A Few Right Steps

VATICAN CITY, VATICAN - MAY 10: President of Cuba Raul Castro and Pope Francis meet at the Paul VI Hall private studio during a private audience on May 10, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. This is the first visit of the Cuban leader to the Vatican, twenty years ago his brother Fidel Castro had met John Paul II prior to his visit to Cuba. (Photo by Vatican Pool/Getty Images)

VATICAN CITY, VATICAN – MAY 10: President of Cuba Raul Castro and Pope Francis meet at the Paul VI Hall private studio during a private audience on May 10, 2015 in Vatican City, Vatican. This is the first visit of the Cuban leader to the Vatican, twenty years ago his brother Fidel Castro had met John Paul II prior to his visit to Cuba. (Photo by Vatican Pool/Getty Images)

By Charlie Johnston

Thank you, dear readers. Your generosity is astounding. I was in St. Louis the last few days – actually in Belleville, where I lived for five and a half years. I visited with the McGlynn clan. When I put up the piece on treated nets for African children to prevent malaria, I had no idea how dire things were. Margaret McGlynn Reynolds, one of the founders of the NETwork Against Malaria, had feared that they would not be able to meet the minimum to make the net distribution for the final quarter. They needed $5,000 by October 1.

At dinner Tuesday night, Margaret’s parents, Claire and Michael, told me how things unfolded. Margaret was steeling herself to tell the African contacts that they would not be able to fund the distribution this time. Shortly after the article went up, they checked in and found that they had received $140. They told Margaret…but when she checked just a bit later, they had $3,000. They thought it was a mistake…and as they sorted it out it grew again. As of this writing they have over $20,000. A few days ago, Margaret sent me an email:

Dear Mr. Johnston,

Thank you very much for featuring us on your blog. We are humbled by the support we received from you and your subscribers. Because of your generosity and that of your subscribers, we will be able to expand our distribution and save lives as a consequence of your contributions. We look forward to sharing with you photographs and details as a thanks for the generosity to provide for the hope and vitality of the children of Uganda. Thank you from the bottom of our hearts. 

Please feel free to share any updates with your subscribers. We couldn’t be more grateful. Thank you for being an answer to a prayer. 

 

Most sincerely, 

Margaret”

While the political and chattering classes are arguing about whose fault it is why things keep getting worse and why there is nothing they can do, you simply stepped up. Quietly, without headlines – and some misery will be spared and some lives saved. Because of your love of God, you took the next right step – and acted as a sign of hope to people who really need it. I hope this does not sound condescendingly paternal, but you cannot know how proud I am of the readers of this website. Margaret and the family have told me that they will send me pictures and video of the distribution – made possible by you. I will post it, probably in early November.

Thank you.

*******

Bishop Rene Gracida sent me an enthusiastic note of thanks for the prayers being offered up for his recovery from a flare-up of a chronic condition. He says he is making steady progress, but has to stick to his regimen. Thank you for continuing to help build each other up in this community.

*******

I have had more than a few notes asking me some version of, “Charlie, what exactly do you see in this Pope?!”

When Pope Francis speaks formally on matters of faith and morals, which he is authoritative on, his clarity, charity and orthodoxy are invariably breathtaking. When he speaks on matters of economics and politics, which he is not authoritative on, focusing on means rather than ends, he is almost invariably clunky, poorly informed, and recommends policies that have impoverished and oppressed people whenever they have been tried. The problem is he speaks at length on secular political matters and treats faith and morals as an afterthought. I get it.

But here’s the thing: God does not just know who we are, He knows who we are going to be. That is why He could look at the zealotry of a Saul of Tarsus, see to the heart, and see that this was the man with the fortitude and steadfastness He could use to spread the message of Christianity throughout the world. He could look at the seeming glib, but degenerate, brilliance and passion of a St. Augustine and see a man He could use to explain and spread the faith to millions. God sees to the heart and knows what can be made of it.

I have said emphatically that Pope Francis IS the Pope of the Storm, I have also said that right now he is in his prelude to greatness – and that, in fact, a significant blunder is liable to lead him into that greatness. I am beginning to think that in a year when the very concept of family is under siege throughout the western world, when Christians are being butchered in large swaths of the world, when babies are being butchered and their organs sold for profit throughout the formerly Christian world, his blunder may be that he occupies his time declaiming against dubious propositions such as global warming and advocating for global governance – relative trivia while the foundations of Christian civilization are being pulverized. Whatever it is, Pope Francis is the guy who will lead us through the Storm like a champion – and God is no more mistaken in this than He was in making Saul of Tarsus the Apostle to the Gentiles or the heretic Augustine into a great Doctor of the Church.

In a larger sense, as irritating as it might be to have a Pope who disagrees with you on secular things, even if he is badly wrong, it is irrelevant so long as he maintains fidelity on faith and morals. The point is that God’s ways are not our ways – and God always has a plan. In many ways, I often do not understand God’s plan, but I do trust His promises even when I don’t understand. He will preserve His Church and carry us safely through this Storm. The question, thus, is not so much whether you agree with Pope Francis on politics and economics, but whether you will obey the hierarchy the Lord set up, Himself, on matters of faith and morals.

*******

I am getting a lot of questions from new readers on matters that I have covered at length on this website previously. Though I have drawn my share of trolls who are trying to disrupt things, I think most are serious and sincere. Even so, on those things that a reader can find for themselves with an hour or two of research here, you are going to have to do it yourselves. I will not clear comments on such things or respond to emails about it any longer. I just don’t have the time to repeat ad nauseum the research that a reader can do, himself.

 

 

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
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310 Responses to A Few Right Steps

  1. Patricia says:

    Charlie,
    Well, I guess the good news is that the Pope may not make a major blunder but that he may have already made the blunder.
    I was listening to various tv and radio stations through out the day yesterday and today. By and large, the commentators, who identified as Catholic, were quite upset about his light handed approach to the Congress and to the White House. For the life of them, they could not figure out why he would not have used the word abortion, never mind the words Planned Parenthood. Anyway, I find it helpful to repeat “God has a plan” because he does. Thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I too was another person disappointed that stronger, more direct language was not used by our beloved Pope.
      But then, these verses came to mind ~ “…there was first a storm of wind, wild wind which rent the mountains and broke the rocks…but Yahweh was not in the wind, After the storm, there was an earthquake, but Yahweh was not in the earthquake. After the earthquake, a fire, but Yahweh was not in the fire. After the fire, the murmur of a gentle breeze….” ~ 1 Kings 19: 11 – 12.
      I guess it was His way of reminding me His ways are not mine.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Rosie says:

        Wow! that says it all! Thanks,

        Liked by 1 person

      • Pam Nicholson says:

        And, everyone, the Pope really gave it to them between their eyes at the UN. I do recommend the book, “Hope of the Wicked” by Ted Flynn, website: http://www.MaxKol.org. This book was painstakingly researched by the author and describes to a t what the Pope spoke about at the UN. He is a mighty wind, but in comparison to God, a breeze, meant to get our attention. Please do try to get copies for yourselves so you can see what the few have been doing, really, a way to global governance which does all it can to destroy the human spirit to exploit the very gifts God has given the world — human beings and the things man uses to control others. God help them. pam, from NJ.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jean says:

        Perfect!

        Like

    • Martha says:

      I think the Pope made his point quite well when he talked about the sanctity of ALL lives to Congress. From early development to the elderly. They should have heard that message without him saying ” abortion”.

      Liked by 1 person

      • old geezer says:

        Eh, what? Did you say “abortion”?

        Like

      • Doug says:

        True. Problem is progressives don’t consider unborn to be life. This is how their argument is justified. If they agree it is life, then all their arguments are moot. So to them, the popes message can hold true. It needs to sink in that it is life at conception.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. jlynnbyrd says:

    I may be naïve, however I think Pope Francis has a world of hearts to touch and knows his audiences. He has been clever in some ways like visiting the Sisters of Charity (off of the schedule). I also perceived warnings for the present time to mitigate, endure and exist after the storm in his messages. I believe wholeheartedly that his actions and the direct reactions from the crowds are speaking louder than his words, thus far.
    God is at the helm of this ship with His faithful servants as the crew and the “Holy Army” as the compass to guide, the shield and sword to protect & defeat and the anchor in the Triumph of Our Blessed Mother’s Immaculate Heart.

    Liked by 8 people

    • janet333 says:

      “I believe wholeheartedly that his actions and the direct reactions from the crowds are speaking louder than his words, thus far….”

      I agree with you Jlynnbyrd. Obviously all are aware of the teaching of the Catholic Church and know how the Pope feels on these important issues. Pope Emeritus Benedict once stated….“I always knew the questions in advance. They concerned the ordination of women, contraception, abortion and other such constantly recurring problems. If we let ourselves be drawn into these discussions, the Church is then identified with certain commandments or prohibitions; we give the impression that we are moralists with a few somewhat antiquated convictions, and not even a hint of the true greatness of the faith ….”

      Liked by 5 people

    • Matthew says:

      I believe it was the Little Sisters of the Poor.

      Like

    • You’re not naïve, jlynnbyrd. You are very rooted in the Spirit – your comment is testimony to that.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Donette says:

    May I offer the following by Fr. Longenecker as to why the Pope is important. And my dear Patricia, I find commentators on TV networks, even those who claim themselves as Catholic are the last people I go to for information on what this Pope does or says. There is a whole generation of Catholics out there who were not trained properly…and even some priests. They are like a loaf of bread that was not baked properly. For them to rise they need to be put back in the oven to bake a little longer. They do not know that we are the Church militant. We are soldiers for Christ and we should never be silent about Him; we should never be shy about speaking of our Faith when the opportunity arises no matter where we are and for some of us the market place is just fine and we should also learn to do this with love.

    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/standingonmyhead/2015/09/ten-reasons-why-the-pope-is-important-for-politics.html

    Ten Reasons Why The Pope is Important for Politics

    francis1

    September 20, 2015
    by Fr. Dwight Longenecker

    Too many Americans think the separation of church and state means religion should be kept out of public life.

    Pastors, popes and priests should keep their mouth shut except on Sundays. In their own church. With their own people.

    If they speak up in the public square they are told to keep quiet and not “jam their religion down the throat of everyone else.

    This silencing of the voice of virtue and a kind of virtual shout down of the prophet in the midst is nothing new.

    When a people are guilty and ashamed they usually stone the prophets, persecute the priests and silence the rabbis.

    Pope Francis’ visit to Cuba and the United State is therefore important not just because he is the universal shepherd of Catholics. He speaks for all people in a way that only a Pope can.

    He is important for politicians and those who view the world thorough political spectacles because he addresses their concerns, but he does so in a way, and from a perspective than is bigger than their own small, limited understanding.

    The Pope is important for politics because he is bigger than politics, and politicians and political pundits need to be able to see and appreciate the bigger picture.

    Here are ten reasons why the Pope must be listened to and why his voice is important for politics.

    1. He is a global leader – There is not other person on the world stage who can claim the hearts, minds and devotion of people from every race, language, nation and tribe. The Pope is truly the only global leader. Therefore his viewpoint and that of the Catholic faith is greater than any national boundary. He can therefore take a wide view. His perspective is greater than that of any purely national interest.

    2. He is a moral leader, not an elected politician – Every politician has to please somebody somewhere. Maybe it is his electorate. Maybe it is the big business who bought him. Maybe it is the shady characters behind the scenes who schemed and worked to put him into office. Maybe it is the leaders of some ideological group he follows. The pope was elected, but he didn’t seek high office and doesn’t give two hoots whether he is pope or not. Therefore he can speak to moral interests without self interest. His views transcend ambition and self interest.

    3. His moral beliefs reach beyond his religion – Pope Francis is the leader of over a billion Catholics worldwide, but on the world stage, even if his particular religious doctrines are not shared by everyone, his moral teachings are shared with the vast majority of human beings. In addition to the Catholic faith, the pope stands for love, for family, for loyalty. He stands for life, for the poor, for the vulnerable. He stands against war. He stands against killing and violence, greed and oppression. He stands against tyranny and injustice. Therefore his teaching and all that he stands for transcends every religion and he teaches a way of peace and love, justice and good for all humanity.

    4. He represents Western civilization – Like it or not, Catholicism is the bedrock of Western civilization. America and all the developed countries–and subsequently the countries the Western nations colonized–all have their roots in a shared classical civilization and Jewish religion which pre dates Catholicism itself. Catholicism is the inheritor and preserver of that ancient wisdom and the bedrock of our shared culture. The pope is therefore not only a religious leader for Catholics, but the head of an institution which reaches back into the Roman Empire and beyond and is therefore the preserver and sustainer of our shared heritage.

    5. The Pope represents virtue-not ideology – No civilization can prosper without personal virtue. The pope–and Catholicism–stands for personal virtue in the face of corporate corruption. The Catholic faith appeals to the simplicities of virtue as opposed to ideologies. It calls for people to pursue all that is beautiful, good and true–not just what is expedient or politically correct or advantageous. It calls for personal goodness, heroic self sacrifice and noble aspirations instead of slavish adherence to an ideology.

    6. The Pope is a man of the people – Every pope stands for the common man. Pope John Paul stood with great courage in solidarity with the workers of Poland. Benedict stood with great courage with ordinary people in the face of Nazisim. Francis stands with great courage for the ordinary person, the simple person striving to bring up their family and live in harmony and peace. Politicians needs to listen and learn from this grass roots, ground up kind of life and ministry.

    7. The Pope reminds Politicians that they are there to serve – One of the Pope’s titles is “Servant of the Servants of God.” His role as servant of the people is a stark reminder to corrupt politicians who spend most of their time with their noses in the trough that they are there to serve, not to enslave the people. He stands as a witness that we are all called to serve in humility and love for one another.

    8. The Pope reminds us of our greater priorities – We are not here simply to acquire more and more material goods. We are here to serve and build up the common good. We are not here to impose worldly ideologies on those with whom we disagree. We are here to serve and help people help themselves to a better life. Catholicism stands for personal responsibility and the full realization of human potential.

    9. The Pope reminds everyone that there is more to this world than material power and wealth – As a spiritual leader Pope Francis is a potent reminder that there is another life beyond this one and all of us will give account of ourselves one day to the judge and maker of all. He reminds politicians, financiers, world leaders that there is more to life than this world and more to life than mere materialism

    10. The Pope is Pro Life – The pope is pro life in the biggest, best and broadest way. He is not only anti abortion. He is for human life in all its fullness for all people. He reminds politicians that there are greater goods than their own short sighted ambitions. He reminds politicians that human flourishing for all people is their business. He reminds then that life is good, that people are good, that peace is good, that family is good, that children are good. He reminds them that all the wealth, all the power, all the prestige, all the politics are there to serve people and empower them to seek all that is beautiful, good and true

    Liked by 8 people

    • Pam Nicholson says:

      Oh yes, we are to be little living crosses in the world! God bless you for such a truly inspired analogy. We are to be leaven in a poorly catechized world of lukewarmness all around, no matter where you go. Thanks for the leaven! pam, from NJ.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. the phoenix says:

    There is a secular blogger who apparently is an atheist or could pass for one, it seems to me. His name is James Altucher, and he’s recently written a blog post called “Is Pope Francis An Atheist and Ten Other Things I Learned From Him” … I am not posting a direct link to the blog because there are in fact writings on his blog that I disagree with for various reasons and would rather not link to a Catholic blog like this one. That said, James Altucher’s post made me cry … it sounds like he’s searching, like St. Paul or St. Augustine … and it sounds like Pope Francis inspires him, even if Mr. Altucher is not yet ready to acknowledge God. Who knows, maybe someday Pope Francis will inspire him to convert? Meanwhile, each of us can say a tiny prayer for him … well, for them … for Pope Francis, and for James Altucher.

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      I have thought of that, too, Phoenix. Some of the things many think are odd may create a renewed call to people who have become alienated from the faith. If they come for the odd stuff, they may stay for the faith. God has a plan. Hee hee…I have told the Lord sullenly a few times about something, “That’s not the way I would do it,” only to have Him smile and respond, “I know.”

      Liked by 12 people

      • Kathleen Wimmer says:

        Charlie, you actually sat to God that you would do it another way? That makes me smile. I love the fact that God lets us say thing like that to Him and continued to hold out Hus hand to us. I like what you said about Paul and Augustine and I know that all of everything is God’s Plan. It is just so very hard to watch such evil in the world and in our own Church. Sorry that I missed you in Belleville. My new little grandson is beautiful and I feel blessed to share time with him and my other grandchildren.

        Liked by 2 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      Prayers going up now, Phoenix.

      Like

    • radiclaudio says:

      I have seen many similar examples myself recently, most especially while the Pope is on this trip. Like many of us here in the RNS family I tend to be conservative and my prudential judge makes me wince when our beloved Holy Father speaks of climate issues, the problems of capitalism, or calls for a single world government. But through much prayer, basically begging God to let me be a little wiser in His ways, I have been permitted the tiniest bit to sense some small corner of God’s plan in what I sometime see as Pope Francis maddeness. Turns out I’m the knucklehead 🙂

      My lost or even anti Christian friends, relatives, and coworkers are speaking of Pope Francis and God with joy and love. How can this be anything but good? Really to me its a miracle. These people have all heard the “arguments and counter points” which did not change their hearts. The Pope seems to be breaking through to them without watering down Truth or doctrine in the slightest. He doesn’t emphasis it as much as I would like, but if I’m honest with myself I have to admit that hasn’t worked so far, probably because thier hearts have not been open to hear yet. (Honestly despite His constant graces raining down on me mine own heart is really only a little open, yet I walk around crowing like a big rooster) The Holy Father seems like he is opening hearts for Christ, and like Charlie ( though less directly lol) I’m yapping that I would do it differently. Thank God for His infinite love or I would be lost. (“man plans, God laughs”).

      I have said before that our Pope has taught my soul that I am the prodigal son’s brother sulking out in the field because my Dad didn’t give my brother the “what for” for being so lost and screwed up. God is telling me He is always with me and what He has is mine (love, mercy, joy, hope, grace, Truth). Our Dad tells us (really he commands of us) that we are free to share these “fatten calves” with our friends without limit.

      At least of the new found joy our lost brothers and sisters have found through the words joy, and love of the Holy Father seems like a geniune opening of their hearts. Like us all they will have to, step by step, say yes and cooperate with this grace God is giving them. But amazingly, at least some seem to be starting a geniune conversion because Pope Francis ran out to then in the field and threw his arms around their dirty stinky bodies, put a ring on thier fingers, robes on thier backs, and shoes on thier feet and told them He loves them and is so happy and relieved they are back with Him. I don’t want to be out in the field sulking any longer. I want to be at the feast with my Father, brothers and sisters, celebrating their joyful return and the great happiness this gives my Dad!!!

      With deepest love and affection for my family here and constant prayers for us all and our families, now and in the darkest parts of Storm to come, YBIC…Rich

      Liked by 9 people

      • janet333 says:

        RadioClaudio…..”These people have all heard the “arguments and counter points” which did not change their hearts. The Pope seems to be breaking through to them without watering down Truth or doctrine in the slightest”

        I agree entirely!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Jay says:

        Thank you, Rich. I’m right there with you. I feel better after reading your response. I think I need to turn off the conservative talk radio in my office. One thing that I have learned in the last couple of days is that there is a difference between faith-centered conservatism and party-based conservatism.

        YBIC
        -Jay

        Liked by 8 people

        • charliej373 says:

          Boy, ain’t that the truth!

          Liked by 3 people

        • NancyA says:

          Jay, yes, yes, yes! I am hoping to find time soon to address that idea, which was very well elucidated by Helen Alvare in a breakout session talk on Catholic Social Teaching. I took copious notes, and really agreed with her message. Also, I have to say I STILL believe the Holy Father IS in his element speaking on social issues which have become politicized. He is teaching the age old Church’s truths… remember, the earliest Christians DID live in community, all sharing with one another. Pope Francis points to a Catholic ideal.

          I am sorry not to be able to fully express my thoughts here. Have to get to bed early as I can so I can make the miles of trekking to SEE him tomorrow and Sunday!

          Like

    • Mick says:

      Phoenix, I have been praying for James Altucher since I saw you comment. And when I saw this article this morning, I thought you might like it:

      http://www.strangenotions.com/15-surprising-things-atheists-are-saying-about-pope-francis/

      Liked by 2 people

  5. lrfitz3399 says:

    So good to hear of the success of the net campaign against malaria. So good to be a part of this community. Prayers for all here; and for the Pope tomorrow in New York.

    Liked by 2 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      I offered the Prayer of Miraculous Trust for Pope Francis and the World Meeting of Families and For Margaret’s Network to help families and children in Africa requesting the intercession of St. Gianna Beretta Molla.

      Liked by 3 people

  6. Hopenjoy says:

    I keep repeating Charlie’s words that Pope Francis IS the Pope for the storm…even after reading Mark Mallett’s wonderful recent piece on the Pope and how he is so much like his Boss, Jesus…I am saddened and discouraged with what I am hearing/seeing about the Pope’s visit to the US right now. Sigh. Global warming, seriously? One world government, great, keep those anti-Catholic false prophet conspiracies going among our Protestant brothers and sisters. Charlie, thank you for your clear writing on our beloved, but confusing, and very human, Pope Francis.

    Like

    • MarieUrsula says:

      Hi, Hopenjoy ~ I’m not sure I understand your comment re “One world government . . . .” I’ve read the transcripts of Pope Francis’s speeches in the US, and I don’t see any advocacy for “one world government.” His words in the transcripts seem to me to be completely consistent with the Gospel of Jesus Christ, which really cannot conform with Democrat or Republican platforms. On the other hand, I have cursorily read various commentaries, some of which are downright hostile and, in my opinion, miss the mark. On FB, I’ve been posting transcripts of some of the actual speeches, which are readily available on the Vatican’s website.

      Liked by 3 people

    • janet333 says:

      Hi Hopenjoy.

      I know what you mean about the “anti-Catholic false prophet conspiracies” Reading them makes me ill! I believe the Pope knows exactly what he’s doing, just as Jesus knew it was best to sit among the sinners at table, much to the consternation of his disciples, in order to show them that there was mercy and forgiveness waiting for them.

      “… That freedom remains one of America’s most precious possessions. And, as my brothers, the United States Bishops, have reminded us, all are called to be vigilant, precisely as good citizens, to preserve and defend that freedom from everything that would threaten or compromise it. Pope Francis

      “And then, as though to underscore that point, Pope Francis made an unscheduled visit to the Little Sisters of the Poor, who are fighting the Obama administration on that very issue” (Catholic Stand)

      Like

    • Christine says:

      I seriously do not understand why you think Global Warming is not real. My husband is a devout life long Catholic and a scientist and at the age of 64 understands Global Warming and the consequences of it in various parts of the world. It seems people in this part of the world don’t see it so it doesn’t exist…..but for those people who have had to abandon their homes and find new places to live because of rising waters it is very real. I wish you would pray for discernment about this issue….just because it’s a democratic issue in this country, doesn’t make it go away. As far as ecnomics go…I am clueless…can’t speak for that at all.

      Like

      • charliej373 says:

        I don’t agree with it because EVERY prediction connected with global warming over the last 20 years has failed. The ice caps have not melted away – just receded and advanced again as they have through history. Winter has not left England. Mass starvation, when it has come, has come because of political veniality in distribution, not because of scarcity caused by weather. EVERY prediction made by the global warmists have failed. It is not evidence to randomly blame every extreme weather event such as have happened with cyclical regularity on “global warming” now. I do not reject it because of “democracy,” but because the science does not hold up and has been pockmarked with outright fraud routinely – East Anglia and such, moving sensors to more urban areas, ignoring the satellite data that was originally called the most accurate by warmists as soon as that satellite data showed it was not warming at all any more – and all in service to trying to maintain rent-seeking grants from governments in exchange for propping up arguments to go to a Soviet-style command economy and polis. Before global warming can be taken seriously, at least one or two of its medium-range predictions ought to actually happen…and all of those, every one of them, have failed.

        Liked by 5 people

        • Petra says:

          I agree with Charlie, and in addition, I am not convinced by the data that whatever changes are happening in the climate are due to mankind’s actions, such as green house gases.

          Like

        • Pam Nicholson says:

          You are right on, Charlie. This is merely junk science, a way to try to control the masses, just as was done in mother Russia as the communists spewed their false doctrines and tried to destroy the church with a more atheistic philosophy to control the masses, and kill all those who might disagree with them. The time for proletariat governance is over. How many more people have to die for regimes who only seek to control the masses by controlling all that God has given us? During and after WWII, they will not talk about this, our fellow human beings who plan to destroy all which is holy, over 50 million were slaughtered in mother Russia. That is so pathetic and the world did nothing. That time must end now. We have a choice. Their lies have only bred mistrust all over the world, so much so, that even in our country, we all just figure any politician is just uttering words, until the next politician comes around and it also is just words without action for the actual good of the people. I still say you write so well, Charlie. God bless. pam, from NJ.

          Like

        • Christine says:

          My belief is that the Pope is all about truth and seeking the truth …even in science. He has top scientists advising him. I love you but you are stubborn. All of your claims are old arguments against the idea that have been addressed by scientists. Sea level rises are actually faster than predicted. groups is affiliated with coal industry….hmmmmm

          Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Christine had a whole group of links to websites and articles supporting the science of climate change. I edited most of it down – as this is not a debate about climate change. You can believe it or not – and you can look up pro and con articles yourself and study the science. Christine believes it. I do not. That is a whole different debate than whether or not the Pope should so emphasize this, which is not part of his Magisterial authority, when Christians are under siege throughout the world, the family is under siege, and prominent politicians and media officials say that butchering fetal children and harvesting their organs for sale is worthy of forced taxpayer support. That is the point, whether climate change proves serious, as Christine thinks, or merely a stalking horse to justify massive, coercive and oppressive state power over all – as I believe.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Christine says:

            Never ever wanted to enter a debate. My heart breaks over all the evil I see around me. God bless.

            Liked by 1 person

      • Doug says:

        What melted the glaciers from the last ice age? My understanding is this was only 25,000 years ago before man was on the scene.

        I don’t want to debate this issue anymore in this forum. So I will not comment anymore here on this.

        Like

      • Pam Nicholson says:

        The type of “warming” you speak of or your husband speaks of is a natural phenomenon which has occurred many times in man’s existence. We had “little winters”, “little ice ages”, we have had earthly warming, and people did have to move around due to rising waters from melted ice bergs, but, this is not like the entire world is in danger due to flooding landscapes. There is nothing to substantiate this argument as Charlie says. Nothing. It is not a democratic point of view or republican non-point of view, it is a very small issue in comparison to what is really happening. The world, people and nature, have been exploited by the few very wealthy people, not nations, people who govern them, like China, and others who know who they are, to grab, seize all that God created for all mankind, not just these few who chose to walk the way of the wicked, their hope to take over control globally, all that belongs to everyone. The church’s stance on creation and the care by mankind is clear. The pope has put an exclamation point to the teachings. We can choose to follow the teachings of the church, or go our own way. The choice is up to us. Blessings. pam, from NJ.

        Like

        • jlynnbyrd says:

          On one hand, I agree that “climate control” is just another arena that mankind is attempting to play God and it is baseless and extreme. Our Almighty Father has had and still does have this under control.
          On the other hand, seeing people litter is one of by biggest pet peeves. I love nature and see it as polluting my/our back yard (no matter where it occurs). The earth and all of it’s creations are God’s work. To learn to care for it in its entirety just brings us one (right next right) step closer to the reverence I believe is required of us (His highest form of creation.)

          Like

  7. RMD says:

    Maybe the blunder was his institution of “fast lane” annulments (Catholic divorces) of marriages, while emphasizing the great importance of “family” today in his speech before congress. If the preservation of families is so crucial to the future development of the culture, wouldn’t making annulments easier to obtain cause further disintegration of families? I assume this will be a hot topic in Philadelphia at the family conference and also at the upcoming synod.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Actually, I don’t think so, RMD. The problem with marriage right now was described, I think, accurately, by a Bishop a few years back – that the hierarchy had done such a poor job of marriage preparation the last few generations that, if carefully examined, as many as 80% of marriages today might not be sacramentally valid. This problem did not just arise – it has been built by long neglect. Now this generation of Bishops is charged with dealing with the consequences of several generations of indifference.

      Liked by 9 people

      • Pam Nicholson says:

        Charlie, you are dead on right. The church has allowed so much of modernism. Modernism has always been a scourge in the church, and this generation and other generations of bishops are charged with making things right. I pray they take the next right step! Big time! Blessings. pam, from NJ.

        Like

      • janet333 says:

        I agree Charlie..I was married at 18 and had no idea what I was doing. I didn’t know my faith, apart from what I’d learned in infant school. I was granted an annulment because I never took the vows seriously…there were many other issues also which I won’t go into on here.

        God Bless You

        Liked by 3 people

      • Mark says:

        Charlie, I agree 100% that big problem has been with the lack of adequate marriage preparation. I was married in my early twenties for a year. We then separated and divorced. My ex-wife was Greek Orthodox and we actually got a “double” annulment. The Orthodox annulled the marriage and I also received an annulment from the Catholic Church. The best thing was that as part of my annulment from the Catholic Church was a stipulation was placed on any subsequent re-marriage in the Church. I was required to got for a year of marriage counseling with any prospective future spouse. So when I then got engaged to my now current wife of 20 years we saw a Catholic psychiatrist for marriage preparation both individually and together for a full year. He then signed off, if you will on a remarriage, and I was able to remarry in the Church. I think the Church should consider requiring something similar for ANYONE contemplating marriage. One or two afternoons of marriage preparation by the priests is simply not enough, particularly in this day and age.

        Liked by 3 people

        • charliej373 says:

          I don’t care much about quick annulments right now – I think it is probably appropriate. What I care about to solve this problem is that the Pope and Bishops demand serious marriage preparation NOW so that we don’t have many invalid marriages going forward.

          Liked by 6 people

        • Doug says:

          Yes! We need to be much stronger for preparation. As parents, it is also our responsibility to train our kids in how to find a good spouse.

          Like

      • Brian says:

        Charlie, the problem and inconsistency I see in the annulment process is that an annulment only determines a marriage was not sacramentally valid at the time of the start of the marriage. Being that in this Sacrament the spouses “marry themselves” (with God and the community as witnesses), and being the Church recognizes and assumes most non-Catholic marriages are valid, I find it logically inconsistent that the annulment process doesn’t also focus on whether the marriage eventually became a valid marriage even though it may not have at the time of the wedding. The current treatment of the abandoned parties in any divorce can be horrible and is often not at all “no fault” or mutual. I wonder if Jesus were here would he make a similar comment to the Church hierarchy as he did in the Bible when he mentions the law of Moses and the false accomodations made to the people. Someone please tell me if I am wrong but I find it hard to believe after many years of marriage and the begetting of children that at some point the couple didn’t “get” the commitment they entered into– therefore making the marriage valid. Also, I don’t know anyone who fully understands the graces and challenges of their commitment often until years into it. I think that is why God makes the courting process and start of marriage so euphoric– you sometimes need those memories to get through the tough times.

        Food for thought. Brian

        Liked by 1 person

        • janet333 says:

          Hi Brian….”……but I find it hard to believe after many years of marriage and the begetting of children that at some point the couple didn’t “get” the commitment they entered into– therefore making the marriage valid”

          I stayed with my ex for many years and had 6 daughters but the marriage was ‘doomed’ from the start because of many things….. and I did not know my faith. I never thought about an annulment until I spoke to a priest who informed me that because I had not taken the vows seriously the marriage was not valid. So yes Marriage preparation is vital! There are no excuses then for not knowing exactly what we are taking on when we commit to marriage.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Doug says:

          Not sure if folks are aware of this, but the divorce rate for couples who practice Natural Family Planning (NFP) is in the 1-3 % range. No where else is that statistic that low. Pope Paul had it right with Humane Vite.

          Liked by 3 people

          • charliej373 says:

            He surely did. It was the single most profoundly prophetic document of modern times, I think.

            Liked by 3 people

          • NancyA says:

            Remember, that is correlation, not causation. Those who practice(d) NFP are also often completely committed to marriage, even a bad one. I know. My marriage is not lasting because of NFP, but I both practiced NFP and stay in my marriage because I am committed to Catholic family life and the preservation of marriage.

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Good point, Nancy. People who practice NFP are already committed sacramentally to their faith in all areas. Yet, it does not completely detract from Doug’s point. If people were properly formed and the culture encouraged that, we might have 97% who practiced NFP and a divorce rate of less than one percent. I certainly think we would not be butchering and selling the organs of babies for profit with sizable segments of our political and media class arguing it is the right thing to do. So if we got formation right (or righter) a lot of the hideous disorders of our day might well evaporate.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Honestly, I think it’s both.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Mack says:

          Brian the reason is that for Catholics Canon law specifies the valid form for marriage. Lacking this it can’t be valid. Couples can’t transform a null union into a valid marriage by themselves because the canonical form requires a public ceremony with the priest as witness. The requirements for valid marriage in the Catholic church are very specific.

          Like

      • Maeb says:

        Well, lack of faith does not invalidate a marriage. Lack of faith invalidates no sacrament. Sacraments don’t depend on faith. However, lack of knowledge of what marriage is could invalidate a sacrament. And a cultural conditioning to regard marriage as something non-permanent and non-fruitful could arguably invalidate marriage. However, the Church has always presumed knowledge of what marriage is, because it is natural. This presumption may be unwarranted in our unnatural age. Another however: people do say words when they marry, and it is presumed that they mean those words. Lack of understanding used to refer to lack of capacity to understand, and lack of consent to lack of power to consent (either by duress or fear or ignorance of something crucial). While I am on the subject of words, and since this forum has a wide audience, and since I have had no luck going to the highest quarters with this complaint, somebody please do something about the materially invalid new English vows: “all the days of my life”! Marriage is not for “all the days of my life”; it is until the death of one partner and then the other is free to marry again. Of course, no one means they will regard themselves as perpetually married after the death of the other, but THAT IS WHAT THE WORDS SAY!

        Like

        • Maeb says:

          I hasten to add that when the Pope mentions lack of faith in the new canon, he is probably referring, a canonist tells me, to a special situation that can happen when people marry as unbaptized non-Catholics (at least one of them), then become Catholics, then divorce – that maybe their natural marriage ought not to be considered to be sacramental automatically upon baptism, since it preceded. I think, though, that when people talk about lack of faith in marriage they may mean natural belief in what marriage is. Que lio.

          Like

        • Mack says:

          Annulment doesn’t invalidate a sacrament. It means no sacrament ever took place because the required conditions were not present, even though a couple went through a ceremony. It was null and void from the beginning.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Kim sevier says:

        Question Charlie– in the days of old when there seemed to be a good moral compass and our Church had a strong clergy — was there a formal program of marriage prep or did the priests communicate the church’s teachings often and well so that good strong marriages were produced?

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          The whole culture took it more seriously, Kim. In many ways, as the sexual revolution rose, the clergy did not adapt fast enough…in some cases not really realizing that the old consensus was dying and in some even worse cases, buying into the toxicity of the times.

          Like

          • Maeb says:

            Oh, Charlie, you are so charitable. From the mid-60’s on, situational ethics, moral relativism, was the teaching of the seminaries. Before that, there was a sort of vacuum, as the old manuals were thrown out and new theories were tried. Older clergy knew the old consensus was dying and they were actually helping to assasinate what was left of it in the Church. It wasn’t some who bought into the toxicity of the times, but most, though I will say that many of them inhaled it, were affected by it, rather than chose it philosophically as “bought in” might imply. From 1965 to 1979 was a terrible terrible time. Priests were not confused onlookers, but happy cheerleaders of the cultural revolution.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Kim sevier says:

            Well– I got married in 1973 (2 weeks after I turned 21) to a fellow I had known for only 7 months- and we weren’t even living in the same city. We met with my pastor for about 15 minutes to promise we would raise our children Catholic (he wasn’t Catholic ). 12 years and 3 children later I decided I didn’t love him any more and a lay woman in charge of annulments at my parish in Florida got me a quick annulment. I was ill prepared for marriage but I grieviously regret my divorce. It feels like I was let down in both situations. Good comes from bad though, as my struggles and grief led me to a deeper and more profound faith.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            Wow, that is big, Kim. Sorry to hear of your experience. However, I have heard this scenario before. I just do not understand how a lay person would be sanctioned by a diocese to do this sort of thing which can destroy families. She will have quite a reckoning. And, so will the bishop. God help him. pam, from NJ.

            Like

          • mmbev says:

            My husband and I had marriage preparation. The very first thing the priest who was preparing us asked me to do was to read a book he gave me. It was Betty Friedan’s “Feminist Mystic”.

            Good thing that God had already made me very curious about the Catholic teachings before I ever met him. I still pray for “Bob” (felt Father was too formal), who married a couple of years later.

            Like

          • To Kim and Pam: I am one of those lay women you speak of whom you say destroys families and will have quite a reckoning when I die. I served for a time as a lay Tribunal Advocate for my diocese as part of my full time job at a parish. It was one of the most important and rewarding things I have ever done. I was duly trained and supervised and my task was to interview the petitioner and prepare the case to be submitted to the Tribunal. This was a rare privilege for a lay person in my diocese but was needed because of the shortage of clergy and the huge number of cases. Lest your comments frighten away anyone who is now in RCIA looking to become a Catholic and may need to go through this process, and lest your comments cast suspicions on the character of any good lay Catholic who is serving in this same role, let me clarify a few things. No lay person can get you an annulment. A decree of nullity is granted by the Tribunal by the authority given to the Church by Christ. They will either find that the bond did not exist or that it did. I did not “destroy families”. They were already destroyed when the cases were given to me. All of the cases I had were people going through RCIA, hungering for the Sacraments, longing to put a painful past behind them, looking forward to the relief of their first confession and the joy of their first Eucharist. I had the joy of helping them put their lives back together. I also saw the ones who were gaming the system; but it was a simple matter to look at their claim legally and honestly say “I’m sorry but there’s nothing here.” I keep reading comments here that indicate that couples who knew what they were getting into and meant what they said should not get decrees of nullity. That is not true. There must be two conditions present for any vow to be valid. You must have the intent to fulfill the vow and also the ability to fulfill the vow. Sometimes there is intent but no ability and sometimes there is ability but no intent. The Church recognizes that there may have been full consent on the part of both parties at the time of the vow but there can be a defect in that consent. There can be no coercion involved, including the coercion of terrible circumstances. There can be no conditional vows ( as long as he stays sober I will stay with him, for example, or I’m marrying her because she is rich) These conditional vows are quite common and often subconscious. A great example can be seen in the movie about Stephen Hawking and his wife. She entered into the marriage thinking he had only 2 years to live. Was she thinking “I can handle it for 2 years but not for 70”? I don’t know but if so, that would be a conditional vow and therefore invalid. In my role I learned the most intimate secrets of what REALLY went on in a marriage and in the minds of the parties – the real story that mom and dad and best friend and children don’t know and will NEVER know. What I learned from this experience is that you absolutely, positively cannot stand outside of a situation and judge it. And I learned that the Church is doing a much better job at this than it may appear from the outside. What do I think of Pope Francis’ reforms? I think of a woman who got married at 16 because she was pregnant and her parents threw her out on the street to a guy who beat her…but put a roof over her head. She did not have enough money to buy groceries much less pay for the annulment process. I think of the married couple with kids who separated so that they could come into the Church. They heroically remained apart for 3 years while their case dragged through the process. Holy Communion was that important to them. I say hooray for Pope Francis! It’s about time someone did something about this slow, archaic, process. And by the way, Charlie is absolutely, dead-on right: the flood of cases is due to the terrible, crazy, bizarre notions a whole society has developed about marriage. Many of the people I spoke to learned about marriage from TV and dysfunctional parents. Isn’t it obvious that we have lost our bearings on what it really is? How else could we have accepted a whole new definition of it and enshrined it into law?

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            Flowers, thank you for sharing this with us from your long – and I am sure difficult – experience. It is a beautiful testimony to people trying to live real grace in terrible circumstances. The Lord will reward you.

            I think this testimony underlines an important fundamental point, too. God will judge each person according to their faith and fruit. Seeing someone who does a job badly or maliciously does not discredit all who do that job, any more than seeing one who does it well and with humanity justifies those who do not. It is a lesson we all need to be reminded of, including me.

            Liked by 2 people

        • Pam Nicholson says:

          I know you posed this question to Charlie, but, if I might be so bold, I would like to tell you something I know. I know that there was a time when teaching was done by priests in a more verbal manner, no actual established catechism one can buy to seek answers. But, in a way, this was highly effective. People wanted to have their first communion and learn more. Maybe that is what is lacking, a more personal approach to learning the sacramental life. I recall in the story of St. Bernadette, that the nuns were doing the teaching. God bless those nuns. And, I believe it was the same thing at Fatima, with the nuns teaching, but the priest was right on top of things, always peeking in to let everyone know that he was watching. Our bishops have this responsibility.pam, from NJ.

          Like

        • jlynnbyrd says:

          In the early 1980’s I was involved with the Pre-Cana marriage prep required by the church before a sacramental marriage could take place. It was a weekend retreat held at a convent and the woman and men stayed in separate quarters and came together to dialogue and to dine under the guidance of clergy and religious sisters. It was a spiritual experience. I just Googled it and saw that it is now offered online. Goodness, that can’t be as effective. Heavy sigh.
          My fiancé and I ended up not getting married, his choice, but Divinely inspired I believe in retrospect.

          Like

          • Doug says:

            I have heard that the success of a program can also be measured in not getting married which means eyes were opened to responsibility of marriage.

            As an aside, our protestant brothers at familylife.com have a wonderful marriage conference called “weekend to remember”. I have been over a dozen times with my bride. Brought many of the practical concepts to working with my bride on Catholic marriage prep. One thing that sticks with me is that the family is God’s smallest battle formation in his army.

            Liked by 1 person

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            That is so sweet Doug, and I love that you still call her your bride.

            Like

          • Doug says:

            I am smiling. Thank you and God bless you Jylnnbird!

            Like

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            Very interesting you mentioned what you said about sometimes the result was no marriage. That is so important. So few people go into marriage really knowing their future partner, but, maybe there are other issues at stake and it requires more prayer and to move on, and see if God maybe has someone more suited to you for His greater Glory. I love saying that so much. But, it is true. If I had known back when I first married my fallen-away catholic husband what I know now, who knows? But, what I did not know was that I was being called to the catholic church in my own heart. And, who could have guessed my husband would come back after 38 years of being away, after he went to a catholic retreat with me. These things we cannot just make up. Too much overt evidence to back up the claim. We are all living reminders that God is always in our midst, waiting for us to say yes to Him. So many blessings to you all! pam, from NJ.

            Like

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Pam, what a beautiful story. Your prayers and examples, patience and love brought your dear husband home! One of my most favorite stories of a wife’s prayers for her husband centers around the late comedian Bob Hope. Here is a summary of her diligence and the mercy and graces she and Bob shared. http://www.ncregister.com/daily-news/bob-hope-and-his-ladies-of-hope/

            Like

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            Oh, thanks so much for passing this story onto me. I had heard about Bob Hope’s eventual conversion, but, did not know how to access the story. Thanks so much, it is a prayer answered. My husband and I were both interested in this, but did not know the full story. God bless and thanks once again from both of us. pam, from NJ

            Like

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            You are so welcome & blessing to you both for your faith and fidelity.

            Like

          • Doug says:

            Pam, you remaind faithful to your husband and God and that makes all the difference! How wonderful.

            Like

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            Much greater resolve to do what God asks of all married people. I was humbled to understand via Holy Sprit and the Blessed Mother that I must not forget about my responsibility to help my husband’s eventual resolve to finally learn that God’s way was so much better than our way which was so lacking spiritually. The Holy Spirit — I pray to Him with resolve and fervency everyday for the world’s conversion, and sometimes someone I am in contact with on some level, at some unforeseen time, may be touched by what they see in me. Jim saw this. He saw the changes and could not deny that I was growing closer to God, and offering up my sufferings for him, hobbling to mass as often as I could and eventually going to Eucharistic Adoration, which I have not been able to do lately, but he does, I am certain did bring him back after 38 years. We just have to have a greater resolve for the happy hope for all who love us, for their conversion of the heart to God. Our Lady does not say it will be easy, but, she sure lets us know al are worth this effort. God bless you and your bride. pam, from NJ.

            Liked by 2 people

      • Matthew says:

        Charlie:
        If you will pardon my saying so, I think that your speculation (and the speculation of others) on the percentage of invalid marriages is pastorally imprudent and dangerous to valid marriages. Married couples need our encouragement to embrace their vocation. Marriages can be difficult, this does not make them invalid. I fear that when married couples hear people speculate as you do (and reportedly as the pope did about a year ago – although there is some question as to the accuracy of the report) that they will simply bail on a marriage that IS valid because someone said many marriages are invalid. Human beings are weak they need strength to do what is right not an easy out when the going gets tough. Again, too easy for a struggling married couple to see your comment or the comment of the pope or some bishop and simply throw in the towel, presuming that their marriage is invalid.
        I hope I have been clear. I am not at all belittling the difficulty of the marriage vocation. I AM calling into question the usefulness/prudence of random, public, (groundless?) speculation on the prevalence of invalidity.
        Matthew

        Liked by 1 person

        • charliej373 says:

          Ah, Matthew…whether I ultimately agree with your take on something or not, it is always well-formed and worth considering seriously. Thanks.

          Like

        • Doug says:

          I almost bailed on my wife 27 years ago due to issues she had at the time. I prayed like mad and the Lord gave me an interior grace through signing with Medjugorje Holy water. Did she or the situation change? No. Did I change? Yes. The grace was that everything would be ok and it sustained me. She experienced physical and emotional healing about 3 months later. What did I learn? Be faithful and trust God. Lean on him with everything you have in you! Now, fast forward 27 years. My wife and I are more in love than ever and we are living the honeymoon. There but the grace of God….. I encourage all here to trust God with all your heart and realize how much he loves you all!

          Liked by 3 people

        • RMD says:

          Thanks, Matthew. I agree with Charlie that marriage preparation was very lacking in the past; however, I don’t believe that means these marriages were sacramentally invalid. Most, if not all, knew the meaning and implication when they vowed “till death do us part”.

          Like

      • Donette says:

        Charlie, Marriage preparation in the past was done by the priest of the parish to which one member of the couple to be married belonged. They met with the priest in a parish office which used to be located in the rectory. When I got married 53 years ago the Church was beginning to cancel out that process. That was right before the disappearance of priests began.

        In was marched married couples replacing priestly instructions and the theological teachings for understanding marriage was out the door. We were told that the intelligentsia of Church thinking was that other married couples could prepare new couples better because they had marital experience. There would be four or five married couples on an elevated stage in the diocesan building with a minimum of 200 couples present. Six weeks of attendance was required and one was given a card of a different color for each week and it was given to one person of the couple. Once six cards were collected the couple was to return all six to the parish pastor of the Church in which they were to be married. There was no accountability of ones presence measured by anyone.

        It did not take long to realize that the married couples on stage in those early days had no idea about marriage other then to explain how they learned how to adapt to each other over the years of togetherness. The biggest decision for the couples being instructed to make was “would she work or would she not work once the marriage took place. It was pitiful, but no one was ever asked their opinions nor were there any real solid questions asked by those in the audience. It did not take long for couples to begin to find ways to get the cards and avoid the attendance required. If one could not attend a meeting they were excused at the drop of a hat. Looking back at the introduced process I now realize it was the early introduction of the laity into taking on the jobs of the priesthood. I have no idea how things are done today, but since divorce is as frequent today as changing an old model car to a new model tells me that people know nothing about the teachings on marriage. Over so many years, is it any wonder that the annulment process is to now be speeded up? Oh yes, people will say the Bishop is to oversee the process. Two dollars to a donut there is going to be lay people put into place and we will have free annulments done in a short time and will be spoken by all as the new form of Catholic divorce.

        Like

      • TLM says:

        You are most likely right on about this Charlie, but this lack of marriage preparation is part and parcel of the greater ‘dismal catechizing’ in general of Catholics since Vat ll. In general there has been either poor teaching of the faithful, false teaching of the faithful or no teaching of the faithful for the last 50+ years. It’s showing up big time now. Our Deacons in my Parish have been screaming about the lack of true Catholic teaching for years now, and we are seeing the fallout pretty clearly. When Catholic kids in college are actually told from a Priest at Mass at a Neumann Center that it’s not at all a sin to miss Mass on Sunday and that the Church is in the process of ‘growing up’ on such matters, that’s just a small tidbit of the atrocity that has gone on with false teaching and no teaching in general. So…………the Holy Father has attempted to rectify at least part of the marriage aspect of this non catechizing, and it will be interesting to observe what exactly the goal now is in the upcoming Synod on the Family. Seems as though a lot of it is already taken care of?

        Like

    • Joseph77 says:

      RMD,
      The supreme law of the Catholic Church is the salvation of souls. There are untold thousands of divorced Catholics in a second marriage who wish to participate in the sacramental life of the Church but are unable, or cannot, or are unwilling, to go through the very difficult and expensive juridical process of annulment. Pope Francis has simply cut the ponderous bureaucratic tape and expense to the bare bone in order that mercy, rather than strict justice would please the God of unfathomable mercy and goodness. We are to have faith in Jesus’ power given to the Church when He said Whatsoever you bind on earth is bound in Heaven, and whatsoever you retain on earth is retained in Heaven. The Catholic Church has been given the power to bind and loose which includes binding and loosing invalid marriages in the annulment process. Pope Francis has it just right!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Matthew says:

        Just a note to clarify: the binding and loosing authority of the Church has nothing whatsoever to do with annulments. The short-hand language we usually use causes this confusion. The Church NEVER “grants an annulment”. What the Church does is conduct a legal investigation to determine whether the conditions for a VALID marriage were present when “Joe” and “Marge” exchanged their vows. (Please note that the investigation has to do with the validity of the marriage and NOT its Sacramentality. Sacramentality and validity are related but separate issues.) At the end of this legal process the Church issues a decree or a “finding” that the marriage in question did not meet the conditions for being valid or it issues a decree saying that it has not been proven invalid. ( Also note that this process starts by presuming all marriages are valid and thus never issues a decree of validity – that would be your marriage certificate.) So in this sense the Church does not “bind or loose”, as if there was some action the Church did that rendered a valid marriage to be invalid.
        Hope that helps.
        Matthew

        Liked by 1 person

        • charliej373 says:

          Nice catch, Matthew. The Church’s power over this is administrative and investigative, not substantive. Important distinction.

          Like

        • vicardwm says:

          It still seems to me that the Church is “binding and loosing” in this case, as even if the Church’s decision is not infallible in these cases, it is still authoritative. For example, if a marriage is annulled but in the eyes of Heaven was actually valid, the parties to that marriage are still free to marry again, and will not be considered guilty of adultery if they marry again.

          Like

      • Matthew says:

        Joseph:
        A further note: I remain puzzled by the “justice vs mercy” lens through which many seem to view this issue. Starting with the presumption of validity, the task of the Marriage Tribunal is to undertake an investigative judicial process to determine whether the marriage in question is null. They are seeking to establish a FACT. A fact is neither just nor unjust. It is neither merciful nor unmerciful. It just IS. The process can be long or short it can be free-of-charge or it can be costly but it must be thorough and morally certain of its conclusion – the FACT of nullity.
        Hope that helps.
        Matthew

        Liked by 1 person

      • mmbev says:

        In making this comment, I am not saying that a speedier process is not called for in certain circumstances. I agree. (Why two or three trials, when one will do?)

        However, my eldest brother is in a situation where all the witnesses necessary are now dead. I realized his longing, and suggested he talk to a priest (select well), explain his situation and feelings now, and begin to go back to Mass, making a spiritual communion since that is his only option. It worked out very well, and he now sings in the choir and even attends some daily Masses.

        The door isn’t locked and barred. It isn’t even shut. Sometimes explaining what IS possible, helps in a situations that looks impossible.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Pam Nicholson says:

          Sometimes greater attention to prayer and fasting can help these things. I will pray for him. It is better to go to mass, not receiving the sacrament at communion, staying for the complete mass to receive the full grace of attending the mass, and giving thanks to God afterwards before leaving the church for all which he has received in the mass. The mass is the most powerful prayer the church has. If this seems like it is not enough, believe me, this type of devotion to the mass is a huge prayer about to be answered, but, in God’s time as His time is not ours. Patience is a great stepping stone as is trust in God’s plan. Tell him also to be at peace as often as he can even when the temptation to become anxious about any little thing can be enough to throw anyone off spiritually in his daily life. God bless him and God bless you as you remind everyone that we need to pray for each other so very much. pam, from NJ.

          Like

        • jlynnbyrd says:

          I do hope that he does not give up trying. My ex did not cooperate with our annulment in any way, nor did the witnesses that I reluctantly chose on his side of the family (all enablers) in his and their own addictions. I had become so codependent that I unwittingly alienated most of my friends and the few family members I have left in this world. My brother just gave up on us including our son, his godchild, and never looked back. My sister was the only cooperating witness.
          The process was long and difficult emotionally, however every step of the way the priest, psychologist, and every member of the tribunal was kind and gracious in understanding and untangling my case. They even waived all their fees due to my lack of finances. My new husband was injured and out of work and I was between jobs at the time.
          It took me five years to get the nerve to request the annulment and after it was finalized about 18 months later, I regretted not seeking God’s grace sooner. I see the blessing in simplifying the process in certain instances too. I will keep your son in my prayers.

          Like

  8. mmbev says:

    I do so agree with your comment, Charlie.

    There are also some facts that I want to learn about regarding the “fast track” situation. Like, are ALL annulments receiving this treatment? What I have read so far that is NOT the case. In a clear cut procedure (yes, there are some), why does one need two or three different tribunals to reach a conclusion? My son and his ex-wife agreed not to have children before they married. Ergo, no marriage. No sacramental marriage anyway, as she is unbaptized. (No, Pauline Privilege is not considered in this situation, nullity is).

    If our justice courts have only one trial (even for torture and murder), why does a straight forward nullity decision require more than one? (Yes, of the two in which I have been a witness, one qualified as very simple, and one would have been more difficult.)

    As far as considering them too namby pamby, one need only go through the process of being a witness once, never mind twice, to discover differently.

    When witnessing under oath before God for any ecclesial court brings a very heightened awareness of what one is saying. With regard to some of the questions, especially when the annulment process involves a family member, there is a terrible tension of being objectively honest, to not be weighed by affection or knowing the problems that exist.

    I have also known people who waited a needlessly long time for a resolution. One young man I met had left and moved five provinces away for the young woman he had met after the collapse of the first marriage. He felt that was the only way he could handle the situation. I prayed that when the decision came through, that the young woman had the good sense to wait for him. Don’t find many today of his calibre. It was fortunate that jobs were available for him at that time. Likely couldn’t happen currently.

    The articles that I have read, seem to feel that things will go wild and free, tossing annulments out like party favours. Yup, that shows a lot of faith and trust in our bishops. If that was going on before, believe me, nothing except those people involved will make any change. And they must answer to God.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Maeb says:

      What happened in the 70’s and 80’s was a scandalous free for all of Catholic divorce on weak grounds. Then there was a tightening up. But the tightening up was procedural, because many of the same people were in charge or people with the same sort of formation or lack thereof, and not knowing how to tighten up in their understanding or faith, they tightened up on rules. So procedures became burdensome and negative appeal decisions given for procedural reasons only.

      Like

  9. Phil says:

    Charlie, reading this has been a great tonic for me and also the comment about certain people (myself included) needing to be baked a little bit more in order to rise. What an absolutely fabulous analogy.

    I’m not so good at analogies myself but I happened to be in Moyross, Limerick yesterday with Br. Damien who is a Franciscan Friar of the Renewal (aka Monks of Moyross as they are referred to by locals over here). He was helping me with Family Formation which is a great way to catechise ones own children from home.
    – I hope it’s ok to give Deb Lindahl and her crew in Minnesota a quick plug. See familyformation.net for more info on catechising kids from home, something which is really necessary in this day and age when whats being taught in schools here is very shallow plus it strengthens my own faith.
    – Anyway, as we were talking about the church precepts, the topic for September, I asked Br. Damien what exactly does the word precept mean and he used an exquisite GK Chesterton analogy. Consider a playground built on the edge of a cliff, let’s say the Cliffs of Moher so people can get a clear image in their mind. Now this playground is in a very dangerous location so it had a fence around it which makes it safe to play in as the kids can’t fall over the edge. One can consider the precepts of the church as similar to this fence. Stay within the precepts and you will be safe under the watchful eye of our Eternal Father in heaven. However, wander outside the fence and your chances of getting home safely, plummet downwards.

    I was really impressed by Br. Damien’s faith and his use of language and felt it resonated with a lot of what Charlie has written about recently about sticking close to the barque of Peter and that the present Pope is valid despite some of his own expressions on secular things. As long as his faith and morals remain true we should not allow ourselves to be sidetracked which I find is very easy to happen with the amount of deceptive articles online. Even the dullest person, if he clings to the cross will be saved. Lord, I pray that I am dull enough not to be deceived in these times.

    Liked by 2 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Beautiful…”dull enough not to be deceived in these times.” How sad it is when people use their smarts to talk themselves into their own destruction.

      Like

      • vicardwm says:

        Basically, the Church is Noah’s ark – the ark of salvation. The Devil will try anything to get us to jump overboard – the Captain is erratic and we don’t understand some of his personnel moves, the fellow passengers grate on us – some of them are complete miscreants and don’t follow the Ark rules but insist on remaining, the ark isn’t going quite in the direction we think best, and to top it off the stench (of the proverbial animals) is nigh unbearable.

        All of the above may be true, but the Ark is STILL the only path to salvation that Christ instituted, and if one jump overboards, the sharks will have their opportunity with them.

        Liked by 11 people

  10. Charlene says:

    Thankyou once again, Charlie.

    Like

  11. janet333 says:

    I don’t know why….maybe they know something we don’t….but our two previous pope’s were also very keen on Environmental issues. Pope Benedict was even dubbed the Green Pope!

    These quotes are taken from a book published in 2012 The Environment by Pope Benedict XVI. The quotes were published with permission from Libreria Editrice Vaticana.

    “The order of creation demands that a priority be given to those human activities that do not cause irreversible damage to nature, but which instead are woven into the social, cultural, and religious fabric of the different communities. In this way, a sober balance is achieved between consumption and the sustainability of resources.”
    (Pope Benedict XVI, Message to the Director General of the Food and Agriculture Organization for the Celebration of World Food Day, October 16, 2006.)

    “Preservation of the environment, promotion of sustainable development and particular attention to climate change are matters of grave concern for the entire human family.”
    (Pope Benedict XVI, Letter to the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople on the Occasion of the Seventh Symposium of the Religion, Science and the Environment Movement, September 1, 2007)

    “The relationship between individuals or communities and the environment ultimately stems from their relationship with God. When ‘man turns his back on the Creator’s plan, he provokes a disorder which has inevitable repercussions on the rest of the created order.”
    (Pope Benedict XVI, Letter to the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople on the Occasion of the Seventh Symposium of the Religion, Science and the Environment Movement, September 1, 2007)

    “My dear friends, God’s creation is one and it is good. The concerns for nonviolence, sustainable development, justice and peace, and care for our environment are of vital importance for humanity. They cannot, however, be understood apart from a profound reflection on the innate dignity of every human life from conception to natural death: a dignity conferred by God himself and thus inviolable.”
    (Pope Benedict XVI, Address, Welcoming Celebration by Young People for World Youth Day in Sydney, Australia, July 17, 2008)

    “The deterioration of nature is… closely connected to the culture that shapes human coexistence: when ‘human ecology’ is respected within society, environmental ecology also benefits.” “The Earth is indeed a precious gift of the Creator who, in designing its intrinsic order, has given us bearings that guide us as stewards of his creation. Precisely from within this framework, the Church considers matters concerning the environment and its protection intimately linked to the theme of integral human development.”
    (Pope Benedict XVI, General Audience, August 26, 2009)

    “When making use of natural resources, we should be concerned for their protection and consider the cost entailed – environmentally and socially – as an essential part of the overall expenses incurred.”
    (Pope Benedict XVI, Message for the Celebration of the World Day of Peace, January 1, 2010)

    “The ecological crisis offers a historic opportunity to develop a common plan of action aimed at orienting the model of global development toward greater respect for creation and for an integral human development inspired by the values proper to charity in truth.”
    (Pope Benedict XVI, Message for the Celebration of the World Day of Peace, January 1, 2010)

    “I would advocate the adoption of a model of development based on the centrality of the human person, on the promotion and sharing of the common good, on responsibility, on a realization of our need for a changed lifestyle, and on prudence, the virtue which tells us what needs to be don today in view of what might happen tomorrow (cf. Saint Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologiae, II-II, q. 49, 5).”
    (Pope Benedict XVI, Message for the Celebration of the World Day of Peace, January 1, 2010)

    “We are all responsible for the protection and care of the environment. This responsibility knows no boundaries. In accordance with the principle of subsidiarity it is important for everyone to be committed at his or her proper level, working to overcome the prevalence of particular interests.”
    (Pope Benedict XVI, Message for the Celebration of the World Day of Peace, January 1, 2010)

    “Too often, attention is diverted from the needs of populations, insufficient emphasis is placed on work in the fields, and the goods of the earth are not given adequate protection. As a result, economic imbalance is produced, and the inalienable rights and dignity of every human person are ignored.” (Pope Benedict XVI, Messag to Mr. Jacques Diouf, Director General of FAO on the Occasion of World Food Day, October 15, 2010)

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    • charliej373 says:

      Yes, Janet. When I was young, I was a traditional “environmentalist” – until I discovered that mostly they were vain and did not know what they were talking about. Then I got hostile when I discovered that, worse than that, they routinely did positive damage to the environment and people from their preening ignorance. It bugs me that this Holy Father wants to express his love of the environment using political means that have always more deeply impoverished the poor, enslaved the powerless and done serious damage to the environment. Means must be suited to the ends. I agree with every end the Pope speaks of – and am baffled that he so frequently recommends means to those ends that have been tried repeatedly and have always been failures at best and disasters at worst.

      Liked by 3 people

      • janet333 says:

        Hi Charlie,

        “using political means that have always more deeply impoverished the poor, enslaved the powerless and done serious damage to the environment.”

        I am not savvy when it comes to this…but what “means” are you referring to here?

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          Using centralized and coercive government power over people and economies. Just two decades ago, St. John Paul wrote endorsing the principle of subsidiarity in his marvelous Encyclical, Centesimus Annus – that all public matters should be done at the lowest level they can be done to prevent centralization of power and the ultimate perversion of it. The Vatican has largely tossed this to the curb. Now it can – for St. JP was speaking of a political matter there. But St. JPs opinion on it has been borne out by evidence – the Vatican’s new take has been a massive failure regularly when it has been tried.

          Liked by 1 person

          • vicardwm says:

            Charlie, I think that the principle of subsidiarity is embedded more deeply in Catholic teaching than JP II’s encylical. It is “enshrined” in the CCC, paragraphs 1883 to 1885.

            You are right that the teaching can probably “be tossed to the curb” in particular cases, but the overall teaching cannot.

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            You are, of course, right, vicar. What I meant – and conveyed rather clumsily – was that JP II’s marvelous Encyclical enshrined it in a very public way and made it a point of profound emphasis of Catholic teaching.

            Like

      • Mack says:

        Charlie this baffles me too. I just saw a good article trust sheds light on this, saying that Francis is basically a Peronist since that is what he grew up with. He has no first hand experience of living in an economy like that of the U.S.. This made sense to me, to help understand some of Francis’ odd statements about the economy.

        Like

  12. Joshua says:

    Hi Charlie,
    I respectfully disagree with you on the subject of downsizing the importance of global warming, which only in 2015, is causing thousands of deaths in many countries (in India and Pakistan there have extreme heat waves that have killed more than 4500 persons, between May and June of this year). Pope Francis is addressing this issue in the spirit of St. Francis of Assisi, the care and respect that we owe to all Creation. On the other hand, I agree that faith and morals (marriage and family) are essential. It is important to harmonize and integrate things as much as possible, to avoid extreme dichotomies of thought, because it is precisely it is precisely these dichotomies that will then be exploited by heretical theologians (I was reading one of these theologians today, it really hurts me to see how wrong he is on faith and morals, more specifically, on marriage and the family).

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Joshua, a heat wave is NOT global warming – it is a heat wave….just like a blizzard is NOT global cooling…it is a blizzard. Nature is cyclical. We first have to determine if it is happening at all (and satellite data says it has not warmed for 18 years now). Then we have to determine if it is an outlier or part of a normal cycle (otherwise we should get panicked at the onset of global darking ever evening). If it is an outlier, we need to determine what role, if any, man played in it. Then we need to determine whether it is an ill or a good. Then, if it bears mitigation, we need to assess whether our planned actions will make it better – or worse.

      When I was a kid in the early 70s – and the scientific rage was the unstoppable coming ice age, the plan was to beggar the economy and mount massive coercive government power. When, in the 90, a few were embarrassed that such never came to pass, but quickly changed their fears to global warming because of the slight warming trend. Their solution was to beggar the economy and mount massive coercive government power. After it was clear global warming had stopped about a decade and a half ago, they started calling it climate change – and once again the solution was to beggar the economy and mount massive coercive government power. I have lived through three separate and contradictory iterations of these supposed climate disasters – and am amazed that the solution is always to make the whole world more closely resemble the old Soviet and Chinese governments – which did among the worse jobs of damaging the environment. When no matter what the problem is, the answer is always to run the world like the old Soviet Union, that is not a problem, but an ideology in search of a justification.

      But weather is NOT the same thing as climate. We had heat waves during the period of the coming unstoppable ice age, blizzards during the period of unstoppable global warming, and various extremes now that we are in a period of relative stasis. Do you know what has saved more lives during weather extremes than anything else? Economic development. I want answers that solve problems – or mitigate them for people…not that make them worse.

      Liked by 3 people

      • vicardwm says:

        Actually, if you look at the historical evidence (and by historical, I mean hundreds of thousands of years of ice core evidence from the ice packs in Greenland and elsewhere), there IS a lot better evidence for a coming ice age than a “heat age.” Check out this link:http://geology.utah.gov/map-pub/survey-notes/glad-you-asked/ice-ages-what-are-they-and-what-causes-them/

        Look at the chart showing the glacial-interglacial cycles over the last 500,000 years or so. Of course, this ice age could begin next year or 10,000 years from now, but the overall pattern is pretty clear.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Matthew says:

        Charlie:
        It is a little dated now but have you ever read “The Skeptical Environmentalist” by Bjorn Lomberg. Lomberg was an ardent member of the Green Party and decided to dig into the science to make a stronger case for the Green Party agenda but, oops!, discovered the science was against it.
        Matthew

        Liked by 1 person

        • charliej373 says:

          Just read a brief synopsis of it. It always amazes me when people choose to advocate screechily before finding out if what they are talking about has any relation to the facts. Better late than never, though.

          Like

          • janet333 says:

            It won’t all matter anyway Charlie seeing as how we are all going to enter a ‘storm’ of massive proportions. May I ask will the earth also be renewed after the rescue?

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Our hearts are going to be renewed. We will take stewardship seriously without trying to make it a justification for centralizing and concentrating power.

            Like

        • SteveBC says:

          Matthew, I agree, it is an excellent book, not just because it evaluates real problems but because it sets out a way to go about determining what problems are worth solving with limited resources.

          Liked by 1 person

      • janet333 says:

        Hi Charlie,

        I saw a programme on the TV recently concerning the Alaskan island Kivalina and how it is sinking further into the sea. What is the explanation for this then if it isn’t a change in climate?

        http://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/small-alaskan-island-kivalina-expected-to-be-covered-by-water-within-10-years/story-fnjwvztl-1227506491329

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        • charliej373 says:

          Janet, you make a lot of nice contributions here. Study tectonics. Go back and read previous predictions from various types – almost all of which turned out to be poppycock. Watch Al Gore’s movie, “An Inconvenient Truth,” which won many awards from the “let’s scare everyone to death so we can take power” crowd, but was wrong on almost all its predictions. The scientific method is NOT to posit a cause and then reflexively blame every problem on that cause. Just 10 years ago, the United Nations predicted that by now, there would be 50 million “climate refugees,” fleeing the Carribbean, Pacific Islands and various coastal regions. There are refugees today – but not from climate – from what we should have been taking seriously but were not. In 1989, the U.N predicted Global Warming would wipe entire nations off the map by 2000. Frankly, I am glad they are getting a bit more modest by just claiming a single island in Alaska is sinking instead of entire nations, large islands and coastal areas throughout the world.

          In 2003, the Pentagon produced a study that said by 2013 that California would be flooded with inland seas, much of the Netherlands would have to be abandoned, the polar ice would be gone during the summer and we were supposed to be engaged throughout the globe in all sorts of “resource wars.” Didn’t happen.

          Beginning in 2000, scientists from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change started saying that snow would soon be a thing of the past in England and that Scottish ski resorts would be shutting down – that children would not know what snow even was. Alas, the weather didn’t cooperate with the scientists and they have largely turned away from this nonsense – and instead started blaming the record snowfalls in the areas supposed to have none the last decade on…global warming.

          I could go on and on but won’t. If you want to believe the warmists scare tactics and predictions, that is your affair. But it DOES have a consequence. Most of the people pushing this stuff also believe in population control – with a huge number of them applauding China’s forced abortion policies as an effective means of reducing population – and they posit that as a way to relieve the “global warming” they ever sense lurking, but can never actually find. The devil laughs when he gets Christians to make common cause with the anti-human crowd for other seeming reasons.

          And seriously, please do not accept at face value anything that blames every problem on a pre-chosen cause. That is not study, merely reaction – and is almost always wrong, to boot.

          Liked by 3 people

          • vicardwm says:

            With some knowledge of science, I seriously question science’s very ability to determine that any global temperature change is due to human intervention. In order to make a good case in science, you need to eliminate all variables except for one, so that when you change that one variable, you can be confident that your changing of that variable is responsible for the result. But in world climate, there is no possible way that scientists even know what all the variables affecting climate ARE, and some of the variables which they are aware of, they are only dimly aware of exactly how it affects the climate.

            Therefore, any results they come up with in global warming, I completely ignore, as they cannot really be scientific.

            Liked by 1 person

          • janet333 says:

            Thanks Charlie..of course you’re right….I don’t know anything about it. I guess I am just trying to figure out why the Pope is so concerned with it. I know nothing but I am one of those curious people who have to know what’s going on. It just takes me longer than it does others to work things out. 🙂

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Oh, heavens, Janet. You have been a fruitful contributor to this website and it is perfectly obvious there is not a hint of malice in your heart. If I ever give you a sharp answer, I pray you know how much I value your contributions and am glad you are here.

            Liked by 1 person

      • Joshua says:

        Hi Charlie,

        The recent heat waves this summer in different countries, was only one isolated example that I gave; you are right that it does not necessarily indicate climate change. But what I have been consistently observing since the year 2000, and has me really concerned, is the floodings that are happening worldwide, and that are reported almost weekly on the news. As you certainly know, reporters in the mainstream media usually don’t provide a deep analysis of events – be it climate, stock markets, wars and refugees, etc -, they only give their news. In the year 2012, you even had a quite significant flooding in New York City, through Superstorm Sandy, which seems to confirm the trend in worldwide floodings. We should not underscore some catastrophical events in the environment, which could then provoque an economic and societal collapse (either regional, or worldwide).

        PS. You forgot to answer Janet’s interesting question (“Janet333”, September 26, 2015 at 5:12 am), about whether there would be some kind of renewal of the environment -physical earth- after a divine intervention and rescue of mankind:

        “It won’t all matter anyway Charlie seeing as how we are all going to enter a ‘storm’ of massive proportions. May I ask will the earth also be renewed after the rescue?”

        PS2. For pictures of the 2012 flooding in New York City, through “Superstorm Sandy”:

        http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/picturegalleries/worldnews/9643442/Superstorm-Sandy-flood-wind-damage-and-travel-chaos-in-New-York-City.html

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          Of course I answered it, Joshua. I just did not answer it in the way that some want. Make of my answer what you will…but it IS my answer.

          Like

          • janet333 says:

            I got your answer Charlie…we will all work together to make this world a better place…in love and harmony with all creatures, but most especially our fellow man.

            Like

        • YongDuk says:

          Joshua and all, I convicted that a friend of mine, who is an environmental engineer, a student in water and soil reclamation, and a convert to Catholicism, is doing her studies on reclamation to come out the other side to help rebuild in exactly the same way Charlie has said other professions and such will use their gifts. It echoes St Paul: don’t be quietistic, don’t stop working waiting for the Lord’s Day (Parousia), keep working, keep studying, keep prudent so not be lax and found wanting.

          That is what Charlie is saying–I think… (sorry if it is not, but I have been trying to encouraging this person in studying and doing research far longer than I have known about Charlie and he seems to confirm what I have felt in my heart.)

          Liked by 2 people

        • SteveBC says:

          Joshua, the best debunking of the entire “science” of global warming that I know of online is by Burt Rutan. Look here:
          http://rps3.com/Files/AGW/EngrCritique.AGW-Science.v4.3.pdf
          Pay particular attention to the graphic that shows temperature and CO2 levels through the past 600M years. At 400 ppm now we are at the very low end of what the Earth is used to.

          Second, “SuperStorm” Sandy was not a superstorm. I think it was a weaker hurricane than Donna in 1960 and was certainly weaker than Bob in 1991. What made Sandy notable is that it went right up the most damaging track for New York, a track that channeled its modest surge into a constricting geography that multiplied the height and effect of that surge.

          Here’s another thing to think about. Water vapor is 40,000 times more of a greenhouse gas than CO2, especially as the part of the light spectrum blocked by CO2 is almost completely saturated at current levels around 400 ppm. CO2 molecules do not *hold* heat energy. They just block its escape into space temporarily. Water molecules can store heat energy.

          Consider: What happens to the amount of water vapor that air can absorb and hold when air temps go up? Answer is that the amount of H2O that can be held by the atmosphere goes up. Conversely, when atmospheric temps go down, the ability to hold all the previously absorbed water declines. The net result is lots of snow and rain, sometimes in odd places. Floods and storms are much more likely when temps drop. Remember, the Earth is a heat engine. When the poles and the equatorial regions are both relatively worm, there is far less need for storms, which are the means Earth uses to transport heat from the equator to the poles. That’s why storms go up in number and intensity the greater the difference between the temps at the poles and the temps on the equator.

          Studies have proven that more humans die when temps drop a degree than if they rise a degree. Revolutions and pestilences throughout history are correlated strongly with periods of lower temps. Greenhouse farmers routinely increase the CO2 levels in their greenhouses. The reason is that at 400 ppm of CO2 in the atmosphere, plants are very close to starvation. If the CO2 level in the atmosphere were to drop below 150 ppm, all life on the planet would die, because no plants could grow. Plants are used to CO2 levels from 1,000 ppm to over 2,500 ppm and thrive in such concentrations, as do the animals who eat those plants.

          Approximately 1,500 scientists contribute to the IPCC reports. Of those, about 30 write the main report, and the executive summary is written mostly by UN bureaucrats.

          Over 31,000 scientists and engineers have signed the Oregon Petition stating that man-made global warming is false. One of those signers is Freeman Dyson, one of the finest scientists of any century. There are many more excellent scientists in the ranks of this 31,000-plus population of skeptics.

          We are often told by the media and the Powers That Be that over 90% of all scientists support the anthropogenic global warming thesis. Compare 1,500 to 30,000-plus and it becomes quite clear that the 90% population are skeptics, not supporters. However, you are never told about this by the media.

          I haven’t got time or space to detail the immense amount of fraud that global warming scientists and apologists have engaged in over the past 25 years, but such reports can be found if you know where to look.

          Our media and governments design their output to capture people who believe that government people have our best interests at heart, are the means to obtain fairness and compassion in our societies, and act as the proper and appropriate guarantors of our cultures.

          But government is not about fairness or compassion. It is about how power is allocated, to whom it is allocated, and how and where it is exerted. There is nothing about fairness in that, nothing about compassion. And our media goes where the power is. I have gotten caught many times over the years by such stories. However, when one does his homework thoroughly and works out the science for himself, more often than not, one finds fraud, power games, and tragedy in ideological “causes” like this one.

          Liked by 5 people

          • Monica Joseph of the Blessed Sacrament, OCDS says:

            Wow, SteveBC, that was amazingly helpful. Thanks for talking the time to write it.

            Like

          • Doug says:

            Right on Steve. Being an engineer, Burt Rutan is one of my heros.

            Like

          • barb129 says:

            Wow…thanks for that explanation Steve!

            Like

          • SteveBC says:

            Well, folks, I’m glad my write-up was helpful. Doug, Rutan retired a few years ago but I’m sure he was an amazing engineer. One of my colleagues from the rocket company I helped found in 1981 later formed another rocket company and worked with Rutan to have Rutan design the body of the unusual vehicle my friend had envisioned. I would not be surprised if that was the connection that helped get the rocket engine technology we used in the early 1980s into Burt Rutan’s Space Ship One and Space Ship Two. Very cool connection that I only found out about when Space Ship One flew in 2004. I never met Rutan but respect his capacities very highly. 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            I just downloaded it Steve. I look forward to reading it. Thanks!

            Like

          • Joshua says:

            Hi Steve,

            Thank you for all the information about global warming; I have download the document from Burt Rutan, I will read it as soon as I can.

            What do you think about the pollution happening in the cities? The encyclical “Laudato Si” treats the problem in terms of “human ecology”, I don’t think that the Pope is being all that simplistic as many people think, in his defense of the environment.

            Like

          • SteveBC says:

            Joshua, I think you have picked up on something real with the pope. I have his encyclical on my computer but haven’t read it. Too many other time demands! 🙂

            However, whenever I read what Pope Francis *actually* writes (as opposed to says in an interview), I am almost invariably extremely impressed. His speech at the end of last year’s Synod was crystalline.

            From what I hear about Laudato Si, he is careful to say that he thinks global warming issues or global climate should be studied, but that he has no particular expertise to judge. I also completely agree that global climate should be studied. However, when science becomes scientism, as it has with those who blindly or fraudulently push the idea that humans are causing global warming by driving cars and ranching cows, we need to reset things.

            In human development, wealth at first brings pollution but then brings not only the means to solve it but also the desire to solve it.

            Very generally and maybe not fully accurately, pollution in cities comes from nitro-oxides, layered with sulf oxides principally from power plants burning coal. These generally *cool* the local environment by reflecting heat away. At the same time, asphalt and concrete create the urban heat island effect. (It is that effect that has badly skewed the surface temperature records over the past several decades and introduced a spurious upward bias to the data collected from these stations.)

            If you go to China, a poor developing country in most areas, you will find massive pollution and devastated lands. This has two causes, not just one. First is the natural desire to get rich first and then clean things up. That’s an attitude I actually have some sympathy with. Poverty sucks. The second is their dictatorial and highly corrupt system where few people have real power to effect positive change. *That* isn’t necessary for life.

            In the US in the 1950s and 1960s people were suing other people in the courts under common law, which is a very powerful but relatively slow way to solve problems like pollution. In the late 1960s and early 1970s pressure built from the progressives and Big Business to set up a government agency, the EPA, to take over the issue and regulate us into a better life. Progressives believed government was the source of fairness. Big Business wanted ONE agency to deal with rather than tons of suits, an agency they knew they could capture once the progressive idealists moved on to their next big cause celebre.

            The EPA has in many cases, particularly in early years, helped the US clean up our environment. I had a friend who grew up coughing in LA in the 50s and 60s. Everyone coughed, he said. Now he can go back there and not cough. Our rivers and streams and lakes are often better than they were. As far as I know the Cuyahoga River hasn’t caught fire in years.

            However, and this is important, over the decades the EPA has often been inadequate or even anti many needed cleaning efforts. As has the FDA and many other government agencies. Partly, this is because no agency of people and a budget can do all that must be done. Central planning mostly doesn’t work. More to the point, however, those who are regulated by these agencies, the EPA in our case here, spend immense amounts of money and use the revolving door to capture the EPA (and all other such agencies). You, Joshua, are never powerful enough to prevent this process.

            If we had left the issue of pollution in the courts and as a developing part of the common law, we would now have much better control over our various sources of pollution. It’s like an army of ants eating a cow versus one man eating a cow. The EPA is that “one man” while the common law participants are the ant army.

            The problem in evaluating pollution in our cities, or the idea of global warming caused by humans, or coral bleaching, or any of the other myriad of issues is that the problem itself is focused on while the *means* to solve that problem is *not* focused on, yet that latter part of the equation is a massively important influence on how the problem gets solved or even whether it gets solved at all.

            For example, coral bleaching is currently blamed on global warming. There is a lobby for AGW, and they have to justify their existence. Yet in the South Pacific, the further you go from humans, the more the reefs are thriving. The principal cause of coral bleaching is humans in their local area, not a global issue at all. Humans cut down trees around rivers, rain takes more dirt into the rivers and down to the sea, the waters around the reefs get more turbid, the turbid water absorbs more heat from the sun during daylight hours than normal so that the water temperature goes above something like 30C before the daily cloud cover and rain over the island can cool the water. Clean up the rivers and reduce the local human impact and reefs can come back. But there is no progressive lobby for this solution.

            We here in the US have done a fair job of cleaning up our environment, but we could have done much better. Our food producing system is utterly broken and sickening most of us. Our medical system is broken, dependent on powerful and toxic medicines and vaccines that do more harm than good. Our financial regulatory agencies have given us crashes. And the list of broken sectors goes on and on and on.

            They all have one thing in common. The capture of regulatory bodies by ambitious politicians in Big Government where all the levers of coercive power are located, combined with Big Business, Big Unions, and Big NGOs, all totally convinced that they are doing what’s right but combining to remove power and freedom from the rest of us while increasingly *not* solving the problems. It’s all one small and very corrupt and hypocritical family, and that family will never include you.

            What’s needed is simple. You and everyone like you need to take power back from the Bigs you have ceded your power to out of misplaced trust and failure to do your own homework. The you and that army need to live *without*hypocrisy* the kind of life that builds a good and healthy and clean society, through local action, common law development, and simple human charity. *Not* through coercion.

            So you see, Charlie is right. The ANSWER is you acting under God to steward the planet in each act you take. That”s all that is necessary.

            If you will not live that way, why should anyone else?

            On the other hand, if enough people wake up and live faithfully in that Light, how could the world not be utterly transformed?

            Start with yourself. That’s how all great change begins. 🙂

            Liked by 6 people

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            We have seen where EPA and DEP have run amok in California tho. People cannot water or build or what have you, if a particular species of bug is breeding there? That is environmental communism. This kind of junk science is not serving the people, it is rather exploiting the fact that people have the right to live and use the resources given to us by God Himself. We need to take back what is given to the world by God. Species of animals, bugs, etc., come and go, but, people will continue on until God decides this will not be and it is He and He alone Who will decide such things. That is another reason why abortion is evil, it does not and cannot fit into God’s plan for humanity. He never told people they could murder, He tells us “thou shalt not kill”. He meant we must not kill people as this is His job to decide when people die. He is God. God has a plan, and we can either choose to do life His way as He asks us out of love, or we can do what is not of Him which is evil, and decide we can take the consequences of this action against Him. That simple. That’s God. pam, from NJ.

            Liked by 1 person

          • janet333 says:

            “So you see, Charlie is right. The ANSWER is you acting under God to steward the planet in each act you take. That”s all that is necessary.”

            Yes! 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          • SteveBC says:

            Actually, Pam, I have heard that the original text of the commandment you cite was actually, “Thou shalt not murder.” Quite a bit different, allowing legitimate self-defense that could result in the attacker being killed. And when you think about it, what we would like everyone to get is that they should not commit murder.

            After all, would you equate someone who is attacked and kills his attacker with someone in China who injects formaldehyde through a crowning baby’s fontanelle? I don’t think you would. I certainly do not. I think the mistranslation of this commandment has done a lot of harm, if for no other reason that it muddies the difference between good and evil.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            Okay, if someone is about to kill me and I have the means to stop the attack, by not killing them, as it is their intent as they come at me with some instrument of murder or to kill. Should I have to kill them to protect my life as they are intent on my destruction, they then give me no choice, right? As for an innocent baby, who is unaware and unable to defend itself on an attack by a lethal poison as in China, I can only weep that this person whose main objective in life is to prevent life from entering the world outside the womb. And, I can only pray that all murder/killing of any kind gets less and less in the world. pam, from NJ.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Joshua says:

            Hi Steve,
            Thanks again for all the information on climate change. The subject is so complex, that it cannot be fully covered here in a single comment. One issue for example that we haven’t covered and discussed here, is the role and impact of modern technology on human society and the environment (Jewish philosopher Hans Jonas treats this problem in his book “The Imperative of Responsibility: In Search of An Ethics for the Technological Age”). We cannot solve environmental problems as individuals alone (although everybody can do his part), there is also a collective responsibility (i.e governments and corporations are also to be held accountable – as we have see recently with the fraud of the Volkswagen diesel vehicles). As for me, I will keep on the side of people concerned by the environment, although questioning and expanding my own paradigms. I cannot cover this subject with as much technical detail and expertise as you have done; I hope however, that I have been able to provide a few insights and intuitions.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Steve, I read Burt Rutan ‘so article you posted. It is right on. It is nice to finally see someone paint the whole picture on this. Like I say, we have had global warming since the last ice age long before we came on the scene. So it is a natural cycle and/or phenomina. If that is not obvious to people, then they are pretty deluded. It does not matter if a million people subscribe to the man made cause. After all, Hitler was elected by millions of people and look where that went. God bless!

            Like

          • SteveBC says:

            Pam, your last sentence about reducing both murder and killing is spot on. I hope and pray for the same.

            Like

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            Oh, I do join you in your prayers for this. We are called to be brave prayer warriors all God’s concerns in the world He created. God bless. pam, from NJ.

            Like

    • Mack says:

      Joshua even if there are significant climate changes, the million dollar question is “what’s causing it?” There is not convincing evidence it is caused btw human activity. Climate change has happened throughout the ages long before people used fossil fuels. During the American Revolution there was a Little Ice Age going on. (Remember Washington crossing the Delaware and it was full of ice? It doesn’t freeze like that anymore.) I’m suspicious of climate change propaganda–and it is often propaganda–because of the money interests involved. Follow the money.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Kristen Martinez says:

    Thank you so much, Charlie! I am wondering if Pope Francis’ belief in global warming is really the way into the hearts and true conversion for the people. Perhaps they wouldn’t listen to him at all if he didn’t subscribe to this. But because of this belief, they will be more open to listening to what he says about the faith. It is beautiful and hopeful to see how God uses the most surprising things and even our mistakes to bring us all closer to him.

    On another note, will you please pray for us? Our daughter Cassie has been battling a rare brain tumor for years. We are praying that Fr. Kentenich, Schoenstatt founder, will grant her a miracle. We also all have Lyme disease and our son Robbie is a recovered autistic through Lyme treatment. Please pray for peace and love to reign in our family. God is revealing many things we must do to grow closer to him and one another. Please pray that we do.

    Prayers for your intentions too!

    Love, Kristen, Ricardo, Robbie and Cassie

    Sent from my iPhone

    Liked by 2 people

  14. Doug says:

    Wonderful Charlie. God is patient with all of us. I was once atheist and allowed to succeed in many things. In my case, this ultimately lead me into a faith and the Catholic Church. We all fall short in some way. So let’s use what ever faults have or what we perceive in others to ask ourselves “Lord what can I do to make myself a better Christian/person? What is my responsibility? How can I be more faithful?”. As the scripture says “let us take the log out of our own eye before we take the spec out of our brother’s eye”.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Patricia says:

    Donnette,
    I think my comment may have been misinterpreted. It does not say that I went to the tv commentators for information on what the Pope said but that the Catholic commentators were disappointed that the Pope did not use stronger language regarding abortion and other moral issues when addressing the White House or the Congress .
    I listened to the Pope live while in the US. I, also, am disappointed that he was not stronger with the Congress and the President.
    EWTN, at this moment of 8:35 am EST, is discussing the Pope’s Encyclical on Climate Change. Raymond Arroyo and his co-commentator, a solid priest, are discussing the rather radical sources the Pope listened to, or used, as sources when writing it. They also commented on the fact that so many people are upset that the Pope did not give as much air time to abortion as he did to climate change. They said in so many words these are not matters of faith and morals so we may disagree in good faith.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Becky-TN says:

    Stay the course……praying for all here.

    God Bless,

    Becky

    Liked by 1 person

  17. And John Boehner resigns…..Did something the Pope say reach Mr. Boehner’s spirit?

    Like

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      Just as I was reading this, I saw the news coverage about the speakers resignation. He was moved to tears so many times yesterday at the words of Pope Francis. It reminds me of a quote attributed to Jimi Hendrix, “When the power of love overcomes the love of power the world will know peace.” Speaker John Boehner appears to have relinquished his love of power.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Patricia says:

    Who knows, maybe the Pope suggested to Boehner in their private chat that if he did not have the wherewithal to defund planned parenthood, maybe he should resign. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Patricia says:

    Charlie, you may correct my spelling. 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Like

  20. Another Karen says:

    Thank you for the update on the Network for Malaria. Please thank Margaret for the work she does and for allowing us to help with her efforts. This is a wonderful and supportive community that you have built, Charlie! Thank you for all that you do for us – I am blessed to be part of it!

    Like

  21. Jay says:

    It is far from me to second guess the Holy Father and I refuse to pickup torch and pitchfork against him the way that some seem to be doing. However, I’m really starting to believe you are right about what the “blunder” may be. I was kind of hoping to explicitly hear backup and support for those of us who are holding fast in our circles of influence to traditional marriage and the abolishing of abortion.

    I feel badly for people like David Daleiden, who has had to endure so much ridicule and persecution for his brave work against Planned Parenthood. It would have been nice for Pope Francis to at least spend a little more time speaking to the issue to which he is dedicating himself.

    Like

  22. Jean says:

    Charlie,
    Thank you for posting this concerning Pope Francis. I dearly love him and pray for him daily and believe he is the Pope chosen by God and Mary to get us through what is coming. I am new here and I thank you for this wonderful Blog, I am in perfect agreement with all I have read from you!!! God bless you!

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Colleen DeRose says:

    I have appreciated Michael Crighton’s fiction for years because through it he suggests that science is as fallible and limited in its use as every other discipline practiced by men. One of his last books was on what he felt were the fallacious claims of climate “science”. Interesting read on this topic. That being said, I trust Pope Francis is astute enough to understand where to start a dialogue with a largely self involved and uninterested world…please let’s stop wringing our hands at every word that comes from his mouth. Peter himself was known for gaffs, downright wrong conclusions and various blunders but it still pleased our Lord to favor him and he remained faithful unto death.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. SharonAnn says:

    The impression I have of Pope Francis’ talks in the US is that he is showing the world a broad open door, inviting and drawing people of all types to actually enter to listen to him – and then he slips in the things that they would not listen to if he stood up and gave a direct speech about abortion or SSM. His loving and gentle ways make me think of Jesus and his approach is to draw people to want to hear what he has to say.

    I believe he is acknowledging that humanity (especially those of extreme wealth) has abused nature in the way of pollution-for-profit which occurs in so many different ways, affecting our food, water and the air we breath. My impression is that his emphasis was more about taking care of God’s creation, rather than on global warming, and then he was able to insert his point about caring for all of creation including human beings at all stages of life, from the unborn to the elderly. He uses the common language of the day which does not turn anyone off immediately, and they stop to listen because it is not the usual scolding they expect from religious leaders. I think it is a brilliant strategy! Who will listen so someone that they are not drawn to? He knows what he is doing. Unfortunately, watching the visit unfold, reminded me of the story of Palm Sunday when everyone cheered Jesus and threw palms on the ground to make His way easier, etc. We know what happened next, so we must continue to pray for Pope Francis and trust that the Lord and His Mother are in charge of his actions.

    Here is a link to another article by Fr. Longenecker which I think is quite good!

    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/standingonmyhead/2015/09/from-pope-francis-five-zingers-for-left-and-right-wingers.html

    Liked by 2 people

    • Pam Nicholson says:

      God’s plan is so wonderful through the Holy Father, isn’t it? And all the members of other faiths at ground zero certainly added to the zeal of the occasion, what all religious leaders are called to be to their flock. God sent us His messenger, and he delivered, and I feel so blessed to be a witness to this call he has reminded us of. Do we do things for God and His creation, or our own gain? Charlie did say it all as it needs to be said and also go to http://www.spiritdaily.com for all the pictures, speeches, and schedule of the Holy Father as he will make his way to Philadelphia for the next two days, then, back to Rome. Oh, what a blessed visit for us, so we better listen to what he says. We have done much damage to the earth and we are co-stewards. May God put in place persons who will pick up the slack and do only good to the earth. No more wars, etc. All of it is about control, and that is not what God wants us to do. Well, blessings for now, pam, from NJ.

      Like

  25. SharonAnn says:

    Here is a wonderful article in the Center for Family and Human Rights newsletter:

    https://c-fam.org/friday_fax/pope-speaks-out-for-unborn-natural-family-in-un-address/

    Like

  26. Jacqueline Marie says:

    Thank you soooo much, Charlie. Yes, we all need to do our “homework”. I am so very limited in the time I have to spend on computer-communication-electronics, that as much as I would like to participate in long discussions, it is not an option. Therefore, I appreciate the archives. I can read when I have a question, and talk to like-minded friends, and pray that I am lead to the place that God wants for me to be. I WISH I could spend more time in research, but I have to pick and choose. I choose the reasonable voices of those who have clarity. Yours is among them. I do desire to become “prepared”. As a late comer, I am trying to get there. Full time work is necessary right now. I am single and must get a house ready for sale – a BIG job. I pray I am able to “hear” God’s will in the midst of the chaos of life right now.
    To Kristen Martinez and family; (If you see this) I too have a grandson who had a huge brain tumor. It was removed, which saved his life, but has caused medical issues since…he is now 4 years old. I will be praying for your daughter, Cassie, and for recovery for all the family. I, too, am trying to be faithful and life is busy enough. Yes, it is a comfort to know that God uses even mistakes to bring us into right relationship with Him. God bless all of of us.
    Again, thanks Charlie!

    Like

  27. Jacqueline Marie says:

    Thank you soooo much, Charlie. Yes, we all need to do our “homework”. I am so very limited in the time I have to spend on computer-communication-electronics, that as much as I would like to participate in long discussions, it is not an option. Therefore, I appreciate the archives. I can read when I have a question, and talk to like-minded friends, and pray that I am lead to the place that God wants for me to be. I WISH I could spend more time in research, but I have to pick and choose. I choose the reasonable voices of those who have clarity. Yours is among them. I do desire to become “prepared”. As a late comer, I am trying to get there. Full time work is necessary right now. I am single and must get a house ready for sale – a BIG job. I pray I am able to “hear” God’s will in the midst of the chaos of life right now.
    To Kristen Martinez and family; (If you see this) I too have a grandson who had a huge brain tumor. It was removed, which saved his life, but has caused medical issues since…he is now 4 years old. I will be praying for your daughter, Cassie, and for recovery for all the family. When praying for him, I will remember you all as well. I, too, am trying to be faithful and life is busy enough. Yes, it is a comfort to know that God uses even mistakes to bring us into right relationship with Him. God bless all of of us.
    Again, thanks Charlie!

    Like

    • Pam Nicholson says:

      Oooo, my heart goes out to families so seriously touched by brain tumors. My own father died of inoperable brain cancer in 1987. I know the helplessness you feel, the prayers you pray and trying to hold onto hope, and I will offer up my prayers from the heart for all these intentions. God bless. pam, from NJ.

      Like

    • Mick says:

      Prayers for your grandson, Jacqueline Marie (and for you as you get the house ready for sale).

      Like

  28. Jackie Dowling says:

    Thank you, Charlie for sorting out the concerns I have about Pope Francis. You are absolutely right.

    Like

  29. Fran says:

    I am not sure what to think about this, Charlie. I plan on reading it again, but if you have any insight that would be appreciated.
    http://www.onepeterfive.com/vatican-conspiracy-against-pope-benedict-for-pope-francis/

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Fran, that there may have been serious skullduggery may well be true. We are seeing rise in the Vatican right now some serious enemies of the faith. But this is not new, During the Medici period, it was rare for a Pope to be elected without skullduggery, yet God preserved His Church. He will do the same now. The point is that there was a vacancy, the assembled Cardinals gathered and consented to the election of Pope Francis. He is validly elected. And beyond that, his personality is what I expected. Much as I loved Pope Benedict, he did not have the notable daring, even swashbuckling style of the Pope I had seen as leading us through the Storm. Francis does. Have no fear…whatever nefarious plans men may have, God has a greater plan – and God’s plan will prevail.

      Liked by 7 people

      • vicardwm says:

        The more dangerous piece of this is that, as a result of the skullduggery, many are becoming more bold in declaring that Pope Benedict XVI is still Pope because he was pressured to resign and certain Cardinal-electors went into the conclave with an agenda. I don’t know enough about the resignation and conclave rules to rebut this, so I hope someone will take up the mantle.

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          Yes, I know, vicar…but I have known the arguments would get more subtle as time went on. This is the satan’s final gleaning of souls to lead away from safety. I will speak of it more next week. One of the greatest agonies of my life has been to know for decades that this was coming, to see it rise, and to know that I must combat it and yet watch many go over the side into the death trap, all the while convinced of their superior holiness. The Lord will tell them, “Depart from me. I never knew you.” It is why I reacted so badly when Bowring launched the first full frontal assault against our dear Holy Father. I knew it had begun and would grow.

          Liked by 3 people

          • janet333 says:

            Oh dear Charlie…you knew all of this all along? How sad!. I have seen the wickedness of the false prophets spreading their poison for the last few years… even before this Pope was elected, Satan had it all worked out. Praise the Lord though because I am seeing a few escaping from the false prophets clutches.

            Are you able to tell us if there is going to be a schism this October? .

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Sadly, Janet, it is the thing I have most dreaded in the lead-up to the fullness of the Storm. Even with all those years to prepare, it still hit me hard when I saw it happening from this side of the veil.

            Liked by 1 person

          • LittleLight says:

            It is so very terrifying. My personal experience last fall, in my parish, almost devastated me. It sounds so dumb to say that, but it was surreal. I am so very grateful now, that I had that experience, and also that Our Lord and Our Lady carried me through it. I am still scared about the schism that is coming, because I know how broken and weak I am. I am very, very grateful that we have a pastor who is not into the politics du jour, but rather steers us all clear of all that madness, protecting us. He focuses on giving us very small, easily digestible, spiritual tasks centered around simple, timeless truths that everyone can grasp and anyone can work on.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Good sound advice from your Pastor Little Light.

            Like

        • Beckita says:

          So true, vicar. In my area of influence whenever I run into what you describe even with the solid resources I have utilized to enlighten the confused, most times I have met total resistance. It’s as if those insisting on the idea that Pope Emeritus Benedict couldn’t resign or was forced to have within them an impenetrable block. When they clutch this position beyond reason, beyond truly seeking the truth, I’m left to believe there are definitely evil spirits oppressing.

          This, in turn, leads me to remember Charlie’s post on January 19th of this year. For newbies and relative newbies it’s a must read. (Well, in my opinion, all of the past material is worthy of consideration to understand where we have been, are and are headed.) For those who have been here a long while, it deserves reconsideration.

          Always praying for you, Charlie, for all here and the entire Mystcial Body!

          Liked by 2 people

      • Fran says:

        Thanks Charlie. That’s what I thought that the intent of the article was to possibly make his election seem invalid. But you know, the more I watched Pope Francis in the U.S. listened to him, and listened to the reactions of people to him Christian or not, the more I believed that he is exactly the Pope the Lord has determined for us in these times. Some people are looking for what they’ve predetermined to see in him and sadly not what the real gifts are that the Lord is giving us through him.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Fran says:

          Adding to my own comment…while I do believe that Pope Francis is doing something wonderful in the world to move hearts, even those of other faiths. He really is so Christ -like in so many ways, and so he inspires people (including me) to also be more Christ-like.
          But….
          I am also greatly disappointed that he did not speak out more forcefully on abortion, and the whole culture of death which is the greatest evil in our country besides the assault against the family, which he didn’t speak much about either. I guess I kept hoping by the end of his time here that he would, perhaps even by today. I really did not understand why he went into his opposition to the death penalty either after his comment about “defending and protecting life at every stage of its development”. That is clearly allowed if necessary according to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, while abortion is always a grave moral evil, and these are innocent children we are talking about too!
          It is quite a conundrum to have two different reactions to Pope Francis! I can only continue to trust that the Lord knows what He is doing. But I wonder if Pope Francis knows what he is doing, and has a purpose that the Lord has put on his heart, that will later be revealed, or has he made a great terrible blunder in not speaking the truth strongly to leaders while in the U.S.? And is he aware that his lack of forceful words has caused many faithful to feel that he has not been a Shepherd to them,and has let them down, while many of those who are liberal-minded are using his words to support their agendas. (Nancy Pelosi’s comment about Planned Parenthood today comes to mind.) I also wonder why someone hasn’t asked him that directly. At least if they have I haven’t seen it. I guess what I am saying in my “thinking-out-loud-here” is that I still love and support and pray for Pope Francis, but I am so confused by him. I know that it is going to get worse, but I am so ready for the Lord to straighten out all this confusion.

          Like

          • SteveBC says:

            Fran, my mother told me a few hours ago that she had heard on the TV that when Pope Francis was in Philadelphia, the City of Brotherly Love, there were no bad events, few crimes, nothing significantly bad. If that is true, he appears to have had amazing effects on the place and on the people.

            If he didn’t catechize or address the most difficult issues but spread peace over the city, perhaps overall it was a good visit properly done.

            Has anyone heard this news of peaceful cities when he was visiting?

            Like

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            I watched an aerial shot of the Philly where today’s mass was held in between events when is was virtually empty. It was so serene that I was convinced it was a still shot. I noticed the flag blowing in the wind at a distance. I watched in amazement that for such a wide area the city was in a sacred reverence of the event and so very well contained. I did finally notice a car roll away in one of the lower corners of the screen, and thought that we could probably never pull off this respect in Chi-town. Perhaps, though with God’s grace. 🙂
            Props to the police and government officials in all three states for a tremendous job at securing Our Holy Father and controlling the crowds! It was a sight to behold on many levels.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            Yes, they were pretty tight. My niece’s husband is a NYC policeman and he said the city was locked down tight. Although he is still considered a rookie, he was told by more senior officers that they had never seen things so tightly. He knew that there had been many, many threats, but, overall, things are just right for this pope. I miss him already. I hope and pray I get to go to Rome on pilgrimage in the future. I have been there, but back in 2003. I would love to see the pope again, but this time Pope Francis, who is leading our church and will see this ship through the darkest hours. God bless him. pam, from NJ.

            Like

          • Barb Watry says:

            While I haven’t heard about other cities during Pope Francis’ visit, the same was said of Denver when Pope John Paul II came for World Youth Day in 1993. In fact the entire time was peaceful, where prior to World Youth Day, there had been much gang violence in the city.

            Liked by 2 people

          • SteveBC says:

            Thank you, JLynnByrd! 🙂

            Like

          • Fran says:

            Thank you SteveBC. I really do see the positive things that Pope Francis has done. I really do believe that he is giving us and the Church a breath of fresh air in that he is helping all see how we can love more like Jesus. But his omission of strong words that might really strengthen the faithful, especially when many of HIS words are being used against the faithful who are trying to uphold the teachings of the Church, really disheartens me.I just have to let it go, though, and keep trusting that it is all in God’s plan. It almost seems that, it being such a glaring omission, especially when he said that his purpose for coming to the U.S. was for life and the family, that there must be a specific reason and purpose for it. Maybe its a sacrifice we are meant to offer up at this time. That just came to me, so I am going to do that.

            Like

          • SteveBC says:

            Fran, I do get it. It seems a shame he did not step up more forcefully.

            However, he was preceded by peacefulness and followed by rainbows. I think this may be a case where the heavenly view on the heavenly side is quite a bit different from our view here on the worldly side.

            It’s hard to argue with so many possible signs of blessing. So I’m going to assume that the Pope did as he was meant to do, despite our disappointment on tactics.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            And, God’s ways are not our ways. God’s time is not our time. The pope did exactly what he came here to do. He evangelized with some other items on a list given to him by God. Are we to expect that the Holy Father should pound his fists on a podium and tell people just how it is going to be while he is in town? Nope. God bless him and all on this site. Keep praying for him. He has much dissention he must deal with. You know, cardinal against cardinal, bishop against bishop, etc.? But, this is God’s church and best we remain faithful and obedient. pam, from NJ.

            Liked by 2 people

  30. Judy says:

    Christians of the M.E. are being exterminated. They must feel forgotten by this Pope (if there are any left). I think that he I think he should be calling for world wide prayer vigils and seeing that they are organized via the internet so that we can all be praying for them at the same time so that the prayers are most powerful. The innocents murdered by abortion have been put on the back burner. Given the the most grotesque practices have just been revealed, I find this shocking that a pope would not take a much greater posture against this. We are all shocked and disgusted at how “late term” babies are cut up and sold, but this Pope has said that we are obsessed with the matter and that statement suggests that we should just somehow let it go…. This week he said that even men and women who do not believe in God can get into heaven. Just how does he know this? I know Jesus is very merciful, but it seems an odd proclamation because He is the head of a Church which claims that we must do regular reconciliation and atone for sins. A person who does not believe at all in God would not do this….. As for climate change, I am discouraged by how much faith the Pope puts in political men and women of very questionable, untrustworthy character, and he seems to have so little faith that an all powerful God will preserve the world and the Church until the second coming of Jesus. (After all the world cannot just exterminate itself if this is going to come to pass.) While he portrays himself as humble, the fact that he would not accept any debate from the opposing parties on climate change leads me to believe that he is quite a bit arrogant in some respects, just like our current president…..I could certainly point out a few more concerns,but I will stop here, I realize that mine is certainly a minority opinion because I regularly hear about incredible stories of people weeping as they watch him on TV or in the street…..I trust that Charlie has been shown some vision of the future, but the vision of the present is troubling…..I have not read all the commentaries because I have been very busy. Some are concerned and some are accepting of Francis. At the moment, I cannot warm up to this Pope. But Charlie says God has a plan. May it be so.

    Like

    • janet333 says:

      Hi Judy,

      There is a lot of stuff out there about the Pope that’s distorted, out of context… or sometimes just not true!

      You posted…”The innocents murdered by abortion have been put on the back burner”

      The Pope has spoken out against abortion many many times Pope Francis…”…. there shouldn’t be even one child who doesn’t have the right to be born, there shouldn’t be even one child who doesn’t have the right to be well fed, there shouldn’t even be one child who doesn’t have the right to go to school”

      Francis denounced today’s “throw-away culture” that justifies disposing of lives, and said doctors in particular had been forced into situations where they are called to “not respect life.” He also stated that “Every child that isn’t born, but is unjustly condemned to be aborted, has the face of Jesus Christ, has the face of the Lord,” he said….. He urged the gynecologists to abide by their consciences and help bring lives into the world. “Things have a price and can be for sale, but people have a dignity that is priceless and worth far more than things,”

      You posted…”Pope has said that we are obsessed with the matter and that statement suggests that we should just somehow let it go.”

      He said we should put it in context…. when we speak about these issues, we have to talk about them in a context. The teaching of the Church, for that matter, is clear and I am a son of the Church, but it is not necessary to talk about these issues all the time…. “He said exactly the same as Benedict….“I always knew the questions in advance. They concerned the ordination of women, contraception, abortion and other such constantly recurring problems. If we let ourselves be drawn into these discussions, the Church is then identified with certain commandments or prohibitions; we give the impression that we are moralists with a few somewhat antiquated convictions, and not even a hint of the true greatness of the faith appears. I therefore consider it essential always to highlight the greatness of our faith – a commitment from which we must not allow such situations to divert us.” Pope Benedict.

      You posted….” This week he said that even men and women who do not believe in God can get into heaven. ”

      Pope Francis says…’The Lord has redeemed all of us … even the atheists’ It is true the Lord has redeemed all of us with His Blood including the atheists, but not all will accept salvation. But can atheists be saved? St. Paul tells us that a person’s conscience will accuse or defend them at their judgement…

      St. Paul tells us that a person’s conscience will accuse or defend them at their judgement…. “The gentiles who do not have the law, do by nature the things of the law. They show the work of the law written on their hearts.” Romans 2:14-16 He is telling us that those who have not known God yet have lived according to the law of God can be saved!

      Early Church Father, St Justin Martyr explains this further..If a man accepted that law, even though he doesn’t know that it’s God that writes it, he is in effect following the Spirit of Christ. God’s Mercy is unfathomable!

      On repentance Pope Francis warned… “If you don’t listen to the Lord, if you don’t accept correction and if you do not trust Him, your heart has not yet repented.”

      The Pope said that Jesus condemned the hypocrites who called themselves ‘pure’ but lived a double life. If your heart is not a repentant heart, if you do not listen to the Lord, if you don’t accept correction and you do not trust in Him, your heart is unrepentant. ”

      Regarding the out of context comment…”who am I to judge” Cardinal Francis George of Chicago says of this…”This has been very misused … because he was talking about someone who has already asked for mercy and been given absolution, whom he knows well,” George said.

      There are many other out of context quotes that can be straightened out too.

      Re climate change…..rightly or wrongly he is only saying the same as his predecessor.

      “Preservation of the environment, promotion of sustainable development and particular attention to climate change are matters of grave concern for the entire human family.”
      (Pope Benedict XVI, Letter to the Ecumenical Patriarch of Constantinople on the Occasion of the Seventh Symposium of the Religion, Science and the Environment Movement, September 1, 2007)

      God Bless You

      Liked by 2 people

      • charliej373 says:

        Well, he didn’t say quite the same as his predecessor. Pope Benedict did, indeed, emphasize our responsibility to the environment but did NOT jump from there to endorse centralized government agencies with vast power to force us to do what a handful of bureaucrats say we must. Both Pope Emeritus Benedict and Pope Francis recognized similar problems, but their approach to recommended approaches to solve those problems are diametrically opposed.

        Liked by 1 person

        • janet333 says:

          Hi Charlie,

          ..”..but their approach to recommended approaches to solve those problems are diametrically opposed.”

          You did answer me on this one a few days ago but I failed to understand what you were telling me. Sorry I am a dunderhead at times..lol Could you tell me in simple terms please?

          God Bless You

          Like

        • Doug says:

          Yes. Benedict emphasized personal responsibility in these areas.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Judy says:

          However, the Pope did speak before a president and an international body who fully embrace more and more control over the masses. It is very telling that our president smiled all day as the Pope spoke, and the Pope did not mention the horrors of abortion on the world stage while he was speaking before the biggest abortion supporter the presidency has ever seen. He did not say anything publicly to a man who supports abortion at every stage of development and who has supported the creation of “comfort” rooms, where live babies can gasp their last breaths with a blanket and warmth….which is supposed to make the whole process humane. He had the perfect opportunity to be brave and stand up for the innocents and unborn. This was a lost opportunity to remind all people where the Catholic church stands, but he did not seize the opportunity, even with polite candor. He seemed to drop the ball on the issue even though Christians, who are regularly mocked, have been bravely fighting for the rights of those innocents whose lives are taken with grotesque coldness and indifference. This brave part of
          God’s army in the USA did not receive any public support at the White House from the head of their Church….though he did visit some of the nuns who have filed suit against the administration and, I suppose, this may have signaled some type of support, though not a very strong move ….. He also did not talk about genocide of Christians around the world, much like our press. ….. In addition, since he did not make clear (at the U.N.) that he was against centralized control to achieve climate change aims or other aims , his words are left open to be interpreted and will be used by those who want centralized control. I am concerned that he does this so very often…..By not making clear what he is against, he has left room for confusion. And since he never mentions that he is not infallible, so many, many people are crying in the streets, because they think the Church is now open to just about anything that was once forbidden. I know that because I hear what people around me are saying. It is easy to smile and to be warm and fuzzy. It is easy to kiss babies, the sick and the rejected, and to ride in a small car as opposed to a big car. It is easy to wash the feet of Muslims, who have probably been vetted to be sure that they are not going to be violent. It is not so easy to say, “Go and sin no more” and that is Christ’s command. This is the hard part of being a Christian because it recognizes that what feels good is not always good. And this is the hard work that Christ commands us to do. Yes, we are to love, but there is no saint who does not follow this command to reject those things which are sin and we are clearly called to make a sincere and sometimes brave effort.

          Liked by 3 people

      • Doug says:

        Well said Janet! I think that people that have not formally acknowledged Jesus (per se) who are living a life of love and desire to do good, when they get to heavens door will realize that they have accepted Jesus by there actions. James: “show me your faith by what you say and I will show you my faith by what I do”. This verse brings me comfort, but scares me too as I ponder if I have really been “doing” my faith.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Judy says:

        At the very least, this Pope should make clear that he is not infallible on temporal matters of science,economics and politics. As far as I can determine, he has not done this.

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          Actually, Judy, he does in his Encyclicals – stating that his opinions on such are not binding or authoritative. I suppose it is his continuing emphasis on speaking on the secular which could lead one to miss that. It kind of saddens me, because when he actually does speak about faith and morals, he usually does so with a breathtaking clarity and elegance. He just does it fairly seldom.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Judy says:

            I trust in Jesus Christ and I am praying for this Pope.

            Liked by 1 person

          • janet333 says:

            “It kind of saddens me, because when he actually does speak about faith and morals, he usually does so with a breathtaking clarity and elegance. He just does it fairly seldom.”

            No one must be reading what I’m reading then. 😦

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Janet, I read part of his first encyclical. I especially responded to what he said about serving the Lord in that our joy in serving comes from knowing Jesus and it comes out of genuine love and also to spread God’s love with a reflection of this with our joy and inner peace. If we are feeling burned out serving, then this usually means we are seeking approval from others and not God. When this happens, it is time to forgive others and move to that inner trust of Just knowing God. It is when we are filled up with him that we can freely give. Of couse, I am paraphrasing, but this is what spoke to me. So I say seek the Lord with all your heart and mind and soul and everything that is within you and you will never be disappointed . By the way, I think you are doing that. God bless you.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Pam Nicholson says:

            Yes, Doug, I truly hear your heart in your words. I have recently been praying for certain wounds I carry which were inflicted by my own family and continues to this day. I know I am praying for them to have their own conversion of the heart, and I dare not give up. Even if I am not alive to see with my own eyes that they have taken up their cross and at least begun to fight the good fight, I know my prayers of endless trust in God’s mercy for them, has been at least a small part in their conversion when it happens. I find that sometimes people come to a part in the road, and they finally really get a better and more clearer look at the choices before them. And then, maybe they even look back to where they have trod, and they realize in an instant, a holy instant, that road they have been on has been fruitless in ways the other road may be more fruitful. A road not traveled but has been seen. How will we explain this to God why we did not try this other road when we had the chance to check it out even to see if it was worth going further? Well, God bless. pam, from NJ.

            Liked by 2 people

    • Doug says:

      Hi Judy, I struggle with the same things. I have read some of Francis’ first encyclical (not the ecology one) and it is marvelous. I see the same struggle with him as I do with marriage. It is a sacrament for life if valid. How do you you make the best of it if you don’t have strong feelings? Do you leave? Is it right to divorce? Do we walk away from the church? This is where trusting in God with everything you have in you is so important. Our joy and happiness does not come from exterior things, but from knowing how much we have an amazing God who loves and cares for us so much. What is my responsibility? What is God calling me to do?

      Liked by 1 person

    • NancyA says:

      Do you know that there WAS a worldwide vigil of prayer called for by the Pope for the plight of the persecuted Christians? And that he did speak to all the issues you mention, in one way or another, throughout his visit? I am sorry not to be able to enumerate them now, but I am saddened to hear repeated remonstrations towards the Pope for omissions that were not made.

      Liked by 1 person

  31. Rick (Kristen's brother) says:

    I agree with what Kristen stated above (and not only because I am her brother). I believe that the Pope, in part, is using the environment as a way to open wide the door for discussions with world leaders. While they are gaga over his seeming agreement with them on global warming, he can hit them subtly with comments about their hypocrisy on many moral issues. I just read Pope Francis’ address to the UN on a Zenit email. It touched on issues of life, the Middle East crisis, religious liberty, and human trafficking more directly than his address to Congress. And it encouraged them to be consistent in applying their principles, not selectively only doing what suits their agendas. Since this likely won’t be the end all and be all of his discussions with our leaders, I am optimistic he will become firmer over time regarding these moral issues which are growing “elephants in the room.” With regard to global warming, I agree the earth is cyclical, and very difficult to prove one way or another if humans are responsible. The old ” correlation vs causation” argument. However I can’t disagree that we can always be better stewards of the environment and avoid the temptation to fall into complacency. Whether this is the Pope’s blimder or not, time will tell if his decision is a good one.

    Liked by 3 people

  32. Rick (Kristen's brother) says:

    And thank you for keeping my niece Cassie in your prayers. Dealing with an unresectable brain tumor for over ten years has been a significant trial for my sister and her family. Much suffering they have had, but offering it up to God.

    Liked by 2 people

  33. CrewDog says:

    There is a “thread” over at MOG talking about the Big Blood Moon tomorrow evening where in my neck of the woods (CDT) it’s a “Full Show”. I think this is the last of the Tetrad Blood Moons this year that have gotten a bunch of folks worked up over .. “SIGNS?”.. might be a good excuse for me to pull out some of my “Special Occasion” Jameson Irish sippin’ Whiskey and Moon Watch 😉
    There is No Doubt that “Signs” have been flashing like Times Square Neon for at least a decade if not since 1917! So rather than discuss/argue these events, pros-n-cons of this seer, Pope, visionary or that apparition it might be, NOW, an excellent time to get closer to The Lord, stock up on a few supplies and get acquainted with like minded neighbors/parish members! If nothing of note happens in your neck of the woods then, at worst, you will have grown in Faith, have extra chow to eat or give to the local Food Pantry, made new friends and have some ammo to take the grandkids shooting at the Gun Club. Sounds like a Win/Win Deal to me!!

    GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Liked by 6 people

  34. Susan, MI says:

    I just ran across this developing story about openly gay comedian and actor, Mo Rocca, serving as lector at the Papal mass at Madison Square Garden in NYC.

    Crewdog, I’m using your line, “GOD SAVE ALL HERE!”

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Hi Susan, I edited most of the material out of this – not because of anything you did, but because the link and source for everything is from the churchmilitant site. They occasionally have some worthy insights, but I have become worn out with them. They are constantly seeking a Catholic to condemn, a reason to be outraged, and constantly take the most malicious construction on every story they cover in order to fuel their outrage. They too often garble the facts to support their outrage for me to trust the basic veracity of their stories any more. So I am pretty well done with them.

      This story will still be there with more credible outlets covering it and getting to the larger facts behind it rather than just imposing sinister interpretations without verifying the facts. So you are very welcome to revisit it next week with better verification from credible sites that do more than just try to claw and tear others down – which is what churchmilitant has become.

      Liked by 5 people

      • CrewDog says:

        Charlie sez: ” …..They are constantly seeking a Catholic to condemn, a reason to be outraged, and constantly take the most malicious construction on every story they cover in order to fuel their outrage….” YUP!!
        We got ChurchMilitant on one end of the spectrum and the anti-Catholic from birth Gospel/Bible Only Types on the other. My usual Oldie radio station airs church shows on Sunday morn and sure-nuff one of the Church Lady Preachers was going on about Pope Francis, The Roman Church and false prophets ;-(
        Even if you don’t believe in Charlie’s version of coming events a thinking person has to believe that Evil Times of some sort are upon us. History demonstrates that Evil Times brings out the worst in humanity … and the best too! During these Evil Times, politicians, groups and individuals will be looking for scapegoats to blame for their miseries. Obama & Pals (like examples, no doubt, can be found in Europe/elsewhere) have already unpleasantly divided the USA by race, sex, income, age, political affiliation……… at the height of The Storm these divisions will burst forth to cause anger, violence and chaos. It has always been so ;-(
        If The Pope is The Lord’s Guy, I don’t believe he can blunder as he is just reading his script in The Divine Play called The Storm? For a guy, like me, living in Bible Belt USA, I’m thinking that the anti-Catholicism that Pope Francis is bringing to the surface may be a good thing ….. I’ll know who to be “on guard” for when serious SHTF occurs ……. and don’t be forgetting!!! There are plenty of “Catholics” who are Protestant & Jew haters “out there” too!! ……… satan & pals are laughing in glee ;-(

        GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

        Liked by 3 people

  35. Judy says:

    These are the words of Ned Dougherty which should be considered, I believe:

    OUTRAGEOUS & DANGEROUS MAINSTREAM MEDIA LIES:
    NWO-NBC implies that a miracle took place in the skies from New York to Philadelphia on Friday and Saturday (Sep 25-26, 2015) during the Pope’s visit.
    THE TRUTH: Natural Rainbows do not occur without moisture, and this phenomenum is NO MIRACLE! But the result of geoengineering – deliberate heavy chemtrail spraying over 80,000 spectators. I was present at Central Park yesterday at approximately 2:30pm, when I received a text from a reader in Queens NY that there was heavy chemtrail activity overhead. I looked up into the clear blue skies and saw the approaching chemtrail clouds from the direction of Queens to the east. I then watched 5-6 chemtrail streams appearing directly overhead, even in crisscrossing patterns, from high-altitude jets.
    Rainbows, more properly named “chemical rainbows” or “chem-bows” began to form, not from the non-existent moisture, but from the nano-particles of aluminum dust, barium, strontium, and other toxic chemicals that were being sprayed by high-altitude jets and almost immediately dropping down – to be inhaled by thousands of clueless spectators.
    Many of them around me pointed their cell phones and cameras up to the sky and shouted “Look at the rainbows” and “It’s a miracle!” How sad that thousands of people did not have a clue that what they were witnessing was not a miracle but a deliberate pollution of our skies by the same psychopaths, who are pushing 2030 AGENDA at the UN!
    By the time the Pope arrived at Central Park at 5:00pm, Manhattan was completely covered by the shapeless chemtrail blanket. On Saturday morning, I was back home in eastern Long Island and the Hampton skies were blanketed by chemtrails. What I observed on both days in Manhattan and the Hamptons (and reportedly as far as Philadelphia PA) is the heaviest bombardment of chemtrails I have ever witnessed. Millions of people in the Northeast have been poisoned in just the last two days, but these chemtrail programs have been spraying, increasingly more heavily, since the 1990s.
    If you still think this is a conspiracy theory, educate yourself at: http://www.geoengineeringwatch.org/

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      I have not studied this subject with any depth, so I would not vouch for it. But even though the site can be intense, it carries some plausibility that strikes me as worthy of consideration. I do know that governmental entities have, at various times, tried to influence or control weather through geo-engineering and it has ever resulted in serious unintended consequences. When I get back home I may devote some time to researching down to the base data on this subject. For now, I neither endorse it nor dismiss it – and think it is worth serious consideration.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Judy says:

        I am not an expert either, but it is worth researching. Ned has researched it quite a bit and is convinced.

        Liked by 1 person

      • SteveBC says:

        Apparently, Colleen DeRose responded to Charlie’s comment here, but I cannot find her comment anywhere.

        The gist was that she wanted my opinion of chemtrails. I am not informed on the subject, but I do admit to skepticism. Contrails from airplanes come and go based solely on the humidity of the surrounding air and the heat and water vapor in the exhaust of the plane’s engines. Although contrails can last quite a long time and spread over a lot of area on one day at one altitude, the next day at the same altitude, planes will leave little or no contrail. An ascending or descending plane can have contrails at one altitude and none at another altitude.

        I’ve never put any real effort into investigating this idea because it doesn’t make sense to me. There are so many other better ways to poison our population (dirty vaccines, GMOs, CAFOs, fructose syrup, bad medical care, etc.) that chemtrails seem like a lot of money and time for little return and no profits.

        As to weather alteration, that is real but how much it strays from research into massive deliberate negative intent and effect, again it seems like too much effort for too little effect and no profits.

        If you follow the money on this sort of thing, the profits are in poisons you can charge a price for and get your targets to buy and like.

        Liked by 1 person

        • NancyA says:

          I don’t believe poisoning is the purpose of intentional chemtrails. I also believe that there are those who know a little but cannot say what they know because of oaths, or fears .

          Like

          • SteveBC says:

            Oh. I had found articles that said it was about poisoning, but perhaps I misinterpreted what they said. I suspect you are more knowledgeable on this than I. There’s just something about the underlying premise that doesn’t click for me. However, I have been in that situation before on other issues and came to find out there really was something there. I will keep my eyes out for further information. Thanks, NancyA!

            Like

    • SteveBC says:

      I have no opinion either way on this idea, having not examined it in any depth. However, I would point out that it may be possible to distinguish the spectrum of these rainbows from videos or photos. A rainbow from water or (more likely here) cirrus cloud ice should have a different spectral coloring, different wavelength scan, a different below-arch dimness, and other factors susceptible to analysis. Also, samples of dust on the surface of the ground where the chemicals (if any) would have fallen *might* be determinable via analysis. Looking at these photos online I would notch these up to cirrus cloud moisture and ice crystals, and possibly to moisture and ice crystals form in the wake of planes naturally, but I really don’t know.

      One thing I would mention is that meteorological conditions that cause cirrus clouds to form can create them over long distances and large areas, leading to cirrus rainbows above many cities in the area. I would like to know if people outside of NY and Philly also saw rainbows that day in their cities. Those would not have been the result of any chemtrail seeding, only natural.

      It is also worth considering that even if the rainbows did arise due to chemtrail seeding designed to fool people, it is a fact that God’s sign did appear over the Pope during his travels. Sometimes, God can use bad or evil things for good ends, in a subtly humorous way.

      The heavens blessed Pope Francis and affected many millions of people in a positive way. Does it matter whether the rainbows were natural or man-made?

      Liked by 2 people

      • jlynnbyrd says:

        Here, here! I took a picture of the almost full moon yesterday on my dinky cell phone. The picture had two vertical radiant beams of light with rainbows. I was enamored by the picture. Upon zooming in the beautiful colors of the rainbow, I could see the resemblance of the Face of Jesus, no lie. I asked my husband to look at what I was seeing and he saw a pointed eared dog with glasses on. So, who knows? It is a breathtaking photo. Unfortunately the skies are overcast tonight and I doubt we will get to enjoy the spectacular lunar eclipse tonight.

        Like

        • SteveBC says:

          That’s very funny about the interpretation of the photo! Ha!

          As for the moon, we had a very good view of it. My mother and I sat out on our somewhat chilly porch and watched it go to full red.

          My primary thought was, “The Old Order Passeth Away…”

          Liked by 1 person

    • NancyA says:

      I do believe in chemtrails. I have been talking about them to my children for years, well before I ever heard of the term or knew that anyone else was noticing them. But. As much as I have watched them being made over years I have never once noticed a rainbow occur in the midst of them, not until yesterday, over the pope.

      Liked by 1 person

  36. janet333 says:

    Same here Charlie..they can no longer be trusted, sadly.

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Susan, MI says:

    Hello Charlie,
    I completely understand and I am grateful for your knowledge of this website’s questionable tactics. I do not want to cast unjust implications or put a question of doubt upon any faithful servant. I very much appreciate your diligence in protecting the integrity of the posts, as well as protecting me from being an accomplice to something that is potentially libelous or to cause another’s reputation harm by disingenuous practices. Yes, the story will still be there next week if other credible sources find there is something to look into.
    I do like that you kept Crewdog’s line.. GOD SAVE ALL HERE!

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      Thanks Susan. They do come up with some good insights sometimes, but it is so surrounded by the weeds of their constant attacks that I no longer trust them. God bless you! (And I LOVE CrewDog’s line – it has become one of our unofficial mottos here).

      Liked by 3 people

      • Monica Joseph of the Blessed Sacrament, OCDS says:

        Charlie,
        Of course this is your site and needs to reflect your judgment. If it is ok ,though, I would like to say to their credit, the churchmilitanttv site graciously allowed the information about Joe Cronin to be put up when we were trying to get the word out. In justice, I would like that to be known; I like knowing who can be counted on in an emergency situation such as that was. As to their general editorial policy overall — of course, this is your site and therefore your decision as to if and how you want them to be referenced here.

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          That is true, Monica, and it was a kind thing for them to do. I have not forbidden any reference to them – but when they are in attack mode, as they too frequently are, I do not accept what they say at face value any more. They have done some good work in the past. I kind of hope they might step back and see they don’t have to constantly act with a snarl and a broadsword all the time. But you are right. When we needed help to rescue Joey from getting the plug pulled, they were among those who stepped up…and I should remember that.

          Liked by 1 person

  38. Brad J says:

    Hello all. First time to post for me. My family and I have benefitted greatly from this site which Mark Mallett put us on to a few months ago. Charlie your insights and writings have resonated with my family and me who are converts to the Catholic faith as well, from 2005.

    A couple of comments. First it was good to read your assessment of the church militant site, which affirmed the conclusion we came to a few months back.

    Second, regarding chemtrails. I need to state that while I don’t for a minute doubt that there are powerful control freaks out there who want to control our weather etc, I am highly doubtful of some of the information that is passed off as fact on that site. I have been an airline pilot for almost exactly 20 years now and have been asked numerous time by good folks “what’s up with the chemtrails?” As a result I went on to the geoengineeringwatch.org site a few times to see what it was all about.

    While I would agree that there are parts of this theory which could certainly be plausible, there are many, many things that are presented as “factual evidence” on that site, which are simple false and this leads me to question the movement.

    A small list of just a few.

    A picture of a 747 with 3 contrails instead of 4 and with fluid coming out of nozzles close to the wing tips on both sides is an airplane that has had an engine failure and is dumping fuel to reduce the landing weight so it can go back and land and get the thing fixed not a chemtrail plane.

    Supposed “modifications” to the engine pod aft of the engine are not modifications at all. They come from Boeing like that and are a different colour because it is hot back there and paint would not last and the tube that is alledgedly for injecting chemicals us actually an engine breather like on your car.

    They state that a high bypass turbofan engine cannot leave a contrail. This is false. I have been leaving contrails for years in these airplanes. All that is required is the right relative humidity in the surrounding air and that changes with the airmass you are in which changes laterally as well as vertically. Just like your car on a cold day, it doesn’t always make the same trail of exhaust as it depends on the relative humidity of the surrounding air. Also they talk about chemtrails starting and stopping…I can often tell when the plane in front of me has started his descent as its contrail will stop because they closed their thrust levers and greatly reduced the amount of fuel they were burning. Just like letting your foot off the gas in your car on a cold day with high relative humidity.

    Anyhow, there are a lot more things that I ran into that were technically false on this site. They aren’t telling us true😉, so I believe it may be more of a distraction than anything. I don’t want to be overly critical of anyone who may have more information on this than I do and I don’t want to come across as thinking that I know all there is to know about this stuff. I’m just a farm kid who flys planes now, I love machines and this site just has a lot of stuff that doesn’t ring true to me.

    I just love the simple truth of acknowledging God, taking the next right step, and being a sign of hope to those around us!

    God bless you Charlie and all,

    Brad

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Thank you, so much, Brad! Thank God we have enough readers here that we can find real technical expertise on most any subject. It is why I noted I had not done detailed research. I loathe the practice, all too common, of deciding what you want to think, then cherry-picking and massaging evidence to support the conclusion you have already made. If you want truth, you follow the evidence where it leads, even when it proves inconvenient to your hypothesis. The site seemed like it might be superficially plausible, but it also had some of the breathless sort of stuff that is a hallmark of sites that have gone round the bend. So I will not have it cited as a credible source on such subjects any further.

      If a site wants to be a good resource, it needs to be rigorous in its standards. That does not mean it can never err – only that it take care not to use errant misstatements it could have easily checked to smear others. This particular site, I think, fails that test, based on the simple matters you show.

      Liked by 1 person

    • sweetwaterhaven says:

      Brad, thank you for this post and insights from the perspective of your significant experience.

      I’ve read some interesting studies lately on whether or not the internet is making us smarter. Certainly we have easy access to more information than ever before, and the younger generations in particular seem to value this as a real edge.

      Of course having access to scads of information is one thing. Having the skill set to effectively parse and interpret that information is quite another, so real experience in practical matters almost always trumps every other posture in my book. As I like to pound into my business teams on a daily basis: I’m not a fan of anecdotes. Good, bad, or indifferent, what are the facts?

      I earned my Air Warfare Specialist designation in the Navy decades ago, so I know some things about aviation, but that obviously pales in comparison to your skill set. As of today, I don’t have the slightest idea what’s actually happening in the skies. Simple observation tells me that something has changed over the years (e.g. – I frequently notice vast, criss-crossing contrails that I’m fairly certain weren’t there 10, 20, 30 years… ago). That’s just an observation, but certainly not enough to jump to any definitive conclusions. Just something that caught my attention.

      Considering the limited time I’ve got each day, I think I’d rather focus beyond the vapor on the One Who sees and knows everything.

      That all said, some know that I really appreciate a good story and like to tell them often. I hope that doesn’t bother folks or seem to conflict with my above statements.

      I’ll spare you yesterday’s outing up to Bell Pass in the mountains to see the super moon and eclipse, but will share one small slice. I stayed for the first half of the cycle, then came back down in the dark using narrow paths, game trails, and rocky arroyos. Fortunately I had a little flashlight in my pack, but it only provided enough illumination for me to take that next right step. Thank God I knew the terrain, but it was a real eye opener for me.

      In a sense, I got a real lesson in what you’ve been talking about, Charlie, so the only meaningful thing I’ve got to share from the experience is this: trust in Jesus!

      God Bless,

      MP

      Liked by 2 people

    • Doug says:

      Way cool Brad. My brother flies 777s for American. What airline and what plane do you fly?

      Like

  39. Brad J says:

    Thanks Charlie, I truly appreciate that you are all about Truth. I pray that I will have the humility to let go of any areas in my life that don’t conform to Truth.

    Brad

    Liked by 1 person

  40. Julee says:

    Pope Francis brought God back to the forefront in the USA. Thousands of people waited for him in the streets…men and women from all walks of life…families…schoolchildren…the elderly…the disabled. It was a needed boost for Christianity and a definite sign of hope! Even through the TV, I could feel the Holy Spirit working through the Pope’s presence to unite us all in God’s love and to remind us to love our fellow man with a merciful love. The assemblies were all peaceful with few protestors–how often does than happen anymore? God’s hand was in this. Pope Francis appeals to the heart and I think that’s what is needed right now, someone who can turn hearts toward God. He’s reaching believers and non-believers both! I love how he made a point of seeking out the vulnerable and marginalized, sending a message that no one is forgotten and all life is created by God and valued. For me his mere presence and his actions spoke louder than his words. I don’t know anything about global warming, haven’t done a scrap of research, but whether he’s right or wrong, the simple message I received was one of love–that the earth and all of God’s natural resources should be protected and distributed for the benefit of all God’s people. For someone like me who doesn’t read as widely or have time to do in-depth research, I may not be as well informed, but I also don’t get too hung up analyzing the Pope’s every word unless it pertains to the tenets of our faith. I respect him as the Vicar of Christ while also realizing he’s still a man.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Pam Nicholson says:

      Oh, yes, I also noticed his humble and gentle way in which he met the people, in all their ranks of life. So loving, so caring, so giving of himself to all those who want to hear the Gospel through his words, given to him by God via his heart. What a beautiful spirit he has and has illustrated we can be in the world, a great and small shining light for all those who want to see whom God has sent to show us He is in our midst. Oh, how I wish God will send me to Rome to see him at St. Peter’s. He truly is the pope for these times. God has shown us Himself through this Holy Father, now it is to us to imitate Jesus as He has sent us His priest-son for us to see how truly right things are with the world, if we choose to be a small and great light growing in holiness. I truly feel so very blessed to be alive to see this man who gives himself to the world, and does not back away when there are so many distractions to reach regular people like me as a reminder to keep looking up, for our redemption is nigh!

      Liked by 2 people

  41. janet333 says:

    Thanks Julee..Of course everyone knows where the Catholic Church stands on the moral issues. What they needed to see and hear was the call of Love from Christ’s Vicar…and this they saw and heard. Praise God! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  42. NancyA says:

    I saw a woman wearing a burka, as we were leaving the area of the Mass yesterday. There was every type of person and family represented there!

    Liked by 1 person

  43. CrewDog says:

    Somewhere in the recesses of my damaged memory banks the phrase … become an instrument of The Lord … comes to mind. Is that not what we are all seeking here in our Blogosphere Family?

    Heartlight Daily Verse 29 September
    John 3:20-21
    Everyone who does evil hates the light, and will not come into the light for fear that his deeds will be exposed. But whoever lives by the truth comes into the light, so that it may be seen plainly that what he has done has been done through God.
    Thoughts on today’s verse:
    Truth is seen in what it does and whom it seeks.
    Prayer:
    Father of every heavenly light, I ask you to correct me gently as I place myself, my imperfections, failures and sins in your presence. Forgive and cleanse me by the blood of Jesus so that I might be spotless, holy, and blameless in your sights. O Lord, I don’t want just to be forgiven, I want to be useful to you and your church. Please help me find my way to usefulness. In Jesus name I pray. Amen.
    Visit heartlight.org for more

    GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Liked by 4 people

  44. Becky-TN says:

    Hi Charlie,

    While watching a few of Bishop Robert’s Barron’s Word on Fire You Tube video’s, I came across the ones below. Both helped me to see the Holy Father in a little better light.

    God Bless,

    Becky

    1. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7S43IP2Wdxw
    2. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfpdpvZPwrg

    Liked by 1 person

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