Joseph Cronin Update; March 9, 2015

By Charlie Johnston

In most ways, things have been going very well for the Cronin family. For George and Susan, the top priority since getting young Joseph transferred to the hospital in New Jersey that is committed to working to get him better, has been to establish a new normalcy for the family, a new daily rhythm to anchor them. That has been moving along nicely.

When they first arrived in New Jersey from Texas, they stayed with George’s father, also named Joseph. Now they have gotten an apartment in a nice town with excellent schools. George was successful in getting transferred on his job as a truck mechanic for the U.S. Post Office. He started work this morning. It is worth remembering that, despite the erosion of our governmental institutions, they are still manned by people. Some of those people have succumbed to the madness of protecting a petty fiefdom and exerting petty authority at all costs. But many have not lost sight of our common humanity and are graceful in reaching out to others. George could not have gotten the transfer accomplished and started work so soon without some people in supervisory positions at the Post Office seeing a family who has suffered and reaching out to try to help cut through the usual red tape. God bless them.

The family’s other children start school tomorrow. So by the end of this week, they will be well on their way to having entered into a new routine. It is amazing when you contemplate uprooting your whole family from a life and re-establishing an entirely new one in a town almost 2,000 miles away – then getting it complete in less than a month and a half. A routine gives our lives stability, allowing us to work with confidence.

Things have gone well with young Joseph, too. His progress has been slow but steady – and sometimes striking. As I had reported to you earlier, he has been reacting to stimuli around him since shortly after arriving at the new hospital and steadily exhibiting more independent, but unconscious, muscle movement. One day when I was talking on the phone with George, young Joseph started kicking his leg and twitching his arm. George and I both joked that he was probably just saying hi to me. Late last week, a couple of new little milestones were reached. When a patient in a

Young Joe Cronin

Young Joe Cronin

coma is moved to a sitting position, it can be dangerous because his blood pressure has a tendency to spike. They sat Joseph up for an hour and all his vitals remained steady. Sounds small, but a big step. Meantime, he has started fluttering his eyelids fairly regularly in response to things around him.

Late last week the Cronin’s got word of a new stressor. They were informed that the New Jersey Division of Youth and Family Services (DYFS) had gotten a complaint last Tuesday from a credible source in Texas, accusing them of medical neglect of Joseph. During the brief, but furiously intense three-day battle for Joey’s life at the end of January, on several occasions, Driscoll Hospital in Texas tried some very-heavy-handed intimidation tactics. Fortunately, George and Susan are steady and I have been through some high-pressure situations before – and so together we navigated some very treacherous waters. On the decisive Friday, Jan. 30, 2015, when George was going to get the temporary restraining order, the hospital had been shaken by the volume of calls that had come in the previous few days and the press inquiries that began that Friday. Bishop Emeritus Rene Gracida had sent a priest to keep him informed and to comfort and counsel the family from Wednesday, Jan. 28, on. The hospital entered into a seemingly cooperative negotiating stance on Friday, offering to help facilitate a transfer. But it took a hardline stance, saying it would aggressively act to remove life support if George went ahead with getting the temporary restraining order. It represented that it had the support of Bishop Gracida in urging the family to back off the restraining order. I didn’t believe it. I took the family’s word for it, but sent an urgent note to the Bishop, asking for a quick response. Below is a large excerpt from that note (in the note, TRO stands for temporary restraining order):

Obviously, I trust you. But I don’t understand. A TRO would prevent the hospital from removing life support, whatever they want. Why do they need to maintain the option of removing that life support or threatening to be very aggressive? 

I am putting my political consultant’s hat on here…and I have been councilor to numerous U.S. Senators, Congressmen and candidates – and have navigated through some very high pressure situations for them before. 

Let me tell you my concern: The Cronin’s want to keep Joey alive until transfer can be fully arranged. They need to buy time. But the hospital needs to buy time, too. If they can do a little dance until about five o’clock this evening and keep a TRO from being put in place, then they have the weekend. On the weekend, the institutions that can help and the media heavy hitters are off. The public pressure on the hospital is dramatically reduced. If they are determined to proceed with life-ending procedures, they could remove support over the weekend and present the A-Team of institutions and media with a fait accompli come Monday morning…too late to do anything about it. The only thing that would prevent that is a TRO. 

Throughout this brief, but intense, saga, it has struck me that the hospital has acted disingenuously – presenting a benign public face while intently trying to justify pulling life support as quickly as possible. 

So I ask myself, if I am the hospital and I actually am sincere about my negotiations NOT to pull life support before transfer can be arranged, why would I be incensed at a court order preventing me from removing life support – which I say I don’t intend, anyway. I have faced many opponents and institutions which, when about to lose the upper hand in a situation, try to intimidate with scare and strong-arm tactics. I have always faced them down – and nearly always prevailed. 

If the hospital really does not intend to pull life support, a TRO is irrelevant to them, simply enforcing the restraint they say they intend anyway. If they are planning to play for time until this evening then pull the plug this weekend, then the TRO would be provocative – but could also save Joey’s life. 

Now perhaps there is something of note I am not aware of from a long distance. I have not gone through this with the parents. I will follow your lead before speaking with them on it. 

But if this were one of my political clients, my advice would firmly be to get the TRO – and the hospital’s frantic objections would not make me less likely to get it done, but more so, for I can think of no reasonable cause they would have to object to it if they actually do not intend to pull the plug this weekend.”

 

Gracida

Corpus Christi Bishop Emeritus Rene Gracida

Bishop Gracida responded quickly that he was not part of any such recommendation and that he fully concurred with my recommendation. That was conveyed to the parents, who then went ahead and got the restraining order, through the legal help of the Texas Center for the Defense of Life, which had been arranged through the Washington-based Alliance Defending Freedom.

The hospital responded by filing a complaint of medical neglect with Child Protective Services of Texas (CPS). Unpleasant as it was, I could envision several rational reasons for them to do this. In the case of significant litigation arising from this episode, it laid the groundwork for a defense from the hospital. Even if they did not prevail, they could cite their concerns as a “good faith” reason why they acted as they did. (I use “good faith” in the legal, not the moral, sense here). A simple CYA. At the optimum, they might find something untoward and seize custody of Joseph and once again have full control over life and death decisions for him. I was not terribly concerned about that. The Cronin family was already under a microscope and, even in the midst of this pitched battle, one of them was with their other children when those children were not in school. Also, I knew that several hospitals had agreed to take Joseph and care for him – that the only thing keeping it from happening immediately was the necessary surmounting of some bureaucratic and insurance-related hurdles – and those were in hand and manageable. The whole thing seemed to become moot when, late that afternoon, Joseph started reacting in ways that demonstrated irrefutably that he was NOT brain dead. To their credit, despite the ugliness of the internal battle, the hospital immediately changed gears and began to give him genuine care for life. It did not escape the professional strategist in me that, once the TRO was entered and Joseph showed unmistakable signs of life, it was very much in the hospital’s interest to keep him alive. Had Joseph died in their care after all that had happened and the legal stance they had taken, particularly after they were proved utterly wrong late Friday afternoon, it would have been a public relations nightmare of Biblical proportions for them. It was very much in their interest to care for him well and get him out of there. Call me a cynic, but in politics I never trusted to the morality of an opponent to get them to do the right thing: I always counseled clients that once you make it in an opponent’s interest to do the right thing – and very painful for them to do otherwise – you can sleep easy regardless of the morality of that opponent. We had made it in the hospital’s interest to give Joseph the best of care until they could get him out of there – so I slept well.

The complaint that came into the DYFS office in New Jersey last Tuesday is nearly identical to the complaint the hospital filed in Texas. If it is not from the hospital directly, it would almost have to be from someone closely affiliated with it. There is no rational basis for this – just pure spite. New Jersey is legally obligated to investigate it and submit a finding within 60 days. During that time, it adds to the stress load of the Cronin’s and puts them in fear that their other children could be taken from them. It is pure spite. The petty bureaucratic mindset cares for nothing and no one so much as being right and maintaining control. In this case, hospital officials lost on both counts. They were wrong and lost control. To the petty bureaucrat, there is no rejoicing that a boy they thought dead is alive and progressing…only fury that they were wrong and the family did not obey their “betters.” So someone must be punished.

All the early indications are that this is a perfectly straightforward investigation by DYFS. George reported that the investigator the family visited with for nearly two hours on Friday seemed pleasant, professional and sympathetic. The good news is that after completing an initial investigation that is determined to be unfounded, if a source maliciously tries to make the same complaint, that can be prosecuted as a crime. Of course, whoever did this knows very well that no one is going to extradite anyone from Texas to New Jersey for prosecution on such a crime. So they obviously think it risk-free harassment. BUT…DYFS will be able to legally ignore any harassing tactics after completing this investigation and could report them to Texas authorities, which could make it a tad riskier than what the harasser is counting on.

I can’t know with certainty who filed this complaint. But I’ll tell you this: if a child in my care became suddenly critically ill in Corpus Christi, I would tell the ambulance driver to take him to the next town over.

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
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69 Responses to Joseph Cronin Update; March 9, 2015

  1. Jessica says:

    I am so glad to hear a routine is in the works! As a mom, lack of schedule is such a challenge. In light of all of this, I’d ask for everyone’s prayers. We are travelling to Dallas (we currently live in D.C.) for a seriously invasive skull surgery for my daughter, Azelie. Our family would appreciate your prayers as we travel – and a little extra prayer for me 🙂 I’m the only one in the family who follows all of this “culture of death” “coming Storm” hullabaloo and this story has made me slightly uneasy about releasing my children to medical staff in Texas.

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Prayers going up for you and Azelie, Jessica. May you have a safe trip and a successful surgery. Pray the 23rd Psalm.

      Liked by 1 person

    • CathyG says:

      You and Azelie are in my prayers, Jessica. I will be attending a special Lenten service at my parish church tonight and will offer it up for you. God bless you….

      Liked by 1 person

    • the phoenix says:

      Joining you in prayer, Jessica, for a successful surgery and full recovery for Azelie, and safe travels for you as well.

      Like

    • audiemarie2014 says:

      Jessica, you, Azelie, and entire family are in my prayers and thoughts. Azelie is a beautiful name. God bless you all.

      Like

      • connie says:

        Yes, Azelie is a beautiful name- one of my favorites and easy to remember because it was my great-great grandmothers name who was Cajun French. It will be easy to remember you and your precious little one in my prayers, echoing Charlie’s and Phoenix. Let us know if you can, Jessica, how things go.

        Like

  2. Nancy D says:

    Obviously there can be no letup on the prayers. The Enemy can infiltrate through the tiniest of cracks in the armor. So let’s cover this family in the armor of prayer, calling on the Precious Blood and the intercession of our Blessed Mother to maintain them in safety and peace. Amen.

    Like

  3. Kathleen Vacheresse says:

    A good example of. Pray as if everything depends on God. And work as if everything depends on you. ST. AUGUSTINE

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Tom says:

    Charlie, I was a bit perplexed when you dove headlong into this that one week. I mean, it’s a very worthy cause, but if your mission is to teach all of mankind of how to deal with God’s plan as it unfolds, I was wondering why you spent so much time and effort helping to save this one soul, when they are literally billions of souls at stake. However, I now think I see where this is also a story that will help many of us as it continues to unfold as you write this (this is what we call foreshadowing, methinks):

    “It is amazing when you contemplate uprooting your whole family from a life and re-establishing an entirely new one in a town almost 2,000 miles away – then getting it complete in less than a month and a half. A routine gives our lives stability, allowing us to work with confidence.”

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Tom, no one can deal with everything BUT, it is a seduction of the devil to neglect the little things because you have bigger things to deal with. It is a play on our vanity. What seems important to us is often trivial in heaven – and what seem trivial to us is often vitally important in heaven. I sympathize with your vantage point. When I knew it was time for the Storm to start setting in in earnest and I was directed to take an extended pilgrimage I really was incredulous. It’s all coming to a head and God wanted me to take a long walk?! It did not make much sense to me, but I did it…knowing that God’s ways are not our ways and He knows best.

      Many good things came out of this. The good people at this site got to really stretch their wings for the first time…to see that working together and doing a little…all together without vanity…opens the door for God to act and then mountains are moved. A blow was struck against the culture of death, even as it advances. But you are also right, Tom. From the time a reader contacted me on the fateful Tuesday I had a profound sense that this was a sign. When Tuesday night I got notice of the false flag of a boy of the same name dying of the same thing in Endgland at the same age a few years back the sense got stronger. When the one Bishop in the country who has publicly partially endorsed me had someone there at 6 a.m. the next morning to confirm the story and comfort the family, I knew this was a sign unveiling…and gave myself fully to it. It still is being unveiled…there will be much more before this story was written. Young Joseph will become a sign of hope for many and a sign of contradiction for many others.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Jacquie says:

      Tom,
      I remember a journalist interview with Mother Theresa many years ago. At the time she was caring for a very sick infant. Perhaps, even dying. The journalist wanted to know why she “wasted her time on this one infant , when so many other infants out there were in need of her care and attention”. She answered that this one infant was her responsibility and all the others were Gods. Now I know this is not a precise accounting of the conversation. But it taught me a a very great lesson. That we must take great care of what is placed before us. To give this one thing all our energies. There is much that needs our compassion and help. But, we are not God and can only do what is placed before us. To that one thing, today, we must be faithful. Take the next right step and be a sign of hope to others.
      Jacquie

      Like

  5. Sandra Kizior says:

    Perhaps this hospital is just anti-life with a vengeance, but my gut feeling tells me (as a registered nurse with a degree in nursing from Loyola U of Chgo.) that they are probably hiding something. . . . Hiding something like a major error on their part. Someone better be insisting on getting all of this child’s medical history, every last page of his medical history, and studying every possible place for errors, for example medication errors. Was he given an adult dose of meds, a pediatric dose, or dosages based on his body weight, for just one example??? Why else are they trying so hard to kill him???

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Yes Sandra, the thought had occurred to me at the time. I did not want to inflame an already raging situation. But some hospital official’s virulence went well beyond the routine arrogant professional anti-life bias. It struck me they seemed way to fanatically eager to get this boy dead and buried rather than just get the right prognosis. So, certain things were put in place to begin a quiet and thorough investigation at the time. It may be they are just fanatically manic about being contradicted…but if there is more to it than that, I assure you, it WILL come to light. There will be accountability.

      Liked by 1 person

      • MMBev says:

        I know that my life has kept me from being “on time” with comments, but you will see this, Charlie. God promised if we pray for Wisdom, He will give it, so I pray most especially for wisdom for you and then for all of us.

        There were two occasions when my son’s life could have ended, or resulted in serious damage to his kidneys and hearing had I not been present. One had to do with the dilution of the medication which was incorrect and I refused to nurse to allow it to be administered in his IV until it was corrected. She didn’t want to go back to the pharmacy and try to get another very expensive dose, so she injected saline or whatever, into the bag before giving it to him. Since it required her to double the amount of fluid the drug was diluted in, the bag came very close to bursting. If I hadn’t been there who knows. Certainly that drug causes veins to be “burnt out” over time, and damages the kidneys and hearing.

        Second time had to do with a nurse speeding up the dose to get it in and done with for her convenience. Knowing that air would soon be heading into his vein, I ran to the station to find someone, empty, and ran back to remove the IV. A nurse was almost screaming at my son (private room), for increasing the rate of speed. She shut right up when I said from the door, that he hadn’t, a nurse had.

        I bet neither of those events were ever charted. So whoever is looking knows already that it’s been charted, and I’m with you. It’s somewhere in the record.

        I had my son’s doctor teach him how to determine his dose according to his body weight in kilos, the dilution required, and speed for the IV for four medications given that way.

        The other thing I learned was that some nurses would not “flush” the vein before the next medication despite orders to do so, and some would flush, but at an incredibly high rate of speed, which was intensely unpleasant for the patient. (Same for me with tumor) Dietitian checked all my medications with the “food” being administered and found that the pain relief created a solid plug if flushing was not done. Well, in spite of my saying that, one male nurse who was called from another floor was mad. He just said, too bad, and went ahead. I ended up with a blocked tube. A very kind nurse worked and worked to get it flowing again, rather than pulling it out of my stomach and reinserting up the nose and down. I was nervous enough after that (because others would do the same thing), not knowing what I was being given, I refused any pain medication, sometimes for long periods of time, until a nurse I knew would flush first. That sometimes took days if she was off.

        One is totally at the mercy of the nursing staff, and doctors. That wasn’t the only event that was not just unpleasant but really caused me a lot of fear and wariness. Even an advocate cannot be there all the time.

        So I will keep right on praying for God to give Wisdom to all involved with Joseph, whose name itself is a sign.

        Like

  6. Louis Cote, Belleville, Ontario, Canada says:

    Hi Charlie:
    I have been following your wonderful blog for about four months; this is my first contribution and it relates to trusting.

    I was struck by your story/journey concerning the Cronins’ experience with health care. These questions came to me: “Who can I trust?” OR “What do I trust and/or know about this person/situation?”

    Your observations show me that wisdom is not so easily identified and must be prayed for as we see in James 1:5-8
    If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask God, who gives to all men generously and without reproaching, and it will be given him. But let him ask in faith, with no doubting, for he who doubts is like a wave of the sea that is driven and tossed by the wind. For that person must not suppose that a double-minded man, unstable in all his ways, will receive anything from the Lord.

    My point is that to acknowledge God is to partner with Him, trusting Him to be my guide and that He will guide me through people and events in my life. God using frail human beings to advance His divine will… now that is the crux.
    During my reflection, I remembered listening to daily mass and thought the homily to be appropriate. Here the link to the homily by Fr. Frank Portelli (times10:50 to 16:25).

    Thank you for your constant reminders to faithfulness.
    Louis

    Liked by 3 people

  7. marie says:

    Would anyone here like to join me in a novena to St Joseph for Joseph Cronin and his family? It starts tomorrow:

    http://www.praymorenovenas.com/st-joseph-novena/

    Liked by 3 people

  8. Ceri says:

    Marie and Charlie, I’m in for the novena to St. Joseph.

    Like

  9. Judy says:

    What a cruel irony that the town is named Corpus Christi. Maybe someone might translate for them.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Somehow, I think that is part of the grace of the sign that is unfolding here. Our Lord rose from the dead carcass of what officials thought had put an end to him…and reigned in glorious triumph. Somehow it seems to me divinely appropriate that a sign of life should rise from the culture of death in a town named Corpus Christi. It seems to me the Lord is making it almost obvious what He is about in this situation. Let the modern Sanhedrin rage all they want. Christ reigns.

      Liked by 3 people

  10. Kathleen Vacheresse says:

    Yes. Iam praying the St Joseph novena for two of our grandchildren Shawn and Maryann will include Joseph

    Like

  11. Chris says:

    I am in for novena to St. Joseph.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. luvmercy5775 says:

    I honestly believe we need to praise the Lord for every circumstance regarding this saga. With the help of our prayers, what the enemy intended for evil, God will use for good. Truly this is an occasion to trust Him with all our hearts. “For we know that all things work together for good for those who love God. Those who are called according to His purposes.” Romans 8:28 And I will surely be participating in the Novena.

    Like

    • connie says:

      I’m with you Luv, praise God in the midst of trial. I am with the St Joseph novena, thank you St. Joseph for your help.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Petra says:

      You are so right. I recently went through quite a trying experience with hospital doctors and staff after taking my elderly mom to the hospital for pneumonia. Upon reflecting on all that has happened, I finally came down to this: I must embrace whatever happened as God’s will. I came to this by reflecting on Our Lady’s life. She was often presented with very bad circumstances in her life. For instance, when she found she was pregnant, Joseph was going to divorce her. He did not. Our Lady embraced it as God’s will. When she was due to give birth to Jesus she was told they must make a somewhat long journey for a census. She does not say, oh no, why is this happening to me; oh no, God could not want this. She embraces it as God’s will. They arrive in Bethlehem, and she is in labor. I am sure she prayed to God that Joseph would find a safe room, knowing she was about to give birth. But no, a reversal. There is no room. Couldn’t God have prepared a room for them, somewhere safe and private?, she could have thought. Instead, she embraced the stable and manger as God’s will. Before they could return home, Joseph comes to her and reveals he has heard in a dream they must escape to Egypt, since forces are out to kill her Son. Does she revolt against this? Does she question why God couldn’t just remove the threat, let the other children live, let Herod die so he would not perform such a despicable deed? No. She obeys her husband Joseph, and God. She embraces their escape as God’s will.
      In my mind, the key is not just accepting difficult things that happen as God’s will. It is embracing them, as if they are the most perfect of solutions, because they are God’s will. It is as if we must pray, and beseech the Lord for the solution that seems good to us (Father, if it be your will, let this cup pass from me), but then, embrace whatever happens as God’s ultimate good for us and those we love (but not as I will, but as Thou wills.)
      Whatever trials the Joey and the Cronins face, I hope they will be able to continue to pray, acknowledge God, take the next right step, and be a sign of hope to everyone: their children, old and new neighbors, relatives, co-workers, school officials and even hospital personnel they meet, and to us. God bless them.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Lily says:

        Ha ha, sorry for the double post, Charlie.

        What I meant to say here, is thanks to Petra. I am trying to live that out – acceptance and thankfulness of all that God brings. I used to think I was a nice, patient person until I had 3 kids. Now I often just feel like an older child, with the same tantrums and behaviour issues. It’s a pretty sad state sometimes.

        Like

      • Lin says:

        This is very profound, Petra. Thanks for sharing this meditation.

        Like

        • Monica Joseph of the Blessed Sacrament, OCDS says:

          I agree with Lin, Petra. Profound and thanks for sharing. Also, Petra, thanks for your witness and steady dedication to the sanctity of all life by your care for your loved one.

          Like

  13. Brother Gilbert says:

    What an Orwellian nightmare those poor parents have been through. My mother never wanted to be in the clutches of doctors and hospitals and it seems she was right. When they start to play God and usurp the rights of parents and family it is a real worry. It is disgusting what the Cronin family were put through.

    Like

  14. Karen says:

    Marie, I will join you in the Novena to St. Joseph for Joseph and his family, and for everyone here and their intentions. May St. Joseph walk on our one side, with Our Lady on our other side, leading us straight to Jesus.

    Like

  15. Mick says:

    Thanks for the update, Charlie. God bless the Cronin family; and may justice be done in the case of the hospital and staff attempting to perpetrate such evil (I certainly pray for mercy for their souls; but MAN to I hope that some butts get kicked at the TX hospital over this).

    Like

  16. Can I suggest praying a Novena to St. Joseph starting this Wednesday?

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      You’re right, mystical. If we begin tomorrow it would end a day before his feast day. I will begin on Wednesday so it culminates in his feast day.

      Like

    • connie says:

      I just read on another website that the reason a novena may start 10 days before a feast day( I assume is why Marie suggested it) is because that left the feast day of the Saint free for honoring and celebrating instead of intercession. As the saying goes ” I learn something new every day” or my other very often used “6 one way half a dozen the other”. Well, not sure if the latter applies, but just thought I’d throw it in because I like the way it sounds:)

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Petra says:

    Charlie said: “But I’ll tell you this: if a child in my care became suddenly critically ill in Corpus Christi, I would tell the ambulance driver to take him to the next town over.” Good idea, but it wouldn’t do any good. 911 emergency vehicles take the person to the closest hospital available. You don’t have any choice. All that can be done is a transfer after the person is admitted.

    Like

    • highway66 says:

      That may not do much good. The Advanced Directive law, which sounds innocuous enough, is the legal basis for what the hospital tried to do and is Texas law throughout the state. Chasing after the Cronins all the way into NJ is probably motivated either by money or raw retribution for the perceived sullied reputation of the hospital because of media attention, or because a bitter person lost their job.

      At any rate, it is naive to think that secularism is not a religion to its adherents. It is. And it has more than its share of hard core fundamentalist believers willing to do all it takes to bring the heathens and law breakers to conversion or justice under their god.

      Liked by 1 person

      • charliej373 says:

        No wonder the secularists make common cause with Jihadists.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Alphonsus says:

          Whoops. How did my screen name – Alphonsus – show up as highway66? Maybe I was thinking about some stuff I was looking at earlier on Route 66, the great American highway, when I signed in. Sorry for the confusion.

          Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Maybe you were just looking to get your kicks… (you young folks may not get that). During one campaign, I made my primary home base a little independent hotel in Lincoln, Illinois, right off Rte. 66. It gave me access within about two and a half hours to the furthest reaches of the state.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Lily says:

            Us young folks might not get it unless we’ve watched the movie ‘Cars’ a million times with our kids… It’s one of my favorite movies (and songs). 🙂

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Okay, Lily, I missed that movie, but glad the old song is still making the rounds. I saw all the kid movies when mine were little – not so much with my grandkids. One day my granddaughter and then three year old grandson were walking after Church in Birmingham. With a rhythmic stride, he started chanting…”I like to move it, move it…I like to move it, move…” It cracked me up and my daughter later explained it was from one of his favorite movies.

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          • Mick says:

            Ha, Alphonsus! I was wondering who the “new guy” was. 🙂

            Like

        • Alphonsus says:

          If you were not driving a drop top Corvette then in IL. Charlie, you were not living it as should be on Route 66.

          Like

          • charliej373 says:

            I was driving a Taurus. I loved the Taurus…great reliable car and comfortable on long distance driving, which I did a lot of. Many cars are comfy for a hundred miles or so and then get achy. Not the Taurus…I could drive all day and never start aching much.

            Like

  18. Susan says:

    Joining you all in prayer ~

    Like

  19. Jim M. says:

    Pray fir Joseph. But also pray for Texas . It is no secret that Texas has, morally speaking the worst “futile care” law in the US. The law gives doctors the right to be the final arbiter of life and death if they believe treatment would be medically futile. The vague definitions under the law give rise to reasoning of medical futility based on “quality of life” post treatment.

    Doctors whose decisions are covered under the law have close to absolute immunity from suit or prosecution.

    Some background: http://ncbcmedia.blogspot.com/2013/05/ncbc-supports-texas-bill-to-protect.html

    So a doctor treating a critical patient may be sued for negligent care, but not if they end care and life. If we follow the money angle, there’s less risk, and cost associated with ending care. Some, including me, would call that an incentive to kill.

    Add the money made in organ harvests and you have some pretty powerful financial incentives to end life.

    Proponents of the law will point out that the attending physicians decision us reviewed by a hospital panel (a death panel?) so there us some measure if due process. And that a family disagreeing with the verdict can find another facility, and that a hospital panel provides some semblance of due process in reviewing the doctor’s decision. A panel that is likewise incented to choose death over life. Oh, and the family is on the clock, getting two weeks to find another facility. If the don’t, the sentence is carried out. And by the way, “some” measure of due process doesn’t cut it under the Constitution when life, liberty or property are being taken.

    Criminal defendants facing the death penalty are provided two lawyers at trial and afforded automatic appeal rights. In Texas, the attending physician and panel are judge, jury, executioner and the final arbiter who are immune from suit. And sad to say, rewarded for choosing death.

    At least two attempts to change the law have gone down in flames.

    Texas has some great medical care, but they need not allow doctors and hospitals to play god.

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    • charliej373 says:

      There was a time when we didn’t need “ethics panels.” That was when we were innately an ethical and moral people. I am persuaded that the primary purpose of “ethics” panels is to come up with plausible excuses to cover over the hideous things we now choose to do. At least we still try for the fig leaf – which suggests we have some vestigial sense of right and wrong in public life.

      Like

  20. 5warveteran says:

    My heart and prayers go out to the Cronin family.

    Like

  21. Jessica says:

    Thank you all so much for all of your prayers! Could I ask for one more small request?

    We got news yesterday that our insurance company will likely deny the whole claim and we will owe $43,000 on the day of surgery. We’d really like to move forward with surgery on March 24th, for a whole host of reasons, but are going to need some miraculously quick (in insurance terms, at least) decisions to be made by tomorrow afternoon.

    It’s definitely possible on God’s terms but I am completely incapable of making this work out. So funny how God puts us in those situations, right? Anyhow, I’d really appreciate everyone’s continued prayers.

    Like

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