Whatcha Gonna Do When They Come for You (Part 2)

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By Charlie Johnston

“I was gazing over toward the Circus Maximus, toward the Palatine Hill where the Roman Emperors once resided and reigned and looked down upon the persecution of Christians, and I thought, ‘Where are their successors? . . . But if you want to see the successor of Peter, he is right next to me, smiling and waving at the crowds.” – Musing of Francis Cardinal George after the election on Pope Benedict XVI, as recounted to Fr. Robert Barron in his book, ‘Catholicism.’

Ordinary Miracles

If events arise that cause you to need to leave on foot, here are some things I found useful during my year and a half pilgrimage walking across the country from Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012.

There were several types of events that I suspect were anomalous to my particular pilgrimage. I thought maybe I should downplay these, because I was not sure how much use they would be to you. I acted in some ways I would not have had I not believed this to be a Divinely-assigned mission. I am normally a prudent man, but I believed this journey was an act of radical faith – and so I acted consistent on that belief throughout. After considering it, though, any of you who leave your homes on foot will also have to act on a radical faith. So I have concluded that I should tell you some of the anomalies, that perhaps it may hearten you and give you more resolve in fearful circumstances.

There are three major areas that were anomalous. I will list them in the order of how much they surprised me, from greatest to least:

Animal Behavior: From within the first month, I knew that wild animals were not behaving as I had expected them to. Squirrels and birds did not treat me as if I wasn’t there, but as if I belonged there and was part of their everyday experience. I walked throughout the heart of the deep south – rattlesnake territory. I was constantly given hair-raising tales of snake attacks. Yet the only two times I even saw snakes in the wild were in Colorado. I was warned by a public works administrator of the dangers of brown recluse

This alligator I saw near Vinton. Louisiana and I agreed to leave each other alone - though I did give it a bit of hot dog I put on a stick.

This alligator I saw near Vinton. Louisiana and I agreed to leave each other alone – though I did give it a bit of hot dog I put on a stick.

and black widow spiders under the bridges I often slept beneath in rainy weather, but I was never bothered. In Houston, I made camp in a little spot at the far outside eastern reaches of the city, near the Buffalo Bayou. A family of rabbits – about 12 or 13 – made camp with me and slept near me at night. It was probably their nest, but it was strange to literally sleep with rabbits. Deer were initially shy around me, but got bolder and bolder as I went along. By the last few months. They were as unconcerned about me as the birds. My favorite occasion was when a little fawn came bounding up upon me in my wooded retreat in northern Colorado. He looked at me quizzically, then curled his legs beneath him and sat before me gazing at me for about 10 or 15 minutes. It was amazing. Wild turkeys were constantly strolling by. They are supposed to be wiley birds who carefully avoid humans but they somehow knew I was harmless to them. After a time, I was struck by the fact that I could move around and even wave my arms at them but they would not care. But most times – not every time – but almost every time, if I raised my camera to take a picture, they would take off.

Several times, dogs came into my camp at night. Not once did they try to roust me. They would always just lay down and sleep near me, then trot off in the morning – though occasionally wanting to play a little first. I don’t think that is entirely normal.

These things made me think the predators behavior was probably not as menacing as it might be under normal circumstances. Twice I had cougars come into my camp – and both times they fled when I sat up. One looked at me in almost comical surprise before turning tawny tail and getting out of there. There were a few bobcats and other small wild cats. Foxes constantly circled around my camp, staring at me and circling restlessly, but keeping their distance. Several times I went to sleep with a fox circling. I only saw three wolves, but they were almost as friendly as dogs. The only animals that really made me nervous were bears. They were not aggressive, but I knew they had no fear of man. One night after I had bunked down in my tent, three bears came sniffing around. They snuffled and snorted a while, then ambled on towards the creek. That made me nervous for I was completely vulnerable. If they had crashed the tent. I was not in a position to do much of anything except hope for the best.

Threats: The only animal I ever had any real trouble with was man. A few got aggressive, two with a knife. But when you walk 15 miles with a heavy pack every day, you get absurdly strong. I had figured a few subtle tactics to demonstrate to aggressive types before things got ugly that I was a lot stronger than I looked. I would do something like shift my pack on the ground with one hand and let it drop, from about an inch above ground, so they could get a sense of its heft and contemplate how effortlessly I moved it, while keeping up a seemingly clueless friendly patter. They invariably backed off. But one incident I cannot explain by ordinary means. A troubled young man followed me deep into the woods where I made camp near Lake Charles, Louisiana. When he showed himself, he pulled a pistol on me. Though my heart was racing, I showed no fear and talked cheerfully about ammo and clip sizes. He started to get angry at my seeming stupidity…then for no apparent reason, he looked a little behind me, got a look of panicked fear in his eyes, turned and ran frantically out of the woods. There was nothing I could see behind me. I started to wearily break camp and move somewhere else since he knew where I was and could come back…then something rose in me. “No,” I thought savagely. “I will fear NO evil. I will move tomorrow, but tonight I am going to sleep right here and I am going to sleep good.” And so I did.

Water: I consider this entirely unremarkable – and only note it because people I trust, including some hardened military types, say it is astoundingly remarkable. I drank from streams, creeks and rivers at least 10 times a week. In the final few months, it was closer to 40. I never used a filter and I never got sick from it. A friend had been terribly worried about this and sent me a water filter. I added it to my pack to soothe him – figured I would use it if I ever had to get water from a stagnant rather than running source. I never needed it and did not take it out of the box. After the pilgrimage was over, I gave it to my nephew, Justin, who was developing a real taste for hiking and outdoor stuff with his Dad.

I have always enjoyed drinking from streams – and liked to hike a lot before my neurological issues arose. I think stream water is amazingly refreshing – and scarcely ever pass a fast- running stream on foot without getting a drink. Despite the necessity during my pilgrimage, I have not developed a similar taste for river water or slow-moving muddy creek water (though I drank from both during my pilgrimage.) It could be I have developed a deep immunity because I have been doing this since I was a kid. On the other hand, I mentioned I did not see a snake in my entire sojourn through the deep south. In normal times, I rarely took a day hike in Alabama around family without encountering at least one snake. Enough people I trust have told me how astounding this is that I figure it should be included here. The rules of everyday life were different on my pilgrimage; not dramatically so, but in many striking ways. I suspect you will find the same if you have to go IF you place your trust in God, live your duty well and act with reasonable prudence.

If you get out on foot into the wilderness, whenever you come across water, get a drink and top off your water bottles. Every time. There is nothing worse than passing a stream on a hot day,

The end of Los Padres National Forest, where I spent nine days walking through wilderness - and always kept an ear out for water. I was hungry enough to eat a bear raw when I took this shot.

The end of Los Padres National Forest, where I spent nine days walking through wilderness – and always kept an ear out for water. I was hungry enough to eat a bear raw when I took this shot.

failing to stop there, then realizing five miles later you are dying of thirst with nary a stream in sight. Get in the habit of doing this EVERY TIME you pass a stream.

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Girding…

The first thing to understand when preparing a pack for an extended walk on foot is that weight is your mortal enemy. Lose all macho pretentious displays or you will injure yourself. There is an ideal weight somewhere for you…an amount you can carry that does not strain your lower muscles. For example, when in hiking shape, I can carry 90 pounds all day without breaking a sweat. But I would never do it for more than a few days time. Why? I can feel the strain it puts on my muscular structure and I know that for every moment I do that, I am profoundly more likely to strain a muscle or sprain an ankle with a minor misstep. It is like redlining a stick shift car: you can do it for short periods with no ill effect, but persist in it and you will damage the engine. I found 75 pounds to be my ideal weight. I could carry that consistently without feeling any strain. Aches, sure, but no strain. Walk with weight long enough and you will understand the difference.

But that is not what I started at. I began with about 40 pounds. As I went along, I got stronger and could carry more weight. I strongly recommend that, unless you are a serious fitness

My son helping me try on my backpack about a month and a half before I left on my pilgrimage.

My son helping me try on my backpack about a month and a half before I left on my pilgrimage.

nut or athlete you start out with the same. Do not be deceived about hearing how military personnel carry 125-pound packs on hikes. Yes, they do, but those hikes are limited in duration and only undertaken after they have undergone rigorous conditioning in preparation. Understand that things get much tougher at the margin. When you are carrying nothing, a single pound feels like nothing added at all. When you are at your maximum reasonable weight (90 pounds for me) every extra pound you add feels like 10 or 12 more – and increases the strain and likelihood of injury dramatically. Above all, you do not want to unnecessarily risk serious injury when you are in wilderness territory. Remember, with every pound you give to an item you carry, that is a pound you can’t use for another item. You have to make choices.

Below I list the things I consider essential or near essential for starters. In some cases, I have listed manufacturers…but companies change over time. All I can say is that those items where I list a manufacturer provided me unique utility a few years back. (I should note, I take no endorsements – this is entirely based on my private experience).

Backpack List:

Backpack: Get a full-size pack, preferably with numerous loops on it that you can attach other things to with a clip if you need external carrying capacity. You can get a decent one at almost any hardware or big box store. Certainly, the camping stores will offer very expensive high-end units, but mine was a moderately-priced Coleman with good stitching that held up under intense use.

Sleeping Bag: I love the comfort of fleece-lined bags, but they are more than twice the weight of micro-fiber bags. On the second leg of my journey, after I was much stronger, I did carry the extra weight of a fleece bag. To start, though, I would recommend you get a micro-fiber bag rated to at least 10 degrees. You can always sleep outside the bag if it is too warm, but you do not want too little bag when it gets cold. My favorite store for getting ultra-light weight but top quality equipment was REI. But the lighter a quality piece is, the more expensive it is. You have to pay to shed weight. Also, I did not carry my bag in my pack, but tied it off and balanced it to some of the loops on the outside of my pack. Even when lightweight, it is bulky and would take up most of your room in the pack.

Tent: If you will be walking in cooler seasons or in climates where the temperature drops dramatically at night, a tent is essential. I carried an ultra-lightweight model I got from REI. It is a two-man model, cost a little over $300, and was of an ingenious self-supporting design. I could put it up in less than 10 minutes. The temperature in that small tent was at least 15 degrees warmer than the outside night-time temperature just from the retained body heat.

Adjustable hammock: I recommend this brand from Eagle Outfitters. Get the double nest, variety, as that has room for your sleeping bag and you can really nestle down into it. It has adjustable straps. All you need is to find two sturdy trees reasonably near each other and set it up. It is very light-weight. When the temperatures are warm at night, you neither want to sleep in a tent or even on the open ground. The hammock helps keep you cool. Through much of Texas, the night-time lows would be in the high 80s or even low 90s. That is miserable sleeping weather no matter how you cut it, but in a hammock, even the lightest breeze would dramatically cool me. Sleeping on the open ground which I did for much of February March, and early April, was out of the question if I actually wanted to get any sleep, for the ground will warm you by a good 10 degrees or more from retained body heat after you have been there for an hour.

Wirecutters: This is not a tool I originally took, nor did the pair I found ever touch any actual metal. Whenever I found a tool along the roadside, I would carry it with me for a few days if it was not too heavy to see what it could do. Wirecutters were my favorite practical tool. When you are making camp where there is a lot of underbrush, it will cut away small branches with remarkable efficiency and ease. When you sleep on the open ground, little roots and stumps can aggravate you and keep you awake. With wirecutters, you can cut those little stumps just below the ground’s surface – and get a good night’s sleep. I never would have thought of them, but after having lived it, I would not leave home for a long hike without a pair of handheld wirecutters.

Knife: An essential tool for a variety of purposes, from cleaning fish to cutting rope. I preferred one with a partially serrated blade, which was useful for makeshift sawing and cleaning of fish. Get a good quality knife. You need it to hold up. If you get a Swiss Army type knife, that can be extremely useful, but take great care to make sure it is a quality one. There are a lot of cheap, junk types. You are going to need your knife to last. I always carried it in a pouch in my pack, so it was not immediately accessible and any police officer who stopped me would not be alarmed by it if they checked.

Garden Trowel: Get a forged model, preferably a one piece unit. This will get heavy use as a type of shovel – and on its side, with the help of a hefty rock, can be used as a sort of hatchet. This is definitely something you cannot get at a big box store. Their idea of a trowel would not last you a week in the wild. Just remember, forged one-piece unit, and you will be okay.

Metal clips: You can get these at any camp or big box store in a variety of sizes. They are used to clip things to the outside of your backpack – or your belt loops. I always kept my water bottles clipped to my side belt loops. I just put up the link so you could see what I mean. I used the type at the very top of the link.

Water bottles: Water is very heavy. I always kept two 32-ounce water bottles, one clipped to each side of my pants on a belt loop. I started off with metal, but switched to plastic as soon as I could. When you walk all day in high heat (and I had a hundred days of over a hundred-degree temps that first spring and summer) your water gets hot regardless of what you carry it in. Carry it in metal bottles and you can practically burn your mouth when taking a drink. Trust me, that is not pleasant. Any time I passed a stream in the wilderness, I got a drink and topped them off. Some people, including my son, prefer some sort of camel back system. That is fine, but it takes up room in the back and adds weight that I thought unnecessary.

Rope or paracord: Again, something of general utility that will find all sorts of purposes as you go along. Paracord is very light-weight and extremely versatile. You can use it for almost everything you would normally use rope for but it has more versatility. You also want to have some sort of length of twine to keep, which is also versatile and useful – and can even be used as a makeshift fish-line.

Boy Scout can opener: You will need to go to a camp store for this. Incredibly cheap and small – about the size of a quarter – it is also incredibly useful without taking up any weight.boy scout can opener In the midst of a period of nine days in the mountainous wilderness of Southern California, a nature photographer stumbled upon me. He could see I was ravenously hungry, but all he had was a can of mixed vegetables to give me. Boy, was I ever thankful I had that can opener! Those were the most delicious mixed vegetables I ever had!

Magnesium fire starter: You can get this at any camp store – and at many big box stores, too. It is just a small block of magnesium with a little shaver and flint attached. You shave off a little of the magnesium into a pile of tinder – leaves and sticks, then use the flint to spark the magnesium shavings, and soon you will have a roaring fire. A variety of this is called Firesteel, originally designed for the Swedish Army. This will emit sparks that are 5,500 degrees Fahrenheit and so can start a fire with little or no tinder. Most units are good for 3,000 to over 10,000 strikes – and rarely cost more than $15.

Netting: This is simple, but vital. There are a variety of mesh sizes you can choose from, but make sure you get enough to stretch across a stream. Using rope and poles, you can set up the netting as a seine to catch fish from any running stream or river. Understand, this is illegal just about everywhere right now except in specific commercial use – as well it should be. It is not sporting at all. But you will only use it in dire circumstances when you are hungry – for genuine survival. Sporting rules are suspended in times of crisis. If you have a simple net and you stay near streams, you will never be in danger of starving.

LED Flashlight with strobe setting: Get an LED model because it is very bright and uses very little power. My last one was used extensively for seven months on the same standard batteries. I don’t know how long it would have lasted, for it lasted from the time I got it until the end of my pilgrimage. I got the one with a strobe setting specifically for bear country. Bears have sensitive ears and eyes to go along with their incredibly sensitive noses. If confronted with one that starts to make an aggressive show, make a lot of noise and start flashing the strobe if you can. It will usually disorient the bear and cause him to retreat. Early on, my son gave me a small flashlight he had gotten at the police academy when he was there. It had a deep red setting, which was very useful for reading at night without easily tipping anyone off to your location. I loved that – but if in bear country, I would definitely have one with a bright strobe setting.

Light plastic poncho: If your gear gets soaked in a rainstorm from which you do not find shelter, it can be more than twice as heavy as when it is dry. I learned this to my sorrow in Mississippi. On Ash Wednesday of 2011, it rained howlingly for 14 hours, all through the night. I had found shelter under a covered bleacher at an abandoned VFW softball field. But in the night, the storm got so violent and windy it was raining sideways. I spent the next three days letting my gear dry out before I could move on down the road. A simple large plastic poncho could have saved me a lot of trouble – and I got one the next time I passed a Dollar Store.

Hiking boots: Comfort and quality are paramount here. You are going to be walking hard in all sorts of conditions. Shoes that are comfortable for everyday use can kill your feet when called on to walk 15-20 miles a day in rugged terrain, through swamps and creeks, and in blistering heat. While high-end running shoes are comfortable, they will last maybe a week in the wilderness before falling apart. You need some top quality hiking boots. I got lucky. I was going to wear some heavy boots – that would have had me walking hobbled before three days were out. My youngest brother saw what I was going to leave in and gave me his pair of Keen hiking boots he had only used once when he and his wife were out in Yosemite. I had never heard of Keen before. To my astonishment, I walked the whole 3,200 miles with the same boots.

My brother, Ron, and his wife, Fran, flanking me. Ron gave me the Keen Hiking boots. He and Fran showered me with equipment at Christmas before I left on pilgrimage.

My brother, Ron, and his wife, Fran, flanking me. Ron gave me the Keen Hiking boots. He and Fran showered me with equipment at Christmas before I left on pilgrimage.

Admittedly, the last 1,500 miles I was generally doing repairs to them twice a week with my little Walgreen’s sewing kit. But after they held out for 2,000 miles, I was determined that they, like me, endure the entire trip if they did not just disintegrate altogether. In Kansas, I was stopped by a State Trooper (one of nine times I was briefly questioned by police along my entire route). He asked how many shoes I had gone through and looked skeptical when I told him I was on my original pair, until I lifted up a foot to let him take a close look at a battered and bruised boot. He was astonished and asked the brand. If I had to walk again, I would get another pair of Keens, hoping the company still makes such high quality and comfort. I DID go through about a dozen pairs of heavy duty shoe laces.

Trail Mix: Trail mix packs a ton of energy without robbing you of much weight or room. I once lasted for nine days on a few handfuls of trail mix each day and stream water. This was not while hunkering down, but while walking seven or eight miles a day in mountainous terrain – physically demanding. In extreme conditions, hunger sometimes does not feel so much like hunger as it does deep fatigue. Trail mix metabolizes quickly and perks you right up. Get the kind that is heavy on nuts and seeds. I liked it with some chocolate pieces, too, for the instant energy it gave. Stay away from types that are heavy on frou-frou, like sesame sticks and such. You need energy, densely packed.

Hat and bandana: A hat with a good brim protects you both from the sun and the rain – and keeps you warm in the cold months. I used about a half-dozen hats along my way. My original soft leather hat was my favorite, but once the heat started rising, it was useless. It would make my head sweat profusely. I sweat heavily from my temples,

The hat I started my pilgrimage with. It was my favorite - but way too hot for any time but winter.

The hat I started my pilgrimage with. It was my favorite – but way too hot for any time but winter.

which streams right into my eyes, which can be blinding if you can’t slow it down. When summer came I got screened, ventilated hats. Much better, but I still often had the sweat problem. A small bandana wrapped around the top of my head – and frequently wrung out, largely solved the problem. In the final few months I just used a simple baseball cap with mesh backing.

Clothes: Carry a small variety of clothes, going from lightweight to heavy – and layer. In the cold months, layering will keep you warm. In either cold or warm, the extra clothes, when put into the sack that holds your sleeping bag during the day, makes for a nice pillow. You will often have to wash your clothes in streams with rocks and dry them on a line or draped over a tree branch or laid on a big rock in the sun.

There are a variety of extra things you can carry, based on your choice. My extra room was taken up largely by my laptop (I needed it to work online at libraries for the little studio I had signed up to provide content writing for) and by paperback books – and my trumpet tied onto the back of my pack. If you have more than one person in the same hiking party, you can dramatically increase what you can carry. I never carried a hatchet. It would have been incredibly useful, but too much weight, so I made do with a forged trowel and a rock when I needed it. Extra people means extra variety of what you can carry – and children, as they were in days of yore, become practical assets. I might add that children, far from the helpless dainties moderns think them to be, are usually more clever and quick to find solutions in the wilderness than modern adults – because they are not so burdened by either conventional thinking or by fear. They tap into the adventure and often come up with ingenious solutions to puzzling problems.

Into the Wild

The first thing to shed if you must set off on foot is any genocidal fears you have based on watching too many “Terminator” movies. In modern times comprehensive wars of extermination are largely an Asian, African and Muslim thing, not a Western thing. Yes, Nazi Germany was a notable exception and there have been two such eruptions in the Balkans (But in the Balkans, both eruptions involved Muslims). In the west, battles have largely been fought over effective control, and tactics are geared to what best accomplishes the goal of social control at the least cost. Even Russia only waged a war of liquidation under Stalin – and that was limited to specific regions or purges. Don’t get me wrong; I am not telling you there is nothing to fear. There is. But you must neither be lulled by unjustified optimism nor paralyzed by unrealistic fears. To make good decisions, you must work from cold, hard assessments based on facts and evidence.

When genocidal rages are planned, there must be a substantial population of people who, under the right circumstances, would give in to such homicidal rage. The ground is usually prepared for this by vilifying and scape-goating certain target groups for years, sometimes generations. In America there has been an effort to vilify Christians, Jews and conservatives of all stripes, even to the point of naming them as likely terrorists in Homeland Security and military analytical reports. But frankly, it has been flaccid – all the more hysterically trumpeted by certain officials and media outlets because it just lacks the visceral heft of the demonization of Jews in Nazi Germany.

In Nazi Germany, a war of liquidation was successfully mounted largely because Hitler deputized a large pool of brutal lowlife thugs – the brownshirts, giving them badges and stepping back to let them have their way. There are really only two substantial pools of people in America with such brutal, malicious, conscienceless mindsets: inner city gangs and the hysterical left –which consistently projects its own homicidal fantasies onto traditionally religious and conservative people. There are, of course, enclaves of potentially radical Muslims, but that is more a problem for the feckless governments of Europe than the United States (unless you live in, say, Detroit). Inner city gangs and the hysterical left are ruthless and brutal enough, but there are two major problems with deputizing either.  The inner city gangs, whether black, Latino or Anglo, are long on attitude and short on actual battle skills. They shoot without hesitation, but would rather look tough than actually learn how to shoot straight. They fold quickly when confronted with tactical units from police or military that are properly trained. The thing that has allowed gangs to flourish in inner cities has been restrictive rules of engagement imposed on police, not the skill with which gangs ply their brutal trade. Remove those restrictions and gangs are quickly defeated and contained. They are tougher than a lot of the non-traditional federal police, such as those attached to departments like education, IRS, mapping agency and park services, but nowhere near a match for unfettered units of traditional law enforcement agencies. As I mentioned in part one, local police and the lower ranks of the military can only be counted on to enforce statist oppression for so long as they believe they are in an actual emergency protecting public safety. As soon as they get wise to the game, they will become the armed center of much resistance, rather than enforcement. The problem with the hysterical leftists, who are mouthy and relentless is that, at bottom, they are wimps and cowards. They bully with their mouths and the legal system – but faced with real, determined physical resistance, they run like scalded dogs (if Republicans in Congress had ever figured this out, we would not be at such a tipping point). The hysterical left is like PeeWee Herman strutting into a saloon, interrupting a poker game between John Wayne, Clint Eastwood, Denzel Washington and Arnold Shwarzenegger, and obnoxiously spoiling for a fight. Peewee can only sustain the illusion that he is winning for so long as the fight is confined to words rather than fists.

What you have here is the most pathetically dweeby class of elites in history desperately spoiling for a fight with the sturdy yeomen of the country. They think it is no contest because they have successfully taken over the positions of cultural and political power in the institutions. They think the “little people” do what they tell them to do because it is the divine order of things. They honestly are so narrow they cannot imagine it being any other way. It does not even occur to them that their “power” is solely dependent on the submission of the little people and that there could come a bridge too far in which the little people turn on them. But like PeeWee, if they insist on having their fight, they will eventually get it – and regret that they spoiled for it in the first place.

If statist authorities did manufacture or provoke a crisis to take authoritarian control, that control would start slipping away within a few weeks because they face some major institutional problems they have not taken into account:

  • The people they rely on to establish early control are overwhelmingly populated by decent and honorable Americans. To maintain control, they have to maintain the illusion of a genuine threat to public safety. Every offense they commit will cause the defection of more and more of those honorable people, which would likely eventually result in the instigators’ being overthrown rather than consolidating power.
  • The allies they can turn to as the traditional, honorable professionals are those seething with sentiments of resentment and entitlement. However brutal they may be, they lack the competence, skill and discipline of the honorable professionals who have accepted much self-denial to train to protect and defend. As soon as the howling rent-a-cops get their noses bloodied, they will avoid areas of potential resistance and keep to where people are more easily cowed.
  • To prolong their shaky control as long as possible, statist instigators will need to focus on high-return areas such as communications, transportation, and population hubs that they can control with minimal investment of manpower, which gets progressively less reliable as the crisis goes on.

So how does knowing these things help you if you have to leave on foot? Stick to rural areas. It is not that anything untoward would ever happen there, but that they are too high-effort, low-return areas for modern mandarins to worry about. Capturing a few does not significantly enhance control, while requiring manpower that could be more fruitfully used elsewhere. Stay away from loudmouth braggarts on your way. There are two reasons for this: First, most are actually cowards when confronted with real adversity and; second, those who are not actual cowards usually lack judgment and will eagerly go running into ambushes and futile efforts that simply drain resources. You will inevitably form communities of people. Stick with serious, sober people.

Do not waste time plotting the overthrow of occupying powers. There is no challenge or great honor in even successfully delivering the final blow to a muddled beast that signed its own death warrant when it tried to take total control. Devote your efforts to helping your neighbors in your little rural communities. If you can, get some canopy cover for such little communities, but do not worry overmuch about that. Even if you have 300 people in a collection of tents, cabins and shacks that are easily visible, you have little to worry about. First, the statists’ fear that we are all trigger-happy wild-eyed gun nuts now works in your favor. They will not want to risk attacking such an enclave except by stealth. Even if they succeeded, they will quickly figure out that when they do, they still have a thousand more such enclaves out there – populated by the sorts of people most likely to fight back; that it does not extend their control at all; and it increases the number of defections from the troops they actually need near infrastructure and population hubs. Quickly enough, they will decide to leave rural enclaves alone if those enclaves leave them alone. Your strategy is similar to Joshua at the wall. The instigators have set in motion the events that will cause the walls of their ambition to crumble. Be vigorous in defense of your enclave, eager to help each other, and ignore the statist occupiers. The walls will crumble soon enough.

When you first set out, keep your course close to streams and rivers. You will not die of thirst and you will always find cover. Even in the most barren parts of the country, I was always able to find cover by following running water. Some of the best cover I ever found was in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the most relentlessly stark city I visited. I followed along the Rio Grande and found a wonderfully sheltered copse of trees…sheltered even more because the trees were otherwise so widely scattered. You will ALWAYS find cover if you follow that rule. At least I did.

If you are in an area heavy with mosquitoes and do not have a tent mesh to protect you, I discovered a very peculiar thing while walking. This may not hold in all cases or for everyone…but I found that if I made camp within about 10 yards of the bank of a stream, the mosquitoes were not so bad. If I got more than 20 yards away from the bank, they were a monstrous cloud. It is counter-intuitive that mosquitoes should be less aggressive closer to running water, but that was my experience. If you have to eat outdoors and there are a lot of ants around, crumble up a dry piece of pastry near the highest concentration of them. Wait about 15 minutes. They will all swarm to the pastry – and you can eat in peace just a few yards from them. I discovered this by accident, too, when I dropped some crumbs of a Pop-Tart in the woods near Waco, Texas. I finished what I was eating, then looked at the crumbs and saw ants swarming them. It gave me that idea, which always worked for me. So the rest of my pilgrimage I always had a Pop-Tart with me.

You will have to choose your own course, but I preferred to walk openly in the daytime. I only walked at night if it was absolutely needed – maybe three or four times the whole journey. I did not want to scare anyone. It seemed to me that an old man with a heavy pack walking in the middle of the daytime was an interesting peculiarity to any passerby. In fact, in rural areas, I often came to a café to find that townspeople had been talking about me for days – and were glad to meet the peculiar old man. The same thing at night would seem sinister and scary. But there was another, strategic reason. That I walked openly said to most that I meant no one any harm. That I did so with confidence suggested it might be dangerous to provoke me. A fellow I met in Houston was working security in advance

My friend, James, the former drill instructor who I met in Houston.

My friend, James, the former drill instructor who I met in Houston.

of the Fourth of July. I had walked up the stairway from the Buffalo Bayou into a great park. When I got to the top, there was this cool artistic metal gating that was made to resemble canoes and paddles, so I pulled out my camera to get a picture. Afterwards, I went to sit on a bench. The security guard, about my age, came over and struck up a conversation. Turns out he was former Marine Drill Instructor. He astonished me after we got to know each other a little by saying, “As soon as I saw you I knew you were someone I didn’t want to have to mess with.” I asked him why, I am an easy-going fellow. He replied that those steps up from the bayou are so steep he got winded when coming up them anytime:

The canoe gate I was taking a picture of when I met the security guard, James.

The canoe gate I was taking a picture of when I met the security guard, James.

when he saw me come up with that loaded pack on my back and immediately turn to take a few pictures rather than sit down and catch my breath, he figured I must be tough as nails. I laughed and said when you walk 15 miles a day with it, you adjust. Walk as children of the daylight and with confidence. Your confidence is not ill-founded.

I do not know what dire situations you may encounter as you go. I told you about the guy who followed me into the woods with a gun. That was nowhere near the most dire situation I faced. It doesn’t even rank among the top three, though it probably makes the top five. There was once I really did not think I was going to make it. I have never discussed it with anyone – even my son – because it was my own stupidity that got me into it. Thanks be to God, He carried through me an hour and a half in which any false move would have resulted, at best, in a quick death and at worst, a slow, lingering one. My walking chant was my Rosary. Understand, my private Rosary is absurdly complicated. Each decade I pray has around 300 specific intentions attached to it. Ah, how generous I was in sharing my wealth of prayer on that journey…on behalf of everyone I met, old schools chums I had not seen from first grade. I even had the weirdest feeling once that I should offer up a decade for the old country-western singer Patsy Cline (who I am indifferent to), that she only needed a few prayers to get out of purgatory. So I did. I was a spiritual Midas for a time. And though I had not publicly discussed it with any but my priests at the time, any time I was faced with a serious challenge or danger, I took a moment to say The Prayer of Miraculous Trust. These were my armor, my sword and my shield as I walked. It was far more difficult than I ever let on to anyone, but far more beautiful and joyous than I will ever be able to describe. But from the beginning I walked with the confidence of one who trusts that God is nearby. He sustained me through (mostly) ordinary miracles. My confidence was not misplaced and neither will yours be if you must go.

Born Free

Many ask me what provisions God has made for those who are infirm, or handicapped or require regular medical attention. He has a plan for such: it is you. I know people want some miraculous exemption, but that is not the plan. No created being knew the certainty of God better than Our Lady, Holy Mary. But when she heard that her cousin Elizabeth had a potentially dangerous late-in-life pregnancy, though she was pregnant herself, she got up and made her way through the hill country to help. In the Annunciation, Mary knew when to leave the details to God. In the Visitation, she knew when to act, understanding that we are the primary instruments through which God accomplishes His will. Her Visitation was not a lack of faith that God would provide, but humble obedience that she was called to be part of His plan to provide for Elizabeth. Mary was full of grace. May we all have a double measure of her grace, to know when to be still and when to act. We are the ones who, in our disobedience and arrogant vanity, have brought this Storm on. Now, we are being given the great grace of being God’s plan. Go forth.

We have assessed things wrongly. We think a child or a handicapped person is a burden to be borne, an expense to cover. But through the instrument of the Storm, we will begin again to see things in their proper order. Money and time are all passing away…like so much costume jewelry. Children, the handicapped, the needy, will soon no longer be seen as a burden, but as a particularly intense blessing. Providing for them, caring for them, will be seen as what it really is: a way to encounter God and lay up treasure in heaven, treasure that will not pass away, but will last. I tell you that soon communities that are not blessed with a handicapped person to care for or children will seek them out, groaning in grief until they find them. Care for them as best you can. And when you are in need, accept with grace, gratitude and docility the efforts of others to help you. Do not let your pride rob them of the treasure they are trying to lay up in heaven. Where your efforts and the efforts of doctors who found their way to your enclave fall short, invoke God through the Prayer of Miraculous Trust, giving yourself over in trust to Him. You will see miracles. When you do, give thanks. You will see others that it pleases God to call home to Him. When He does, immediately begin asking for their intercession, to help you from heaven to endure.

That is what your duty and your calling is; to endure. Endure and help others to endure. Just a generation hence, people will look back in astonishment at our age and how degenerate we had become. In three generations, people will be more ashamed to find a director of Planned Parenthood in their family tree than to find a slave trader. Ten generations from now, people will look at us as some sort of primitive race, almost alien in our routine barbarity and emptiness. But if anyone from that age happens to read this, I plead with you to look deeply, for we are not aliens: we are you. We, all of us, are always the ones who killed Christ. It is never those “others who are not like us.” I plead with you because when we humbly know that, we do well. When we start to think we have figured it out, that we have got it, that is when we start heading downhill. For any who might read this in the future, it is critically important that you keep this ever recollected, for after this Storm, the next time there is a mass falling away, there will be no rescue, only the end of days.

For those of us at the precipice of this great ledge in history right now, let us act with the sure knowledge that, 500 years from now, some wise man will stand before a great judicial hall of our age and say to a companion, “I look upon this hall where the secular forces that taught it was a woman’s right to execute her child, that any who held fast to the Christian definition of marriage must be deprived of their property and work and jailed, that all knees must bend to the whims of the state and I ask, ‘Where are their successors?’ But if you want to see the successors of the remnant who kept faith during that terrible winter of the soul, all you need do is look at their smiling faces all around you and hear the laughter of the children they have borne through the ages.”

Endure. Wait on the Lord and He will strengthen your heart. Endure, I say, endure.

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
This entry was posted in Preparation, Solidarity, The Storm and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

356 Responses to Whatcha Gonna Do When They Come for You (Part 2)

  1. Mary Ann says:

    Re: boots. Waterproof or not?

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    • charliej373 says:

      Mine were not waterproof, but there are times I wished they were. In Dallas one day, after being flooded out of three areas of shelter the previous night, I accidentally left behind something essential. I ended up walking 12 additional miles with seven bad blisters on my feet to get it. It was the most agonizingly painful day I had. When your feet and shoes are soaked through and you must walk, you will develop very painful blisters. Thanks be to God, I was able to rest all day the next day.

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      • Catma27 says:

        I was thinking that on the spiritual plane the most important thing is to be steeped in THE WORD OF GOD! We must know HIS PROMISES and PRAISE HIM AND THANK HIM IN ALL THINGS! Our faith will see us through no matter what ! And we can take the next right step!

        Liked by 1 person

      • CrewDog says:

        Don’t buy insulated boots ’cause when they get wet (feet sweat) they are hard to dry out and and in cold weather can lead to frostbite/trench foot. The Air Force found this out the hard way when they issued us cold weather insulated flying boots (very nice and expensive) but a problem if ya had to bail-out! Get good wool blend socks and foot powder! I think some of the ladies here have been stocking up on deodorant and toothpaste … BO and bad breath might be the least of our problems!!

        GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

        Liked by 2 people

          • Lin says:

            Wow, great info, CrewDog! Thanks for posting!

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          • Mona says:

            I just baught Asolo hiking boots on the internet. But I think it would be more apropriate to by a snorkle and swimmfeets. Denmark is a very flat country whith a lot of water around it. I fear a tsunami of big dimentions. Denmark was the first,country, as far as I know, having free rights to get abortions for all. It was in the early 70 ths. I fear that Denmark are going to be punished seveely.
            Mona

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          • Mick says:

            Mona, may God bless and protect you and your family.

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        • Barbara Dore says:

          bread soda will do!

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          • marie says:

            Mona, I have also contemplated a tsunami-type disaster in Denmark, given the very flat terrain we have here. You are right about the abortion mentality. It is fully ingrained in the minds of the population that it is just another part of the ‘health care’ service.

            Thanks for the tip about getting Asolo hiking boots on the internet. I actually don’t know of any proper outdoor activities shop in the country, do you?

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          • marie says:

            sorry… I meant to write “abortion has been around for so long and freely available in every hospital that it has become fully ingrained in the minds of the population that it’s just another part of the ‘health care’ service …”

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          • Mick says:

            Marie. prayers for you and your family, and for all of Charlie’s “family” who live outside of the United States.

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          • marie says:

            Thanks for your prayers, Mick. I also pray for you and everyone on this blog every day. I’ll include your dad in my Rosary this evening. God bless you, everyone here and all those in our territories of souls.

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          • Mick says:

            Thank you, Marie.

            I love your name. It was my grandmother’s name, it’s the name I took when I was confirmed. It’s also part of my daughter’s name (Anne-Marie).

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    • Lisa says:

      Hello Charlie,
      Over the past several years I have felt the Holy Spirit has been guiding me in subtle ways and putting tasks on my heart to prepare myself and my family for upcoming trials. I have at times been mocked but really feel God is working through my obedience, so that I may assist and be hope to others during the trials we will face. I have a sense that our hope will be a temporary refuge for many for a unknown period of time and that the Blessed Mother showed me through a dream to encircle our small acrage with blessed salt and to have faith in her shielding mantle of protection. I also have sensed that at some point myself and my family would have to flee on foot. I have yet to fully understand where we must go but feel confident we will know the time and the direction. The next right step is to continue to grow in prayer and love, so I am better able to share and spread this beautiful message of Divine Mercy in this extrordinary year! I am so excited about this beautiful plan of love and mercy that God has for us. I am so excited for a renewal of this evil and suffering world we live in. I rejoice and thank God that I have been chosen to live in this time and I pray that I am open and strengthened every extra day that we are given in this time of His mercy. I too have endured great suffering that seems never should have happend and did not make sense. I realize now that it was and attack from satan and that through that battle I came out victorious with God’s guidance and constant strength. I know God used my suffering to purify me and I will be able to look back on that suffering and battle while in the midst of future battles again, and have hope in victory again.
      I very much enjoy reading your articles and doing word searches of items on my mind then reading about what you have written about these wors in the past. I have discovered little tidbits of knowledge here and there like what items I should add to my backpack or what direction God may be directing us to flee on foot when that day is made known. I am very excited about the recent reading of the Shrine that will be built at Mt. Meeker. Having just been led to your blog about 6 months ago, I hadn’t heard mention of the shrine in recent articles. I have found so much information in word searches and reading comments that I always advise people to be sure to read the comments when I share with them your blog. Thank you Charlie for being a faithful servant of Christ and bringing hope and guidance to myself and others.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Dorothy says:

    Charlie
    I am a nurse working in nursing home with elderly… Do I guard my post ?
    I have a family too…
    If.we all leave what will happened to the sick and hospital bound ?

    I thank you for your post and all the valuable and practical advise but still in my heart
    I just cannot comprehend all that is ahead of us
    You have seen the future so it is a bit easier for you …

    I am preparing meal, baking a banana bread .. It is such a beautiful day
    I look at my plants( Io e gardening so much) listen to birds look at my pets
    And truly tears come to my eyes .
    Is this really last “normal ” summer… ???
    My house has a generator when we moved in here 5 years ago I jokingly said if
    Electricity is out I can cook for whole neiberhood.
    I wAs born in Poland, every year we would go on the pilgrimage to see miraculous
    Picture of Black Madonna in Czestochowa. We would walk 40 km per day for 7 days
    It was truly very hard for a lot of people .. The love for our Lady carried us trough but it was phisically very hard!!!
    If we have to walk to escape how do we know were to stop were is the safe place .. I guess angels will guide us ! Charlie what you are telling us is sad very sad ….

    Suddenly Mark Mallett, john Martinez and others are stressing the urgency that I guess it really shook me so much!!!
    Mark Mallett is talking about the demon of fear .. (Read his last posting)
    What if we all get attacked and misinterpret true God’s voice due to panic and fear
    Am I going to be strong enough for people around me, specially when there is always disagreement with the spouse, kids misbehaving …
    Charlie thanks for trying to warn us but maybe only truly holly people will be
    Able to make it so the new era will be Holly without sin.
    Maybe we have to prepare for death ….

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    • charliej373 says:

      Dorothy, it is ordinary people who will make it. If you are overcome by fear, trust God anyway and He will lead you unknowing through the forest of that fear. Faith is an act of the will, which is why I emphasize taking the next right step.

      Always take care of your family first: they are souls given into your care for a time by God, Himself. But begin to contemplate and work on plans for the patients in your nursing home. I don’t have answers, but you are right there and if you put your mind and heart to it, you will be surprised at some of the practical inspirations that will rise in you.

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    • Petra says:

      Dorothy, you’ve given me an idea. I live in a large city (Chicago) and I sure don’t want to go to a relocation center, and I don’t know if I’d be able to escape to a rural area in time, but your post got me thinking — if I can’t get away, maybe I’ll walk myself over to a nursing home (I can think of a Catholic one and a Lutheran one, each within a mile of my house) and volunteer to care for the elderly. Surely they are not going to try to evacuate nursing homes or people who are working there, because of the level of care needed for the patients, and I have tons of experience having taken care of my paralyzed mom for 15 years in her home. Although I have no formal training, I know a lot about wheelchairs, and bed sores and positioning and swallow problems and incontinence and even a little about suctioning and feeding tubes, and am not shy about getting my hands dirty. So, maybe that’s where I need to be, and if others run for refuge, or are taken away, I’ll be needed as a kind of nurses aide.
      I think I’d feel safe and happy there – doing what I know how to do and not being corralled, as long as martial law doesn’t include extermination of those who can’t help themselves. Oh my! Lord, have mercy!

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Bob says:

    I suppose we should all add more brisk walking to our schedule. if the storm comes we will be glad we did and if Charlie is just a crazy old cote we will still feel better about it. A win either way!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Charlie, what religious things did you bring w you on your pilgrimage? (I.e., Bible, Rosary, scapular, holy water, etc). Thx!!

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    • charliej373 says:

      I brought my Bible, of course my Scapular, I have almost always used my hands for my Rosary – a decade of fingers, you know, and it is always with you. One couple from Sulfur, Louisiana, gave me a beautiful Rosary he made by hand – and I have kept that. Most Rosaries I get I gave away to someone I think might get use out of it. I also had several religious books…writings of various saints and solid biographies. For Holy Water, it was fairly cool. I put some in one of my water bottles…and as I always topped it off whenever I could, there was always a little there. When I would get to a Catholic Church, I would add a little more. That was about it…though I know I had a few prayer cards with me, too. I like to keep my devotions simple and few – as my favorite devotion is to do.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. diane says:

    Charlie,
    Because God’s has different plans for each of us, because He has created us in a unique fashion, and He knows our needs, and knows what our weaknesses are and our surroundings, and those in our care. Who else can we turn to? I have no clue how to pack back – I’m in a tropicla city, with aligators and hot humid weather. If I go South I’m in the Keyes if I go North I’ve got a lot of Everglades to get through, if I go East I’m in the ocean and if I go West – more Everglades and then the Gulf – Feeling kind of trapped here in South Florida. Plus my husband ain’t gonna go no where. But i’m thinking that maybe I can get a few things ready for my kids who may be more inclined to hike and back pack. – I’m just kicking this idea around – i’d would almost want them to take a hike (ha ha) than to hang around with an angry dad and a mom that is practicing taking the next right step. I’d rather pray them away then to have them panic. I don’t think I could keep my husband and 5 children calm enough to understand that God is in the midst of all that is happening.
    Wow – this is just blowing me away.
    But God is my God and He will continue to be my God.
    Love. I do.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Well, Diane, I will be in Fort Lauderdale in June for a meeting and presentation – and you will certainly find some friends there. In fact, one of the reasons I am plotting out monthly trips is not so much so people can visit with me and me with them, but so they can find people who live right around them who will become their support network. And who knows…one of the men who has become one of my most steadfast helps around Denver, originally came to hear me under protest. As he told his wife, “I don’t want to go listen to some slick huckster peddling Armageddon.” While there, he got chills several times and told his wife in hushed wonder on the way home, “This guy is the real thing.” That happens frequently when someone stumbles upon the site expecting doom and gloom and overheated apocalyptic fantasies – and finds what is actually here, instead. Don’t press, but you may want to record the talk and conversation if you come. Don’t blame people for an aversion to this. They are right…most who speak of such things are not grounded in the ordinary and are taken with flights of overheated dark fantasies.

      Liked by 3 people

      • diane says:

        I am glad you will be in Fort Lauderdale – and i will be grateful to meet others with the same faith walk.
        I have had a tough week since Easter – I seem to be dodging grenades constantly. Mark Mallet had a good writing today. He heard the Lord tell him to keep going and yesterday I asked the same question and i heard the Lord tell me to keep plowing through. One step at a time, sometimes it feels like I’m walking in the dark, in quick drying cement. Rough week spiritually.
        I will continue to pray for you all –
        God Bless you.

        Liked by 1 person

      • malachi99 says:

        This is undoubtedly the very thing that sets you apart from the moon bats, doom sayers, and indeed the well intentioned but equally ungrounded peddlers of apocalyptic tales from the crypt. Your wicked sense of humour, your love for the ordinary, your prudence, wisdom, and focus on the simple every day things that real flesh and blood men and women face is not to be found anywhere. Your mission is indeed unique and I am now beginning to see much more clearly why you mentioned that it was indeed unparalleled in salvation history. Time will tell but i’d be willing to wager the house, wife, and kids 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • charliej373 says:

          Thanks, Malachi. It is always heartening to see when God does something new. It can be more than a bit unsettling to be the new thing He is doing. I often tell people that the only thing wicked about God is His sense of humor. I hope the same can be said of me.

          Liked by 2 people

    • Janet M says:

      Diane, just a thought for where to send your kids (or yourself and your husband, if he becomes willing)…from your description of where you live, you may not be terribly far from Ave Maria. There are some pretty terrific people there, and I wouldn’t be surprised if towns like that take people in. You and your family can certainly find a way to serve other refugees there, if indeed others come to take refuge there. It’s also a great place to pray for the rest of us.

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  6. marie says:

    Charlie, I know that Europe is not your purview, but do you have any advice for us? You have mentioned the threat from militant Islamists in our countries. While the idea of being rounded up by governmental authorities is certainly repugnant, the alternative of being at the mercy of jihadist ISIS-style militants makes me shudder. Any general words of wisdom will be appreciated, thanks.

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    • charliej373 says:

      You are right, Marie. I do think of Europe, but America is always right before me. I will contemplate your situation a little. You have the problem that your leaders have opened the door wide to the external threat, which is now right on top of you. You can give thanks that Jihadists consider you neither “the Great Satan” or “the Little Satan,” so you are not as important a target to them. Unfortunately, you are a lot softer target for them even than we are with this administration laying out the welcome mat. It may be to your advantage that your leaders have been so feckless for so long…when events decisively prove statists and leftists wrong, they often react with an emotionally-driven harshness, so they may react to any serious provocation with more dispatch than we would in the states. Alas, a leftist publicly humiliated by being wrong is often as irrational as a woman scorned, so they can react with scorched earth rage. I will have to contemplate this from a tactical and strategic standpoint a bit…and that could take a few weeks.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Mick says:

        “As irrational as a woman scorned”? Why, you… you… you genderist! 🙂 (The Left makes up stupid-sounding, insulting terms all the time; so I thought I’d have a little fun and try my hand at it.How’d I do?)

        Liked by 3 people

        • charliej373 says:

          You’re pretty good at it, Mick! Sure you’re not a reformed leftist?

          Liked by 2 people

          • Mick says:

            Shhhh… you’ll blow my “cover”! 🙂

            I gotta say, though, there are few things more irritating than being mistaken for a leftist; unless, perhaps, it’s being mistaken for a Muslim. Let me explain.

            In late 2007 I had a lady that I barely knew run up to me after Mass and say, “You must be so excited! How will you decide whom to vote for in the primaries?” I looked at her, I’m sure with a stunned and rather stupid expression on my face, and asked what she was referring to. She responded, “Hillary or Obama? How will you pick which one to vote for?” Because OBVIOUSLY if you’re a black woman, you’re going to be seriously conflicted over whether to vote for the first black to be a serious presidential contender, or the first woman to be a serious presidential contender, right?. Never mind that both are progressive, freedom-hating, pro-abortion, left-wing wack jobs.

            However, this experience caught me less flatfooted than the time I was mistaken for a Muslim four times in the same day, in my Midwestern hometown with a population of only 30,000. This was in 2002, I think. I used to love to wear silk headscarves because I think they’re pretty. Well, I was home from California in order to bring my two kiddos to visit Grandma and Grandpa. I was going to run some errands, so I put a scarf on my head and prepared to walk out the door. My mom looked at me and said, “You can’t wear that; people will think you’re a Muslim.” I laughed and told her that there was no way that that was going to happen in Jackson, Michigan. I mean, it wasn’t Dearborn, so what’s the big deal? As usual, I should have listened to Mom. In two hours of running errands, I had three different men approach me and ask me if I were Muslim; and a fourth man said “Salaam” as he passed me on the sidewalk (I’m not sure how to spell it, but I knew that it was the Muslim greeting meaning “peace”). I should note that none of these men was Middle-Eastern; they were black. I should also note that that was the last time I wore a silk headscarf in public.

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            Condescending assumptions by people of identity politics is both irritating – and sometimes hilarious. In 2008 I was the regular panelist on a Sunday night show on WLS Radio in Chicago. One evening, the guest panelists were the communications director for the Cook County Board President – a black guy, and the chief lobbyist for the abortion industry in the state – a dweeby little white guy. At one point, I said something about “black folks” and the white guy interrupted me solicitously to say, “You mean African-American.” I hotly told him, “No, I mean black. I have a black son-in-law and two bi-racial grandchildren. Black folks are my family and I’ll call my family what I want. How many black relatives do you have?” The white guy literally cringed while the black guy’s mike had to be cut off for a minute: he had erupted into gales of laughter. After the show, he asked me to join him for a cup of coffee. We laughed, but he told me seriously that he was sick to death of “oh-so-sensitive” white guys condescending to him.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Mick says:

            Love it, Charlie! You’re my kind of people.

            And since you mentioned radio, I have a question for you: Do you ever do radio guest appearances regarding the topics we discuss here? I ask because we have two Catholic radio stations (that I know of) in southern lower Michigan: Good Shepherd Catholic Radio in Jackson, and Ave Maria Radio in Ann Arbor. When you’re in Michigan in September, would you be open to doing some radio? I know a guy that works for Ave Maria, and I know several of the Board of Directors at Good Shepherd. So if that’s something that you’d be up for, I could make some calls, if you like.

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          • charliej373 says:

            Oh sure. One fellow had asked me, was going to get back to me and never did. Microphones make me about as nervous as water makes ducks. It has kind of been my element.

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          • Mick says:

            Well then, let me know at what point I can place some calls (I suppose you’ll have to firm up yourtravel plans first, no?). I hope you’re able to make your trip here before all the stuff hits the fan.

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      • Lilia Florentiae says:

        Please I also would appreciate some ad vice for europeans. In Italy we are reached daily by boats full of immigrants. Political parties have opposite views. EU is almost inert. Some boats sink. It is difficult to know what to do. Thanks anyway for what you do for us. You are in my prayers.

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        • charliej373 says:

          Lilia, I know I need to speak more directly to Europeans on these subjects. I am thinking hard about it and I will soon. But as one reader wryly observed a few days back, it will come in CST – Charlie Standard Time – which is a rather mercurial thing. But I hear you and I take it very seriously.

          Like

      • marie says:

        Thank you, Charlie, for this reply. Please don’t feel, however, that you need to write a separate article for us non-Americans. You have already given us very sound guidance and I know you have more than enough on your plate. Besides, as you have pointed out to readers in the USA, we will all face different situations: some will need to flee, some will be rounded up, some will stay put. I think we can all move forward doing the best we can if we follow what you have already written regarding the various scenarios and, above all, your advice of ‘Acknowledge God, take the next right step, be a sign of hope to those around you’.

        Since I seldom comment, please allow me here to thank you once more for all that you are doing through this blog. It was a turning point in my life the day I followed Mark Mallett’s recommendation to read your writings. Thank you and may God bless you.

        I have also become very fond of many of your commenters, too many to mention by name. I don’t know if I will make it through the coming storm, but whatever happens, I hope to meet all of you one day on the other side. It will be a joyous reunion 🙂

        Let us pray for each other as we all go forward to face the greatest storm in the history of mankind.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. deaconmnrick says:

    Here are some resources people can use to help be better prepared in the physical sense. I don’t have any affiliation with these sites. The first would be the book series 299 Days, http://www.299days.com/. The author wrote a 10 volume series about a collapse in this country that is believable, and provides lots of good information on what people can do during a collapse. A second good resource is Chris Martinson and his site, http://www.peakprosperity.com/. He has a lot of free material and also sells subscriptions to access the rest of the material. I do have a subscription and find the information he provides to be of great value. The last one is The Survival Podcast, not what you would think by the title, http://www.thesurvivalpodcast.com/. Jack is a libertarian, but spends most of the podcasts helping people find ways to live a more sustainable lifestyle.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Michelle says:

    Who is this John Martinez, to whom a couple of people have referred?

    Like

  9. Karen D. says:

    Catma27, more on the Word of God – last week in response to a comment here I googled “Do whatever he tells you” to get the Cana Wedding bible reference and surprise, surprise – the phrase came up in the Old Testament too. In response to Pharaoh’s dream, Joseph prepared for famine in the good times and when it hit Pharaoh told the Egyptians and the ‘whole world’ to go to Joseph and “Do whatever he tells you”!

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Karen D. says:

    Charlie, thank you for both parts of this possible scenario. We are all in a huge variety of current situations and God is able to speak to each of those situations even if it is only in one particular phrase of your writings, so thank you. Now before the Feast of Pentecost we should pray earnestly for the gifts of the Holy Spirit to be poured out in abundance so that we are equipped according to His Plan for each of us, wherever we are situated, geographically and family-wise. God bless.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Sr Lorraine says:

    I live in a large community and I have no idea what God will ask of us as the Storm fully breaks. Somehow I can’t imagine the senior sisters backpacking through the woods with their walkers! But God leads us in different ways. Recently I felt the nudge to go through my things and downsize a lot. I gave away some things I had collected to prepare for the Storm, and it seemed like the right thing to do. When I collected them I think I was acting more out of a fearful spirit, dreading whatever the Storm might bring. Now I just feel much more peaceful about it.
    The most important thing is spiritual preparation. On Pelianito’s blog she just had a message about how so many special graces are available to us now because of the significant times we are living in. The Year of Mercy has got to be among them. I suspect that if the collapse comes by the late summer or early fall, by December 8 people will be seeking God’s mercy. It will be a very propitious time for grace.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Sr Lorraine says:

      PS I’m not suggesting that others should give away what they have collected to prepare materially. God leads each one of us differently.

      Like

      • kathy kalina says:

        Sr. Lorraine;

        I think it’s very likely that you gathered those things because they would be needful for someone else! I believe that everything I’ve gathered is for others, and might or might not be used by me.

        Like

        • kathy kalina says:

          Also, it could be that your community will be a place of refuge. I’m remembering a story about St. Claire, who turned back pillaging savages from her monastery by exposing the Blessed Sacrament in a monstrance to bar their entrance (and it worked!)

          Liked by 1 person

  12. Jean says:

    Charlie and to all:

    I didn’t get through the entire comment section but noticed a lot of conversation about what to pack. In case it wasn’t mentioned, I want to suggest one cheap and easy item that will keep your sleeping bag dry when you are sleeping (dew can soak a sleeping bag quickly). Go to a nearby storage unit and buy a plastic single bed mattress sleeve. I don’t know what they are called, but an entire single mattress can fit in them. I used one when I went to Europe and camped out in Germany. Germany has soaking wet dew in the morning but I was as dry as ever. Would not go anywhere camping outdoors without one.

    Like

    • Petra says:

      Yeah, that’s a waterproof mattress cover. You can get them at places like Target, Bed Bath and Beyond, or Walmart or online at lots of places for at little as $10. Thanks for the idea.

      Like

      • Jean says:

        Well, I’m not referring to the covers that slip on a mattress and go under your sheet. I mean a heavy duty plastic sleeve for storage (you may mean the same thing). The top is open and does not zip closed.

        Either way, keep in mind that a child could smother in a sleeping bag enclosed in plastic.

        Like

  13. Barb Watry says:

    May God bless all here! I pray every day for all of you, those who only read and those who comment.
    I have been wanting to join in the conversation, but I am struggling with what I want to say. I can so identify with many of the other commenters… Sue and thePhoenix, particularly resonated with me, but others as well.
    Last year, I had the feeling that by Thanksgiving (November) of this year (2015) I would not be where I currently am (Denver, CO area). I didn’t know whether that meant not in CO, in a different place in CO or back where my family is… in Wisconsin. I still don’t. But now I don’t know if I am supposed to leave at all.
    Charlie, this post and part 1, did not “concern” me or cause me worry. I don’t know if that means I am in denial or not. I sometimes think that if I ignore things I don’t like, they won’t happen or will go away.
    Next week I turn 60 years old and will be retiring from my job of 29 years (I commented this on a post several weeks ago). If the Storm were not here, I would be fine for the rest of my life.
    I know that if my retirement savings are going to be gone, I should purchase some of the items mentioned in your post and what some of the commenters have mentioned… but for some reason I am reluctant. It concerns me that I don’t even seem to want to be prepared, just in case. Normally that is my mode of thinking.
    Please pray for me that I can hear the Lord’s whispers to me, about His purpose for this part of my life. I intend to start my days of retirement spending more time with Him in my parish’s adoration chapel. I will bring you Charlie, your family, and all those here, with me, as I hope to learn at His feet.

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      Again, Barb, different people are called to different things. The important thing is that you follow faithfully where you are called to.

      Like

    • Anne says:

      Thank you Barb…. We all sure need your prayers .good use of your time.

      Like

    • jobrower says:

      Thank you Barb. We are blessed to have Perpetual Adoration at the Cathedral here in Las Cruces NM where I live and I am blessed to be able to be there an hour before Mass every weekday morning except Friday. I have mentioned before that, as of now, I know I will most likely be remaining where I am because I will not abandon my husband who is paralyzed on his right side and unable to flee on foot. As Crew Dog says so often….”GOD SAVE ALL HERE.”

      P.S. Charlie, I purchased several Prayer of Miraculous Trust cards and am leaving them in the Adoration Chapel, one or two at a time.

      Liked by 1 person

      • charliej373 says:

        I hope to get it more widely disbursed. I will be passing them out at every event I go to around the country beginning this summer. Obviously it has stood me in good stead – calmed me and reminded me of Who is in charge regardless of outcomes and sustained me through my pilgrimage across the nation. It will be a great help in the times we face.

        Liked by 2 people

  14. Sr Lorraine says:

    One material prep that may be overlooked is to throw out all your junk now, while we still have regular garbage collection. We might need to make use of extra space to help others in the Storm. After the collapse it will be harder to get rid of junk and it can accumulate fast. I’ve been doing this for some time now in our large convent and I didn’t need to convince my superior that the Storm is coming to get permission!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Bob says:

      And with us planning to move to get closer to family I am doing the same. It takes having to move stuff to make me ask if I really need it and with that I fear it will take a storm to really help me simplify.

      Like

    • diane says:

      Sr. Lorraine,
      I have thought about the idea that we may not have garbage colleciton – and instead have infestaions of critters – I will start cleaning up our garage and take some things to the trash mountain in our community. Good idea.
      God Bless you all – stay close to the Heart of Christ – so close that He gives you His and in return He takes yours.

      Like

  15. Mary-Louise says:

    Charlie,
    I wish you were coming to New England soon because there is someone in Maine who is a kindred spirit. She underwent her own Great Storm, and came out the other side with miraculous faith.
    Her name is Ann Marie Schmidt. She is a survivor of Auschwitz and also a Soviet prison camp. She grew up in an aristocratic family in Czechoslovakia; her father was a friend of the young John Paul II. She fought in the resistance. After the war she was rescued by American soldiers and became an interpreter at the Nuremberg trials; she married an American officer. Years ago she had a show on EWTN, and she still has a retreat ministry. (You can hear a 5-minute excerpt of her story at Lighthouse Media: http://www.lighthousecatholicmedia.org/store/title/to-hell-and-back-divine-love-and-the-cross-1)
    I feel she has been a sherpa to many people in the lead-up period to our Storm, because she talks about survival under the harshest conditions. She has also seen what is coming for many years. She told a friend of mine not to give up a rural home and move closer to her children, because her children and grandchildren would flee the city and return to her.

    Like

  16. Bob says:

    As for LED lights when I hunt I use headlights which you can get at any sporting goods or big box store. I like them as I can carry my rifle and other items and not have to hold the light. Also our Friend Mark Mallott in his last post seemed to sense economic collapse coming in Sept. He seemed to be reading the signs with possible prophetic sense too but I am not sure. In his April 21 entry but my work computer won’t allow me to post the link. I got here early today!

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      They are certainly good and bright, but require a lot of energy and are bulky. I would not take them on a journey whose end I could not be certain of.

      Like

      • Bob says:

        Check it out. I just bought a small one from Cabellas which weighs about an ounce or 2. It is true the older ones were heavier. The good small ones cost a bit more but I find them useful for hands free. I would carry 2 lights but as I once was a caver we always carried extra, at least 3 into a cave. And we had those old “Justrite” carbide headlights which were just “wrong” especially when one caught fire on my hard hat!

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          Oh wow, Bob, I had no idea. I stand corrected on the bulk and weight issue. How are they on energy use – a truly vital concern for a long-term trek?

          Like

          • Bob says:

            LEDs and most use 3 AAA batteries. They vary based on how bright they are. Some have low and high power options. Mine last awhile for a year or so until they get dim but I only use them for hunting, checking car fluids or other night work.

            Like

  17. Patricia says:

    Charlie,
    I have been reading about Jade Helm for awhile and with family in Texas I think about it a lot. A thought came to me at Mass this morning after reading Deacon John earlier: Is it possible that the troops which are already there in many cities of Texas will be used to fight the ISSI camps which we have been told are 8 miles from the US border? Clearly, there are “allowed” to be there or we would have taken them out already. This would then allow martial law in the ” hostile” state of Texas and it would fulfill the elements of the dream that a well-known minister had recently. He said that he saw the entire southwest over run with Islamist terrorists. Red flag event from start to finish.
    What do you think?

    Like

  18. Mary-Louise says:

    Charlie,
    OFF TOPIC. President Obama announced this morning that Warren Weinstein was killed in a drone strike in January. I want to thank you again for asking all your readers to pray for him. I felt a strong prompting to pray for him before I wrote you about him, and I offered my Divine Mercy novena for his this year. My daughter has told Warren’s family that people have been praying for him, and I hope that gives them some comfort. Apparently the Weinsteins are upset at the way the administration handled his captivity and relations with the family. (In a news story, http://www.nationaljournal.com/white-house/white-house-three-americans-killed-in-counterterrorism-operations-20150423)

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      I have cringed as I watch our nation coddle enemies and toss friends to the wolves. I remember, as a boy, when evildoers specifically avoided Americans for fear of the sure and certain retaliation that would come. Now we are their favorite targets – and government toadies try to tell us we should accept these things in stride. I hope the Weinstein family finds peace and resolve.

      Like

  19. Kris says:

    Sister Lorraine , I like your comments and I think I like your superior!!! God bless you. I am so used to religious that don’t seem to have a clue to anything except getting more money from the government. Not that I am going to point fingers. It is just nice to see a religious actually talking with radical trust in the good God. Blessings.

    Like

  20. Jennifer says:

    I agree with Sr. Lorraine.The spirital prep is first and this year of mercy is providential. I do have two questions for anyone who can help. One is why the time frame of this September or fall? Several other sorces point to this. Second question I did not see covered by Charlie was the question of food. What did you bring? Did you forage?
    Blessings to all

    Like

  21. Bob says:

    Dry stuff.
    When I used to canoe I would use ammo boxes which is not practical for backpacking but for smaller must keep dry items I have found small plastic bottles with screw on lids to be effective and cheap.

    Like

  22. Mary N says:

    Paracord is great stuff! My husband makes paracord wrist bands, keychains, etc…
    The bracelets and keychains can be taken apart so that a person always has rope handy (it’s very strong). I even use it for trellises in my garden and to train young apple trees. Paracord can also be separated into individual strands to use as fishing line.

    Your words to future generations touched me deeply, as did your words in the entire Born Free section. May future generations learn from what happened here and may they truly understand your words “we are you” because the minute pride and arrogance sets in as it has in our century it’s all downhill from there. The people of this era forgot they needed saving.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      My son is a huge paracord fan, too. He makes all sorts if things with it, too. Made all sorts of paracord accessories with a bunch of his cop buddies for an ongoing fundraiser for a disabled cop.

      Like

  23. anne ovari says:

    Not sure of the time difference but I hope it’s still the 23rd so I can wish you a very HAPPY BIRTHDAY! CrewDog. May God bless you and thank you for your steadfastness in the Faith.☺

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Alphonsus says:

    I’ve been rattling around in my head the idea of having to leave the home to escape. It took me a while, but I finally identified a place closely by enough to walk to if necessary in an emergency. It’s an untended 160 acre ranch that recently was donated to my employing institution. It’s only a 30 minute highway drive away. I spoke today to a couple of field biologists who have spent some time there. Turns out the ranch is Rattlesnake Headquarters – and I do mean Headquarters. The minority snake population is a healthy mass of copperheads, too, with some cottonmouths mixed in.

    I’m guessing that all those snakes are not living off of nature’s version of the government dole, so there has to be a lot of rodents to support them because the aggressive feral hogs there are too large for an average dine-alone snake meal. I once saw a startled rodent run up a kid’s pant leg when I opened the door to go out from a building while the kid coming in held it for me. It wasn’t pretty.

    Apparently at this ranch there also is a stock tank where frogs easily can be caught if you have the skill to do so. Those would be worth competing for with a hungry pit viper in the dark, no doubt.

    So, I think my calling during a collapse is just to lay in supplies and hunker down at home with the family. Unless God shows me a better way than what I have been able to devise on my own with this ranch scenario.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Of course, it could be very intimidating right now to ne’er-do-wells if you told them cheerily, “If things go south, I’m heading to the safety of the snake farm!”

      Like

      • Alphonsus says:

        That’s an idea, Charlie. I also thought maybe I could turn the tables a bit on that situation and pack a rattlesnake cookbook.

        Like

  25. cathryn7 says:

    It’s plain to me that some of those animals were angels sent to protect you along the way. That’s why they weren’t acting like “animals.” I got a flashlight that is charge by solar light or even house light, with backup battery. I feel this is best for a long camping trip. Regular batteries do go dead after a while. We could be hiding out for 3 years.

    Like

  26. maureen says:

    I read the post from Mary-Louise that talks about Ann Marie Schmidt. I have been attending her retreats in Kennebunkport Maine for the last three years. I will be there next weekend for another one. We are from central MA (Milford). Looking forward to you coming out this way in July Charlie! We have a large community who is also eager to meet you!
    I totally agree with you Mary-Louise; Ann Marie is another Sherpa for Jesus’ people! It has been easier for me to digest all that Charlie shares with us, since she has also been guiding us to prepare for the storm. Your messages align! Will you be in Kennebunkport next weekend Mary-Louise?.

    Like

  27. Ann says:

    The technology to remotely disable cars has been around for years. Here’s an article from 2012 about GM vehicles. http://www.economicpolicyjournal.com/2012/04/how-government-will-takeover-your-car.html Any vehicle equipped with OnStar, for example, can be remotely disabled, even if you are not subscribed to the service. Here’s an article where it was actually done. http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2012/07/18/cant-just-shut-it-off-anywhere-onstar-stops-stolen-camaro-during-police-chase/ Of course, only the cases where they used it to stop a criminal get reported, not the “accidents” where a targeted person was killed when their brakes “failed” and they went over a cliff. Whistleblowers have reported OnStar collusion with government agencies, which, like everything else, has been denied. They can also listen to conversations inside your car. And it’s not just GM, but any newer vehicle that is equipped with GPS, and many other technologies that can also be used remotely for nefarious purposes.

    Someone else here asked about how you can expect to hide, with all the new technologies available. I’ve been following these developments for years, and find them deeply disturbing. For example, police are using mobile vans with x-rays that can see through walls right into your home. The following article was published already in 2010. Today’s technology works from a much greater distance and shows much greater detail. Hundreds of these vans are already in use across the country. http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2010/08/24/full-body-scan-technology-deployed-in-street-roving-vans/ There are tiny, insect-sized, camera-equipped drones now that look and fly like insects, and can trail a target, feeding live video back to the base station; and so much more, of which the general public is completely unaware.

    I’ve always been a person who would rather know the whole truth, the actual realities I may face, no matter how dire, rather than blind myself with a comfortable ignorance in the face of what could be extremely grave dangers and unspeakable suffering. So it has sometimes been very hard for me to read all this discussion that often sounds to me like preparation for an extended camping trip rather than the hellish, near-starvation, surrounded by death and terror everywhere, brutal life and death survival scenario I’ve envisioned when the Storm is raging. And this is all I can see when I try to imagine what kind of scenario could possibly cause everyone, even the most staunch Christians including myself, to think there is no hope but for the promise of a divine rescue, as has been prophesied.

    My biggest fear is not sleeping in the woods, or running out of food, but rather that I won’t pray enough, and having too many “plans” that I might miss the whispers of that “still, small voice.”
    The most comforting thing from Charlie’s Part 1 of this discussion for me (besides the whole idea of trust-love-do) is his expert political opinion that “they” won’t be so much motivated to use their technology and resources to track down those who flee. I’m starting to get the items for a backpack, but I also started re-reading a classic book I remembered from years ago called Practice of the Presence of God, by Brother Lawrence, a 17th century Carmelite. I think if I can develop the ability, as Brother Lawrence teaches, to live every moment in the conscious presence of God I’ll be OK. I’m not very good at it now, but it gives me hope. The book is free online in many places if anyone else is interested, Here’s one: http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/5657/pg5657.html

    Like

    • Ann says:

      (My comment was meant to respond to joanp62 on the “older comments” page. Sorry if it posted in the wrong place.)

      Like

    • cathryn7 says:

      If we have that bomb that explodes in the upper atmosphere, it shuts off the power grid, with all electricity, and I would think that batteries, and the electrical system in the cars won’t work either. Is this true?

      Like

      • charliej373 says:

        It depends on the size and power of such an event, cathryn. Practically speaking, this is not a tough one. If crisis comes and you want to try to evacuate by car, you go out to your vehicles and try to start them. Either they work or they don’t. If they do, good luck. If they don’t, get those walking shoes. The point is, you will know within five or ten minutes. I don’t say it is imprudent to get an old-technology vehicle; it may be very prudent. But I rarely waste more than a few moments of worry over a situation I can’t control in which I will know the answer within minutes of a crisis.

        Liked by 2 people

      • CrewDog says:

        If you have an old car/truck that still works when most others don’t then THEY will, no doubt, confiscate it as soon as THEY see/find out about it. Plan/prepare for the “simple life” and if The Lord moderates The Storm ….. Bonus Time 😉

        GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

        Like

    • SteveBC says:

      Ann, you are so right about what the Storm will actually be like in some aspects. Our Lady of Kibeho’s words are particularly sobering to me sometimes.

      Charlie and I have joked about passing the popcorn while we watch the show, but that is gallows humor in the face of stark reality. Every now and then, I get a whiff of what it could actually be like, and I really have to help myself start to breathe again. When caught in such a moment, I try to remember that there will also be moments of joy and beauty, when we have a moment with family or friends or a stranger, when everything goes right, when someone lends another a helping hand in love.

      I think your intent to hold God before you is entirely consistent with Charlie’s “Trust God” which he has put first in the order of Trust-Do-Love. I am also trying to remember God more often and to act well when I do. I could definitely do better than I am doing, but I am better than I was. I suspect that is true for many people at this site.

      Like

  28. cathryn7 says:

    Also don’t forget our cell phones have GPS tracking devices so we could be tracked that way. We have to be careful what we carry.

    Like

    • SteveBC says:

      Very good point, Cathryn7. I intend to wrap my cellphone in several layers of aluminum foil if the authorities start obvious efforts to control the population. Even when apparently off, cellphones can be a risk. Control software can have them on and listening or tracking you even though they look to be off. Another way of safing a cellphone is to remove the battery if you can. You should assume that as soon as you take the cellphone out of the aluminum or put the battery back in, the authorities can start to listen to and track you.

      Liked by 1 person

  29. Spikenard says:

    Charlie, I wonder about your animals friends too. Apparently before the Fall, Adam had reign over animals. And there are many stories of saints both befriended by animals as an angel of protection (St. Don Bosco) and those who had friendly control of animals: St. Anthony of Padua, St. Rose of Lima, and of course St. Francis!
    But regarding the fleeing aspect ~ my husband is hopefully one that will step up to bat when the time comes, but he is not presently swayed. Do you think I should still purchase hiking boots, tents, etc. for myself, husband and 4 remaining children for when those times come, even if he’s not on the same page in that regards?
    Also wondering if you’ll be passing through Putnam or Dutchess Counties, NY when making your New England rounds?

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Can you get such boots as part of your everyday life? Do you already hike or consider such? If you can do it without fomenting division, great. If not, keep solidarity with your husband and trust God to give you what you need when you need it. You know, I was south of Dallas when a set of shoelaces on my boots broke. I knew I should have gotten some the week before (the journey was much tougher on laces than on the boots – I went through about 10 pair of laces.) When you are carrying a load, walking with no laces is a lot more irritating and difficult than you would think. I wearily went into a patch of woods to sit and rest a spell. To my surprise, just where I went to sit was an old rotted pair of boots…utterly useless – but they had a new pair of laces in them. I laughed as I re-laced my boots.

      Liked by 1 person

  30. robert kealy says:

    Good morning Charlie, thanks for all your insight! How soon after the crash will they come after us and will they close border crossings between states for instance between jersey and pa.to prevent us from going to rural areas?

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      I have no idea, Robert…or even if they ever will. Like I say, even if it is through this scenario that final descent into chaos begins, it will barely be a few weeks before even they know they are losing control altogether rather than consolidating it. My counsel is designed to keep you focused on acting whatever happens by simply keeping your head, acknowledging God, taking the next right step, and being a sign of hope to those you encounter on your way. It is a way of simplicity that will sustain you and keep you focused on God whatever specific details it encounters.

      Liked by 2 people

  31. CrewDog says:

    The below is, sorta, good news. They will allow the Navy Chaplain to “put in his 20” with the remainder of his career, no doubt, in some “Outta Sight-Outta Mind” paper shuffling “job”. A minor victory for the good guys but we have lost the battle. The “Message” has been sent. Submit or pay the consequences …. and ….. Good Bye-Good Men ;-(
    “Navy spares controversial chaplain accused of misconduct”
    http://www.militarytimes.com/story/military/2015/09/04/modder-chaplain-navy-fired-intolerant-nnptc-controversy/71695820/

    GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Liked by 1 person

  32. connie says:

    I think the Powers That Be, has the Navy “spare” Chaplain Modder and Judge Bunning releasing Kim Davis from jail, do NOT want to create martyrs.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. CrewDog says:

    RIP Sisters and Friends!
    ……….. and Lord Obammy and John Kerry claim there is not enough evidence to proclaim Christian Genocide by Islam in the Middle East!

    “4 Catholic nuns, 12 others killed in Yemen retirement home”
    http://bigstory.ap.org/article/7750…ill-16-including-4-nuns-yemen-retirement-home

    GOD PROTECT MY CHRISTIAN COMRADES & SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Liked by 1 person

  34. CrewDog says:

    MICROAGGRESSION!! When was the fist time you heard this word!? A year or two ago? Another word coined by the godless Left to Shut-Up anyone who does not agree with their AGENDAS. Parents are paying $25 Grand a year so their kids can be filled with this kind of BS … and graduate with a “Degree” that might qualify them to be a Night Shift Manager at Mickey-Ds!
    MADNESS ON PARADE!!
    “University of North Carolina Releases List of ‘Hostile’ So-Called ‘Microaggressions’ — Check Out the No. 4 Category”
    http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2016/06/25/university-of-north-carolina-releases-list-of-hostile-so-called-microaggressions-check-out-the-no-4-category/

    GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Like

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