasured all the family traditions even more than usual… gathering as a family reading Luke’s Christmas story, singing traditional songs, just enjoying being together as a family. Even mass was so special this year, not crowded and it was really possible to be so thankful for just being there, receiving the gift of Jesus with my whole family, safely.
        I am wondering if this extension of peace and calm was a special gift from the Lord, one that was given to us because of prayers??? I have been saying the Flame of Love prayers and recognize them as a special gift for these times. Might we be able to avoid some of the chaos of the future through prayer and fasting?

        Liked by 1 person

    • CrewDog says:

      I hope-n-pray to have an experience like that one day! I’m a gregarious Type A hyper personality and have trouble staying quiet, still and concentrating on prayer. I don’t like litany or repetitious prayers and have trouble with the Rosary in that regard. I expect many have that problem and, perhaps, why there are so many different devotions and prayers? I don’t spend time worrying about it ’cause God made me and knows my heart. After spending time here, MOG and other Christian sites, I’m believing far too many folks get discouraged and “wrapped around the axle” ’cause they don’t fit somebody else’s mold or that mold that some kindly, though slightly misguided, Parent, Nun or Priest tried to force upon them? I can’t prove it but I have no doubt The Lord has looked out for me over the years ………… I wish I knew, exactly, why?

      Liked by 2 people

      • charliej373 says:

        Because God sees hearts, CrewDog. People torpedo themselves because they do what they think they should rather than what the Lord moves them to do. Love, charity, generosity…these are the things God esteems. The Lord looks out for you because He knows your heart.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Katherine, this is a confirmation of something similar that came to me recently regarding the significance of each word we speak, especially in prayer. I wrote an article here on that topic: http://joyofpenance.wordpress.com/2014/12/21/the-word-made-flesh/ A friend of mine also had an experience of the power contained in each word of the Lord’s Prayer. In her “vision” each word reverberated in heaven and on earth. Powerful!

      Like

      • Bob says:

        My wife and I have talked about words several times as her dad had a thing about “you will need to account for every idle word you speak” and he often said too little. I was just telling her today that words of praise to God words to encourage others and words to make others laugh or to appreciate God’s creation are all fine as long as we take time to be silent with God. Being conscious and discerning about our words is always good.

        Like

  19. Debbie Dixon says:

    A friend recently shared your writings with me. We have a political and religious background in common, so I enjoy your writings very much. I am a Baptist convert. I reside in the Charlotte NC diocese and used to live in the Raleigh NC diocese. I worked in the political arena until my 30s, then joined a Catholic missionary order for about 10 years. Politics & religion, a dreaded combination at social functions. How NOT to win friends and influence people. And how can I not like a fan of the Hallmark Christmas movie chick-flicks. I recently enjoyed EWTN’s World Over interview with Martha Williamson (Touched by an Angel) about her Hallmark Movies & Mysteries Signed, Sealed, Delivered for Christmas premiere movie/new series. I can’t resist these evangelization opportunities (posting the EWTN interviews on Facebook to my Protestant family & friends.). Oh, St. Paul, pray for me. Christmas blessings to you! (aspiring) St. iPad from NC

    Liked by 2 people

  20. Julia says:

    Happy and a Holy Christmas to Charlie and all who visit this site. May God grant all a peaceful and blessed New Year.
    I hope things don’t speed up in the coming year LOL. I have come to the conclusion it is I who am slowing down. In truth, some days seem to come and go without me catching up at all, and my prayers for the day take two days.
    Others seem to have had wonderful Holy experiences this Christmas, for me it was a sense of impending doom on Christmas eve, What it may mean is beyond my understanding. Or maybe it is time to stop reading doom and gloom stories. What is that lovely prayer. ‘God give me the grace to change the things I can, to accept the things I can not change and the wisdom to know the difference.’

    Do you realise John Lennon, or at least some of the Beatles were Roman Catholic. I was told by a parish priest some years ago one of the Beatles had an uncle who was a priest. Conversion or reconversion is not outside the realm of possibility. And apparently some of their songs were a bit prophetic, for good or for bad.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Connie says:

      Once, a little country parish church, St. Martin de Porres, that I used to attend, played the Beatles song, “Let It Be” during Mass at some point(don’t remember now”). I was so surprised yet delighted because the words just fit so beautifully for Our Lord’s Mother, even though McCartney had written about his own deceased Mother who visited him in a dream(according to Wikipedia). That to me, was a bit prophetic, the way that the lyrics could have been written about Our Lady. So, although never really a Beatles fan, I do like to hum that tune every now and then. It makes me feel closer to Our Lady, like to me it makes her words come alive.

      Like

      • charliej373 says:

        I had noticed the same lovely thing about that song, Connie.

        Liked by 1 person

      • They fit exactly the words of the “fiat” in the old English form “Let it be unto me according to your word.” That song is so Catholic that Lennon objected to its lyrics. I think McCartney may have made up that reference to his own mother (also called Mary) to put to rest Lennon’s objections. Other songs with Catholic reflections are “Lady Madonna” and “Eleanor Rigby.” This last one was perhaps the first song that included thoughts about death and the futility of life. That was considered a no-no in the happy mid sixties. For many “Eleanor Rigby” was the first song in the Beatles’ “dark” period that followed. McCartney continues to be a sui generis Catholic and even composed some liturgical music like “The Liverpool Oratorio.” Many of McCartney’s songs are based on dreams, most notably “Yesterday” that came to him in a dream when they were filming “A Hard Day’s Night.”

        Liked by 1 person

        • Judy says:

          You surely know a lot about the Beatles. How close were you?

          Liked by 2 people

          • I was 9 years old when I heard them for the first time. I was simply there when it happened. I think I learned a lot of English and definitely learned to play guitar and sing harmonies listening to them. They were one of the few joyous things I had growing up when I was younger, so much younger than today. I listen to music a lot, I am an amateur musician and composer… I had the great privilege of growing up at the time of the Beatles and Bossa Nova. I was close to Brazil but far away from London but the Beatles were on the radio 24/7 for about 10 years from 1961 to 1970. When I was that young they were sort of my older brothers.

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            My youngest aunt, who is only three years older than me, was wild about the Beatles. We went over to my grandparents frequently – and were there when they appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show for the first time. My aunt had a television in her upstairs bedroom and made me come up and watch while she squealed like a little girl. I thought the whole thing was weird…and their music was weird…and they looked weird. I had no idea I was watching a seminal cultural moment (at that time, I would not even have known what that meant). It was just my annoying aunt forcing me to watch something stupid. I later came to appreciate their musical genius.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Another curious factoid: John & Paul met on the back of St Peter’s Church in Woolton.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Judy says:

          Since your post, I have been reading a lot on line re the Beatles. Paul once said that they were agnostics. I think that they were searching for something, but they were like all the ’60s people. They rejected the establishment and they searched far off the normal paths. I liked their early music because it was somewhat innocent and the melodies were fun and catchy. When their drug phase began, I really didn’t care for it. My college professor told me once (it was the music professor) that they really did not produce anything new as far as music was concerned, but they were prolific. I never adored them like many girls, but I still enjoy some of their music when I am out and an old song is played.

          Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Strange thing for your music professor to say, Judy. I did briefly consider going professional and majoring in music. The Beatles did a lot of innovative and melodic and chord sequences. They were not just pop.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Judy: I think a lot of people envied them. I remember some saying that they were not really the composers, that they had a secret creative team, etc. If they did “not produce anything new” then no one ever did. For instance “She said, She said” was extremely innovative at the time. One had to work real hard at wrapping one’s mind around that song. Try to come up (for example) with drum part for that thing! A real connoisseur would say it is just a B flat Mixolydian scale and yah, yah but one 25 year-old Liverpool kid had to come up with a thing like that in 1966 (with or without the help of drugs) and not some formed composers like Ginastera or Schönberg who were original but really major bores! That song was a long way from “Be my baby” (a great song BTW.) Young people around that age “followed” the Beatles as if they were some kind of demi-gods. I was merely fascinated by the chord changes and some lyrics and never went any further than that. In fact I thought their interest in things from India was rather silly, and I knew enough English back then to hear their comments on radio or TV and find them rather pedestrian, even stupid. But as musicians they were a magical combination, great composers, prolific; George Martin helped a lot to guide them and form them as musicians. Your professor should have defined originality and then show how Lennon & McCartney failed to be “original” while they manage to interest (and blow the mind) of other great musicians of the day like Sinatra, Herb Alpert, Wes Montgomery, Brian Wilson (of Beach Boys fame another great and really original composer) Don Sebesky, among hundreds of others. If your teacher was not impressed may be he was a case of a wool eared man who taught in school because he could not hack it in the real world. One has to be careful not to come as a dwarf when dismissing giants. I knew many musicians who went into drugs trying to duplicate the Beatles’ experience but it became obvious pretty soon that if there was no real talent to start with no amount of chemicals and/or schooling could make up for that. On the other hand someone like Dick Carpenter studied music because of them and came up with some good music of his own!

            Like

  21. Mary-Louise says:

    Charlie, since this is a “musings” post… You mention time changing and the pace of events quickening. I have followed Medjugorie for a long time. According to your timeline, we have less than three years to the rescue by our Blessed Mother. That should mean we will be hearing the public announcement of the Medjugorie miracles within that time frame as well. I’ve wondered if they would begin after the Church commission announces its ruling on the site… Any thoughts?

    Liked by 1 person

    • NancyA says:

      Mary-Louise, I don’t believe the Church cam make a definitive ‘ruling’on it while any part of it is ongoing, unless it were to be a negative pronouncement.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Mary-Louise says:

        There is a Vatican commission that wrapped up its investigation at the beginning of this and apparently forwarded its conclusions to the Pope. There has been no official mention of what they found or if any action is to be taken. That is the ruling … not on the authenticity, but on the work of the commission. For one early story, check this out http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/vatican-commission-completes-medjugorje-investigation/

        Liked by 1 person

      • Observer says:

        I would chance to say that events of the “storm” or purification could be the triggers that would necessitate heaven’s help/intervention through the various promised miracles or signs. And a Cardinal who participated in the commission recently hinted that there may first be the decision to make Medjugorje an official place of worship or shrine….that is, giving it importance while awaiting the completion of the promises for fulfillment.

        Although claiming not to prejudge any decision by the Holy Father it appears with his comment that the cardinal is anticipating Medjugorje will be recognised by the Holy See as an “official place of worship” while the question of the apparitions and the messages will be left to another time.

        Cardinal Puljic also expressed his surprise that no decision was made this year and hinted that he expected the Holy Father’s announcement in the near future.

        http://crownofstars.blogspot.com/2014/12/confessional-of-europe.html

        Liked by 1 person

  22. audiemarie2014 says:

    As Mary_Louise said, since this is a “musings” post…I’ve been struggling a lot lately with repeating behavior I thought I had under control that causes me and others grief. I had spun into a depression of shame, which I am climbing out of by the grace of God. Today, I spent some hours in quietude, telling God I have no control over myself and asked Him what he wanted me to do. Thinking I’d get no concrete reply, as some people do, I got up and did a few things that needed to be done. Then, I remembered a priest recently telling me in confession to pray that the Holy Spirit help “root out” this problem. So, I look at all the books I have and found one that I had put back on the shelf, “Navigating The Interior Life”, as I had been wondering just what is my interior life, etc. There was a bookmark I had placed in the section about root sins. Good grief! Does the Lord really want me to work on myself NOW?? With the storm having begun?? I don’t have time for that! Ha! Well, it appears to be the exact time to do that. Just thought this was perfect timing. 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

    • Mack says:

      Once I had an opportunity to have a sister pray over me, who has been praying for people for over 30 years for healing of memories. She said that what she does is “to pray into the root,” that is, to ask the Lord to heal the root of the problem, which can sometimes be in infancy or even during our mother’s pregnancy. And to share a beautiful thing she said, that when she is out in public and sees something that indicates a person is acting out of some hurt, she just quietly prays for them and asks Jesus to heal the root of whatever is causing them to act badly. It is a beautiful practice. For example she said once in a store she heard a parent berating a little boy in a very harsh manner. So she prayed for that parent’s healing, and also for the little boy that he wouldn’t carry that hurt into the future.

      Liked by 6 people

      • audiemarie2014 says:

        Mack, that is uplifting. I am going to try to pray into the root, since I know no priest or sister around here that would do that. It certainly is a beautiful practice. Thank you for sharing this.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Depression is such a cross. Let’s pray for each other?

      Liked by 4 people

  23. Charlie, how old are you? ☺️

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s