Gather the Children Together

San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone celebrates Mass at the Cathedral of the Assumption of Mary on the Feast of the Assumption of Mary - August 14, 2015

San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone celebrates Mass at the Cathedral of the Assumption of Mary on the Feast of the Assumption of Mary – August 14, 2015

By Charlie Johnston

-Sacramento, California

I noted in my guidelines for coordinators that you should not put pressure on either a Priest or a Bishop concerning a visit by me. As I noted, my preference is not to get them caught up on having to make some decision concerning me, but to help build them up as they proclaim the faith.

In some cases, priests have been among my coordinating committee in a region. In some, high diocesan officials have been part of the committee, sometimes openly, sometimes discreetly. After talking with Mary, my personal assistant, it seems clear to me that unless a priest is actually on your original coordinating committee, you should not look to have a presentation done at a Church. Our poor parish priests are besieged. My presentation is a bit out of the ordinary – and hard to explain. Many priests simply do not want something that is outside of the normal mainstream. That is not necessarily laziness, just prudence given the hectic demands on their time and the number of peculiar requests popping up. Those priests who have been following me for a while know that I am entirely orthodox, so it is easier for them. But the odds of you getting a Church venue for an event if the priest is not already a fan of the website is pretty slim – and we have had a few coordinators scrambling for a venue after a Priest changed his mind.

I don’t care if I speak at a VFW, Knights of Columbus Hall or whatever. It is the message that is important. If you look at the videos here, particularly the Birmingham Video, you will see that I am pretty straight-up orthodox and committed to the Barque of Peter. Except for official chancery inquiries and bona fide reports, I am going to put no one in contact with my director priests. They have work to do unrelated to this – and the demands of this work is mushrooming. The only thing I will send out is a simple statement from my Parish that I am a Catholic in good standing. There is a multitude of material here on the website showing other venues I have been at and the people and clerics I have met with there. Even if a priest has been following the website, I do not want to make the presentation from a Church if it would create a distraction from the solid work he is doing.

So save yourself some last-minute scrambling. If you have a priest on your committee who already enjoys the site and wants to offer his Parish Hall or Church to host, go ahead. If not, find another venue from the start and you won’t have to worry about the rug being pulled out from under you.

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Though I was right in the midst of it this morning, packing in South San Francisco to depart for Sacramento, I did not even know there had been an earthquake until I heard about it on the news later. I thought it must have just missed me, but the reported area was right where I was. Strange, I have now been through three or four earthquakes in my lifetime, but I never noticed a one of them – and only heard later that it happened where I was. Either I am extraordinarily insensitive to such things or have some great shock absorbers.

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Mark Mallett has a great piece today on Protestant prophecy. As you know, I have said I was told that all faithful Christians and Jews are to be treated as full and equal partners in the work before us and that God, Himself, will draw unity as a fruit of the Storm. I am troubled, though, that much modern Protestant prophecy focuses on judgment without rescue. I think Mark is right that it is because many have abandoned Our Lady. I don’t know how this came about. Martin Luther had a healthy veneration for Our Lady – as did even John Calvin.

When I made my presentation at the Cathedral of the Assumption in San Francisco on the Feast Day of the Assumption of Mary, I prayed that I might be inspired to effectively bring Protestants back to the love and tenderness of Our Mother. They don’t have to be Catholic to love Holy Mary – just ask Martin Luther or John Calvin. But any who reject Mary dogmatically make themselves spiritual orphans, I think.

I ask my Protestant friends who do not honor Mary and are willing, to undertake a private discernment. Tell the Lord you only want to do what pleases Him, that you are quietly going to say a Rosary for a few weeks – a set time. Ask Him to show you whether veneration of His Holy Mother pleases Him or not. Then go where He leads you after you are done. It is important to do it for a set time, so as not to be pushed away by either old enmity or the dark one.

In any case, I figure Mark’s column is so timely I reprint it in full below.

—with Mark Mallett—

The Marian Dimension of the Storm

THERE are many sincere and genuine “prophets” in the Protestant churches today. But not surprisingly, there are holes and gaps in some of their “prophetic words” at this hour, precisely because there are holes and gaps in their theological premises. Such a statement is not intended to be inflammatory or triumphalistic, as though “we Catholics” have the corner on God, so to speak. No, the fact is, many Protestant (Evangelical) Christians today have a greater love and devotion to God’s Word than many Catholics, and have cultivated a great zeal, prayer life, faith, and openness to the spontaneity of the Holy Spirit. And thus, Cardinal Ratzinger makes an important qualification of contemporary Protestantism:

Heresy, for Scripture and the early Church, includes the idea of a personal decision against the unity of the Church, and heresy’s characteristic is pertinacia, the obstinacy of him who persists in his own private way. This, however, cannot be regarded as an appropriate description of the spiritual situation of the Protestant Christian. In the course of a now centuries-old history, Protestantism has made an important contribution to the realization of Christian faith, fulfilling a positive function in the development of the Christian message and, above all, often giving rise to a sincere and profound faith in the individual non-Catholic Christian, whose separation from the Catholic affirmation has nothing to do with the pertinacia characteristic of heresy… The conclusion is inescapable, then: Protestantism today is something different from heresy in the traditional sense, a phenomenon whose true theological place has not yet been determined. —Cardinal Ratzinger (POPE BENEDICT XVI), The Meaning of Christian Brotherhood, pp. 87-88

Perhaps it would serve the body of Christ better to do away with the self-imposed categories of “Protestant prophecy” vs “Catholic prophecy.” For an authentic prophetic word from the Holy Spirit is neither “Catholic” nor “Protestant”, but simply a word to all God’s children. That said, we cannot as easily do away with the real theological divisions that persist that at times do great harm to both private and Public Revelation, either casting God’s Word into a false interpretation or leaving it greatly impoverished. A few examples come to mind, such as those “prophecies” that depict the Catholic Church as the whore of Babylon, the Pope as a “false prophet,” and Mary as a pagan goddess. These are no little distortions, which in fact, have led many souls to even abandon their Catholic faith for a more subjective (and thus precarious) religious experience.

Furthermore, these distortions have, in many instances, left out the most important aspects of the Great Storm that is upon us: that is, the triumph that is coming. Indeed, some of the most authentic voices in the Evangelical realm almost entirely focus on the coming “judgment” of America and the world. But there is so much more, so much more! But you won’t hear about it in Evangelical circles precisely because the triumph that is coming revolves around the “woman clothed in the sun”, the Blessed Virgin Mary.

HEAD AND BODY

From the beginning, in Genesis, we read how Satan will do battle with this “woman.” And the serpent will be defeated through her “offspring.”

I will put enmity between you [Satan] and the woman, and between your offspring and hers; they will strike at your head, while you strike at their heel. (Gen 3:15)

It is impossible to separate the mother from the offspring—the child’s victory is also its mother’s. This is realized for Mary at the foot of the Cross when her Son, whom she carried into the world through her fiat, defeats the powers of darkness:

…despoiling the principalities and the powers, he made a public spectacle of them, leading them away in triumph by it. (Col 2:15)

And yet, Jesus made it eminently clear that His followers, His body, would likewise share in the despoiling of principalities and powers:

Behold, I have given you the power ‘to tread upon serpents’ and scorpions and upon the full force of the enemy and nothing will harm you. (Luke 10:19)

How can we not see this as the fulfillment of Genesis 3:15 in which the Woman’s offspring is prophesied to “strike at [Satan’s] head”? Yet, one may ask how it is possible that Christians today are this woman’s “offspring” also? But are we not Christ’s “brother” or “sister”? If so, do we not, then, have a common mother? If He is the “head” and we are His “body”, did Mary give birth only to a head or to a whole body? Let Jesus Himself answer the question:

When Jesus saw his mother and the disciple there whom he loved, he said to his mother, “Woman, behold, your son.” Then he said to the disciple, “Behold, your mother.” And from that hour the disciple took her into his home. (John 19:26-27)

Saint John Paul II notes the significance of the title “Woman” with which Jesus addresses Mary—it is a deliberate echo of the “woman” of Genesis—she who was called Eve…

…because she was the mother of all the living. (Gen 3:20)

The words uttered by Jesus from the Cross signify that the motherhood of her who bore Christ finds a “new” continuation in the Church and through the Church, symbolized and represented by John. In this way, she who as the one “full of grace” was brought into the mystery of Christ in order to be his Mother and thus the Holy Mother of God, through the Church remains in that mystery as “the woman” spoken of by the Book of Genesis (3:15) at the beginning and by the Apocalypse (12:1) at the end of the history of salvation. —JOHN PAUL II, Redemptoris Mater, n. 24

Indeed, in the passage of Revelation 12 describing the “woman clothed in the sun”, we read:

She was with child and wailed aloud in pain as she labored to give birth… Then the dragon stood before the woman about to give birth, to devour her child when she gave birth. She gave birth to a son, a male child, destined to rule all the nations with an iron rod. (Rev 12:2, 4-5)

Who is this child? Jesus, of course. But then Jesus has this to say:

To the victor, who keeps to my ways until the end, I will give authority over the nations. He will rule them with an iron rod… (Rev 2:26-27)

The “child” whom this Woman bears, then, is both Christ the head and His body.

A WOMAN STILL IN LABOR

How does Mary “give birth” to us? It goes without saying that her motherhood to us is spiritual in nature. Even Martin Luther perceived this:

Mary is the Mother of Jesus and the Mother of all of us even though it was Christ alone who reposed on her knees… If he is ours, we ought to be in his situation; there where he is, we ought also to be and all that he has ought to be ours, and his mother is also our mother. —Martin Luther, Christmas Sermon, 1529.

The Church was conceived, so to speak, beneath the Cross. There, a profound symbolism takes place that mirrors the marital act of consummation. For Mary, by perfect obedience, “opens” her heart completely to the will of God. And Jesus, by his perfect obedience, “opens” His heart for the salvation of humanity, which is the will of the Father. Blood and water gushes forth as though “inseminating” the Heart of Mary. The Two Hearts are one, and in this profound union in the Divine Will, the Church is conceived: “Woman, behold your son.” It is then, at Pentecost—after the labor of waiting and prayer—that the Church is born in the presence of Mary by the power of the Holy Spirit:

And so, in the redemptive economy of grace, brought about through the action of the Holy Spirit, there is a unique correspondence between the moment of the Incarnation of the Word and the moment of the birth of the Church. The person who links these two moments is Mary: Mary at Nazareth and Mary in the Upper Room at Jerusalem. In both cases her discreet yet essential presence indicates the path of “birth from the Holy Spirit.” Thus she who is present in the mystery of Christ as Mother becomes—by the will of the Son and the power of the Holy Spirit—present in the mystery of the Church. In the Church too she continues to be a maternal presence, as is shown by the words spoken from the Cross: “Woman, behold your son!”; “Behold, your mother.” —SAINT JOHN PAUL II, Redemptoris Mater, n. 24

Really, Pentecost is a continuation of the Annunciation when Mary was first overshadowed by the Holy Spirit in order to conceive and give birth to a Son. Likewise, what began at Pentecost continues today as more souls are “born again” of Spirit and water—the waters of Baptism that flowed from the Heart of Christ through the Heart of Mary “full of grace” so that she would continue to participate in the birth of the People of God. The genesis of the Incarnation continues as the means by which the Body of Christ is born:

That is the way Jesus is always conceived. That is the way He is reproduced in souls. He is always the fruit of heaven and earth. Two artisans must concur in the work that is at once God’s masterpiece and humanity’s supreme product: the Holy Spirit and the most holy Virgin Mary… for they are the only ones who can reproduce Christ. —Archbishop Luis M. Martinez, The Sanctifier, p. 6

The implications of this profound presence of Mary—by God’s design and free will—places this Woman alongside her Son at the center of salvation history. That is to say, that God not only willed to enter into time and history through a woman, but intends to complete Redemption in the same manner.

On this universal level, if victory comes it will be brought by Mary. Christ will conquer through her because He wants the Church’s victories now and in the future to be linked to her… —POPE JOHN PAUL II, Crossing the Threshold of Hope, p. 221

Thus is exposed the “gap” in Protestant prophecy, and that is that this Woman has a role in giving birth to the entire People of God in order to further the reign of God on earth, the reign of the Divine Will “on earth as it is in heaven” before the end of human history. [1]cf. The Coming New and Divine Holiness  And this is essentially what was described in Genesis 3:15: that the Woman’s offspring will crush the serpent’s head—Satan, the “incarnation” of disobedience. This is precisely what St. John foresaw in the last age of the world:

Then I saw an angel come down from heaven, holding in his hand the key to the abyss and a heavy chain. He seized the dragon, the ancient serpent, which is the Devil or Satan, and tied it up for a thousand years and threw it into the abyss, which he locked over it and sealed, so that it could no longer lead the nations astray until the thousand years are completed. After this, it is to be released for a short time. Then I saw thrones; those who sat on them were entrusted with judgment. I also saw the souls of those who had been beheaded for their witness to Jesus and for the word of God, and who had not worshiped the beast or its image nor had accepted its mark on their foreheads or hands. They came to life and they reigned with Christ for a thousand years. (Rev 20:1-4)

Thus, the key to understanding the “end times” lies precisely in understanding the role of Mary, who is a prototype and mirror of the Church.

Knowledge of the true Catholic doctrine regarding the Blessed Virgin Mary will always be a key to the exact understanding of the mystery of Christ and of the Church. —POPE PAUL VI, Discourse of 21 November 1964: AAS 56 (1964) 1015

The Blessed Mother becomes for us not only a sign and real hope of what we are to become, but a mirror of what we already are:

At once virgin and mother, Mary is the symbol and the most perfect realization of the Church: “the Church indeed. . . by receiving the word of God in faith becomes herself a mother. By preaching and Baptism she brings forth sons, who are conceived by the Holy Spirit and born of God, to a new and immortal life. She herself is a virgin, who keeps in its entirety and purity the faith she pledged to her spouse.” —Catechism of the Catholic Church, n. 507

Thus, the coming triumph of Mary is at once the triumph of the Church. [2]cf. The Triumph of Mary, Triumph of the Church Lose this key, and you lose the fullness of the prophetic message that God wants His children to hear today—both Protestants and Catholics.

RELATED READING

The Triumph — Part I, Part II, Part III

Why Mary?

The Key to the Woman

The Great Gift

The Masterwork

Protestants, Mary, and the Ark of Refuge

Welcome Mary

She Will Hold Your Hand

The Great Ark

The Ark and the Son

 

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
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77 Responses to Gather the Children Together

  1. Pamela Nicholson says:

    Hey, Charlie, have you got a letter from your bishop to do talks in other dioceses? Long story, short, I had such a negative response about having Tom Rutkoski (now deceased) by not only diocesan priests, but, the bishop’s chancery as well. And, it seems they had heard about Tom’s conversion story which involved Medjugorje, but, it was more in line with, “Who will really want to go to something like this kind of talk?”. Well, I was on fire anyway because of how God has been working with me and within me. So, I realize that if a priest of diocesan bishop does have a particular excuse or reason for not having someone like you go into the churches (Tom always preferred to have mass, recitation of the rosary, his talk and then he would do the laying on of hands with the blessing of the Blessed Mother, etc., afterwards, if people would come up and there were willing catchers) I know in my case, it helped build up my humility and help me to see that I was really just a conduit for God’s work with Tom’s talks. These kind of rejections gave me a thicker skin, so to speak. I don’t know how long you have been at what you do for the Lord, but, I guess you know exactly what I am talking about. I just want folks out there who read your words to know that you must accept all the rejections with grace and peace, and maybe, in some unusual way, the way you take the rejection will plant a seed. Never fight with a priest even if he gets down on the messenger. Best not to ever be combative because he may not want anything to do with Charlie right now. God does work in funny ways, mysterious ways. And, that is why we must pray for priests very much. Jesus Himself said not to ignore the prophets, but, priests don’t always like prophets, and Tom was not one himself, although he knew things. So, I am not trying to tout Tom’s books, but, folks can get a copy of his conversion story at http://www.gospa.org. It is unvarnished and full of situations which can only be described as “God-incidences”. People, just keep praying God will make it possible to have a little opening to have Charlie invited to do talks, but, keep in mind Who is really in charge. Stay humble always when working for God even in the smallest of ways. God’s blessings on you all. pam from NJ.

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    • charliej373 says:

      Hi Pamela. My Bishop was fully informed prior to me beginning to act publicly. He has chosen to act with prudential silence, neither forbidding me nor encouraging me.

      I am proud that Archbishop Aquila was one of the Bishops who publicly flatly condemned Planned Parenthood and the Culture of Death after the videos were released. He did not mealy-mouth it and try to equate it with some lesser evil. He has also initiated another project I just love: he plans to have Confirmation at a much younger age – I think third grade. His point is that, as things now stand, Confirmation is often regarded as a sort of graduation from Christianity. He wants it to be seen as entry into a true deepening of Christian life. I love it and hope it spreads all over.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Pamela Nicholson says:

        You have a good bishop there. I am so taken aback by all the good which comes from your blog/site/ministry. I cannot believe what kind of obstructions are in place in having a person who has had a great conversion experience is just kept held at bay. We are to proclaim what the Lord has done with us and to us, and I cannot tell you how much it heartens me that you are going wherever “He tells you”. I cannot help remembering the vital importance of remembering what Our Lady said in scripture. It seems her words are constantly on my heart now, and I pray they will remind us all, as they have you, to do whatever He tells us with the spirit of a little child, as we are His children, and what He says, still goes. Thanks Charlie for your thoughtful clarification on your bishop’s stance. To me, the black and white can never say enough anyway. It is what is in the heart of one who has learned and keeps his faith open to daily conversion that can move spiritual mountains. God bless and thanks for raising me and my family up in prayer. We need it badly. pam from NJ.

        Liked by 1 person

      • mmbev says:

        I am delighted to hear that! I was confirmed at age seven, not long after receiving my first Confession and Eucharist. No graduation going on then!

        One of the saddest encounters from my catechism teaching days, was in our parish parking lot where I was having a discussion with the father of one of our candidates for confirmation

        The discussion grew a bit more heated for him as time passed. Finally, he threw up his hands and yelled at me, “Jesus, Jesus! What’s Jesus got to do with it!”

        I think we were having trouble communicating with each other.

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  2. EllenChris says:

    The purpose for the following brief outline is to illuminate the wonderful quote from Cardinal Ratzinger taken above from his work *The Meaning of Christian Brotherhood.*

    The term “Protestant” as an easy umbrella term is misleading. There are great differences between those who are identified under this umbrella. Roman Catholics would benefit from understanding this. I really, really hope that everyone will read this through to the end for the sake of understanding.

    Anglicans understand ourselves to be full members of the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church which we proclaim every Sunday in the Nicene Creed. We are a reformed branch of The Church as it continued during the Reformation. Please do NOT call us “Protestants.”

    Methodists derive directly from Anglicans. The Church of England refused to consecrate and send bishops for the large and powerful “Great Awakening” in the Americas which began in the 1740s and was preached by the Wesleys and Whitefield who were Anglican priests. In frustration, Wesley held a “consecration” of a bishop (not himself) by a gathering of, and laying on of hands by a group of priests. These bishops were not recognized as valid by Anglicans, and so they became a separate movement. The Church of the Nazarene developed out of the Methodist Movement.

    Lutherans retain some sense of catholicity, as do Presbyterians to a lesser degree. They understand theology from the point of view of their early leaders such as Melancthon and Knox as well as Luther and Calvin, respectively. Luther had no intention of separating from Rome until he found himself excommunicated.

    Puritans originally based their ideas on Calvin, but then developed their own much more radical theology on a supposed return to the Old Testament. They embraced the term “Protestant.” By eliminating all symbols, statues and pictures (as being “graven images”) they lost their sense of Jesus Christ as True God and True Man in One Person. Within 3 generations of coming to the American Colonies, the Puritans transmuted into Unitarians — those who deny the divinity of Christ and therefore ceased to be Christians. Those who still acknowledge Jesus Christ continue in the Congregational and United Church of Christ groups who are properly understood to be Protestant.

    The “Protestant” Movement really got going with the Anabaptists who taught a theology which was very different from the Holy Tradition. Essentially, they did not see sacraments as genuine means of Grace, only as an expression of personal faith. All the various denominations of Baptists developed out of this source. The only “sacrament” that they deem to be necessary is the acceptance of Christ as personal Savior and Lord — the “born again” experience. They would ask a Roman Catholic if he is “born again” and if not, they would question if that person is genuinely a Christian. Communion is merely a memorial service with a scrap of bread and a shot glass of grape juice. Most of the various, so-called “Non-denominational” churches are really some form of Baptists in their theology and practice. These are really “Protestants” in the truest sense of the term.

    Quakers were the original “Pentecostals” back in the 1600s, using and expressing what have come to be known as the “Charismatic Gifts” or Gifts of the Holy Spirit. However, the Pentecostal Movement is usually understood to have originated with the “Azusa Street Revival” which occurred in Los Angeles in 1906. The power of the Holy Spirit was keenly felt and many miracles of healing and conversion followed. The “Mainline Churches” were uncomfortable with a lot of what they considered to be unseemly behavior, and therefore many independent church groups formed under the designation “Pentecostal” with the Holy Spirit as the focus — such as the Assemblies of God and later the Vineyard. Baptist groups were especially uncomfortable with charismatic type expressions of faith.

    After World War II many of the Baptist-based and Wesleyan groups identified themselves under the term “Evangelicals” because their focus was on preaching the Gospel of Salvation in Christ. They did and are doing a great deal of mission work and millions of Christians around the world owe their Faith in Jesus to them. Also in the 1950s, what came to be known as the “Charismatic Movement” re-introduced the Gifts of the Spirit into the “Mainline Churches” particularly the Episcopal Church in the USA and many Methodist churches largely through networks like the “Full Gospel Businessmen’s Association. In the 1960s the Charismatic Movement found its way into the Roman Catholic Church as well. Today the largest and fastest growing Christian group is the worldwide Pentecostal Movement.

    So don’t just call every “non-Catholic” a “Protestant.” Anglicans especially find this rather offensive. Baptists, Presbyterians and most Methodists would find it more acceptable. Pentecostals prefer that term as their designation as such. And we all include millions of dedicated and joyful Christians who do not identify ourselves as “Non-anything” but rather by the term CHRISTIAN according to the positive characteristics spoken of by Cardinal Ratzinger in Mark Mallett’s quote.

    So how about this: let’s all call each other, “Fellow Christians!” That really works for the Kingdom of God.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Mary W. says:

      Dear Ellen Chris,
      For the sake of better understanding, I need to pose some questions to you, in all due respect.

      Would Anglicans consider themselves in a class apart from Protestants just as the Greek or Russian Orthodox do? Do Anglicans honor Our Lady, the Blessed Virgin Mother, the Mother of God, as highly as the Orthodox do? What is their attitude towards her, in other words?

      Is not a ‘reform’ church(which you say the Anglican Church is… if I understand correctly) the same as a church protesting some essential beliefs which make Roman Catholics Roman Catholics?

      My paternal family is Greek Orthodox. My dad became Roman Catholic before marrying my mom however. Therefore I am very much aware of certain things which cause disunity among Christians. As well, my husband’s family are (inactive) Evangelical Lutherans. My husband is now Roman Catholic.

      I appreciate the information you presented above. I have learned much from it, but am still a bit confused.

      Yes, let us be one at last. When we are united, which is the hope, I rhetorically ask: will there be a Pope? Time will tell.

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      • Pamela Nicholson says:

        Hi! When Jesus returns, there may not be a need for a pope. However, our pope, has been especially chosen with great care by God through the power of the Holy Spirit. The Holy Father is in essence representative of Jesus Christ on earth until He returns. The Holy Father is given particular special graces by God at the time of his being made pope of the Church, so he is given particular tasks which are representative by the Magisterium or Holy See, at any given time. Ever wonder why this particular Holy Father is coming to Philadelphia, USA? City of brotherly love? Place where the Declaration of Independence was written and signed, and by a few catholics as well? These are questions for theologians because for us, it is hard enough to remember we are here to know, to love and serve the Lord. We are to be as little children, always asking God what He wants of us at any given point in time, and we must remember He has no problem slipping through time barriers known to man and those unknown to man. He loves to surprise us. So, we must always just remember the pope is here a short time just as we all are, but, he is also here to know, to love and to serve the Lord. Sorry about repeating catechesis but I have to remember these things daily just as anyone else does, so, this is my yes to being a little child for Jesus. He is my all and when we all really get it, so to speak, He will also be everyone’s all when ready to accept Him for Who He is and what He says He will do. He is coming, and very soon now. pam, from NJ.

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        • charliej373 says:

          Let me just say that Jesus does not come physically until the actual end – and I have been assured since childhood that this is NOT the end. I expect that the unbroken line of Popes will continue long after the Rescue.

          Liked by 4 people

          • EllenChris says:

            R. T. Kendall entirely agrees with you, Charlie. He said that the “Call in the midst of the night” (Matthew 25: 6), the Awakening, comes at some indeterminate length of time BEFORE Jesus returns. So, there is indicated a period when the bridesmaids have lit their lamps, but the Bridegroom has not yet arrived. There are other places in Holy Scripture as well which indicate a time of new appreciation and living in the Kingdom before the End of the end. Mark Mallett has done a great job of describing and discussing this.

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      • EllenChris says:

        Contrary to popular belief, the Church of England was not started by King Henry VIII. His son, Edward succeeded him, died very young and was succeeded by Henry’s daughter with Catherine of Aragon, Queen Mary. Mary reunited England with Rome. When she died of plague, there was a brief struggle for the throne, and Henry’s second daughter, Elizabeth was designated queen. In the preceding hundred years there had been desperate civil wars in England, and it was imperative that the throne be firmly and peacefully established. In 1558 the new Queen and the Parliament rejected an attempt by radical Protestants to make the Church in England really radically Protest-ant; they did not want that. Elizabeth sent an envoy to Pope Pius V in 1559 to negotiate mutual recognition between England and the Papacy. The Pope roared at the envoy: “All the thrones of Europe belong to me, and I will not give England to a bastard!” Elizabeth could not abdicate without starting a new civil war. So she kept her throne, and she and the Parliament and the bishops worked on settling the “question of religion” in England: this is called, “The Elizabethan Settlement” (1559). This is the real beginning of the Church of England and of its daughter churches planted by missionaries around the world. And BTW, there had been many martyrs on both sides of the issue — terrible brother against brother.

        The Church in England wanted to keep its sense of Catholicity in very many ways. The C of E had to struggle mightily against the radical Calvinists, however. So much so that the Puritan Oliver Cromwell and his gang revolted in the mid 1600s and executed both the King and the Archbishop of Canterbury for being “Too Catholic.” (This King is sometimes referred to as Saint Charles the Martyr) The C of E was not formed around Protest against the larger Church. In order to settle England down, however, some elements of the Reformed theologians were incorporated. The most important of these concerned a strong focus on the importance of Holy Scripture and the preaching of the Gospel as well as a streamlined liturgy in English.

        In the midst of this, Our Lady was always cherished although Her role was diminished. The Puritans, during their own reign of terror destroyed Her statues and shrines, but not all and not permanently. (You could maybe guess that I am not a big fan of the Puritans). England had been called, “Our Lady’s Dowery.” In the 1800s the Oxford Movement restored a much stronger and clearer focus on both Our Lady and Holy Eucharist, but that is a different story of a later time. It comes as no surprise that the Eucharist and Our Lady always seem to sort of go together.

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        • Mary W. says:

          Dear Ellen,
          It is obviously that your are very knowledgeable and I do not want to contest that. I would like your take however on a few things. Why or how did such fierce anti-Catholicism thrive in England, especially in the mid 1500’s? Why did Catholics need to hide the practice of their faith and why do we have such martyrs as the Jesuit St. Edmund Campion and St. Margaret Clitherow who were willing to die to pass on the sacraments of the Roman Church?
          I tend to believe that these reforms, all over Europe at the time, were exploited for political purposes. The countries involved were not happy that the Roman church owned much property and were wealthy because of it. The Principalities wanted their share of the bounty, so to speak.
          Was this the drive to rid (read: martyr) Roman Catholics? The examples of drawing and quartering abound. A sad time in salvation history, for sure. Thank you EllenChris or anyone for further enlightenment.

          Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            Just so you know, Mary, during the brief period of Restoration, Catholics were equally brutal and fierce against Protestants. The oppression was NOT a one-way street.

            Like

          • EllenChris says:

            Mary W. Charlie, just below here, is quite right. There was a whole lot done in the name of religion at that time that was downright anti-Christian and horrible on all sides. Spain was no kinder to those who were not Roman Catholic.

            I know about the martyrs — on all sides. The point is — which I think Cardinal Ratzinger-Pope Benedict was referring to — is that the Reformation was 500 years ago. If Christians cannot let go of the wrongs done 500 years ago, how are we going to learn to love each other as sisters and brothers now? We are called into a true oneness according to God’s Will through the Storm. That means showing the world what forgiveness and healing really looks like. Jesus told us that the world would know Him by the love we have for one another. That should be our endeavor, by His Grace. (And just BTW — one side of my family is Irish, so I get it. Oliver Cromwell martyred Anglicans along side Roman Catholics — anyone who was not Puritan. When can we forgive and move on?)

            Liked by 2 people

          • Pamela Nicholson says:

            We can forgive and move on, but, there is so little understanding or teaching to catholics about real martyrdom. We are either going to do things God’s way, or some other way. People either want to know the truth as it is told, or they may want some other understanding because it is too hard to believe. We have abortion in this country, which was and still is legislated from the bench, and to my estimation, not only is abortion still an abomination, and evil. But, it does go on in this country everyday, women are being hurt, babies body parts are being placed under microscopes, unwilling test subjects, but, people are talking about it, and big time, now that the cat is out of the bag about why big money people like the Clintons, Bushes, etc., are pro-Planned Parenthood. It is a money-maker for people who love money more than human life. Do we just forgive and move on in this respect? There are lots of martyrs but do we see abortionists being martyrs for life? No, they love making money the way they do, or they would not do what they do everyday no matter the cost to human life in general. So, do we just move on from man’s historical roots of one human being hurting another because it is too hard to deal with on a human level, or do we continue to try to understand why human beings find it so necessary to kill their brothers? Is religion or faith really what God had in mind to use as a reason to kill someone who is not like us in our faith? This is truth. Do we stop talking about how Jesus died on the Cross for our sins? Let’s be honest and understand that we all have a lot of work to do, and no man is holier than thou, as they say. Are we all willing to say and believe that we will be willing to die for our faith when put to the test as Jesus was? He asks this of us, so can we all say that we are? Blessings, pam, from NJ.

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          • charliej373 says:

            Be careful about assuming the Bushes – or any other reputed conservative – is pro-abortion. Sometimes we are betrayed by those we trust, but often now those we trust are smeared by the pro-abortion forces because they know we will pull away from them. Even if the elections were going to be held, I am not a Jeb Bush supporter (too meekly establishment for my tastes), but I regard most of the supposed pro-abortion evidence against him to be a smear. He sat on the board of a charitable foundation – that turned out to give money to Planned Parenthood. Good luck finding any charitable foundation that doesn’t these days. It is criticizing him for swimming in toxic waters – while we are in the same waters ourselves. Do you ever get Starbucks Coffee…or go to Disneyland…or buy things from Target? Since you are endorsing them, who endorse Planned Parenthood, does that mean you endorse Planned Parenthood? Of course not. When you find that someone you admired supported something that has supported Planned Parenthood, look back over your purchases and donations of the last week and you will find you have given money to at least seven who support Planned Parenthood. It is the culture that must be changed.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            Charlie, I am disabled so I do not get around as I would like to. I cannot go shopping even for groceries now. It must be best for me to just do what I am doing, nuf said on that. I do not buy anything from any of these corporations, but, they are really the ones out there in the public eye. They have people behind the scenes who really have placed these establishments in a bad light to pro-life folks. I do not hate these folks but I do not like what they do. But, like the rest of us, they, like us, will have to answer for all we have done to push ourselves away from God. Blessings. pam, from NJ.

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      • mmbev says:

        I have personally, over the course of my adulthood, been involved with or friends with a real variety of “fellow Christians”. Quite a number of them didn’t know what to call themselves. Usually, I found that they believed in elements of a cross-section. The current family I am growing to know well, have pastor who is Spanish, a no longer Catholic lay man, with elements of Baptist and Evangelical facets and the congregation uses only the church name that they have given themselves as far as I can find out.

        Year before last close friends decided to not follow their Traditional Anglican denomination as they joined the Catholic Church, and joined the Eastern Orthodox Church (Greek, I think,) instead. But they don’t believe in divorce.

        When my son was in his third year of University, he was hired by the Vineyard church in that city to be their youth (pastor) leader, and the leader of their Sunday music ministry. He was and is Roman Catholic. As part of his “pay” he lived with the pastor and family.

        My dad’s family was very unusual. Two communists, one the leader of the communist party in his province, and incarcerated after the Spanish War for a while, a Mormon bishop, a Roman Catholic, and one died in WWII. He didn’t have enough time to settle the issue.

        In my Canadian neck of the woods we have really mixed ourselves up. When discussing religion we just ask what the person is, and otherwise use the general categories of Protestant, Eastern Orthodox and Catholic.

        I love that we’ll be united after the Storm.

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    • SteveBC says:

      EllenChris, thank you for this. I don’t see a clear explanation of Episcopalians, and I know several here in my local area. Are they related to the Anglican line?

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      • EllenChris says:

        The Church of England uses the adjective, “Anglican.” This part of the Church catholic spread to the territories which England controlled at various times. The Jamestown colony founded in 1607 included a C of E priest. All C of E clergy were required to take an oath of allegiance to the British Crown, so after our Revolution we had a bit of a conundrum. Around the same time that the U.S. Constitution was ratified, the Anglican presence in the U.S.A. also formed an independent entity which most often used the name Episcopal Church, U.S.A. Other former colonies also followed this pattern; all refer to themselves as “Anglican.” There are 38 semi-independent Anglican churches around the world in former British colonies and other places as well — e.g. Anglican Church of Australia; Church of South India; Episcopal Church of Scotland, etc. In the 1800s these churches formed what we call a “Communion” that is, a family of local churches all of whom have inter-communion and recognition of each other’s ordinations. We all share the same heritage of The Book of Common Prayer. There are approximately 80 million Anglicans, most of whom are in Africa; we are the third largest Christian Church in the world. During the 1800s Anglicans worldwide amalgamated into the Anglican Communion with a meeting of all our bishops at the Lambeth Palace of the Archbishop of Canterbury every 10 years. Very sadly, our unity has been crumbling in the last 12 years due to unilateral actions by the Episcopal Church USA which were rejected by most of the rest of the Communion. (This is hugely complicated, and I would rather not go into it here). Over the past 10 years, a new Anglican entity was formed called the Anglican Church in North America which is recognized by most of the national Anglican churches, but which does not have recognition by the Episcopal Church USA or official authorization by the Archbishop of Canterbury. (Another LONG story). i hope this is helpful.

        Liked by 1 person

        • SteveBC says:

          Thank you, EllenChris. This actually does help. It seems that the term “Episcopal” is probably US-only in its use. Perhaps it will fade away if the Anglican Church in North America replaces the Episcopal Church USA, which I think really has been pretty egregious.

          Now I realize after reading all your informative and heartfelt comments on this subject so far, I have a question that you probably won’t want to (and don’t have to!) answer, but here goes:

          If the Anglican Church exists simply because some Catholic Pope got mad and rejected the original request to rejoin the Catholic Church, why do you (who obviously know so much on the things that divide or unite) convert to become Catholic?

          Liked by 1 person

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            Folks, let us not cast aspersions against the Seat of Peter, rather, it is better to get it from the horse’s mouth, so to speak. There are lots of questions about what popes do or not do. The pope answers directly to God, but, the Holy See and Magisterium is what he and the rest of the church are called to humbly follow as set forth by the early church fathers. They are the Christian jewish rabbis/priests which were called together just as we have synod today for cardinals. All these words, like Episcopal and synod, are all catholic in nature which come from greek words which mean things catholics learn about from the catechism of the catholic church. No one has asked me but I will tell you that Dr. Scott Hahn, a convert to the catholic faith, explains all these issues which are not understood even by many catholics. But, he will direct anyone who has never heard of or read anything about the early church fathers, i.e. St. Justin Martyr, and others, to read these books and he clearly and concisely explains what their importance is to the church and why they are so important to what we catholics hope to be an example of, holiness. We are all sinners, and the early church fathers along with the popes of the past explain the teachings through things like encyclicals, bulls, etc., which catholics are to become familiar with as all the teachings of the popes must coincide with all matters of faith and morals. They cannot break rules to suit themselves for some kind of agenda. All earthly agenda, except for the pope’s job of spreading the Gospel message to all four corners of the earth, has always been their job. Please also go to the Vatican website and you can see archives of all the teachings of the church on any subject or issue. I have given places to look but the church has no secrets or secret agenda. It is here on earth for all to learn and study and put to actual use in all everyday situations. I just think I have had my fill of people saying bad things about the popes of the past or this one until they learn what their job is on earth, in the world. I don’t see how people taking all kinds of unkind words and attitudes against God’s vicar on earth is helpful or Christian. Catholics do not rip apart protestants because they do not want to be catholics. Rather, we are supposed to love all humanity, just as Christ loves all humanity. Can anyone out there actually say and believe with all heartfelt, down to the soul conviction, that they love the whole world and would die for any one human being, as Christ did? That is what a Christian is, to pick up your Cross, just as Jesus said, and then, follow Him. Are we all willing to do that as He instructed? Do we love that much? Blessings. pam, from NJ.

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          • SteveBC says:

            Pam, I’m not sure what you’ve said here, but I was not doing anything but drawing on EllenChris’s own statement with my take on the situation. Just so we are all on the same page here, this is what EllenChris wrote several comments above: “Elizabeth sent an envoy to Pope Pius V in 1559 to negotiate mutual recognition between England and the Papacy. The Pope roared at the envoy: “All the thrones of Europe belong to me, and I will not give England to a bastard!” Elizabeth could not abdicate without starting a new civil war. So she kept her throne, and she and the Parliament and the bishops worked on settling the “question of religion” in England: this is called, “The Elizabethan Settlement” (1559). This is the real beginning of the Church of England and of its daughter churches…”

            So it looks to me that Pius V was mad-angry and rejected the request to rejoin/reconnect. Personally, I find his conduct reprehensible in that context. Since this was not a matter connected to faith and morals as I understand it, criticism of this Pope’s actions and words is allowed.

            I was in no way criticizing EllenChris or any other commenter here, nor was I attacking a Pope for something within his sacred ambit, something I have no intention of doing.

            Since I hold EllenChris in very high esteem, my question to her is an attempt to get her reflection on her own situation so that I might benefit from her insight in a way that would help my own “betwixt and between” status.

            I hope that helps, Pam. I am sorry if I said something that offended you, and I hope my explanation here will help set things right.

            Liked by 3 people

          • EllenChris says:

            This is a big question, Steve, but I will try to give you some thoughts. I was not raised in the Episcopal Church. Right now the great majority of Episcopalians have come from other other Christian groups. Many were Evangelicals who were longing for Sacraments; others (more than your would think) are former Roma Catholics who were alienated for one reason or another. “Lapsed” Catholics don’t always just languish in the mist, they gravitate to our sacramental life.

            I continue to choose to be an Anglican for many reasons. None of this should be taken to imply any criticism of Roman Catholic belief and practice. I hope that neither you nor anyone else will respond to this in terms of arguing for the Roman Catholic position. I am not arguing against the RC position, I am merely stating our own positions and why I take them for my own.

            We are a kind of bridge church: we include respect for and reference to Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and “Reformed” theology, spirituality and practice. We believe we are all part of the “Church Catholic” and therefore do not exclude fellow Christians simply for being different from us. In the 1600s the great theological question developed by priests like Richard Hooker and Jewel and others was the endeavor to locate what they called, “True Religion.” To do this, they made great use of the early ecumenical Councils and the Fathers of the Church with a strong and clear focus on Holy Scripture as the Source and well-spring of all Truth. We invite fellow baptized Christians to receive Jesus’ Body and Blood in Holy Communion with us. (Just BTW, you would be welcome to do that too if you wanted to, Steve). Our tradition of Preaching the Gospel with vigor and clarity is enormous and beautiful. There is an emphasis on Jesus as The Savior and Lord with a personal commitment to and relationship with Him. We make use of the Gifts of the Holy Spirit, such as healing prayer. In this way we are a “Three Streams” Church: Scriptural, Sacramental and Charismatic. There is a lot more, but I don’t have time.

            Now are we currently living up to all of this very well? I am sorry to say, “Not really.” Right now faithful Anglicans are in a terrible place; the liberal wing positioned itself with a lot of power and has been causing a lot of devastation. We have been having our own internal “Storm” (we have already arrived where other churches, including the RC Church, are now heading). My only question has been, “Where do You want me to be in the midst of all this, Lord?” The only indication I have had from Him is to stay where I am and serve His people in this place as best I can. There just ain’t no greener grass nowheres! Brown dirt and crab grass in everybody’s yard! Charlie has said some good things about holding our posts where God has put us. My heart aches for all that is going on in the Episcopal Church (and I saw it happen up close and personal). But I have a bishop who is one of the few holding out for orthodoxy as best he is able. I could go to the ACNA, but our good Lord has not given me leave to do so (yet?!?!) All my husband and I can do is stand our post and serve those who need us here by His Grace.

            So let’s all just pray for each other in peace. I am hopeful that all these questions will disappear soon as the Lord Himself brings us all into full unity with Him and each other.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            I am sorry but I do not want to come off combative as that is never the intent of Our Lord, but the truth is what Jesus Himself told the apostles before ascending to the Father… (edited)

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Pam, I deeply appreciate the contributions you have already made in such a short time to this comment board. You are getting caught up in trying to argue everyone into Catholicism. With respect, that is not what this site is about. I am unshakeably Catholic, but I have been told to treat all faithful Christians of any persuasion (recognizing the Holy Trinity) and Jews as full and equal partner in the work before us, that God, Himself, will see to the unity as a fruit of the Storm if we love and work together with each other. I do not want this to veer off into a debate board on who, precisely, has just the right flavor of Christianity.

            At times you state that the “simple truth is…” as prelude to giving your interpretation of various Scriptures. I often agree with those interpretations – but you dismiss reasonably credible alternative interpretations as, simply, error. I think that presumes too much. In any case, I very much appreciate your enthusiasm and vigor, but this site is designed to be a safe haven for all who take their Christian or Jewish faith seriously, so I must ask you to tamp it down a bit. Make your point with charity on what you believe – but a lot less on how others who take their faith seriously are mistaken. Trust me, God will be very charitable with all who are humble and sincere, wiping away their errors. We are to build each other up here.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            Charlie, have I said anything contrary to faith and morals? Is there a problem with the seed? Have I placed too much fertilizer where the tree is to hopefully grow and sprout roots? pam, from NJ.

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          • Pam Nicholson says:

            Charlie, I just want you to know that there is a great thing we can learn from prophecy which has been given to you. Prophecy is meant to stir the faithful to take notice of all that God has done, not what we have done. I just read on Wendy Cukierski’s site something I want to share with you which is what I try to say to people but never have the right passage or encyclical to be able to best paraphrase what I am trying to say when I hope I am planting seeds. “the union of Christians can only be promoted by promoting the return of the one true Church of Christ of those who are separated from it.” — Pope Pius XI. We are in a war against satan and his minions, and we better be on top of helping Christ get His church to where it needs to be. I am just a messenger stating a point that we are lovers of God or of the things of the world. As Blessed Mother of Medjugorje stated very aptly: “What was once wrong is now right, what was once right is now wrong.” This was a warning to us to wake up and help others wake up. So, maybe this blog is not for me. I seek to help in the healing process of hearts which feel so left behind and not part of a process which Christ gave His church 2,000 years ago. He died on the Cross and asked us to carry ours if we wanted to foillow Him. God speed. Get well soon. Sorry I don’t seem to come across quite as aptly as I would otherwise be accepted. I pray for the lukewarmness of all persons. God in His mercy hears these prayers. He is sending folks like you around to spread the news that God has never left them, so I bid you goodbye for now. God bless. pam, from NJ.

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          • SteveBC says:

            EllenChris, thank you so much for your explanation. I found it very much on point. Sticking to one’s station and duty at this time makes great sense. It seems that we are all to coalesce during the Storm, but sticking with current duty is a fine thing.

            My mother was a Catholic but shifted to Episcopalian a number of years ago. I was Catholic as a child, then journeyed away, and am now returning at least intellectually to the Catholic Church and confirming my Christian roots, even as I attempt to retain or reconcile the many good things I found on my journey away and back. Not easy, but I think it is important to try.

            If you recall our conversation here a few months ago, I was in effect saying that I felt my duty station was to act as a bridge for non-Christians and non-Catholic Christians back to Christianity and even to the Church. I remain of the belief that being “betwixt and between” is where I am to remain until God gives me further instruction. I find it gives non-Catholics an opportunity (a safer place) to discuss their concerns. I am someone like them, seeking, yet I am also increasingly clear in my own understandings, which can help move them along perhaps a bit more quickly and a bit less fearfully than they otherwise would have. So far, I believe this is helping others in at least some small way. It will be more helpful I think when the Storm truly hits, but who knows?

            I am also very much in agreement with you that everyone in different Christian and non-Christian Churches and sects would benefit from relaxing together. I know people from just about every religion (including Progressivism LOL!), and I find them and their beliefs fascinating even as the differences and commonalities stimulate me to clarify my own. So many of those people are very good people, and I have hope that this Storm will give all these fine people an opportunity to let go of differences and join together without further recriminations or arguments. If that takes apologies, that’s fine. If the divisive things are simply dropped without apology, that’s fine, too.

            Thank you for your invitation to join you and your Church for communion. Perhaps if we were not several hundred miles apart, I would take you up on that, especially given our common belief that we can be bridges in tough times. It will be interesting to see if we end up in the same Church by the time the Storm is complete and Rescue has come. 🙂

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          • charliej373 says:

            Just for the record, Steve, I had a wonderful time with Ellen and her husband, Fr. Mike. I participated in Evensong Prayers with their community.

            Liked by 2 people

          • SteveBC says:

            Yes, Charlie, I know you did enjoy your stay with them. How could you not? EllenChris is someone I always pay attention to here on your site because she invariably provides valuable information and wisdom. I applaud her for choosing as she has, and I have thanked her for responding so thoughtfully to my question. I think we are both in agreement that she is a gem. 🙂
            (Are you blushing yet, EllenChris?!)

            Liked by 1 person

        • torilen says:

          Thank you, EllenChris. All that you have written has been very helpful to me. I have had many misconceptions & been taught many things about Anglicans, Episcopalians & Protestants that have been incorrect. I’ve always been surprised at how little people seem to know about their own purported religious beliefs & yet how quick we are to assume we know about – & have the right to judge or spout off about – the beliefs of other groups of people.

          Liked by 3 people

          • EllenChris says:

            Thank you, Steve and torilen. What I wrote above was not any kind of criticism but merely a statement of history. The incident between Pope Pius V and Queen Elizabeth’s envoy did happen. Nearly 500 years later we are ALL — on all sides — faced with the challenge of learning how to understand and accept each other again. Understanding includes accurate information. My birthday is on the Roman Catholic feast day of St Thomas More and St. John Fisher. On the Anglican calender is the commemoration of Latimer, Cranmer and Ridley who were Anglican bishops martyred (among others) by the Catholic Queen Mary. Pam said: “Catholics do not rip apart protestants because they do not want to be catholics.” Well, sorry, but yes, they do just that. Both sides of the question do it to each other — It goes both ways. And it needs to stop.

            But how about this: When the violent pagan king of Uganda turned against Christians, Anglican and Roman Catholic page boys in his court were all martyred together for their faith in Jesus Christ. They share one feast day together in our churches and in the Heavenly Kingdom.

            That is what I am trying to get to here: trying to find our connections instead of perpetuating old grudges. Forgiveness and healing are necessary. It is not simply a matter of requiring all “Protestants” (a misnomer as I have been trying to explain) to abjure their heresies and come crawling home to Rome. Pope Benedict’s statement in Mark Mallett’s article is a much better and clearer understanding of the real relationships. I will repeat it here:

            “And thus, Cardinal Ratzinger makes an important qualification of contemporary Protestantism:

            Heresy, for Scripture and the early Church, includes the idea of a personal decision against the unity of the Church, and heresy’s characteristic is pertinacia, the obstinacy of him who persists in his own private way. This, however, *cannot* be regarded as an appropriate description of the spiritual situation of the Protestant Christian. In the course of a now centuries-old history, Protestantism has made an important contribution to the realization of Christian faith, fulfilling a positive function in the development of the Christian message and, above all, often giving rise to a sincere and profound faith in the individual non-Catholic Christian, whose separation from the Catholic affirmation has nothing to do with the pertinacia characteristic of heresy… The conclusion is inescapable, then: Protestantism today is something different from heresy in the traditional sense, a phenomenon whose true theological place has not yet been determined.” —Cardinal Ratzinger (POPE BENEDICT XVI), The Meaning of Christian Brotherhood, pp. 87-88

            What have your fellow Christians contributed? Primarily a strong and clear emphasis on the Truth of God’s Holy Word as His own Self-Revelation written, and a zeal for spreading the Gospel throughout the world which has been done and is now happening at the cost of many martyrs.

            ISIS does not ask Christians which particular denomination they belong to before they take their heads off. The 21 martyrs who were beheaded on the beach in Libya last February were Coptic Christians with their own “pope.” Did Jesus scold them for not being Roman Catholic after they held their Faith in the face of much torture and willingly gave their lives as martyrs for Him? Really.

            That’s all I have to say about this. Pam, may God fill you with His Peace.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            No, Christ does not scold, man has taken it upon himself to scold. We are either willing advocates to all Christ asks through His Church, or we do our own thing. No one is perfect at that, but, Christ knows we will all walk fine lines between right and wrong, but, He asks us to follow Him. Can any Christian say they always have done exactly what Christ told us to do? We are all works in progress, not merely people who say, I believe this or that, we are to become great saints, because that is all that is in Heaven. Not everyone who dies becomes a resident of Heaven, it is by our choice in life and at death, if we have truly chosen Heaven. God does not go through a sieve and decide who goes and who does not. We must put ourselves through that sieve everytime and ask, “What would Jesus do?”. Can any human being really say they do this? I doubt it very much or we would not be in the state of affairs the world is in now, due to our yes to focusing too much on what we attain through goods, services and sometimes words or actions. Where is Jesus in all our decisions when we are buying a yacht. He did say to the rich man, “Sell all you own and then, follow me”. Is that so hard to believe that people can do this? I know several examples, and most of them are all saints. Blessings, pam, from NJ.

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          • SteveBC says:

            Pam Nicholson, Jesus scolded a whole ton of people during his three years. He even tore up the Temple in righteous anger, tossing the tables of the moneylenders. He was constantly scolding the rabbis and other religious of the time. I suspect he did not break any of the 10 Commandments while doing this, and he had a serious purpose.

            Liked by 1 person

      • Pamela Nicholson says:

        I was baptized in the Episcopalian church, but, am no expert in their theology. However, what I do know is that there is a so called, “high” Episcopalian and a “low” Episcopalian church. One is said to be more catholic than the other due to the use of torchbearers and some other ceremonial “items’ used to begin their service or mass. Well, we catholics have it all, and where did the protestant churches get these “items” from? Where else? The catholic church. It is easy to pick and choose what one believes they can live with or without, but, where is the praising God in all of this. We are to use all the earthly things which have been blessed by a catholic priest to praise God as the angels are right there with us as we are praising God at mass. An angel could be sitting right next to you, and you may not know it, but, they are there, especially in the presence of the Holy Eucharist. adoring and worshipping Him. So, next time someone gets combative about why catholics make such a fuss? at the beginning, middle and end of the mass, remember, the angels are even there singing the opening and closing hymns with us. So sad when we see people entering late for mass or leaving before the closing hymn, but, just remember they are there, and you never know when one may leave mass with you as you are walking to your car. It is a beautiful thing also to have a period of thanksgiving after mass before you leave the pew. Pews are more than just a seat. They are a place we can learn great lessons of humility for how God works in the world with such little children that we are. “God bless us, everyone!”. pam, from NJ.

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        • EllenChris says:

          Thanks, Pam. But, people did not sneak in and “Get their stuff” from the RC Church and then run away with it. We all started out as one Church. We all included rituals and usages that some groups kept and others felt that they did not need as time went on after the Reformation. Anglicans enjoy more continuity with the Pre-Reformation Church than some others. This is a matter of style, not substance. We may all lose our beautiful buildings and lovely linens and chalices in what is to come. Some of my friends in the Episcopal Church have already lost *everything* connected with worship because they chose to remain faithful against demands to give in to heresy and apostasy. What matters is our faithfulness to God, not our stuff.

          Really — this is my most heartfelt plea: Do we all not have enough wounds that we need to inflict new wounds on each other?!!!?? Is *that* really what Our good Lord is asking us to do? Or are we called to reach out beyond our history of accusations and woundedness to help heal the Body of Christ? I think maybe I was pushed to join this blog to help encourage that healing. It seems like this is what Charlie is looking forward to — reunion of all according to God’s Will. Why not get a little head start on this process?

          So how about this: I am no one important and I have no official role. But as an Anglican, as far as it lies with me to do so, I ask forgiveness from all my Roman Catholic brothers and sisters for what people of my Church had done to people of your Church.

          Is there anyone else who understands this enough to reach out in the same way to others? THIS is a powerful way of healing which I have seen to make a big difference. Let us all pray for one another in peace with loving hearts.

          Liked by 4 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Thank you so much, Ellen. You make the plea with such eloquence and passion, I wait to hear from you when people ask a truly heartfelt question, even if that question veers a little into divisiveness at first. Far too many people attack based on another not being like them – when we are all going to find that we have fallen short. God bless you for yours and your husband’s fidelity to the faith (and your wonderful kindness to me as you coordinated my visit to Albany).

            Liked by 5 people

          • Beckita says:

            Thank you for your instructive and insightful posts, Ellen. Thank you for your humble expression of apology on behalf of your Church. I find no better response as a daughter of the Roman Catholic Church than to echo the expressions of apology made by St. John Paul II in the great Year of Jubilee 2000: Please forgive us for our sins against your Church. Peace be with you.

            I also echo our beloved Pope Francis: “… It is sin that has separated us… It is a long road of sins that we all shared in… We all share the blame. We have all sinned. There is only one blameless, the Lord.”

            If anyone missed this one, truly it is a gem: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YrS4IDTLavQ

            Liked by 2 people

          • Pamela Nicholson says:

            At least people are talking. We are a church which communicates everyday with all the Church has and does offer us. You have to understand, I was an evangelical Lutheran, and coming from that background, not being told much about the Blessed Mother other than the fact that she was chosen by God to be the Mother of God, was never stressed enough. She has influence as a mother of all people, and she has led many people who were away from the faith, back home to the catholic church. As a former Lutheran, we, in my church, were not open to really knowing what our faith was actually about. When I went to services, there was so little joy. We were not taught about the gifts of the Holy Spirit other than the fact that the Lutheran calendar liturgically speaking was the same, even many of the Sunday readings, were the same as the catholic church. I had to find out why this was. I also guess that growing up in my neighborhood, there were so many catholics to us Lutherans, that I had to find out the difference, if any, and as to why my parents and other relatives were so staunchly against the catholics. It was okay to make money from them (my grandparents owned a iiquor/deli and had fish on Fridays with all the things catholics like and did eat on Fridays) and a good portion, aside from alcohol, and this was where they made a better portion of their money, but to really get to know their faith and why they did as they did on Fridays, was completely out of the question. How could one have so much hate or behind-the-back dislike for catholics when you don’t even understand where they are coming from? I knew I had to find out. Maybe that is my personality, but, I had to know why their priests’ hands were so blessed that our ministers’ hands, in the minds of catholics, were so much more appreciated in the sacraments. As a former Lutheran, I even learned my marriage had to be in the catholic church as a Lutheran marriage is not really considered a valid marriage in the catholic church. One has to be “churched” to understand what marriage truly is, and marriage is a holy trinity, so to speak, as you marry with the intentions to do your marriage with God right beside you, especially in all the intimate decisions married people make, and it is our duty to do all we can to help our spouse make it to Heaven. I never learned anything like that as a Lutheran. So, this is why we are all asked to be like little children, because we must live a life looking to God for all answers to our daily questions and needs. When we leave God out of the picture, we do tend to do things our own way, which may not be God’s way. We are all called to be great saints. And, I’m sorry if I have been so wordy, but, I am giving you words from my heart, not my mind. Where are our hearts in all that we have done and left undone? Can we all say we have done enough to wipe away the stain of original sin? Christ shows us the way to holiness, and that is what it means to be a Christian. God bless. pam, from NJ.

            Like

          • Mary W. says:

            You have my utmost respect EllenChris and I have been blessed to have reaped the fruits of your knowledge and love for Christ and your fellow Christians. Thank you for reminding me (us) that the main point is to forget the past and move forward in love.

            My questions were not meant to attack or be divisive. My knowledge of the Anglican martyrs is null. I have often heard of Spanish Catholics persecuting Jews or Muslims but not much on the persecution of Protestants except for the Huggenots perhaps. I admit to ignorance, therefore my questions to you.

            As said earlier I married a Protestant (and never forced him to convert which he did many years later of his own free will). His loving attitude(and those of his family) is far above mine, in my estimation. Yes, I will see how “short” I have fallen when the time comes…more fallen than what has already been revealed to me by Our merciful Lord.

            Let me digress in telling the story of when I was a very young girl of 9 years of so. My Greek Orthodox(convert to Catholicism) dad passed three years previous to what I considered brow beating on the part of a particular adult Orthodox relative. He made fun of me, my mom, and the fact that we were Catholics hanging on to that “Pope”. I could not defend myself. I have forgiven him for that but as little children we are somewhat affected by certain things. So please, all you non-Catholics reading this, I follow suit in asking forgiveness of any offense we as Roman Catholics may have caused you and your church. Truly, the plea is to be united in love and to be a true reflection of God’s love, always and everywhere.
            I think we, here on this blog, do pray for each other and we mean well, most of the time. Charlie does not allow us to get out of hand, I think. Smile !

            Liked by 3 people

          • EllenChris says:

            Thank you so much, Beckita for your posting of St. John Paul’s apology and the statement by Pope Francis. This is exactly what I am trying to get at here. We all need to reach out to one another in humility and love. Forgiveness and Healing will follow.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            We are healed by the truth of the words of Jesus Himself. We are all conduits to speak and live the example Our Lord taught us by His Own Example, and that of His Mother. His words do not come from us, we just repeat what our Father tells us is the truth. Let us all seek to be as holy as Our Lord is. God bless, pam, from NJ.

            Like

          • EllenChris says:

            Mary W. I did not at all take your questions to be negative in any way at all. 🙂 Thanks so much for sharing your journey from your heart. We have all been hurt; we have all hurt each other. Placing blame will not help. Reaching out in humility and forgiveness is the path to the Kingdom of God among us. Thank you so much for your participation in the mutual apologies, acceptance and healing. See — this is the kind of thing that our good Lord Jesus is doing among those who love Him. Many blessings all around.

            Liked by 2 people

    • luvmercy5775 says:

      Thank you Ellen. Excellent teaching. You clarified more than a few points for me.

      Liked by 2 people

    • NancyA says:

      Thank you for this very informative comment, EllenChris !

      Liked by 2 people

    • Lily says:

      Thank you very much Ellen. That is a helpful look at denominations.

      I have a question about the sacrament as a means of grace and/or personal expression of faith. Mainly I’m wondering if the Anabapists, Baptists, and Evangelicals have done such a good job converting people (bearing fruit?) how necessary are the sacraments? And honouring Mary, etc? Would they have done even better if they had those aspects?

      Really, I have no clue about these things, and I ask in all sincerity. Thank you!

      Like

      • EllenChris says:

        Dear Lily, I am firmly convinced that sacraments are completely necessary. All Christians Baptize and celebrate Holy Communion in some way. Yes, I think probably there would be more strength and sweeter fruit if their understanding of sacraments was better. Yet, their missionary work has been extremely effective. They have a burning love and desire to see people come into a salvific knowledge of Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord. Beyond that, Our good Lord is very generous and provides for them as they turn to Him. Recognizing that does not mean letting go of an understanding of the real power of the sacraments which Jesus Himself gave us for our good. Beyond that, I don’t know what else to say — some things are better left to God Who is bigger than all of us.

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Steve says:

    Wow! This piece is wonderful and beautiful in it’s simplicity! It gives a detailed explanation of the importance of Mary to Christians everywhere in a manner that can be understood by anyone! Amazing work!

    Like

  4. rbiel2 says:

    Charlie, you say we are to unite/join with Christians and Jews.
    All good, but how am I to view Jehovahs Witnesses, Mormons, Unitarians,etc. and the like?
    –for the Church says they dont even have valid baptism, therefore are not Christians
    and they are certainly not Jews.

    Not to mention fully compliant cultural Christians, the old mainline Protestant denominations who are more or less the anti-Church?

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Well, rbiel, I did say “faithful” Christians. If someone, including a nominal Catholic, actively seeks to overturn the Magisterium or deny the Gospels, he is not a faithful Christian. I am speaking of people who, even if they have some disagreements about God, are trying to find Him as He is, rather than raise Him as a battle flag in their own image. Now as for the others, take care…for even if you cannot take them as a partner in the work, if they are of good will, you need to embrace them as a neighbor. And take care that you do not become the lawyer in Luke 10:29 who thought he could still follow his own will on the matter of who was his neighbor.

      Liked by 1 person

      • rbiel2 says:

        “Now as for the others, take care…for even if you cannot take them as a partner in the work, if they are of good will, you need to embrace them as a neighbor.”
        ———————————————————————————————————–
        I think your trying to cite Mark 9:40
        “for whoever is not against us is for us.”

        Unfortunately, I can see this, at some initial stage, as being a very tricky mess!

        Like

  5. EllenChris says:

    I would not doubt that Mark Mallett made a thorough search of Christian prophetic websites that do not identify with membership in the Roman Communion. He searched through these various sources and noticed that, while many Christians especially charismatic/pentecostal folks who are very receptive to prophetic words and visions, have a sense of the future similar to Charlie’s vision, they have little or no sense of “The Rescue” as Charlie has presented it or of the Triumph of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Mark did his homework and saw a genuine pattern — okay.

    But that is not quite the whole entire picture. There are some who do, indeed, include a sense of a bright and beautiful promise of the time after the Storm. Also, just as a helpful disclaimer, Charlie is not responsible for or validating what I am writing here — it is just my own observation.

    John Paul Jackson was a Pentecostal Christian who (most unfortunately) died this past February, 2015. His life paralleled Charlie’s story in many ways: he began seeing things and being “visited” at a young age. He struggled with this and finally gave in to living his life for God; he also suffered purification and serious training. Before I found Charlie on this website, I had learned a lot from John Paul. He, like Charlie, felt that he should only talk about the things that God told him to share, and was very strict about not sharing anything he was told to keep to himself.

    He used the term, “The Perfect Storm” to describe what he had seen which had pretty much the same content as Charlie’s vision. Unlike the prophetic Christian websites that Mark made reference to, however, John Paul did speak about the time after The Storm a little bit. Because he felt that God had not commissioned him to describe the time of The Rescue, he kept most of it to himself. However, he did say that The Storm would be over, “sometime before 2020,” and that God’s power and presence would be manifested in new and astonishing ways. He particularly mentioned that people would be given a strong and clear sense of God’s active relationship with them and that many miracles, especially of healing, would occur beyond what we see now. He also indicated massive conversions and a new world, without giving details.

    The other person I have encountered who has been given a very strong prophetic vision of the future is an evangelical/pentecostal pastor named R. T. Kendall. R. T. came from Kentucky, got a PhD in Theology from Oxford University, and then pastored the Westminster Chapel in London (“Free Church”) for 27 years. I attended a conference with him this past June which was a very powerful event in many ways.

    As a young man R. T. had a very life-shattering experience of the Holy Spirit and was given a vision of things to come. At the conference he described to us a terrible time of shaking and chaos — again, similar to what Charlie has said.

    However, R. T. spent most of his time talking about the purpose and goal and outcome of The Storm (he also used that term) which is to purify and prepare the world for a new era. He referenced the parable of the wise and foolish bridesmaids in the Gospel of Matthew Chap 25, vs 1 — 13. Verse 6: “In the midst of the night, there was a cry, ‘Here is the Bridegroom, come out to meet Him’!” He pointed out that there is a time lapse between “the call in the middle of the night” and the actual arrival of the Bridegroom who comes after the wise maidens have lit their lamps and the foolish ones have gone away to try to buy oil. R. T. said that we are now in “the midst of the night” but that the “Cry of the Bridegroom” is going to happen very soon. He then went on to describe the awakening of the Bridesmaids as the Greatest Great Awakening the world has ever seen. He said: The Church — the whole church — is mostly asleep but will be awakened to prepare for the Bridegroom’s coming. He said that, “The Jews will be converted overnight and the Muslims in a single day.” There might be very few, here and there, who will hold out against conversion, but “Everyone will know without any doubt that God is GOD and Jesus is the Son of God.” He described life in the Holy Spirit according to God’s Divine Will, and a world renewed. While he did not use the word, “rescue” he described it in terms so similar to Charlie, that my husband and I had our breath taken away. Just BTW, R. T. said that God had promised him faithfully that he would live to see the time of “The Awakening,” and he just turned 80.

    Again, I am not attributing any of this to Charlie. I am not making comparisons or trying to add anything or to try to create a “concordance” of prophets. But, to me, it is extremely helpful to see that God is bestowing an understanding of what He is about to do upon people in different places who do not even know each other. Confirmation of prophetic words by a certain element of consistency is a useful tool for understanding as well as for faith and trust.

    Now, neither R. T. nor John Paul made reference to Our Lady. I don’t know, but I have an idea that the particular element of revelation concerning Our Lady St. Mary in the coming time is reserved for a Roman Catholic source because it is here that Her immaculate conception and role as
    Queen and mediatrix is best know and honored. As Mark Mallett pointed out, She is an essential and central focus of the New Era of Peace. Yet God, in He mercy and grace, is giving some glimpses of the Time to Come to all His faithful people everywhere — everyone who is willing to listen and open their eyes.

    The Triumph of the Immaculate Heart; the Era of Peace; the Kingdom of the Divine Will; The greatest Great Awakening: all are pointing to the same thing. We are going to be set free from the power of darkness which has been growing over the last few hundred years. The Bride will be one, without spot or wrinkle. “On earth as it is in Heaven” will grow into a Reality.

    Our Lady is the Mother of the Bridegroom and the preparer of the Bride.

    Listen for the “Cry!” The Bridegroom is coming!! Come out to meet Him!

    Liked by 6 people

    • charliej373 says:

      I had some wonderful conversations with Ellen and her husband, Fr. Mike, while in Albany on this very subject – particularly about R.T. I think most honest Christians, if Christ sent His Mother to rescue us, would then honor her as He does. But she is a very important aid in navigating this terrible Storm – and so I worry a lot about those Christians who do not honor her as their Mother, as Christ commanded (John 19:27).

      Liked by 6 people

      • EllenChris says:

        Most Anglicans have a special place in our hearts for Our Lady St. Mary. A friend recently came back from the double Shrine of Walsingham which has both Roman and Anglican chapels. It is a place of great healing and understanding where genuine fraternal love grows. We have an order of nuns dedicated to St. Mary and many of us make regular use of the Rosary. Last month I was asked to do a teaching on Our Lady’s role as intercessor for a local chapter of lay women which is a large and thriving “order” in Anglicanism, the Daughters of the King. They were extremely enthusiastic about learning more about Her and the way that She is a channel for God’s Grace because their main purpose is intercession for those in need. They understood that their own intercession is hugely enhanced when brought into Her intercession for us.

        In my own experience I find many Christians who simply have not been properly “introduced” to Her but who are quite open to her place in salvation. I think Charlie is quite right that most of these would embrace Our Lady with Joy when it is made clear to them how our good Lord Jesus wants Her to be accepted. Those who have the most trouble with Her role and place are the most radically “protestant.” That is, in the Baptist tradition and the churches following that line, they have a Christ alone, Scripture alone, Faith alone kind of approach. So they are rather narrow about understanding the place and function of the entire Communion of Saints. However even with them there is a great sense of wanting to love and please God. I think many of these would accept how the Lord uses Her when that becomes apparent.

        This also ties in with the question that was asked above concerning folks like Jehovah’s Witnesses and what not. If they are genuinely seeking Truth, even if they are now incorrect, they will embrace Truth when He is revealed to them, with His Mother. If there is simply the malice of pride, factionalism and a disdain for anything that does not derive from their own crankiness, then there will need to be to be some large repenting before they can come to the Truth.

        Liked by 3 people

        • audiemarie2014 says:

          EllenChris, your posts are very helpful and educational, and I appreciate that. Thank you so much!

          Liked by 3 people

        • Pamela Nicholson says:

          Sometimes, and this has been my experience, the Blessed Mother is waiting for us to approach her. Why not? This is a step towards learning about ones own vocation as a Christian for holiness. All along the Old Testament and the New Testament, God is telling us what He wants and sees for us in His plan for all of us to be great saints. Notice how saints like St. Bernadette and the children from Fatima (St. Jacinta and St. Francesco) were young and not the very best educated, and not particularly scholarly as they came from poor families. But, a big thing they have in common, communism always was there to try to quell the attention given to the Blessed Mother. We can draw our own conclusions on the good or evil question of what one considers communism to be. All throughout history, the evil one lies in wait for willing persons, usually atheists, or someone who is truly ignorant of what the Gospel is, and gives them a leg forward to try to destroy the One True Church. This will never happen, as God keeps His promises that the Church will never be destroyed. What’s wrong with just a small prayer to Our Lady to ask her if she is really there for you? She does answer if you ask with all your heart. Sometimes we get so caught up in how awful a situation is, we wait and wait, but, with the same result. She comes and she delivers you right to Her Son. She is the best mother I have ever known and ever will. Hail Mary full of grace! pam, from NJ.

          Like

    • Pamela Nicholson says:

      Yup, He is coming soon and Maranatha Come quickly Lord Jesus! I just had a chance to watch “Song of Bernadette”, and as she was given to do the work of mercy in Lourdes by Our Lady (and Jesus was with her even if she did not see Our Lord at the times she appeared to her), Bernadette told all she saw but stayed faithful in the end to what she was told to do. Our lives are strongly attached to too many things in the world to accept that God is our all, and He is, there is no doubt about that. Let us all become little like St. Bernadette, regardless of the suffering we will encounter which will be very hard for those who equate success with worldly things. Let us hope that our success as Christians is all God has asked before, during and after the storm. We can do so much good even in the smallest of things for our neighbor before, during and after the storm. God knows we have some trepidation about this coming storm, but, in the end, His Sacred Heart and Our Lady’s Immaculate Heart do triumph, and God makes no mistakes in His plan. Keep hope and littleness alive. Don’t ever say, “oh, this is not much” or “who will know the difference anyway?”. God does and He made us all in His image, so, He knows what we do and think at any given time, It is foolish to think we can keep anything from Him. Stay focused on obedience of a little child, and therein lies our hope. God bless. And, pray to the Holy Spirit daily. See where this gets you. pam from NJ.

      Liked by 1 person

    • “Confirmation of prophetic words by a certain element of consistency is a useful tool for understanding as well as for faith and trust.”

      Yes. I appreciated your post, EC; I find it very interesting to read the similarities there in Protestant prophecy to what we hear in Catholic — I have never personally heard such uncanny agreement between them. I want to research them and maybe add them to my list of resources at the Our Blessed Hope board.

      Our Blessed Hope: http://blessedhope.yuku.com/ A website and discussion board focused on the special times in which we live; and the Private Forum is now in operation for *POSTING MEMBERS* of Charlie’s TNRS blog. Post on the OBH board and ask for a key.

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    • “Confirmation of prophetic words by a certain element of consistency is a useful tool for understanding as well as for faith and trust.”

      Yes, it is a method of discernment. Thank you for your post, EllenChris, it was very interesting overall, and also to see such similarities between these prophecies and the ones we see normally coming from Catholic sources. I’ve made a copy to keep, as I want to research these and possibly add them to my list of resources at Our Blessed Hope.

      Our Blessed Hope: http://blessedhope.yuku.com/ And by the way, the Private Forum at OBH is now in operation for posters coming over from Charlie’s blog; post anywhere on OBH and ask for a key.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Ellen says:

    Hello. I am wondering if you could help me? I don’t understand why the Catholic Church has not made any statement on the predicted events for September? There are so many people unaware of the prophesy and I’m so concerned about why the Church hasn’t spoken. I apologize if this has been addressed previously, I wasn’t able to find anything. Thank you. God Bless, Ellen

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      There has been no formal prediction by any except through private revelation and by some secular analysts who see a lot of things coming to a head between September and November. I have made no formal prediction on it, though I see myself being cited as having done so regularly. There is no reason for the Church to comment on something that is purely a matter of purported private revelation and secular speculation. The Church’s job is to teach us how to behave whatever happens, not to make assessments of ongoing rumblings – at least until they become so large as to divide or seriously trouble the faithful. So I understand your question, but you ask why the Catholic Church has not made an exception and commented on such speculation this time when she almost never comments on such speculation beforehand. Because that is not what she typically does.

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      • Ellen says:

        I understand and thank you, Charlie. I’m aware of the usual manner in which the Church handles private revelations and should have realized on my own that She would not comment on what some are speculating about happening in the Fall. Again, thank you and God Bless. Ellen

        Like

  7. CrewDog says:

    I find all of the above interesting but I’m thinking that, very soon, we will not be spending much time on Church History or the finer points of Catholicism vs. Protestantism vs….. whatever! The days of “Are you Born Again?” or “You are Saved only through the portals of the Church of Rome” will be done! The fact that the message of St Faustina/Divine Mercy tells us that Jesus reaches out to EVERY Soul at death convinces me that Saved Through Jesus can be a “last gasp” deal … for everyone … though not a optimum Path! …. As does the Prodigal Son and late in the day Workers in the Vineyard ….. We are facing a time of God Fearing vs. The godless and besides survival our “jobs” will be one of saving the salvageable godless ones at a real basic level of Judeo-Christianity. I’m guessing this is one of the goals of The Storm?

    GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Pam Nicholson says:

      I cannot answer for Charlie’s prophecies for the world, but, I think scripture along with all the prophets of the Bible and Jesus Himself have made it clear that there will be a coming storm. People now have to take notice of what is and has been happening. I do not see how one can just hide their head in the sand and just expect that all will go well if we just try to ignore what we are living and seeing before our very eyes and noses. I am also cautious about prophecy, but, I do not see how we can avoid the mercy that brings prophets into our midst. Thank God for prophets who speak His words to His people among all generations! Peace and blessings. pam, from NJ.

      Like

    • EllenChris says:

      Wow, Crew Dog, as usual you hit the nail right on the head with a minimum of extra words. So well put!! Both sides have their prejudices which need to be let go of. What you are saying is exactly the point! It may be helpful to many to at least get a clearer idea of who each other really are, but in the end we just simply have to make up our minds to follow Jesus. There is too much at stake to waste time trying to make angels dance on the heads of denominational pins. God save us all — oh yes indeed! (I always love your posts)

      Liked by 2 people

      • Pam Nicholson says:

        There is a book called “Born Fundamentalist Born Again Catholic” published by Ignatius Press, written by David B. Currie, which explains so much about his former misunderstandings of what he had been taught as a Christian fundamentalist in the evangelical movement and how he did his own study to find out if what he was believing was completely true as an evangelical. He wanted the truth, and he found it in the RC church. You can follow his journey into the catholic church, and see how he faced so much persecution from his own family due to the true understanding he now has of the Roman Rite. He chose to seek the truth. So many out there who believe that their way is enough, but, as a catholic “More is required”. More of us, our surrender to the words of the Gospels, and Christ Himself said, “not by the scripture alone”. He said that because He knew that even when He was alive that people would skip around and put all their faith in scripture alone, not by all that Christ gives us which is Himself in everything the church offers which no other church can. We can go on and do our own thing, that is our free will choice, but, best to feed out of the trough which Christ alone has provided. Notice how everything Christ did, even being born in a manger, born to be True Food and True Drink, not a memorial or distant memory, but, the Truth. We have free will to do as we wish. but, Christ asks us to go just a bit farther for the fullness of the Truth. He is our all. God bless. pam, from NJ.

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          Yes, David Currie and Scott Hahn are inspiring examples of great converts. But I have to tell you truly, I find many pious Catholics I know who are as arrogantly ignorant of their own faith as many of the sort of Fundamentalists who ignorantly attack it. Both pray to the same God, both say they are defending the truth without working up much of a sweat to challenge their own assumptions. I used to insist that researchers who worked with me on projects be able to defend an opponent’s case effectively before I would take their analyses seriously. When anyone assumes that whatever they believe is “truth” and all else is ignorance without seriously examining what they and others believe, it is no more about faith than Job’s pompously pious friends – it is vanity. The way that men such as Currie and Hahn came to their conclusions was by rigorously examining their own pre-conceptions.

          I respect the faith of all who are sincere, even if they are sometimes misguided. I will have enough misguided notions Our Lord will correct before I can reach heaven that I dare not spend much time correcting what I think to be the misconceptions of others I think sincere.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            Charlie, where does humility and obedience stand if we are to know, to love and to serve the Lord? When can we say to ourselves that our knowledge is good enough to spread the Gospel? We cannot. The idea is that we are little children and we have come to this faith on our knees, so why would we not want to learn that living the faith requires more work sometimes? pam, from NJ.

            Like

          • torilen says:

            Amen, Charlie!

            Like

          • EllenChris says:

            Thank you so much, Charlie! I have just now come home from the yearly retreat of our Franciscan Community of the Holy Cross. What a blessing! Our good Lord Jesus worked powerfully in our lives and in our Franciscan Community. I really appreciate the stand you are taking, Charlie, on genuine good will and community among faithful Christians here. Every church of every “flavor” is under attack by the demons. Members and factions of every part of Christ’s one holy catholic apostolic church are being dragged away from faithfulness into confusion, apostasy and sin. Our Next Right Step is to care about and care for one another in humility and peace.

            I have really been working hard to be at peace with and accepting of Pam. But Pam, beloved by God, your posts are really coming across in a way that is a big turn-off. You assume that everyone is ignorant of your own “truth.” Forgive my foolish boasting but I have read the Fathers of the Church and Council documents and the great theologians down through the centuries. I respect Scott Hahn’s journey, and yours, but God has put me on the path He wants me to take, and I am being as faithful as I can. Love and stick to your Church; but, constantly demeaning others will NOT attract them to your Church, it will only push them away. I hope you will prayerfully consider this as a way to more fruitful dialogue instead of just backing off into corners. I am NOT going to get into any arguments with you. May God bless you and keep you in His Peace, which passes all understanding.

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  8. Pingback: We shall all be one

  9. Personally I count all people of good will as full and equal partners — and I mean *all* (Catholic, Protestant, Jew, Muslim, Buddhist, Atheist, whatever). Are not they the ones upon whom the angels wished peace in the Gospel (and which we do too in the Gloria at Mass)?

    As to the question of whom I feel, shall I say, “dispensed from evangelizing,” because they are perfectly fine right where they are — that’s another question entirely. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      Nicely put, Daniel…thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

    • EllenChris says:

      Thank you, Daniel. Many people within Christian Churches have never been evangelized or truly converted to faith in Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord, or catechized in the Faith received from the Apostles. God gave His covenants to the people of Israel, yet they do need to recognize Jesus as Son of God. And the other religions need to hear the Gospel given by the Father through Jesus His only-begotten Son in the power of the Holy Spirit. Rather than being “dispensed from Evangelizing,” we need to get on the stick, allow ourselves to be more deeply and fully converted to God’s Truth in our own lives, and then to touch the lives of those who have not actually heard the Gospel. May God give us the Grace to do this!

      Also, while various people have differing opinions about many things on this Blog, I have never heard Charlie refer to people of Eastern religions as “equal partners.” The One True God has spoken through the Prophets of Israel and definitively through His only-begotten Son, Jesus. Those who worship other gods will need to hear the Gospel. We should want to help everyone to meet the Lord Jesus even on the edge of the Storm, but it is my hope that they will all at least see Him truly in the Rescue. God bless you, Daniel.

      Like

      • charliej373 says:

        I am told that we should treat all faithful Christians and Jews as full and equal partners in the work before us. I say that we should treat all others of good will as true neighbors and allies.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Pam Nicholson says:

        Oops! I was corrected by a priest on this issue of those from the Eastern religions. I thought that one must only be a Christian to be part of the church, but, I was wrong. Anyone who is outside the church is God’s own creation, and part of the church, because, they can convert with our prayers and sufferings to make their way into the church. Anyone ever see “The Devil Never Sleeps”? Worth the watch, as so many Buddhists, etc., converted to some form of Christianity. Come Holy Spirit. I was told that as long as the Lord allows the church to continue its mission to convert souls to the One True Church, that we must remain faithful in our prayers to the Holy Spirit for the conversion of all souls to Christ. I thought the same thing, but, I have read too many accounts of people of the Eastern religions since I was corrected, who have become great saints and martyrs of the church due to their unwavering faith, once their conversion took place via missionaries. I will never forget to pray for their conversion as well. They are still undergoing great numbers of folks converting to Catholicism and other Christian denominations. Hope springs eternal! God bless. pam, from NJ.

        Liked by 1 person

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