Turbulence Ahead

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By Charlie Johnston

The last few weeks for me have been something of a foreshadowing of what lies immediately ahead. Besides a three-day power outage and a five-day Internet outage I had a week’s worth of floods. The heavy snowstorm brought the power outage as its date to this dance. It has kind of been an indoor pilgrimage.

Besides my sister, Kim, I am adding my son, Charlie, and my godson and nephew, Denton, as editors of the website. In addition to clearing comments, I will have them begin to solicit guest columns and handle some mail. I am finally making a little bit of a dent in the email load…only about three weeks behind now. I am developing some guidelines for the new editors here…need to have them in place before I hit the road.

Friday I will meet for a final layout of the “Go Forth” booklets on prayer groups – and get them ready to be printed. I will also work out the logistics for the first trip to the southeast, which will come in late June. I have a checklist up for people who want to host a visit – and I will make final plans for the first trip based on that and the contacts who are already waiting.

Meantime, I have been contemplating what is ahead. I don’t worry so much about the turmoil in the world, though I stay aware of it. As I have often said, much of that I put in the “These things must come” category. I am far more concerned about the contours of the turmoil that is growing in the Church.

Last year’s first session of the Synod on the Family revealed some of the fissures that have opened up at the highest levels. I had no fear of the outcome, in part because that session could not do anything binding, but mainly because Christ promised that the Pope and assembled Bishops will be protected from doctrinal error on matters of faith and morals. I believe Christ – and fully trust in what He promises. But it did reveal that there are a host of high clerics and authorities who are determined to force the Church to break faith with the Lord – or they will go their own way.

The most obvious challenge comes from the “progressive” wing, which believes we have outgrown those absurd Biblical injunctions. They actively conspire to undermine Church doctrine – and were eager to claim the Pope, himself, as their patron. They had to be shocked and disappointed at his stately, concise confirmation of orthodoxy to close that first session. You can almost feel it bubbling up that they will either have their way or go their own way. Already, in Germany, Bishops have spoken of what I call the “Henry VIII option:” – they will decide in their conference what Church doctrine is for their country regardless of what the Pope and Magisterium have to say. I find myself thankful that Cardinal Raymond Burke is free enough of pressing responsibilities that, like a doctrinal handyman, he can attend to leaks wherever they spring up.

Cardinal Raymond Burke

Cardinal Raymond Burke

The progressives reveal that they don’t actually believe in God. They think the Church an ingenious creation of man, rather than the gift of the Risen Lord, and so think it can be amended as it suits their fancy. But if it is not from God, then it is merely a kingdom designed to support their comfort, ambitions and sinecures by leaching off the faithful. I didn’t sign up for that. If they ever got their way, progressive enthusiasts would find that neither does much of anyone else who doesn’t actually have a sinecure supported by the faithful. The old mainline Protestant Churches in America have discovered that since the 70s, as they have gotten progressively more “relevant” and found themselves facing extinction. But these internal dissidents are arming for battle and will have sway for a time.

Then there are certain extreme traditionalists who are gripped by a restless and unseemly eagerness to declare Pope Francis an antipope and tool of the devil. Shoot, a big chunk of these had already so declared him before his election – before they even knew who he was. These have the virtue of actually believing in Christ, but it does them a fat lot of good, for they believe in a Christ of their own making and completely ignore His assurances if it gets in the way of them showing their dominance over everyone else. They will quickly and eagerly condemn you for the merest trifles. I react viscerally because it so reminds me of the Fundamentalist Holiness denomination I saw as a child – a denomination that, at the time, called God “beautiful” but painted a picture of a bloodthirsty monster ever on the lookout for excuses to smite His poor children. I reject it now as I rejected it then.

I do not fear an antipope so much as I do a procession of them. I know it is not Francis, for a validly elected Pope cannot be an antipope. I don’t even have to ask my angel about that. But I see rising, across the world, a host of people determined to set themselves up as their own popes – some to enhance their power and expand their sinecures, others to savor the thrill of condemning the rest of us poor mopes.

Confusion grows. Initial reports that Pope Francis had called Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas an “angel of peace” have now been somewhat rebutted by the Italian press which maintains he expressed the hope that Abbas would become an angel of peace. The issue was obscured when the official Vatican spokesman said he was not quite sure what the Pope said, but that he knew the Pope MEANT that he hoped Abbas would become an angel of peace. I think we can safely assume that that is what the Pope meant. The controversy obscured the much larger issue of the Vatican’s formal recognition of Palestine as an independent nation. I imagine it was done to try to protect Christians under siege in the Middle East. I can’t say I am an enthusiast for protecting some people by turning your back on others under siege – but it is not new. The Vatican pursued a similar strategy in the 60s and early 70s with the Soviet Bloc to try to minimize persecution of Catholics. On the other hand, if I were a Jew, a lot of the steady work of solidarity formed by Popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI would seem inoperative now and I would be looking at the Catholic Church with a more jaundiced eye.

Coming on the heels of a downright chummy meeting with Cuban President Raul Castro a few days earlier, it is discomfiting. To be a practicing Catholic in Cuba has been an imprisonable offense under both Raul and his more famous brother, Fidel. I suppose that, too, is an effort to protect Catholics on that benighted island. I wish the meeting had been a little less chummy, though.

The Pope, alone among Bishops, is a head of State and must engage directly in international diplomacy and certain political matters. That is, in fact, his secular responsibility, as distinct from his Magisterial responsibility. I think we were a bit spoiled by the late St. John Paul, who was one of the four or five most gifted statesmen and diplomats of the last century. I don’t recall him ever cozying up to or appeasing a tyrant to protect Catholics…but it was pretty common practice before him.

I was amused at the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops warning that without nuclear disarmament, the world would be in danger. The world IS in danger. If the conference wanted to speak credibly, it would support vigorous means of enforcement, but it has generally taken a delicate hope for the best from the promises of tyrants approach. If the responsible world disarms without such a vigorous enforcement mechanism, it will usher in a nuclear apocalypse. But that was just a bit of silliness.

I was shocked when the Pope’s top advisor lambasted opponents of giving governments massive centralized power to combat climate change as simply greedy. Without going into details of the merit of the climate change issue, I would have expected the Vatican to speak to the science of the issue, the evidence, the facts, rather than to just attack the character and motives of opponents,  like some cheap Sunday morning talking heads show. One might look at how well the environment is cared for by nations that have strongly centralized power. I hope the Vatican is not planning to adopt the Russian or Chinese model to fix things, but the top advisor sure made it sound that way. If the Vatican does come up with a plan that will shift massive power to centralized government authorities and supports the sort of plans that will put millions out of work and consign more millions to lives of poverty and servility, I hope actual evidence and facts play into it somewhere rather than just insults and smears.

There were four or five other events that shook me while I was in the mountains. Fortunately, I have been expecting this since my visitation back on December 20 of last year. It is not just we, the laity, who get a little panicked at how out of control things are getting. It happens to clerics in top positions, as well. Certainly this Pope seems to have a bit of a predilection for trusting authoritarian government power to force people to do good. That has not been the way it works out in practice, nor is it the way Christ set things up. When Catholics set up the first major hospitals, they did not petition Caesar to do it on their behalf. Our forbears actually did it. When the secular kings of the dark ages tried to destroy all the classical texts of knowledge, Catholics did not petition them to adopt a different policy. Rather, our forbears formed monasteries and took it on themselves to preserve that knowledge by copying the texts and preserving them for future generations. It is always tempting to recruit government to be the Church’s agent in forcing people to do good. But whenever the state takes the power necessary to be such an agent, it quickly takes on the role of master and oppresses the faithful.

Many clerics think that if they endorse some leftist, progressive policies, it will get them out of the target zone of statist authoritarians. My friends in the faith, we ARE the target. It does not matter what sops we give those who would be master. We will ever remain ground zero for the secularists artillery.

And yet, my certainty that Pope Francis IS the Pope appointed by the Holy Spirit to carry us through the Storm is undiminished. His manner of acting, his flamboyance, his intense engagement are characteristics I long saw before he came on the scene. The Pope, himself, has said he believes he has been inspired by God. Frankly, I believe him. His immediate two predecessors bolstered the solidity of the doctrinal foundation, which had been shaken by post-Vatican II misinterpretations and enthusiasms. Pope Francis is profoundly pastoral.

Let me speak bluntly for a moment of part of what I was shown last December concerning the Church. In this age where everything has been politicized, we think our friends are those who agree with us on policy and our enemies those who disagree with us. It pleases God to show us that not all who agree with us are our friends nor are all who disagree with us our enemies. It also pleases God that each of us should have the humility to play our position well without abandoning it to kibitz at another. The Pope and the Bishops are central – like a pitcher and a shortstop on a baseball team. But they err if they wander too far from their position to tell the more mundane left fielder or first baseman what to do when the game is on. If they spend much time at it, they are not helping the team, but abdicating their responsibility. When your responsibility is scary, meddling extensively in another’s is a way to avoid your responsibility while seeming to do something important. But it will not do.

At the center of everything is the heart. What is the heart of the person involved? I find myself in disagreement on several things with the Pope these days. Even so, I do not at all get the sense he is vested in whatever he says being right, regardless of the consequences, like so many secular politicians are these days. When modern politicians’ plans lead to massive failure, they usually double down and do more of what caused the failure in the first place – because vanity and self-worship are what is at the heart of their ethos, not service and a seeking after what is right, true and just.synod-of-bishops-pope-francis I think Pope Francis is a pragmatist in the noblest sense of the word: he wants what builds up, not what tears down. At the preliminary session of the Synod on the Family last year, many progressives insisted they were speaking for the Pope. Though it was gentle, they got their heads handed to them when this Pope closed the Synod with a profound confirmation of orthodox doctrine. This is not a man who is afraid to take a risk, nor a man who can be easily played. I know Abbas and company think they have won a great victory. They may have. If they abandon their genocidal ambitions of extermination they may, indeed, have found a new friend and patron. If they go back to business as usual, I think they will discover they have made a relentlessly implacable opponent. Don’t forget that when ISIS showed it would not abandon savagery, this Pope did not dither. He called for coordinated military action to defend the oppressed. He is slow to decide forceful action is needed, but unlike most clerics, he is not queasy to call for it when the evidence is irrefutable. I think Pope Francis is determined to do the most right thing he can think of at all times. I may disagree with him on what that is at times, but I have confidence that is his guiding star.

I get many readers who think dealing with angels and heavenly beings makes everything easy. Ha! If you only knew. Actually, you get some snippets of information, usually very incomplete, and then the instruction to come up with something…figure it out. You then have to step out with courage, knowing full well you may make a huge blunder. Your successes surprise you and please the angels. Your stumbles often amuse them, even as they help to clean up the mess. But you have to have the courage to put yourself on the firing line all the time, knowing that sometimes you are going to get wounded because of your own clumsiness. I think Pope Francis is doing just that.

We have to live a certain solidarity. We have to build each other up, even when we don’t agree with each other on various issues, though with a core of fundamental values. I certainly have not been shy about publicly disagreeing with a Bishop – or conferences – if I think a situation merits it. But I think most of our Bishops want to do the most right thing they can, too, and take their job seriously. I have been grieving for several months over something I don’t understand. Boston’s Cardinal Sean O’Malley has been a Bishop I admired.

Cardinal Sean O'Malley

Cardinal Sean O’Malley

We have some mutual friends – and I have prayed for him daily since the day he was assigned to Boston. I admired the way he stabilized that Archdiocese after the brutal fallout of sexual abuse scandals. Just a few years back, he served as the firewall keeping legalized euthanasia out of sweeping through the northeastern states. He has some marvelous accomplishments to his credit. But I was dismayed by his 60 Minutes interview a few months back. It troubled me how eagerly he threw Bishop Robert Finn to the wolves when the interview got tough. I have discussed before how deeply troubled I am that Bishop Finn, an orthodox prelate who had rejuvenated a moribund diocese, committed the equivalent of a confused misdemeanor and got the book thrown at him while progressive Bishops who have actively participated in unambiguous cover-ups and offenses get slaps on the wrist and are treated with honor. But I also got the nagging sense when the Cardinal spoke of being the Pope’s key advisor on these sexual abuse matters, that he saw himself as a sort of inquisitor general, looking for Bishops to smite, rather than seeing himself as taking the lead among his colleagues to set things right and restore confidence among the faithful. It suggested to me a lack of respect for the many fine men who are trying to lead the flock and a hint that he would be a further burden to them rather than one who would help them carry the load. That nagging sense was jolted into a conviction when Cardinal O’Malley fired a janitor in a Catholic school for using a proper restroom, but at the wrong time of day, because of the potential for it looking bad – then fired the principal of the school and a teacher who objected to his over-reaction…particularly because NO ONE had even hinted there was anything sexual or even amiss about it. That is not justice; it is the sort of dark obsession that would do Inspector Javert proud. I have thought so highly of Cardinal O’Malley and his accomplishments that I want to think he means well. But my confidence is shaken. Most of our Bishops are good, holy committed men who often stumble, but try to stumble forward. They ought to be accorded respect for that, even in disagreement. And they ought to be accorded that respect by other Bishops, as well.

I think that most of our problems arise when we depart from the culture of faith, the simple straightforward directives of Christ, and replace it with some secular enthusiasm of the moment. The sexual scandal was caused, I believe, primarily because we traded in a culture of faith for a dependence on secular therapy and psychology. A serious Christian does not need a psychologist to tell him whether a man who collects crotch shots of children is fit for ministry: he knows the man is not fit. If a psychologist tells him otherwise, a serious Christian knows that psychologist is a dangerous idiot. Bishops are not primarily administrators, fundraisers, theologians, strategists, or orators – though all of those may be useful tools in carrying out what they really are, which is Apostles of the Living Christ. When Bishops lose sight of that and start behaving as if they are the secular board of directors of Catholicism, Inc., they are headed for the shoals. The answer to most of our problems is to re-commit to the fundamentals. In 25 years as a Catholic, I could count on one hand how many times I have heard the Real Presence preached. If Catholics are versed in the Real Presence, the sanctity of life, marriage, and the family, most of our problems would evaporate like dew on a sunny day. On that score, I am coming to appreciate my own Archbishop, Samuel Aquila, more and more.

Archbishop Samuel Aquila

Archbishop Samuel Aquila

Though not known as a “hail fellow, well-met” sort of guy, he generally refrains from merely political matters while applying himself to matters of faith and morals. Right now he is intensely working on a program so that confirmation becomes a deepening of the life of faith rather than a graduation away from it. That has the potential to bear real fruit – and change the culture. I would that his brothers would spend more time on such things.

So here is the blunt reality of what is ahead: I am afraid that many of our best Bishops over the course of the next few months are going to say and do some dumb and, sometimes, offensive things. Many of the worst actors are going to carefully guard what they say, the better to lead the unwary away from the one ship of safety later. You need not agree politically with a Bishop – or the Pope. When you disagree, you need to do it while maintaining awareness of their humanity and a due respect for their office and person. Do not let even the severest disagreements on policy matters be confused with doctrinal error. This is the only ship that can carry us through the Storm. Do not let a squabble with the captain or crew inflame you into scuttling the ship. Let our squabbles be of the fraternal sort, ultimately geared to building each other up. This is the barque of Peter, guaranteed by Christ to weather even the most violent storms. Where else would we go in these stormy waters?

When I was running large political races, occasionally a Regional Coordinator would make the error of telling me he had made no mistakes in his region. I would almost always tartly respond that if he had made no mistakes, he was not doing enough – and had better up his game. No one can say Pope Francis isn’t doing enough.

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
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115 Responses to Turbulence Ahead

  1. Excellent thoughts, Charlie. This Pope has not committed any mistakes that Peter our first Pope did not commit. The truth is, God will save us even with a terrible Pope and all the glory will go to Him as usual. That is the way it should be. Trust not in princes …

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      Well, let me say I do not think Pope Francis is a terrible Pope. I think he has the makings of a truly great one.

      Liked by 1 person

      • God gave us Peter, selected by the Father and then anointed with the Holy Spirit by the Son. From the human point of view Peter could be considered a terrible Pope: hesitant, impatient, impulsive, intellectually lacking, thick as a brick sometimes, filled with fear some other times. Not the man I would want as my CEO but through him God established the Church. Peter’s road was winding all over the place but he managed to arrive to the end and he ended well. All’s well that ends well and yet Peter was not Gregory the Great, or Pius V… or any of the other steady, nearly unfailing Popes. I agree he has the makings of a great Pope — even a saint — although too many fail to see how the Spirit is using him.

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        • Mary W. says:

          Charlie wrote: Pope Francis is profoundly pastoral. I would say he acquired that style through his experience with the people of the barrios in Argentina. Carlos Caso-Rosendi could tell us more about that perhaps?

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          • I have little time to respond so I will quote from something I wrote in 2013 in th NCR

            “Francis will be more apt to kiss the wounds of the leper on the road to Assisi than to have his ring kissed. He ascended to the throne of Peter on the feast of St. Joseph because he is also, like that saint, a man of few words, a man who leads by silent, manly example. The lukewarm and complacent in our Church are about to experience the power of his sanctity.
            Like many Argentines, Pope Francis descends from Piedmontese immigrants, and I believe his strong Marian traits are part of his upbringing: La Madonnina was part of the family back then, and Pope Francis never ceased walking with her. He has repeatedly consecrated the Archdiocese of Buenos Aires to the Immaculate Conception, and it was no surprise that, in his brief address to all of us the night of his election, he mentioned his intention to also entrust the city of Rome and the life of Pope Emeritus Benedict to the loving care of our Blessed Mother.
            When I attended Mass at my neighborhood parish later in the evening on that historic day, I noticed that all of the parish priests where there. I happen to know that they were all formed as priests at the side of Cardinal Bergoglio. It was an unseasonable cold afternoon, and I saw a young boy begging by the main entrance to our church. He must have been about 11 years old, and he was shivering, dressed as he was only in a t-shirt and short trousers. One of the priests walked by, and I noticed he gave a quick glance to the boy. He went into his office and returned with a long-sleeve cotton shirt and a sweater taken from the charity boxes. Moving quickly, because Mass was just about to start, he gave the boy the items and made sure he put them on. The whole thing took about a minute, and I was the only witness; I don’t think Father noticed that I was standing there. I recall this because that is a gesture of genuine care by a man who grew as a priest under Cardinal Bergoglio’s watch. That is the spirit of this archdiocese. That is what the careful example of Francis has sown in this big, unforgiving city at the end of the world.”
            The following day, I was having lunch with a friend not far from church when I overheard a group of Jewish neighbors at the next table talking about the new Pope. They loved him, and one of them was talking about the priests the cardinal sent regularly to the slums and shantytowns to say Mass and help the poor in any way they could. Someone interrupted the story at that point and quipped: “I wonder how many socialists go there to deliver a cup of soup after elections are over.” I thought: “That is seed falling on fertile soil.”

            Read more: http://www.ncregister.com/site/article/he-walks-with-mary-and-st.-francis/#ixzz3atXB3xqz

            Liked by 8 people

          • Mick says:

            Carlos, this is so beautiful! Thank you. I’m going to go read the article at the NCR as soon as I have time. Viva Papa Francisco!

            Liked by 1 person

      • M P P says:

        I pray that our present pontiff will indeed turn out to be a great saint. But right now I am disturbed by the men he surrounds himself and appoints. When there is an orthodox statement coming from the Vatican it feels like a small bone thrown to calm down the faithful. Meanwhile high prelates who say ‘bravo’ to sodomy and who condone sins either by their words or their silence are wolves in shepherds clothing. Yes, I am grateful to be in the Denver diocese where we do not have to deal with a weak or heretical bishop or one who stamps down pro-life efforts or the TLM or adoration. It is true and very sad that you have heard few homilies on the Real Presence. Me too. And when the Gospel cries out for extrapolation to speaking of Christ in the Blessed Sacrament, it seems Father always stops just short. Or when have you heard a preaching on the evils of contraception or even abortion? How often have you heard a warning on pornography or about avoiding the evil in books, TV, movies? On the positive side, when have you heard a homily on prayer or a teaching on the sacraments? Our dear priests who have the most awesome vocation in the world are hammered and when some have the courage to speak of the hard truths, they are persecuted. But it that not what Christ told His disciples to expect?

        Liked by 1 person

        • charliej373 says:

          One of the most marvelous pro-life homilies I ever heard came, to my surprise, at a Parish in Milwaukee…which, in my experience, was the most troubled diocese I have ever spent serious time in. Afterward, I spoke to the priest and thanked him. He grinned at me and said, “I am a Dolan priest, not a Weakland priest.” (Speaking of the brief time Cardinal Timothy Dolan was Bishop there – as opposed to the lengthy time Rembert Weakland was there.)

          Liked by 2 people

        • Judy says:

          I agree that there appear to be very mixed signals at the moment and that does begin to cause confusion among those who have worked hard to try to follow their faith and its teachings. At the same time, I know that the Holy Spirit is very powerful and will likely put an end to the confusion, if one is open to Him. However, we appear to be headed toward chaos, so I do not know when that will occur. I think the faithful will be tested in a very big way…..I shall be interested in hearing what the Pope will say on climate change. Maybe he will say that, though we humans may be contributing to the problem, God is in control and that is where we much place our focus. If we honor and love God, then He will find a way to help solve this. If he leans toward a cap and trade approach, then the economies of the world, which are already weak, will surely be under severe attack and this will be the final nail in the coffin, in my opinion…..If is obvious (due to the pope’s history ( as Carlos’ states it ), that the Pope is very concerned about the poor. However, he is not an economist, nor a scientist, nor a politician. He can exhort the faithful to do more, but I do not think it is his place to raise up the U.N. and try to use to it enforce anything in any country. That would be a very bad move.

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  2. jnursester says:

    Charlie, thanks for that. You always manage to reassure me with your common sense.

    Like

  3. SteveBC says:

    Charlie, this is a wonderful article, hitting a lot of good notes. If we trust in the Admiral as we should, much of what the Captain and crew do here on Earth will be far less likely to knock us out of balance. We’re going to have a lot on our own plates and can ill afford unnecessary or disruptive worries about the Church and its doctrines or about the actions of Church officers in physical and political matters. A number of commenters here have seemed to believe that disagreements they have with the Pope or a bishop in worldly matters can or even should be grounds for questioning the Foundation of the Church overall and in their own personal lives. I think your article here may help these folks relax a bit and not worry so much. I know it helps me place the disagreements I potentially have with the Pope about such things as climate change and so on on a separate and lower level than Foundational trust.

    Liked by 6 people

  4. Lin says:

    I especially benefitted from learning about Archbishop Samuel Aquila…thanks for your analysis of trends in the Church!

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  5. mmbev says:

    Well, I would put this entry in as one for your top ten. I discovered that when I let go of following the news to provide me with information, I, although unaware, did pretty much the same with the news about the “Church leaders”. I realized that ALL news I obtained was flawed one way or another, and as such was a waste of time. I don’t know enough in most areas to make correct judgments, so why make any judgments at all.

    Actually, I love this column, because it says what is right, just, and true. If I trust Jesus, really trust Jesus, then He has everything in order and it is not my job to correct anything, unless it hits me with the same force as God’s starter (the 2 X 4) and I know down to the core of my being that wrong is being done. Then I know the order and process Jesus has set up for me to do something about it, with kindness, the interest of the other at heart, and love.

    That doesn’t mean that my thoughts don’t become a bit conflicted at times when I read something. It mainly means that I keep my mouth shut, even when I find out more clearly what is true, unless someone else is spouting off the lies.

    I am so glad that my “post” is so tiny and insignificant. What a blessing from God for me, and what a call to pray for those, all those, however we perceive them, who must lead the Church, and the countries of the world.

    .

    Liked by 6 people

    • Mick says:

      “I am so glad that my ‘post’ is so tiny and insignificant.” Exactly, MMBev! It must be so difficult and scary (well, to those of good will, at least) to be well known and in a position of authority or wide responsibility. I remember reading about the life of one of the popes (I can’t remember which one). When it was announced that he had just been elected to the papacy, he burst into tears of anguish. What a cross it must be to know that countless souls are depending on you, and that all of the bad guys (and even some of the good guys) have their weapons trained on you.

      Liked by 5 people

    • Centurion_Cornelius says:

      Well-said, mmbev! And ever MORE well-said, Charlie. This post really is one of your “Top 10.”

      Praise the Lord and pass on the Faith!
      and (in keeping with your nautical themes:)

      Liked by 2 people

    • Fran says:

      I agree MMBev. I had a teacher in the 8th grade who told us that you can get the gist of a lot of news just by reading the headline, and I have found that it works for that, and for just getting a sense of what is going on in the world without having to figure out if the information you are reading is correct or not. Saves time too.
      One of my faults is that I am SO easily distracted, even by “good” things, when I am sensing that Jesus is wanting me just to learn to better recognize His voice (and Our Blessed Mother’s) in the stillness, (then perhaps I can hear Him in chaos too) so I can know what the next right step is for me.
      As far as Pope Francis is concerned, I think Charlie is right. Perhaps he is making some mistakes, but I don’t feel like it is because he has any “agenda”. I think his only agenda is following the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, and his true love for the “lost sheep”, and we don’t know what the Holy Spirit will do. Everything that seems wrong, can be turned around in an instant at the right moment. I was thinking about this yesterday at mass when listening to a homily about Saint Paul. We have to remember as Pope Francis keeps telling us that our God is a God of surprises!

      Liked by 2 people

    • jcg17jcg says:

      I heard this yesterday:

      “There is no truth in the news, and there’s no news in the truth.” I thought it was timely for our times. As Charlie stated, the longstanding truth is this:
      the last barque floating when this is all over will be will be that of Peter. So get a board, hold your post and pray for perseverance with love. Julie from Arizona

      Liked by 2 people

  6. Mick says:

    Charlie, thank you for this phenomenal and encouraging post.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. Kathleen F. says:

    Let’s fasten ourselves to the mast of the barque of Peter and ride out the storm. It’s the ONLY way to travel! One of my favorite quotes from the gospels is Peter’s reply to Jesus when asked if they too wanted to leave him – “Master, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life.”
    Another great post Charlie ~ thank you & God bless you and all here.

    Liked by 4 people

  8. Dave says:

    From above:
    “It also pleases God that each of us should have the humility to play our position well without abandoning it to kibitz at another.”

    This is my take-away from this post Charlie. I don’t have to ensure that each and every “Nancy Pelosi”, or “Joe Biden” is personally answered and put in their place. I will however, never erode my core beliefs on things like abortion, same-sex marriage, and the sanctity of marriage/life. I don’t have to keep asserting them at each opportunity I perceive. Just make sure the next step taken is in the right direction.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Lynette says:

    Charlie, There is more at play than just Cardinal O’Malley’s suggestions of something needing to be changed here in KC. There are people here who have been fortified in their convictions that it just takes a bit of muscle and influence in using their connections to Rome to get their agendas taken seriously (due to, in part, the turncoat behavior of some of those who were interviewed by the Vatican representative), and now, the rescission of the priestly assignments are scattering the sheep and discouraging the faithful even more. Bishop Finn told my husband and myself when he first arrived here that he had learned in his years as priest to strengthen those who were trying to do the right thing and holiness and not spend all his efforts in trying to reconvert those who had strayed. He was doing just that, and now that the shepherd has been struck, those of us who are trying to live faithfully, have been dealt a serious blow and we do not know which of our pastors we can trust to preach and teach the Gospel, to bind up the wounds. I would bet that some of those pastors do not know who they can trust either, those who also are missing Bishop Finn and who knew him to be a good father. The faithful were so badly beat up when he arrived and now we are struggling to understand why the Vatican would do such a thing. Our hope lies Jesus’s Mercy and his Mother’s intercession for a another good shepherd arriving who will somehow unify the flock here and drive out the money changers. We are in need of some TLC and not political jockeying for favor. We hold our breath. Come, Holy Spirit, come.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Dave says:

      Well said from “the trenches” Lynette.This is where theoretical meets reality. As Charlie recently said, those who have the upper hand are given full credit for their actions. This must be a part of separating the sheep and goats.

      Like

  10. Vanessa Joy says:

    Wow! Thank you for clarifying the utter importance of staying in the Baroque of Peter despite the growing tsunami in our culture of death and despair.
    As a Protestant convert, I did not become Catholic to remain Protestant! I was a church jumping fool looking for a place I could call home with strong moorings and a steel ship to ride the waves. I am witnessing many Catholics bumping ship and acting like Protestants under the guise of deeper knowing and a self righteous pity for the Church because many of our Bishops and Our beloved Pope have been overwhelmed by the speed of the attacks coming at the Church. I am deeply saddened at their unwise decision to throw our Pope under the bus as well!
    Pope Francis words of ” angel of peace” gave much fodder to my catholic brothers and sisters who are looking at Him with an “evil” eye. When I heard His words , I thought how lovely as he is calling this world leader to a higher place to become an angel of peace. By the grace of God, I immediately understood where he was coming from. It is no different when I lovingly plea at abortion minded women walking into the mill, “thank you for choosing life. ” I know full well they are steps away from killing their child, but I am hoping these words might inspire them to reconsider . We must as Saint Paul tells us to call out the good in one another. We must pray for courage to keep in Mother ship and not jump ship and sail in a rowboat to the shores of heaven. Many will drown along the way.

    Liked by 4 people

    • connie says:

      Vanessa, somehow, I knew what Pope Francis meant, also. It touched me to know that he saw the”potential” of another that most would see as “hopeless”- a leapord who deoesn’t change his spots, so to speak. And yet again, Pope Francis shows us how to see with Christ’s eyes and to think with the mind of Christ. He always gives me pause because he does many things, it seems, in a way that causes one to think just a little deeper and just a little wider in scope. And I can see Jesus, in my mind’s eye doing so many things in the gospesls which throw people off balance ( shaking them up)- that is why I don;t worry so much about what he says or does. to me, he is acting an awful lot like Jesus in the gospel. Those people who encountered Our Lord trying to truly look at things in the new, and surprising ways Jesus was proclaiming were the blessed ones. May we all be blessed by Pope Francis’ Christ like pastoral approach.

      Liked by 2 people

  11. Ruthie says:

    I feel that Pope Francis is a wonderful Pope and I feel blessed to have him at the head of our ship. I live about 20 miles north of Boston and my parish is under Cardinal Sean O’Malley. So much happening here with their ‘collaborative’ change within the churches as they work to promote evangelization and bring people back to church. In this area, it isn’t working and is doing the opposite. So very sad. They are dismissing people from roles/paid positions within the church without any accord and as a result, people are leaving the faith/Eucharist every day.

    You are correct Charlie saying we need to pray for Cardinal Sean O’Malley and all the others who lead us in faith in the right direction and the wrong. I know it is going to get worse and I know that I have to keep my head down and take the next right step by focusing on Jesus and Mary and putting it in their hands and trusting in Jesus. The human errors are just too great these days in so many ways and spiritual warfare is all around us.

    I look forward to receiving your “Go Forth” information and will do my best to gather the sheep and spread God’s word to move us protectively through this Storm. Thank you Charlie for all you do. God bless.

    Like

    • Mary-Louise says:

      For those unfamiliar with Boston’s history and its unique mix of politics and Church, there is a great book by Phil Lawler, former editor of the archdiocesan paper The Boston Pilot. It’s “The Faithful Departed: The Collapse of Boston’s Catholic Culture.” Boston was Ground Zero in the 2002 sex abuse scandal, but the machinations of some high-level people working in the chancery had led the ways years before. The book is on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Faithful-Departed-Collapse-Bostons-Catholic/dp/1594033749/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1432306092&sr=8-1&keywords=Phil+Lawler)

      I used to be enthusiastic about Cardinal Sean, but after the disaster of the Ted Kennedy funeral, the scandal of the archdiocese instituting a Yoga program for chancery employees, forced closures of some churches with little notice, and many other missteps, I feel he has failed in his mission. I hope he gets the grace of a wake-up call before things get even worse (I live in MetroWest Boston).

      Like

      • Patricia says:

        Great book Mary-Louise. Also metro b-town.

        Like

      • Mack says:

        I”m in Boston too and I am not a fan of Cardinal O’Malley for various reasons. But he is my bishop and shepherd so I have to pray for him and I know he has a difficult job. People outside the area probably don’t know there is also a problem with managing of finances in the Boston archdiocese. The top paid 13 employees are getting paid very large salaries — just over 3.7 million (salary and benefits). This is a counter witness and inhibits real pastoral work. I am not making this up. It has been well researched (link below) with all the details. Some Catholics here do not give to the Catholic appeal (which helps pay the salaries) and instead support their pastors and parishes directly. It’s a messy situation.
        https://bostoncatholicinsider.wordpress.com/2013/03/18/boston-archdiocesan-pay-hits-cathedral-heights/

        Like

        • Patricia says:

          yup, it is.

          Like

        • cookieb13 says:

          Mack, thanks so much for this link; I just spent the last two hours fascinated…reading posts from BCI. Cardinal O’Malley’s heartless treatment of those school employees is inexplicable until one understands the incredible dysfunction of that archdiocesan hierarchy. I thought we had it bad here in St. Petersburg, Florida! Coming back to my faith in the mid-80’s I was given a St. Cecilia medal from a kindly elderly Monsignor at St. Cecilia’s…then a year or so ago, visited and was sad to see it’s sterility and it’s pro-homosexual reputation.

          Like

          • Patricia says:

            Cookieb13,
            It’s reputation is well deserved. It is openly practiced and the Cardinal is well aware. I was there one morning a few years ago just before a Sunday Mass and saw the rainbows banners carried by the priests down the aisle. The hierarchy is captive to the agenda for whatever reasons.

            Like

          • Mary-Louise says:

            Mack,
            Looking at Boston Catholic Insider brings me back. In my mind the worst financial scandal was the lawsuit by the Daughters of St. Paul against Cardinal Sean and the archdiocese for the mismanagement of their pension fund. An ugly family food fight played out in the pages of the Boston Globe. (https://bostoncatholicinsider.wordpress.com/2011/05/26/daughters-lawsuit-against-cardinal-settled-but/)
            I have a priest friend who says the archdiocese won’t be healed until the churches lie in ruins and Cardinal Sean and a tattered group of priests are forced to say Mass out in a field. That goes along with the “words of knowledge” a friend told me were floating around at the Michael Brown/ Spirit Daily conference in Boston recently, about a bigger-than-9/11 event in store for Boston. (No other details on that.)

            Like

          • SteveBC says:

            Ah, Mary-Louise, all this about Boston is disturbing to say the least. I pray that the possible “words of knowledge” event you describe may pass Boston by. However, with the recent Irish referendum, who knows, maybe that’s on our path. I know many people in Boston and grew up outside of it. To see it desecrated like New York would be sad and difficult for so many people.

            Like

  12. Ed Allison says:

    ” This is the barque of Peter, guaranteed by Christ to weather even the most violent storms. Where else would we go in these stormy waters?”

    Exactly. Immediately, this brought John 6:67-68 to mind:
    67 Jesus then said to the Twelve, “Do you also want to leave?”
    68 Simon Peter answered him, “Master, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life.

    Like

  13. Karen says:

    I admit after the Radcliffe assignment I lost my peace. That is always a sign to me to stop reading the news and go pray. St. John Bosco’s vision kept coming to mind. Charlie’s post confirms it. (Wish I could figure out how to post a photo of it here). God placed me and my family in the barque of Peter and here we will stay– tethered securely to the Most Blessed Sacrament and to Our Lady.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Funny thing, Karen…after the visitation in December – and then with this rising as expected – I was terribly agitated about it all…wondering how to discuss it, when it both irritated me but I knew this was a temptation to pull people away. Then the day before yesterday, I remembered how often the political clients I was closest with and I frequently had knock-down, drag-out arguments in private, then made common cause in public. Those appreciated that I would speak bluntly with them, yet was absolutely loyal. I thought, hey, would I do less for my religious leaders than for my political clients? And people can understand that. So I finally came to peace the day before yesterday…figuring yeah, this is going to be a rocky ride, but we’re going to get through to the other side.

      Once, I was running the campaign of a formidable, accomplished woman for Congress. She had been in television most of her life – and was elegant and funny, too. Often, her husband drove us when we needed to travel together to some event, so we could discuss various issues and such. He was marvelously discreet. One day, we had a big press conference set up. ON the way there, she and I had an intense row over something – I don’t remember what. But we were going at it the entire way over. When we got there, she was steaming. Inside, there were three television crews, several radio crews and a bunch of print media. Still animated by our fight, she spoke with animation and passion with fire in her eyes. One reporter ventured a “gotcha” question which she knocked right out of the park. You could feel the power in the room – and all the reporters felt it, too. She was a professional, so mad as she was, she knew it was a spectacular success. When it was over and we were walking back to the car, I muttered to her that maybe I should tick her off before every press conference. She gave me an elbow to the ribs, then we both started giggling – and her husband said that might be a very good idea – as long as I was the one doing the agitating and not him.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. JG says:

    The analogy of the baseball team is very vivid. Sorry if this sounds scandalous but if the Pope and the bishops are the pitcher and the short stop, which are key positions in baseball, for the team to win – get many souls to Heaven- then they have to do the job no matter how tough the competitor is ( even if it has the backing of the leader from H- E double hockey sticks). We need the second base man and the catcher to call a meeting at the mound, have their pow wow and tell the pitcher and short stop to get their heads in the game. If it takes the second base man or catcher to verbally tell him/them to knock it off , then do it. We need to be praying for who ever these team members are so they have the grace and composure to be effective in a good way.
    I think your advise on us peons who sit in the stands, on the bench (dug out), or part of the staff & team is very excellent – anyone who has played sports knows there is always someone who is disgruntled and is willing or unwillingly kibitzing the team. Our job is to not be one of them or to aid and abet them. Don’t give them fuel for their fires.
    May God bless all here and so sorry if I offend anyone –
    JG

    By the way Mark Mallett’s last entry was very good – the one about fear and courage.

    Like

  15. Mary Ann says:

    A bunch are declaring themselves at CU….maybe while they are there at Pentecost the Holy Spirit will zap them. Charlie Curran must be happy to be back in the saddle where it all started. http://dc2015.ei-research.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/DC2015-Main-Program.pdf

    Liked by 1 person

    • Mack says:

      It seems like a mixed bag. Some of the speakers are pretty good, like Ralph Martin.
      But the talk on “Celebrating Cardinal Walter Kaspar”….I”m not so sure…what are they really celebrating?

      Like

  16. Mary Anne says:

    To all here who are being called to ‘consistently’ pray and offer sacrifice for holy Priests, our Lord and His Holy Mother are in need of your commitment now more than ever before. Seriously consider this call…they need YOU!
    http://www.foundationforpriests.org/

    Like

  17. Bonnie C says:

    Hi Charlie,

    Just wondering if anyone else got the idea that you might be alluding to the Supreme Court’s decision on gay marriage that is supposed to come about in June. Since we are able to know if it is going to rain by the signs, and we “see all these things happening” – I’m afraid that all signs point to persecution of the Church – and our Bishops are going to have a time of it in short order. I hope I’m wrong, but sadly, my heart tells me otherwise.

    Like

    • jaykay says:

      Speaking of gay “marriage”, you in the U.S. will undoubtedly be in the process of being advised by the media, doubtless barely able to conceal their joy beneath a tattered veil of “objectivity”, that gay “marriage” has been approved in Ireland, by what appears to be a large majority, in our national referendum yesterday.

      This is devastating for us Catholics who take it seriously, not so much that it wasn’t expected (it was, given not a single political party choose to go against the herd and that literally millions were pumped into the ‘Yes’ side – thank you, Chuck Feeney – and also that the media pimped more brazenly than usual for one of their pet causes). No, what is devastating is the evidence of the complete and total lack of discernment of truth by those, particularly the educated young, who mindlessly parroted the whole equality/discrimination/bigotry shtick and in such a shrill, raucous way. Reminds me of the scene in The Life of Brian: “yes, we are all individuals”. Dispiriting also was the contribution of the Archbishop of Dublin who said Catholics could vote for this in good conscience, provided that were aware of all the facts. No, really. You couldn’t make it up.

      Anyway, push on, as always. To the point of Charlie’s wonderful posting (which I read early this morning before I heard the news – and am I thankful for that!), yes, I know we’ve got problems, big ones, and more coming. And I’m feeling particularly down right now. It just got a lot more difficult, particularly for those openly identified with the Church or, as some would say, a “certain sort of Church”. But, what the heck! I’m used to not being popular at this stage, and the main challenge will be to maintain a sense of genuine goodwill and avoid bitterness. I think that will confound them, actually! Gotta make it genuine, though. God give me the strength for that.

      Liked by 1 person

      • charliej373 says:

        God bless you, jaykay…and I mourn for the loss of a sense of faith in good old, Ireland, long a bastion of the faith. I prayed to St. Patrick and noted that it seems the snakes have come back. He might want to have a look around.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Bob says:

          I think Robert George had it right when he said we are still permitted to call ourselves Catholics in this culture as that does not mean we believe what the church teaches on human sexuality but if we open our mouths and admit we really agree with church teachings such as pro life or what the church really teaches on human sexuality we will be persecuted!

          Like

        • jaykay says:

          Thank you Charlie. As the day went on (it’s almost midnight our time) it became increasingly difficult to maintain the “grin and bear it” attitude, particularly when His Grace the Abp. of Vichy ooops, Dublin, was quoted on national radio as saying that the Church “had to take a reality check”. Well yep, just like it did for Diocletian. Centurion Cornelius posted a wonderful WW2 poster above, probably from the really dark days just after Pearl Harbour. Because, friends, that’s what it feels like over here to those of us who are, ummm, counter-cultural. But hell, as they said in London during the Blitz: “we can take it”. Now how to do that in a genuine spirit of hope, knowing it’s more than just hanging on for the sake of it? There’s the rub. Well, 2000 years of example help. Because, as She said, “in the end…”. Prayers for Ireland, please, brothers and sisters. Blessings to all. J.

          Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            In this article, it is unclear whether Archbishop Martin means the Church needs a reality check on its position on homosexual marriage – or whether it needs a reality check on how it could effectively convey its fundamental message to young people. In charity, I would prefer to think he means the latter. But in looking up various statements, I was a bit unnerved that throughout the period leading up to this vote, his harshest language seemed reserved for those who support traditional marriage rather than those who want to destroy the sacrament. One could easily infer that he had been signaling that he was okay with it – so if he meant the latter in the “reality check” quote, he did a mighty poor job of conveying the Catholic position, himself. Perhaps he needs a reality check on how to proclaim the faith.

            Liked by 2 people

      • malachi99 says:

        Well Jaykay it truly is a devastating state of affairs but like you say not entirely unexpected after years of min moulding and behavioural modification. Our young people, unfortunately, are innocent of any understanding of truth or the natural moral law despite years of so-called catholic education. Our bishops do have a lot to answer for but we must not discount the palpable anti-catholic animus of this benighted republic. Though I live and work in dublin I’m thankful I’m an Ulsterman the heartland of Catholic Gaelic Ireland. I’m also thankful for my fellow belligerent ulster protestant countrymen who have resisted the baying mob up to now. I can with all honestly say that I have no allegiance to this puppet republic and its farcical political establishment. In another age heads and limbs would be en-route to the four corners of this venerable and ancient land sullied by these treacherous and treasonous usurpers and saboteurs. They will stand condemned by the future sons and daughters of this great land.

        God save Ireland

        PS: If only we had a second amendment 🙂 seriously…

        Liked by 2 people

        • charliej373 says:

          Ah. malachi…one wonders if it pleases God to begin a form of profound unity between some of the Ulster Protestants and the serious Catholics in your land. That would be an interesting fruit of this terrible offense.

          Liked by 3 people

          • malachi99 says:

            The thought has occurred.

            Liked by 1 person

          • W. Leo says:

            Pope Francis: Together today, I here in Rome and you over there, we will ask our Father to send the Spirit of Jesus, the Holy Spirit, and to give us the grace to be one, “so that the world may believe”. I feel like saying something that may sound controversial, or even heretical, perhaps. But there is someone who “knows” that, despite our differences, we are one. It is he who is persecuting us. It is he who is persecuting Christians today, he who is anointing us with (the blood of) martyrdom. He knows that Christians are disciples of Christ: that they are one, that they are brothers! He doesn’t care if they are Evangelicals, or Orthodox, Lutherans, Catholics or Apostolic…he doesn’t care! They are Christians. And that blood (of martyrdom) unites. Today, dear brothers and sisters, we are living an “ecumenism of blood”. This must encourage us to do what we are doing today: to pray, to dialogue together, to shorten the distance between us, to strengthen our bonds of brotherhood.

            Liked by 2 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Whoa, Leo, the phrase, “ecumenism of blood,” is a chilling, but I fear accurate, one.

            Like

      • marie says:

        jaykay. I am with you. And feel pretty gutted. You are eloquent. I am not. St Patrick, pray for us. God bless Ireland. Sorry, I’m just so sad. God help us.

        Liked by 1 person

        • jaykay says:

          Not to get over-obsessed on this, but that “reality check” comment will do huge damage. You see, it was made on National radio. We’re very small, and our National radio station is like the BBC in the UK, and only 4 years younger so it’s invested with all that authority. It’s also, like the Beeb, a bastion of secularism. As is the Irish Times (like the NY T, and again almost as old). So that quote was always going to be abused (given the I T did at least publish the entirety but how many will read it?) and was extremely ill-advised. Yes, it was in the context of failures in educating children. Yes, the Church has had control of education, for historical reasons, and still has, even though for the last 40 years the standards of Catholic education have been woeful. There is really no parallel to our situation anywhere else. All this is well-known here.There is huge pressure to divest the Church of its role in education. It was not, strategically, if one wants to use that term, the right thing to say at this time. The man is media-savvy, he knows.

          Now, prayers for him and his brothers anyway. They are what we have. And we are what they have to work with. No one-way street of righteousness here 😉. So it pleaseth the Lord. So let’s get on with it. In faith and charity.

          Like

          • Bonnie C says:

            jaykay, we are commiserating with you. This seems unfathomable, but then again, so does the way America goes. Soon, for our Bishops, and then for us, we must “choose or perish.” St. Peter, pray for us!

            Like

      • SteveBC says:

        Ireland’s decision seems unusually important to me, compared to what is occurring on other social and political debates.

        If I recall something I read earlier today, Ireland is the first country in the world to approve gay marriage as part of their constitution. I’m rather stunned, given Ireland’s past commitment to the Catholic tradition. Given the juxtaposition of this event with the gathering Storm, it seems to me that it marks a significant jump in the pace and severity of events around the world.

        I feel this event has a significance not seen before, a breakthrough from the spiritual world into our world in much the same way that the breakdown in Syria was both different from and fundamentally more damaging than any of the other Arab Spring outbreaks. The earlier AS outbreaks did not really spread. The Syrian outbreak has spread in ways that seem unstoppable, spilling out across the world.

        It seems to me that this vote in Ireland concerning a hot-button public debate, like the outbreak of brutality in Syria, will let loose its own flood (consider Revelations, with the flood used against The Woman). It could create many more such events much more quickly than we would expect, in a way that seems unstoppable. If so, then the Supreme Court’s June decision will be heavily influenced by the force of the flood unleashed by Ireland. If the Court allows gay marriage, the flood sweeps across the US. If the Court resists the effects of this flood and says no to gay marriage, the flood will not stop but simply turn aside and seek other paths through the world.

        Liked by 9 people

        • charliej373 says:

          I think your instincts on this are probably sound, Steve. As big as this is, it may even be bigger than it looks.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Mick says:

          Steve… Ugh. I hope you’re wrong; but I strongly suspect that you’re right. Jesus, mercy.

          Liked by 2 people

        • SteveBC says:

          For what it’s worth, my gut has been upset for the past several days in a very deep way. It could be intimations of stuff about to happen in my life only. However, others in my family and around the world and internet have indicated serious concerns as well. I’m thinking we do not have long to wait for something big to happen. Not the Collapse, but perhaps the beginning of the real ramp of events that will lead to it.

          This is not a prophecy. Just a gut feeling that is very strong that something is about to happen that will shock and dismay people and put us all in a different frame of mind.

          Liked by 2 people

          • CrewDog says:

            Steve sez: “Just a gut feeling that is very strong that something is about to happen that will shock and dismay people and put us all in a different frame of mind.”
            I’ve had this gloomy gut feeling since 9/11/01. I can only attribute the lack of terror attacks to the continued protection of God ’cause any fool knows our Government is not that competent ;-( Just think back 25 years to 1990 and the collapse of the Soviet Union and the joy of all the WWII thru Cold War Veterans/Families that thought that “Happy Days Were Here Again” and we could all “Cash-In” on the World Peace Dividend …… what a mirage that was … Eh!! There has been so many Big-n-Bad Events these past 25 years that even those of US who are World-n-News watchers have become numb and the vast majority of our citizenry are ignorant … and happily so! The Deluge is already here!

            GOD BLESS ALL HERE …. And My Comrades-n-Arms who have “Gone Before”. AMEN!!

            Like

          • marie says:

            Steve, I have been feeling exactly the same way for some days now.

            I don’t know. I am still dismayed about the Irish referendum. But I think somehow it is something deeper.

            Wish I could put it into words ..

            Liked by 1 person

          • Kati says:

            It’s interesting that you should mention this, Steve, because we just received (on Friday) a new email from John Martinez, who is taking his call to be a watchman very seriously. He is receiving a great deal more information on the continuing “over the top” buildup for Jade Helm. I have no recollection of EVER having seen such a huge military buildup like this in my lifetime (I’m in my 70’s)….and NEVER with regard to possible military action to control the citizens of this USA! People are contacting him with substantive information and proof of what is taking place. Time to get even more serious with our invincible weapon: the ROSARY!

            Liked by 2 people

          • SteveBC says:

            Kati, how do you get his emails? I just occasionally see his articles at afterthewarning website.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Kati says:

            Steve, to answer your question: I really don’t know HOW I got on his mailing list. I do not recall ever signing up for it. At this point, I will simply attribute it to the Holy Spirit. He gives his email on the website you mentioned. It is johnservantofgod@austin.rr.com .
            Perhaps you can request being added to his list. I sincerely hope this helps. 😉

            Liked by 1 person

          • SteveBC says:

            Marie, I was just thinking of what Charlie says about North Korea and the Storm (if I am remembering correctly): That the Storm would come through North Korea but not be directly caused by North Korea.

            This Irish referendum gives me a similar feeling to yours and to this bit about North Korea. It feels as if whatever we are concerned about in our guts will later be seen as coming through this referendum but won’t be a direct effect of this referendum.

            It’s more like the result of this referendum is to *allow* something to occur somewhere else in the world that would otherwise not have been able to occur. We just don’t know yet what it will be.

            Like

          • marie says:

            “It’s more like the result of this referendum is to *allow* something to occur somewhere else in the world that would otherwise not have been able to occur.”

            Steve, I think you are right. Things are accelerating now. As Charlie says, ‘These things must come’.

            I also think, however, that this referendum will have direct consequences. Just today I read an article about some in Italy stating that their country will be next. Also, don’t you think it will be cited from now on by those who are pushing this agenda? As though, somehow, the Irish result has confirmed them in their boldness?

            I’m still so distressed about it. It certainly stole my Pentecost joy.

            On that note, I received a very encouraging mail today from Australian Alan Ames. He noted the timing of the event – right before Pentecost – and urged us to remember that God’s victory is assured:

            “All faithful Catholics should hold firmly on to this truth and should never lose hope and never despair for God has all in hand and at the appropriate time in the appropriate way He will show the power of His love in the victory of The Lord, Jesus, on the cross and in the resurrection.”

            Have mercy on Ireland and on the whole world.

            Like

          • SteveBC says:

            Marie, sorry, I’ve been unclear. I totally agree with you that the referendum will have direct results in many other nations. Italy as you suggest, the US Supreme Court decision, and so on.

            In the context of my “allow” remark, though, I was adding an indirect result, much the way people talk about the 1973 decision on Rowe vs Wade that allowed abortion in the US and appears to have resulted in the US declining ever since, because heavenly protections were withdrawn.

            The Flood effects are the direct effects you cite as now possible. The “allowed” effects are more about damages incurred as God is removed from Irish and World affairs and as heavenly protections are removed, “allowing” events to take more difficult paths.

            Liked by 1 person

        • connie says:

          Steve, were you thinking of Revelation 12:15 when you so succinctly tied this all together?

          Like

          • SteveBC says:

            Connie, thank you for the specific cite. It is indeed the verse I was thinking of, but I didn’t know exactly where it was in Revelations.

            All this is really a flood of words at its center. Changing words, overwhelming people with words, definitions, legalisms. Like any flood it will knock down any person based or concept written on sand, and all will be absorbed by the sand of the desert of the merely physical someday soon.

            However, in the meantime it causes a lot of both apparent and real damage to our world and the foundational concepts our civilization is built on.

            Rebuilding society as deeply as we must is an act that requires exposing the unassailable foundations even as the parts of the foundation built of sand must be washed away. So the flood of water in 12:15 may be the weapon the satan chooses to do damage against the Woman, but in a way, by sweeping away the apparent foundation, this may ultimately do good by exposing the parts of our foundation that are solid and which can later support the construction of a new society. Let’s hope and pray so.

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            Man, you get smarter all the time…but you are peculiar about it. When you think you are smart, you are usually just ordinary. But when you think you are ordinary, you are often extraordinary. You are a fascinating study sometimes, Steve!

            Like

          • SteveBC says:

            Ha! Charlie, I read this comment to my mother, and we both had a real laugh! 😀

            Like

          • marie says:

            Steve, I’m tagging this onto Connie’s reply above. Yes, I think you are right about the indirect consequences. As someone else here said, God will not be mocked. We will see the results of heavenly graces being removed.

            Your talk of The Flood reminds me of the prophecy of St Patrick about Ireland being flooded in the end times. I think I first read about it some time ago on a site called Unveiling the Apocalypse. I have always thought of this as a literal, physical flood. However, I am now wondering if it could be an ideological flood? Or perhaps what we are seeing now is first the one, then the other will come? Any comments, Charlie?

            What crushes me most about this is how quickly Ireland has gone from being the land of saints and scholars to this pagan society which is bitterly anti-Catholic. I have no doubt that many of my family voted yes. Everyone is so angry with the church because of the child abuse crisis. It’s almost as though the yes vote was some kind of revenge against priests and bishops.

            So sad.

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Yes, Marie, heavenly beings often talk in figurative, dramatic language that means something different than we think it does. In part, that is because what is a figurative, ideological flood here is seen as an actual spiritual flood there, more dramatic and destructive than a natural flood here. So they often speak of the reality they deal with. But since we can only dimly perceive the awesome power of spiritual forces, we naturally gravitate to the much more petty, in terms of eternity, but dramatic in our eyes, natural interpretation of the sayings of heavenly beings.

            The most dramatic physical events are never more than a sign of a much larger spiritual reality. It is a poverty that we usually see them as the substance, rather than as the sign of the reality.

            Liked by 2 people

          • marie says:

            Thanks, Charlie. There’s a lot to think about here, both in general terms and in terms of what Ireland is likely facing in the near future.

            I had the foolish idea I already pray a lot, but I can see I need to up my game.

            St Patrick, pray for us.

            Like

        • mvislander says:

          We are all on the same wavelength here. I immediately thought of the tiny Island nation that saved Western Christian civilization during the Dark Ages that had now turned its bak on God during this critical moment in the storm. I think we can pretty much foretell what will happen next month in Washington D.C. by looking at the signs. As a periodic visitor to my ancestral homeland since 1990 I have taken note of the changes to this beloved Island. As Malachi noted, I too, detected a palpable anti-Catholic sentiment during my last visit in June, 2014. Oh the melancholy for dear old Eire. Tears and prayers for you JayKay and Malachi and for us! God save Ireland+JMJ+

          Like

    • CrewDog says:

      “MARCO RUBIO: USA AT ‘WATER’S EDGE’ OF DECLARING CHRISTIANITY ‘HATE SPEECH”
      http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2015/05/26/marco-rubio-usa-at-waters-edge-of-declaring-christianity-hate-speech/

      It’s a hard thing to imagine and comprehend, especially approaching old age, but as Christians we are expected to embrace the coming persecution with hope and joy … just as in ancient times. The Truth is: These godless global lefty humanists slept through history class. From the Coliseum in Rome to the Shipyards of Gdansk the message is clear! Persecute US and we will grow stronger and STRONGER!! So!! Let satan’s useful idiots do their worst, band together with other faithful Christians, whatever their denomination, grow in The Lord and advance to eternal VICTORY!!

      GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

      Liked by 3 people

      • Nancy says:

        I spent the weekend watching a lot of World War II history videos in anticipation of Memorial Day and not to lessen the history of any other war or conflict, but to admire my father’s generation. I hope and pray that their spirit of courage, sacrifice and honor is still
        present in our hearts ready to rise up when needed.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Petra says:

        Crew: As I was reading your post I got a mental picture of Bing Crosby as Fr. O’Malley in “Going My Way.” Yep. He sure was the epitome of that hateful bigoted Catholic Christian we all are so familiar with – you know, the one who is perplexed by evil but wants to see good in the person, and tries to find a way charitably around it? Yep. I’d call that hate. 🙂
        Well, they’re right about one thing. We sure do hate evil (but not so much the evildoer.)

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Phillip Frank says:

    ” You have the words of everlasting life”.
    The Church that Jesus founded through the 12 dottering men only proved HIS greatness not theirs.
    For us to expect perfection in any human being running the Church is not only a lack of faith in Jesus Himself and His promises but a good window of our own weakness in our faith walk if we allow doubt or what the enemy wants us to do…dispare. What we can expect is that the weakness of our betters will made perfect in the strength of our God as He has promised.

    Like

  19. CrewDog says:

    Here is another “SIGN” that being a Christian is already “Patently Offensive” to the godless Left and their Political Party. This will be, no doubt, appealed but the results of the “appeal” may well come from The Lord’s Higher Court and The Storm.
    “Federal Court Rules Pro-Life Views Are ‘Patently Offensive”
    http://dailycaller.com/2015/05/22/federal-court-rules-pro-life-views-are-patently-offensive/
    GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Well, CrewDog, I take a certain grim comfort that these sorts of people think they are winning while they are actually filling out the particulars of their own indictment.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Patricia says:

        Charlie,
        My question may fall into the category of “not answering that yet” or “already did and you did not pay attention” but here goes: is it possible that the immediate chaos that is to come is the rise and fall of the secular left, including the financial chaos, thereby filling out their own bill of indictment AND that the remainder of the storm is the ISSI and China/Russia confrontation?

        Like

  20. kris says:

    Yesterday my husband and I were rejoicing in the fact that we have nothing more important to do than tend to our garden, run our small business, take care of our children . We are unknown in one sense, just do what God puts in our way. Today, in the Mass readings on EWTN we listened to the wonderful sermon on Peter being asked three times by Christ, do you love me? I was especially hit by the admonition, feed my lambs. I had such a warm feeling knowing that that is my role and that of my husband, to be the lambs. I am happy to be a little lamb and trust in my shepherd, Christ, who calls us and takes care of us. I gave up reading what the pope says, I gave up criticizing our priests who are all about social justice and nothing about spiritual development. I help my kids deal with the errors that they hear regarding same sex attraction that our priests and parish administrators tells us is not in error. My family prays for their conversion and that they will be given the grace to become holy humble priests when the time comes to defend the faith for real with possibly their lives and those of their flock. In the mean time I find I play more, enjoy my time with my kids more in the evening and plan to make my yard beautiful for the world to see the truth that comes from beautiful things. I always thought I had to be in someone else’s business, correcting them and I was always in the midst of turmoil. I am so glad that I have been taken out of all that and am now just a little lamb trusting in our shepherd to take care of us. I hope I am on the right path, and the best sign I know regarding this path is the peace that resides in our hearts and our home. God bless you all.

    Liked by 4 people

    • I feel like over the past few years I have been weeding my whole life and what I too have found is that I want to be an example of beauty and joy. To be at home creating a beautiful space for our family to celebrate, pray and live life. To bear good fruit and be a beacon of light and hope. I too hope to be an example that, even with lacking leadership in our priests, we go to Mass for Christ. So I agree, less criticizing more living life simply, beautifully and being at peace that we are in Mary’s mantle and in the palm of HIS hand.

      Liked by 3 people

  21. Patricia says:

    To Jaykay and all those of Charlie’s friends in Ireland: those of us who are of Irish descent and still Catholic, not in name only, are heartbroken. If I remember correctly it sounds as if the Irish “took the soup”.
    The shock of it is that it was the people who voted for it not the government forcing it down the country’s throat. When we vote on the issue, overwhelmingly we vote it down. I expect Ireland will have a difficult summer. God will not be mocked and neither will the millions of Irish who died for their faith.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Patricia says:

      My comment, btw, is to commiserate with you. Even though we vote it down our court’s then decide we are sexist and homophobic and revoke our vote. We are all in the same boat and it looks as though it is sinking. But Jesus is there and He will prevail. Thank God.

      Like

  22. Mack says:

    I am very sad about Ireland too. When Pope John Paul went there in 1979 he gave an amazing homily on how the fidelity of one man, St Patrick, was responsible for converting a nation.MAy God raise up a new Patrick to do the same today. The great apostasy is in full flower but in a short time we will be rescued.

    Like

  23. NancyA says:

    Have you seen Dr. Moynihan’s Letter #17? Very interesting reading. I was especially impressed with the interview with Cardinal Burke but the whole is very interesting indeed. Particularly note the prophetic words of then Father Ratzinger in 1970!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Karen says:

      NancyA and all – Dr. Moynihan’s Letter #18 on the Irish Vote has some very important and indeed depressing explanations regarding the outcome of the vote – focussing on the method or circumstances surrounding such an event – doesn’t bode well for any moral battle in any of our countries – whatever the subject matter.

      Like

      • NancyA says:

        I did see that, Karen, and felt a little more consoled, actually, to think that in effect, they were partly bullied into the yes votes by economic fears. I look upon those facts as hopeful that individuals are morally opposed more than the votes indicated. Unfortunately, the end result remains dismal but I hope more souls are repentent in light of this info on the lobbying that was undertaken.

        Like

  24. Karen says:

    Beginning today, Pentecost Sunday, it will be 40 Days until the Supreme Court votes on “gay marriage”. I am thinking of Ireland, and how their example will influence U.S. Catholics. “If Ireland, which is sooo Catholic accepts this, then maybe we should too”.

    I am asking all the NRS readers who are willing to fight for the soul of our country (and the world, because as the U.S. goes others will follow) to commit to fasting and praying these 40 Days for the Supreme Court justices and their vote. If we fight the principalities together it might make a difference…

    Liked by 5 people

  25. lynnfiat says:

    “Anyone who is so “progressive” that he does not remain rooted in the teaching of Christ does not possess God…” (From the second letter of the apostle John)
    Years ago, just after coming into the Catholic Church (1993), I was told by Our dear Lord, “As the veil in the Temple was torn in two, so will my Church be.” At the time I had no idea of what this meant. I now see it happening before my very eyes. Let us pray many Rosaries!

    Like

  26. Lin says:

    I wondered if anyone could share an opinion on a situation I am facing…in late summer, our diocese is having a week-long retreat for high school students, to help them discern if they are called to the priesthood. However, because this event is being hosted at a Catholic college which is into “diversity” (ie, there are college-sponsored clubs for LGBT), I have serious reservations about allowing my 10th grader to attend. I wish the diocese had chosen a more conservative campus to host the program. Are my concerns unreasonable?

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Sorry, Lin, but I think your concerns are valid. When I was a teenager, I was a trumpet player and had an agreement with the Archdiocese to play for various major public events, including ordinations. Several times, I stayed overnight at a large seminary there. I was not Catholic, but I was shocked at the grab-ass games some of the seminarians played at night. Once, I had a buddy come out with me who also played – and he saw it too and was deeply disturbed. I was hideously embarrassed that I had gotten him into that, even though I wasn’t Catholic. If I would have complained I would have been told to “lighten up” – and get with the program, no doubt, that later played into creating such scandal. I think you should probably tell the Diocese that you can’t let your child go to a host site that is committed to opposing Catholic doctrine. I still shudder when I think of my experience, even though it was just antics. But the antics could have destroyed my respect for a priesthood I did not yet subscribe to. It is bad enough to deal with the pressures and temptations of the secular world. It is intolerable to send your kids to be indoctrinated into lies under the banner of approved Catholic venues. I wouldn’t do it, and would let the Diocese know why.

      Liked by 1 person

      • CrewDog says:

        The Lavender Seminary business is just one of hundreds of reasons for the upcoming struggle. While we dread the upcoming Storm we live in Hope that many of us will emerge into those “Sunlit Uplands” that Winston Churchill spoke of 75 years ago at the beginning of another epic struggle.

        GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

        Like

  27. Lin says:

    Charlie,
    Thanks so much for your straightforward answer and for sharing your disturbing experience. I was thinking along the lines of merely not allowing my son to attend; thank you for the encouragement to “defend the faith” by telling the diocese our reasons why!

    Like

  28. Mary Ann says:

    I think Fatima’s miracle of the sun was not just a sign but a prophecy.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Judy says:

    Ireland’s vote was truly shocking. It was the young who came out and made the difference, as I understand it. I believe that this Supreme Court will follow the same route. It is a sign of the times. And the signs continue to upset and worsen. As for me, I am so busy with pressing problems in my personal life that I cannot dwell much on this madness, but I realize that it continues everywhere. I read the headlines, try to take the next right step in my own life, and fit in prayer and sleep.

    Like

  30. Mack says:

    The vote in Ireland is very sad and as Steve said above, I too think it marks a big event. However don’t forget that the left poured huge amounts of money into this–specifically Chuck Feeney, and Irish-American billionaire who donated hundreds of millions of dollars for this. The left has control of the media, etc. Thus they heavily influenced people. But as Charlie often says, in the End, God wins. I feel more sad for the persons who are committing serious sins thinking that they can choose their own lifestyle of sin without any consequences, endangering their eternal salvation.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Judy says:

      I know that God wins in the end, but the whole of it is still upsetting and, apparently,will get worse. I pray for guidance and fortitude daily. I am exhausted right now and cannot imagine any more added to my plate. The next right step is very hard to see. I find a lot of people in this position.

      Liked by 1 person

      • charliej373 says:

        Judy, I very much sympathize with you. I know many of you were worried about what had me so down at the end of last year. You are seeing in real time a part of what I was being shown then. I did not like it, but it was helpful to know that, distressing as it all is, it IS part of God’s plan to set things right. So it, too, while offensive, is not quite what it seems. May we all remember the Word of the Lord from Jeremiah 29:11: “For I know the plans I have for you, says the Lord, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope.”

        We know with confident certainty that the Lord is true.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Judy says:

          Charlie, I think that your burdens are greatest and I always ask God to send His angelic army to hold you up . I always have you and others in my prayers. I often think of you and Mark Mallet ….. Just as I write this, God has given me one of his little signs, what I call an unexpected ” whisper” , or “His smile”, just to remind me that I am not alone. Sometimes when I am feeling that I cannot take or do any more (but must ….due to circumstances), He often reassures me with this sign. I am so grateful for that, but the fatigue and distress continue. There are people who think am a very strong person. I think that only God knows the true nature of me. Yes, I can show strength, but then my body tells me that it simply cannot go on any more. And, like you, I must retreat for at least a day or more, until I can recoup my physical and mental strength. Oh, well, I know that God will make some good come from all this, but , of course, we do not see the end of the road. Often all we can see is the trial and the heaviness of it all. But, the little whispers do help one’s state of mind, and my spirit rises up just a little more to meet the challenges. Thank you, my dear Jesus!

          Like

        • Patricia says:

          So we can plan a summer vacation?? 🙂

          Like

        • Mack says:

          That’s very encouraging, Charlie. I’m pondering what it means that it happened right before Pentecost. Maybe it will shake up some fearful Catholics to realize we must speak up and teach the faith truly. I saw an article saying some Catholics in Ireland are saying we need a new language to communicate Church teaching on sexuality. Well we already have it — the theology of the body that John Paul gave us. “It is not quite what what it seems” — perhaps when the collapse comes it will all be swept away when governments fall. And apparently that’s not too far off now from what you said previously.

          Liked by 1 person

  31. jaykayjaykay says:

    Well, Mack, while Atlantic Philantrophies has donated hundreds of millions to Ireland in general, in fact only (!) 25 million of that was specifically for “LGBT” causes. Yeah, “only” $25m.

    As reported in LifeSite News recently: “In their report, entitled, “Catalysing LGBT Equality and Visibility in Ireland,” Atlantic Philanthropies details its funding, and gives a breakdown of how their money has been able to influence Irish social and political life. In the report’s synopsis page, (http://www.atlanticphilanthropies.org/learning/report-catalysing-lgbt-equality-and-visibility-ireland), the author reviews some “accomplishments” of Atlantic’s grantees, including:

    * Passage of a landmark 2010 civil partnership law

    * Secured public referendum on civil marriage, which is scheduled for 2015

    and

    * Government creation of a Gender Recognition Advisory Group, the role of which is make recommendations on how to proceed toward legal frameworks for gender recognition for transgender people”

    Needless to remark, this Niagara of outside funding – which in Irish terms is truly vast, given that we have fewer than 5 million people – was conveniently ignored by our guardians of objective reportage, those fearless newshounds ever ready to speak truth to power, shine light in dark corners and uphold the interests of those without a voice etc etc yadda yadda blahdy-blah.

    Well, no surprises there.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Lin says:

    Off-topic, but I wanted to share the following video featuring Fr. Dwight Longenecker. His message is very consistent with Charlie’s TDL message. He discusses how God calls each of His people on an “adventure”, and as we trust Him and walk with Him, we then have a “faith story” to share with others to help bring them to conversion—and that this is the answer to the many grievous problems to the world: one by one, each believer sharing with others their “faith story”.

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      I respect the good work the Lepanto Institute often does, but the Philadelphia Archdiocese says that the Talley Management Group, of which Matozzo is an employee, will only provide logistical support and will not act as a gatekeeper. I trust Philadelphia Archbishop Charles Chaput. He is both solidly orthodox, having spoken boldly on what marriage is and must be – so he is not timorous at all. I also trust him not to be duped…he is not naieve. In today’s climate, any company you hire to do an ancillary job may have a homosexual activist on its payroll. I think Lepanto Institute – and all of us – need to be very careful about determining what role a company will play and what role any homosexual activist will play in the event or we risk defaming someone or some entity that has not deserved it.

      Like

  33. Kathleen vacheresse says:

    Thank you Charlie, God bless you and may your Angels always watch over our community.

    Like

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