Thank You

Just a brief note to thank you all. Comments today have been making me misty-eyed. I am overjoyed that it really seems you all are getting it – and developing a genuine steely resolve to live in God’s will, to be that sign of hope even as the satan rages around us at his eviction. I regret that sometimes I am not clear enough, but something must be going right, as folks here do seem to be developing a holy fortitude to look beyond themselves. That is the secret.

Also, forgive me for my email box has exploded. It seems for every five messages I answer, I have 10 new ones in the queue. I am working at it – all too slowly. The disclaimer that it may take a week is more like two weeks now. But, hey, keep those cards and letters coming folks. I am not completely recovered from my little episode late last week and have to lay down from time to time. But this gives us a wonderful opportunity to live fortitude and patience together.

I have to tell you, contemplating going public with these things, I was very scared. Knowing that I was supposed to tell people hard things, yet fill them with hope and steely resolve…I just did not feel up to it. I did not see how it could be done. I obeyed…but I was a little sullen. When I started this website, I almost defiantly told the Lord, “Fine, I’ll write it and I will tell them true as best I can. But if You want it to mean something, You will have to do it, because I will not do a thing to market it.” I was kind of demanding a sign from Him – and hoping that maybe it would all go away. A few days ago, I was going to wish everyone a Merry Christmas in their own language…but when I went to check which countries had given visits in the prior week, there were 72. It’s why I found that chart…I would still be looking up translations if I hadn’t.

I can feel now from so many that this has become a sign of hope, that it has stilled many of your fears, that you are completely serious about ministering to those around you. Thank you. You have become a profound sign of hope for me. I want you to know that.

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
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103 Responses to Thank You

  1. Nancy Davidson says:

    Obedience is everything. Thank you for your Fiat. It gives me courage.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. radiclaudio says:

    🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Melanie says:

    Thank you Charlie, it helps to receive your emails and have you speak up with such honesty and clarity. I clearly sense the evil in the world (have had dreams myself of Satan openly laughing at us, he was dressed garishly like a painted woman but, more clown like) And of the ocean turning black with red volcanic like bubbles… It helps to keep it in perspective, keeping my eyes on Jesus and praying for fortitude, to be a light to others and point always to Jesus.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Maureen O'Brien says:

    You are truly a blessing to us, Charlie! May the Lord continue to preserve you and give you strength in the mission He has given you for the flock! God bless you always!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Shirley Bachmeier says:

    Charlie, this is an about face on the reply I want to share with you. If you have not seen the DVD Mary of Nazareth (Ignatius Press) starring Alissa Jung; it is not to be missed. It is the best Mary adaption that I have seen. I shall say no more as many are giving their recommendation; I think it has an anointng as did The Passion. “This is Mary’s Time” and this movie speaks it loud and clear. Shirley Bachmeier

    Liked by 1 person

  6. LJD says:

    No Charlie, thank you. For all of your joys and crosses carried well and all of the falls. They have led to this moment and to all of us. I have not met a soul here in person, but can say you have moved all of us and inspired us to be better for Him and we are all better for it. God bless you and all of us here.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. CrewDog says:

    To paraphrase Lord Nelson at the commencement of our battle:
    “God expects that every Christian will do their duty”

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      CrewDog, if you have never read a really good biography of St. Joan of Arc, you really should. You remind me of a modern personification of General LaHire. He was an earthy, salty fellow – at first did not much care for this teenage girl, but became her biggest supporter and a truly devout man without losing a bit of his salt, earthiness, or fortitude in battle.

      Liked by 1 person

      • NancyA says:

        Charlie, my little 12 year old, Betsy (with learning disabilities) is searching for a saint for Confirmation. She (or I) read the stories and she’s making lists and taking notes. I asked her what type of saint she would LIKE to ask… “cool and who loves Jesus.” So… I recommended St. Joan of Arc. We read a bit and she’s interested, but still discerning. I was intrigued to learn that she was only canonized in the twentieth century! That St. Therese, when she wrote and put on the play in her convent, playing the French girl, was not playing a canonized saint. I had no idea how newly canonized she was, although I recognize that the pious French long knew of her saintliness. I am interested in reading Pernoud’s version, myself.

        Liked by 1 person

        • charliej373 says:

          Nancy, your niece might very much enjoy Mark Twain’s version of Joan of Arc. As I have mentioned before, it is rather chirpy, but entirely historically sound, and I think it would be the easiest and most entertaining read for a child.

          Liked by 1 person

          • NancyA says:

            Thanks… Betsy’s my daughter and that would be entirely too much reading for her. Though 12, her reading level vascillates between about grades 2 and 4. We’ve been exploring the shortest tales of saints in the many various collections I have. If she does choose St. Joan, I might get her the Twain book for keeping and reading at leisure, though. For myself, Pernoud’s version appeals most, with the historical research, attention to records of eyewitnesses, etc. I’ve never felt any great call to her story, but if Betsy is drawn to her, I would like to foster her relationship.

            Like

          • Pat says:

            Yes I enjoyed Twain’s version. Twain was a non believer but was so enthralled with St. Joan he went to France and studied her life for many years, if my memory serves me. The movie made several years ago actually is close to her bio. I’ve read many books about St. Joan. Lo we could use one of her likes around here. She was funny, tough and on fire for The Lord.

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            I read that Twain was an unbeliever for most of his life (his story, “The Mysterious Stranger” was a literary statement of his atheism), but I also read that his exhaustive research on the book on Joan of Arc led him to reconsider – not into full belief, but into an agnosticism that leaned more towards belief than away from it.

            Like

          • Judy says:

            I shall see if I can find Mark Twain’s version. Thanks for recommending it !
            By the way, Charlie, I do believe God is showing you that your very difficult task is beginning to bear fruit. We all need to see that type of success after great effort, no matter what the task has been. Our Lord has given you a Christmas gift , I think,
            ………Since you seem to be an avid reader, I wonder if you have read Unbroken? The title is suitable for the times, as Judeo-Christians face the Storm…..I have read that Angelina J. had a miracle on the set. She is not a believer, I understand, but needed the sun to come out to do a scene. There must have been a time element involved, because she was desperate. She asked, what would he do? (referring to her protagonist, and I do not know his name) She got down on her knees and prayed. I believe that is was raining. Amazingly, the sun came out in as she prayed, and she got what she was praying for. Once the scene was filmed, the not so nice weather returned. I think Angelina was greatly influenced by the central character of his film. I think that God must have been working in her life that day, and maybe in the days before and afterward. I think that God has been drawing her in, and maybe she even accepts Him as Lord and Savior. Christ works in amazing ways to bring us back to the flock.

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Yes, He NEVER misses an opportunity to call when we can hear.

            Like

        • Fran says:

          Nancy, homeschooling for many years led me to some of the best books and authors for Catholic children. Some that might be helpful to you are: Saint Joan by Louis de Wohl (this is by Ignatius Press who has a whole “Vision Series” of Saint books). Any of the Saint books by Mary Fabyan Windeatt, I highly recommend. I have passed these on to my daughter for my grandchildren, so I don’t remember if she did one on Saint Joan, but I know there is one for Saint Therese.There is another book called Saint Joan of Arc by Susan Helen Wallace that I believe we had on our bookshelf at one time also. These might be more suited to your daughter’s reading level. Many you can find used for not too much I think. If you do a search in BookFinder.com you will find many of these. I hope this helps.

          Like

          • KW says:

            Hello Nancy (and Fran)! The Windeatt series seems to be a little easier to read than the Vision series (at least for our children so far), but I haven’t seen a St Joan of Arc. I was just playing on Setonbooks.com and they recommend the Mark Twain one for around a 10th grade level. There’s a “Glory Stories Audio CD” with St Joan of Arc and St Anthony that may work. The “Encounter the Saints” series has a Joan of Arc book and it’s recommended for 4th grade level or so. Good luck!

            Like

      • Mary A says:

        Mark Twain’s is the best.

        Liked by 1 person

      • CrewDog says:

        Ok .. OK!! I just ordered a couple books on St Joan … I’m thinkin’ this is the 2nd time Ya have given me a “Point-Out” to do some history readin’ 😉
        GOD BLESS US .. EVERYONE! ….
        …………………………….. & GO HOGS!! …. BEAT TEXAS!!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Judy says:

      Yes, CrewDog, you have resolve of a General. I agree with Charlie!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Debbie Dixon says:

    72 countries … only 81 more to go. We learned from our guide on my 2013 Holy Land pilgrimage that there were 153 nations when St. Peter went fishing.
    John 21:11 (NRSVCE): So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore, full of large fish, a hundred fifty-three of them; and though there were so many, the net was not torn.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Bob says:

    I must admit I have hope and yet some fears at the same time. Jesus too felt very much fear at the prospect of His storm and we too being weak should not be surprised that we too are sometimes “Of Little faith” but as my confessor used to say I should give up my ego and learn to trust in God and to let Him have the victory in me. If I am weak I should remember the words of Jesus,
    “Can you not pray with Me for an hour”? “Watch and pray as the tempter is close at hand”. We need his strength as John ch 5 vs 5 reminds us we are the branches and if we are not In Him we are fit only to be thrown in the fire.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. shjihmhs says:

    Charlie – Thank you! From reading all the comments and sensing who your followers are, I believe you have a faithful and faith-filled band of brothers and sisters. In the military there is an expression that says it all about how they stand together when the mission is a tough one and I think it applies to all following you on this blog – Charlie, “…we’ve got your six (ie, your back)” Whatever happens, we will stay strong and be there for each and every one of us. God bless.

    Liked by 1 person

    • David says:

      No one will be left behind. Together we stand to weather the “Storm” in His name. We will gather on the other side to sing His praises as long as we have His will in mind and have each other’s backs.

      Like

    • This reminds me of something a dear friend of mine wrote many years ago called “The Faithful Remnant Prayer”. It is a declaration of courageous faith which more and more rings out in my heart as we join together in this present Storm, keeping our collective eyes on the sure and certain hope of victory:
      “We, the faithful remnant, washed by the Blood of the Lamb through His victory on the Cross, by the power of His true Eucharistic Presence and through His holy Word, in union with the Two Hearts, CONQUER. . .with the faith of a mustard seed. . .IN HIS NAME! Amen!

      Liked by 2 people

  11. Bob says:

    Another consideration is that I am considering this “preparation for a storm” as a spiritual exercise as from where I sit I cannot know for sure that what Charlie is hearing is correct and any private revelation must be discerned over time. Lest I be like one of those sitting on the hill waiting for the storm to come and not being busy doing the ordinary acts of my life which I am called to do until I am shown otherwise. There is perhaps a temptation to be looking ahead when I need to be busy at work here with what light is still available. I am going to see my spiritual director this weekend and as he is an Opus Dei priest, I am sure he will advise my faithfulness in the ordinary tasks of my life and I have not yet been called to the ordinary work which Charlie has been called to!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      Thank you, Bob. To abdicate your ordinary work is not a sign of faith, but a sort of despair. I constantly encourage people to do the things that make sense today, while walking with eyes of faith whatever comes. Again, I go back to my pilgrimage: I had my destination in mind, but each day I just did what was right in front of me. Do what is right in front of you and God will see you to the destination He intends for you.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Mary-Louise says:

        Charlie, Your comment reminds me of a sermon I heard on the feast of St. Benedict. The priest said that St. Benedict never started out to found a way of life that would save Western civilization. He just did each day what he knew God wanted him to do, one day at a time. His rule of life was focused on everyday duties.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Fran says:

        Charlie, I feel like that the Lord is teaching me more and more to just do the simple things He asks of me, and not to have any expectations or at least not to dwell on my expectations. Today I did just such a thing. It was something that I kept feeling that He wanted me to do. I was actually a little scared to do it. It took some courage. It didn’t turn out as I would have “expected” or hoped, but that is ok. I did what I felt the Lord asked, and I am content. He is pushing me out of my comfort zone, and that is a good thing for me. As someone else mentioned here, I have been learning and growing, and going through a lot of feelings like everyone else. I think these spiritual growing pains now are for a good reason, although I don’t really understand it all. I am trusting that I need it, and that it will help me reach that destination that He intends for me. The funny thing is that as soon as I pat myself on the back for “getting” something, then He shows me (often with a chuckle I imagine) just how little that is, and how much farther I have to go. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • charliej373 says:

          I know that feeling, Fran…pretty much the story of my life. When you get to being proud of not being proud, you are starting to get it, though not quite there yet! But God makes allowances for us.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Bob says:

            Proud of not being proud. Oh how that pride tries to get in any way it can. Like most things I suppose only God can free us from that plus a bunch of hard knocks or of more falls and scraping the knees.

            Like

          • Bob says:

            Until I learn to ask God’s help first instead of trusting in myself. But it has taken many falls for me to learn that. And many confessions.

            Like

        • Connie says:

          I was thinking last night of what you said, Fran, about these growing pains probably all of us here are feeling at some point or another, and of getting pushed out of our comfort zones. You and Bob have talked about not getting too happy with ourselves for our “triumphs”, and it occurred to me that we should very much still celebrate our triumphs because there will be so many trials and tribulation. We just have to honor Our Lord and thank Our Mother for the triumphs instead of ourselves. Just a thought about how to keep celebrating when it seems there may not be much to celebrate in the coming days.

          Charlie, I am wondering if you have thought about people getting overwhelmed over all the pain they may see around them. I know we all want to help each other but what can we do if we become just flooded and begin to feel helpless. What can we do, do we “take a step back” so that we can “take the next right step”? I am thinking of that field hospital that Pope Francis talks about and there is so much “incoming” that I can imagine just being knocked down to my knees with the pain around me and inside of me.

          Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            Connie, when you are overwhelmed, rest. People stupidly feel guilty about that. But you can’t do much if you push yourself to where you cannot go. When I was on my pilgrimage, some days I didn’t have it. I didn’t push. I would sit and read and nap – and pray that I had the strength the next day. When I ran large statewide campaigns, often candidates would want to go constantly. I insisted that they take at least one day in each nine as down time. The fact is, if you are running at 50 percent, you are about 90 percent more likely to make a fatal error. We are not the titans. Rest when you need it.

            This became much more noted for me as I was hit with my neurological problem. The biggest annoyance is not the pain, but the frequent fatigue and the easy onset of it. And I can’t work through it. If I don’t rest when the fatigue or the pain reaches a certain level, I am likely to knock myself out for a week. We are not the titans. Trust God and rest when you are fatigued – physically or mentally.

            Now, it is rare for me even to write an article in one sitting. I write…then I read for a little or watch a detective show or play a video baseball game (the only way I can hit a home run anymore in this life. I hope to get the real thrill again in the next). That is not goofing. If I don’t do it, I can’t get my work done…my mind works on autopilot in a way it can’t always when I look directly at things. So I could not get any work done at all without it. Do what you need to do to actually accomplish what you need to – and don’t worry about what people think.

            Liked by 1 person

    • Pat says:

      I agree with you on this 100%!

      Like

  12. audiemarie2014 says:

    Thank you, Charlie!! I had felt the tension in the air for a few years, but without you, I’d have no idea what was coming or from where. You’ve given me hope, encouragement, and direction. I trust you. I love this family here. God bless you, Charlie, and all who read and comment on this blog.

    Liked by 3 people

  13. BrookeE says:

    The thanks go to you Charlie, God bless you always.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Bill says:

    Charlie, thank you for your blog, Very interesting and beneficial as I develop steely resolve. Right now my resolve is a bit mushy but is beginning to solidify.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Bonnie C says:

    I got this link from a friend and just had to share it with you, dear friends. http://www.cbn.com/cbnnews/us/2014/December/Abortion-Cartel-Implodes-Clinics-Close-Nationwide/. It is a 30 second read. Praying that it is true!

    Liked by 2 people

  16. E. Allison says:

    Thank You Charlie. Your obedience and humility are drawing people to you. God Bless you and your mission.

    There’s a storm coming…..

    Like

  17. SteveBC says:

    Well, Charlie, I wouldn’t say that you have “stilled my fears.” Actually, I’d say you’ve scared the livin’ daylights out of me! 😀

    Quite the opportunity to learn to work through that and stay focused on Now in light of Possibility.

    Let me add my thanks to everyone else’s. This community and all the good fruits would not have been possible without you, the Reluctant Keystone.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Pat says:

    Ok, I still have reserved judgement on this site but I want to relate a dream my 15 year old daughter told us at dinner today. Mind you I have not mentioned anything to her about the Chastisement.
    She said, “dad we were on this gigantic boat(ship) in the middle of a terrible storm, and people were screaming and panicking to get in. We followed this handsome actor into a room filled with gas, me and mom passed out but you(dad) did not and people pulled us out, and we closed him in there to die. Dad the good looking guy was trying to kill people cause there was not enough room on the boat. At the end we we’re happy watching Isaac’s (her brother) basketball game. But there were not many people left.
    Personally I will have a hard time dismissing this.
    For these past many years my worry is not for me but for my children and what they may have to endure.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Fran says:

      Pat, I understand what you are feeling for your children, because I feel the same ( I still have teens at home, and also married children, and grandchildren too now). One thing, that Charlie pointed out to me, is to remember that they were put here by God at this particular time. So many of them are not only going to rise to the occasion, but are going to shine like stars. Many of our children and grandchildren are going to endure this trial, and see and enjoy a wonderful period of peace and joy. This gives me great hope.

      Liked by 1 person

    • David says:

      Many of my grandchildren are having dreams like this.

      Liked by 1 person

    • NancyA says:

      Very comforting that her dream contained a lot of hopeful elements, and a happy ending!

      Like

  19. Carolyn Wright says:

    And, you are a profound sign of hope for all of us as well! God Bless you! Carolyn

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Sue says:

    Charlie,
    I have a question for you that I think may be relevant to others as well. Some time ago, a number of folks on Peli’s blog were reading the book “Unbound” by Neal Lozano. In case you are not familiar with it, it is about deliverance, and is, as the subtitle indicates, “A Practical Guide To Deliverance”. Having read about halfway through the book, I am pretty sure I need this kind of help, but have no one in my life to pray with who is a practicing Christian. Further, mostly the priests that I have confessed to seem to believe in the devil in the general sense, but not so much in the particular sense. (Example: last week I went to confession, and the priest, whom I had prayed would understand me, would not even let me finish my confession-he brushed aside my agenda, telling me that God already knows everything I ever did, knows my heart, and that I should bear in mind that we are imperfect human beings and always will be such. I have to say, I was let down, and I felt cheated out of my chance to “clean up” for Christmas, but to be fair I did leave with a sense of peace that I did my part.) Anyway, I suspect if I was to approach one of out local priests asking about deliverance ministry, they would a) not have the time; and b) think I was some kind of cuckoo. What are your thoughts on this subject, and does anyone else have any helpful suggestions or insights? I live in southeastern Minnesota, so I suspect there isn’t much of any help in my area, though I would be delighted to be wrong…

    Liked by 2 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Sue, I have sent a note to a priest I know who is within 100 miles of there. If he knows of any resources near you, I will let you know.

      Liked by 1 person

      • audiemarie2014 says:

        Please let me know about any resources around that area also, Charlie. I’m wondering if Sue and I have the same priest, but have been to several and most seem to be the same way. Thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Sue says:

          Audiemarie,
          First, I have to tell you I love your kitty cat icon-sometimes I hover my cursor over it so the image will enlarge-makes me smile every time! I agree, having been to several different parishes in my city (which btw, is host to a world renown medical center), that most of the time, I hear the same bland assurances from each priest. One always says “May He continue to grant you your heart’s desire.” Horrors! I think to myself “Did you even HEAR what I just confessed?!” And as Carlos noted, it is often likely that I will not be asked to make an act of contrition, although I make a point of doing so afterward. I don’t mean to be critical, and I certainly don’t think I am holier than they, but I am left with a profound sense of disappointment that I am not getting the “feedback” from the Lord as it applies to my spiritual condition. I’m no theologian, but the “feel good” part of confession is supposed to be that your sins are forgiven, go in peace, not that what we did or neglected wasn’t a sin in the first place. Of course God knows everything I’ve ever done or will do-precisely why I need to go to confession!

          Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            Ha, Sue! My daughter, after a profound period of defiance and rebellion (years) wanted to go to confession. She went to a priest who treated it like assembly-line absolution and was furious. She wanted a priest who would take her sins at least half as seriously as she did. Well, since the absolution was valid, even if the vanilla priest was not comforting, I arranged for her to talk with one of my directors about the period – and to confess whatever new sins she had. I drove her down and went to have coffee while they talked. Picked her up an hour later and she had a big grin on her face. She said it would take her a week to do her penance – and that made her feel like she was forgiven.

            Liked by 1 person

          • audiemarie2014 says:

            Sue, I’m glad you like my kitty icon! Have a few cats and dogs and they make me smile…most of the time. tee hee. I think we might live rather close to each other, as I live north of a world renowned medical center! I’ve had some very different experiences in confessions since coming back to the Church in the last year and a half. This blog of Charlie’s has helped me so much! Talk about confusion!

            Like

      • Nancy says:

        My pastor has introduced the Unbound Seminar in our parish in Omaha, He is starting another session of eight Thursday evenings beginning Jan. 8. All that is needed is a book and a workbook. I think a DVD presentation is also part of the presentation. His homilies indicate that he is very aware of the need for deliverance.

        Liked by 1 person

    • I have experienced that a few times. Allow me to remind any confessor that may be reading this: when Simon Peter told Christ not to be so hard on Himself he got his named changed to Satan (temporarily.) Every time I got that treatment — here where I live they go straight into absolution without penance or act of contrition nine out of ten times — I just consider that confession invalid out prudence. I am quite willing to spend time in Purgatory for my sins, I do not need to spend extra time there because of some dull witted, lazy confessor who got his ordination papers from a box of Cheerios.

      Liked by 1 person

    • MMBEV says:

      (I’ve made me, me again.) A few years ago, I wanted to go to confession and because I really wanted an older priest I felt would understand me. I picked a man who had been our bishop some years before and who was visiting. I wanted to discuss my feelings about my cognitive fracturing and had gone over how I had contributed to problems in our marriage. (Even with abuse and alcoholism, how we react makes a difference.) So I explained what had happened etc and told my sins, and ….wait for it …he gave me a good twenty minutes on how selfishness was the cancer of the soul. Well, if a steam roller had gone over me fifty times I couldn’t be any flatter. I felt so awful I can’t even begin to describe it.

      About a month later, discussing confession with my eldest son (time to go etc) I said to him, I had to most AWFUL EXPERIENCE LAST TIME. The priest gave me a twenty minute lecture on …. and my son said, selfishness is the cancer of the soul. Blue crayon. And I said WHAT? Well, he’d gone to the conference too, and the same priest and go the same spiel. He said, yah know, after years and years and years they must get just awfully tired of the same old same old.
      And so they look in the crayon box, and decide, well, this week I guess I’ll use the blue crayon, and everyone gets the same thing. Next week, likely a totally different color. It stuck me as so funny I don’t think I will ever forget. And I don’t worry about what the priest says. Sometimes it’s a blue crayon, other times WOW. Jesus speaks directly to me, and exactly what I need to hear.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Sue says:

        MMBev,
        I think I’ve been getting the rosy crayon, lol! This last time, I was at a communal reconciliation where several priests were stationed at various parts of the church. I chose an older priest stationed less than two feet from the tabernacle-I had put a lot of heart and soul into preparing for this confession, and I wanted to be close to Jesus, literally. I almost started bawling out loud when the priest brushed aside my concerns (perhaps noting the line behind me?), but I did my best to consider his answer as coming from the Lord, as I had prayed to that effect beforehand. I am going to try again tomorrow, as it is my birthday, and I will then be ready for Our Lady’s feast day, and First Saturday-a spiritual hat trick, as it were!

        Liked by 1 person

    • ann says:

      Sue I had a very similar experience many years ago with a priest when I went to make a full confession. He used almost the same words to me, and I went away feeling no peace. Some years later on retreat I told the priest there about it, and he said that the priest who dismissed my whole list had done wrong, but that I went there to confess everything and the priest did give me absolution so the sins were all forgiven. That God honored my desire and the absolution covered it all. This was a very orthodox, traditional priest so I felt that I was getting the straight story. I hope this helps.

      Also, another priest very traditional and careful said in a sermon that we can daily and more than once pray “In the Holy Name of Jesus, I bind every spirit not of the Holy Spirit around me, and I send these spirits to the foot of the Cross of Our Lord Jesus Christ for Him to deal with as He wishes.”

      I’ve done this. Very powerful. Hope this helps. God bless.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Bob says:

      If anyone near St Louis is in need they could call our Diocesan Renewal center. We have a diocesan monitored and supervised healing and deliverance ministry and we have had workshops on Unbound but we are not using only that approach to healing and deliverance. If you contact jane Guenter with contact info on the left she may know of someone in your area in these ministries or Charlie may want to call himself
      http://archstl.org/renewal

      Liked by 1 person

  21. COMMENT FOUND IN THE WEB

    “It is not that hard to figure out that if you and I give Tom $100 our actions are quite less expensive than creating a state administration to give Tom $100. Our lack of solidarity and true Catholic action created the opportunity for the left to “come and help” and pay themselves with power and money for “doing the poor a favor.” The best remedy for Liberalism (of the Left and Right) is a healthy Christian society where we have PERSONAL concern for the poor. Writing a check once a month is NOT personal involvement. We have to get close to our poor smelly brethren. Our salvation depends on that, and that alone. I am not making this up.”

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      I always love watching “A Christmas Carol” at this time of the year. (The 1984 George C. Scott version is my favorite). I drive some of my progressive friends nuts by noting that he starts out as a heartless liberal and ends up as a compassionate conservative. After they get done sputtering, I note that at the beginning of every movie version of Dickens’ classic novel, Scrooge opines that the government is responsible for taking care of the poor, like every good little progressive says. But by the end he recognizes, as conservatives know, that WE are our brothers’ keepers.

      Liked by 3 people

      • CrewDog says:

        The George C. Scott version is without a doubt the best “Christmas Carol” and it was a made for TV Movie. I’ve always wondered if it could have been any better if it had been made by a big Hollywood studio? In 1984 the PC anti-Christian Left had not “taken-over” yet! … Was 1984 really 30 years ago!?? … Where have the years gone? My parents warned me time would Fly-By as I got old…. come to think of it .. Christmas 84 was the last one I enjoyed with both my parents alive. With The Storm upon US the fact that I’m facing it as an Old-n-Tired CrewDog troubles me the most!
        Merry 5th Day of Christmas! 😉

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          It is bizarre to think it was 30 years ago, CrewDog. I liked George C. Scott and was looking forward to that version when they started promoting it. Sure enough, here was a Scrooge that did not shrink from the battle at the first whiff of black powder. The music was absolutely sublime. And of course, if you could convert an irascible curmudgeon like George C. Scott, well, you could convert anyone. (Even an irascible old CrewDog 😉

          Like

          • E. Allison says:

            I must admit, I prefer the 1951 version with Allister Simm. To each their own.

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            I prefer the Tiny Tim in that version, E. The Tim in the Scott version is too cloying for my taste. I also like the scene in the Simm’s version where Scrooge has first woken up and realized it’s Christmas Day and is so giddy the housekeeper runs off screaming. I know the Patrick Stewart version is the one most frequently shown now, but it largely leaves me cold. Just seems to have no heart.

            Liked by 1 person

          • E. Allison says:

            I agree about the Patrick Stewart version. I never liked it all all. Once was enough. We have the Allister Simm version on DVD and watch it several times each year. The best scene is at the end, after Scrooge give Cratchet a raise and sends him out to buy more coal. He says in a cranky voice, “I don’t deserve to be so happy!”. Then he throws the quill pen over his shoulder and begins to laugh, “I just can’t help it!”. That laugh really seems genuine, as if the last line was ad lib. As he laughs so hard, he has to wipe the tears from his eyes. Love it! I think that’s what endears me to this version.

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            When she was little, my granddaughter used to love to watch the Scott version with me over and over. She was terrified when Marley’s ghost would say “Srooooge.” and would hold tight to me. Finally, she got to where she could take it…but then she would try to scare her little brother by saying, “Scroooge.” And he would look at her like she was nuts – while she and I would crack up laughing.

            Like

          • KW says:

            I had to throw in a vote for our standard…The Muppet Christmas Carol (even the little kids will usually watch…and sing along 🙂 ). I didn’t realize Patrick Stewart had a video one (I’m a bit behind on normal TV I guess). I really enjoyed listening to the audio of his one man version.

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            As an afficianado of versions of “A Christmas Carol” since I first read it in maybe third grade, I must refrain from comment on this one. (And I am not really sure how to spell “afficianado” or even if it is the right word, so I wrote it loud!)

            Like

          • KW says:

            Aww Charlie- it’s not that bad. Of course, a veggietale video a couple weeks ago helped break me out of a funk potentially heading towards despair, so perhaps I’m just wired to find the little bits of goodness in lighter weight fare. Or, perhaps the long term sleep deprivation of having little kids is finally getting to me 🙂

            Did you ever listen to the Patrick Stewart audio one (we’re talking mid/late 90s when I heard it)? With all the reviews against his video one, I don’t know if I’ll ever attempt to make the time to watch it, but the audio one is worth the time (at least once). It’s set up as a reading of the story instead of acting everything out.

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Ha, for the longest time, KW, my sister was absolutely crazy about the Sponge Bob cartoon series. I mean as an adult. This went on for years – and folks had to insist that she have two televisions so that she could feed our obsession with Sponge Bob while the rest of us normal folks watched other things. (Well, maybe not normal, but at least abnormal about things other than Sponge Bob. And seriously, if you’re going to get obsessed about a cartoon, I can relate to the Roadrunner or Tom ‘n Jerry, but Sponge Bob?! Really?!)

            Like

      • ann says:

        thank you Charlie. Well said. I love the George C Scott version too, best out there! So believable. And thank you for this blog and for your faithfulness. God bless you and your family and all here. Blessed 2015, Under the Mercy, as C.S. Lewis would say.

        Liked by 1 person

  22. Richard L. Bertrand says:

    Charlie – phrases, issues and incidents struck me since I came to know of you and following you. All this is shaking me at the core because this is bringing me to question what God wants of me :
    1st finding you through Mark Mallett which woke me up to The coming Storm & trusting GOD and his Mercy for several years;
    2nd –> following your archangel lead with the moto “Trust – Do – and Love”`;
    3rd –> This phrase requesting me to look at the rest of my life and others differently: ” This is not about you, but about Him”;
    4th –> Just before Christmas I lost my 25 years old job as a disaster recovery consultant with no lifeline and means to support me and my hailing wife ( I’m 69 and she is in her 70’s);
    5th –> Coming to the realization that I have became one of your early followers – I consider this as a gift from Heaven;
    6th –> I’m a french Canadian from Quebec-Canada, therefore English is my 2nd language but capable of conveying your messages to very needy people around me;
    7th –> I got the latest news that my youngest son *39″ has been institutionalized in Vancouver; severely damaged by a life long battle with his dependance to sniffing glue and hard drugs ( over 25 years), he just came out of a 6 months desintox program – Last night I tum him over to our Lady of the Miraculous Trust.

    I gather that the Storm is here for me, I am at a lost to understand and fight life as it is given to me. but in the depth of my soul I want to believe that God is minding my ship more than ever.

    I therefore place my faith in Him so help me God.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Richard, the Lord sees your abandonment to Him and He has not forgotten you. I have prayed that He send His servant, Nicholas, to guide you and your family, to comfort you, and to make you a sign of hope to all you encounter – and especially for your son.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Connie says:

      I offer up all my sufferings this week for you, Richard, and I pray that God infuse your soul with the sweetness of His tender love and give you the grace of renewed Hope and Courage.

      Liked by 1 person

    • ann says:

      Richard you are in my Rosary today, and I will keep you on my prayer list. God bless you.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Elizabeth G. says:

      Richard,
      Le Seigneur est proche.

      Like

    • Mick says:

      Richard, je vais prier pour vous et pour votre famille. Je vous salue Marie, pleine de grace…

      Like

      • charliej373 says:

        …le Seigneur est avec vous. Vous etes beni entre tous les femmes et mon cher Jesus, le fruit de vos entrailles, est beni. Sainte Marie, mere de Dieu, prier pour nous, pauvre pecheurs, maintenant et a l’heure de notre morte.

        Love that, Mick…at the beginning of my Rosary on the prayers for faith hope and love, I pray the Hail Mary first in English, then Latin, then French. It reminds me of the universality of our faith.

        Like

        • Mick says:

          Just out of curiosity, where/when did you learn to speak French?

          Like

          • charliej373 says:

            High School. I am very rusty…can read okay, but have a hard time understanding it spoken. I think I may get a Rosetta Stone program to refresh me. But when I was in Montreal I was fluent – and was exorbitantly pleased when a waitress thought I was from France.

            Like

          • Mick says:

            Ha, Charlie! When I was in Montreal, I was not fluent–and was exorbitantly mortified when the waitress thought I was an idiot.

            Liked by 1 person

  23. Katherine Bailey says:

    Hi Charlie; I too have felt the Lord giving me a not so gentle “nudge” at times to continue with the course of action He has trained me for, when I would just rather focus on the things I know can bring a bit of earthly satisfaction, (to me) most likely. It is very difficult to stay in the present moment and simply live each day as it comes, rather than focus on what we know is most assuredly coming over the next 3 years. I think most folks would not want to get out of bed tomorrow, than face up to the fact that we are going to suffer and are expected to bring as many souls back into the light of God’s grace by our example and prayer during all this. It’s like walking a tightrope every day to continue on the “normal” path , whatever that might entail for each of us. I just remind myself that I am not alone any of this and that it’s always easiest to “eat the elephant one bite at a time”. I don’t know how you have been able stay on track all these years quietly bearing the knowledge that the Lord has entrusted to you, but I certainly am thankful for your fortitude. God Bless you and all who walk this path with you.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Dorothy says:

    Dear Charlie, Thank You for all that you have given us so far, but I am fairly new to your blog and sometimes I feel a bit lost. It’s like coming in in the middle of a conversation and trying to pick up the gist of it. I have gone back a few weeks to try to catch up. Is there someplace I can go to read from the beginning? God bless and keep on truckin’..

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Hi Dorothy,

      Well, you could just go back by date. I started this seriously last March. Alternatively, if there are subjects you would like to focus on first, you can type them into the “Search” feature at the upper right hand of the page and they will pull up related articles. Also, on the Blessed Hope Forum run by one of the commenters at this site, she has compiled a clickable index to many of the articles I have written or that concern these things.

      Like

  25. narnialion54 says:

    Dear Charlie,
    If you could only know how your hand extended to me when I was drowning. Two sons, due to drugs/alcohol at the very door of death/brain poiso/ning/suicide near attempt/deep coma/many ER visits/ my mom disowned me/lying in the depths of hell on earth in deepest despair/ addicted myself/ and then through Mark Mallett, I found you.
    “I know you’re out there somewhere, somewhere, somewhere. I knew I’d find you somehow, somehow, somehow…” (moody blues)
    God found me.
    Glory to God!! I am staying in the shadow of his wings.
    Your prayers, this beautiful community/ I am so grateful.
    Thank you for saying YES to God.

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      I am glad this site has been such a powerful sign of hope to you Narnia. It is a great community for many.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I can not be sure about who are the valid prophets of our day, I only watch to discern which ones seem most worthy of serious consideration, and then I feel it’s some kind of calling for me to try to get the message out to others.

        What I am quite sure of, is that this community of sincere, deep-hearted, faithful believers coming together at this time, in this place, seems miraculous, and I value reading and communing with all of you. This group is growing rapidly, and I’m convinced it must be God’s will for us to be here together.

        Like

  26. Julia says:

    There are a few posts about going to confession and coming out feeling not as clean and clear as we would like to be. I have a few funny and sad memories from the confessional.

    Hope God and Charlie won’t mind me sharing a funny one.
    Quite some years back I was trying to be in a good state spiritually; but looking back I was getting it all wrong anyway. Well, I had spent over a week preparing to make a complete confession and get a complete clean slate in God’s eyes. I arrived at the confessional only to find no priest. People even then (37 years ago) were not really bothering to go to confession regularly, so the Priest was indoors watching football on the Saturday afternoon.

    I knocked on his door and he came out and went to the confession box in the church where I went in and started to tell all. As I was ‘sharing all with the Lord’ I heard what sounded like a little snore. I said, ‘excuse me Father are you listening to me.’ No reply. So I said a bit louder ‘are you asleep Father.’ He grunted and said ‘No, I said Father, what did I just ask you. He did not know. I reminded him telling fibs to me was not the way to do it in a confessional and assured him I would forgive him. Anyway the end of it all was, he confessed he had nodded off and apologised. Then he helped me make the best confession of my life.

    When I came out, and told my husband who was waiting for me, he said, ‘I’m not surprised, anyone would fall asleep listening to you.’ And I still see the funny side of it all. Always wondered if Jesus was having a nap that day. Besides football would win over every time.

    Hope you all see the funny side.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Fran says:

      That really was funny,Julia! It reminds me of a story about my mom and dad and confession. When they were engaged, they went to church together to go to confession. My dad, (always the jokester) came back from his confession, and knelt next to my mom pulling out his rosary. He said to her “Well, honey, we are going to be here awhile. I’ve got a few of these to pray.” My mom told me that for a minute she thought, “Oh my, what has he done? And I am about to marry this man?”, before she saw that big smirk on my dad’s face. He loved relating that story to us…but the funniest part was that many years later, almost 40 I think, my mom got him back. They again, went to confession together, and my mom came out after my dad had already been, knelt next to him and leans over to whisper with all seriousness, “Honey, Father says that he wants to see you again.” She said the startled look on my dad’s face, before she broke out her own dimpled smile…was priceless.

      Liked by 3 people

  27. We are celebrating this eve of the New Year and again I wish you all a blessed and holy 2015.
    I am sorry if I see this consecration of Russia thing as a non-issue. Most of you are likely to have received some mails from a certain organization asking for donations, prayers, and other support to “consecrate Russia now.” I am not saying that they are wrong, it is certainly good to have people thinking about the words of Our Lady of Fatima. Years ago Fr Patrick Peyton used to tell us all the time that “Fatima matters” and that we should pray the Rosary daily, with our families. I knew a saintly man, now deceased, who lived here in Buenos Aires and was in charge of Fr Peyton’s work here in Argentina until he was mysteriously dismissed through no fault of his own. For all I know that good man was as saintly as Fr Peyton. Once I received a wonderful grace while chatting with him (please see http://tinyurl.com/q8kn8sl) He was also a very devout follower of Our Blessed Mother, and a personal friend of John Paul II. From him I learned that the driving force for renewal in this world is the Catholic Church.

    Paraphrasing him: “If the Church declines, the world declines. If the Church flourishes, the world will follow suit. The Church flourishes when we all strive to be saints.” Just a few hours ago the Pope has called attention to that matter. Since Christmas he has been mildly chastising the Vatican Curia for not living up to the high standards set for us by the Lord. Some even felt his words were not appropriate but let me insert a little matter for reflection here: if we lead by example, shouldn’t that be good for the world? My take on it is that we have fallen into some kind of mechanistic way of thinking and forgotten to live like Jesus said we should. I lead the list there.

    Jesus is “the way” and His mother told us again and again to do whatever He tells us to do. In fact He Himself told us: “you can do nothing without Me.” Popes may have been lazy or timorous in effecting the words of Our Lady regarding the consecration of Russia. I think that will be done “by the book” when things get difficult enough. We are just like little children and run to our mothers when we feel pain. I can imagine Our Mother saying then: “Didn’t I tell you what to do?” The Holy Father seems to get it right: we have a problem in the upper echelons of the Church’s administration. This is not ” the smoke of Satan anymore” it rather is a thick fog of confusion that we must clear before we do anything else (“in union with all the bishops.”)

    I am sure you all agree with me in that there is not “one thing” we must do but a more all-encompassing change that WE CAN ALL PARTICIPATE ON: change our ways, clean up our act, follow Jesus and DO EVERYTHING HE TELLS US TO DO.

    If enough of us manage — through God’s grace — to do just that, the Holy Father will consecrate Russia one more time, (‘in union with the bishops of all the world,”) perhaps with not even one rebellious bishop among them… and then light will again come from the Orient and Russia will be called to her unique Christian destiny in history.

    Our part is to do what we are asked to do, to bring to the Church a pure sacrifice: “Bring all the tithes (the whole tenth of your income) into the storehouse, that there may be food in My house, and prove Me now by it, says the Lord of hosts, if I will not open the windows of heaven for you and pour you out a blessing, that there shall not be room enough to receive it.” Malachi 3:10 or in the words of Aristotle … “Where no one fails to be good, no one fails to be blessed.” Now if a pagan philosopher got it … shouldn’t we get it too?

    God bless you all in 2015

    Carlos

    Like

  28. SteveBC says:

    Charlie, I feel most fortunate to have found your site and all the people here who are participating, even if they are only reading. You have done well, and you have done good. I hope the rest of us have something like your courage if and when God calls on us as he did you for this site.

    And I think the insistence on not marketing the site “is a feature, not a bug.” 🙂

    Like

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