Quo Vadis?

Jesus-Wept-1

By Charlie Johnston

I am working on a piece on Islam and the crisis that confronts us. I have always loathed naieve fecklessness in confronting a challenge – for the false mercy of tolerating the intolerable ultimately and invariably leads to a vicious backlash that can become a fire consuming all in its path. This is why I so often use the phrase, “Judge righteous judgment.”

My thoughts on this are well-defined and of long standing. But I want to be extra precise in writing publicly about it.

Two little noted things about the Paris massacres struck me, one for its hideous irony and another for its sublime hope in humanity. In the Bataclan Theatre which was the site of the worst of the massacre, the heavy metal band was going into a rendition of their hit song, “Kiss the Devil,” when the shooting started. It gives me shivers. On the other hand, in that most cynical of European Cities, Paris, people in apartments started opening their doors and pulling strangers in to safety once the magnitude of the attack became clear. People reached out to strangers – while other strangers were on a murderous rampage. Our hearts want to reach out to each other.

As I ponder how to be clear, I think of an old story about a gentle Quaker farmer who was awakened in the middle of the night. He grabbed his rifle and went to see what was happening, At the bottom of the staircase, he saw a burglar trying to open his safe. He considered the situation for a moment, then raised the rifle to his shoulder and announced, “Friend, I would not harm thee for the world. But thou standest where I am about to shoot.”

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
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186 Responses to Quo Vadis?

  1. Lynette says:

    I noticed one of the news mentioned the attack on a street named after Voltaire….

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Patricia says:

    And let’s not forget the name of the heavy metal band: Eagles of Death

    Liked by 1 person

  3. prayingflower says:

    Oh, the gentle Quakers. Would that I be more like them. Thank you, Charlie.

    Liked by 3 people

  4. John says:

    You’ve got to check and recheck your gear before walking into battle. Don’t bring the wrong breastplate by mistake because you didn’t inspect your righteous motivations and mission.

    Like

  5. JeanE says:

    “Friend, I would not harm thee for the world. But thou standest where I am about to shoot.” Wow, do I love that!!! Charlie, thank you for this! I just talked to my husband about getting a gun- he used to own so many but we sold them all years ago! I have never wanted a gun because I can’t imagine shooting a human being and we don’t hunt (yet..lol) ..well, I think it’s time and reading this has helped me to not be in such knots about it. Maybe this is easier for men than women, I don’t know.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Mick says:

      Jean, I’m not a big gun person; but my husband (who is) gave me my first gun for my birthday in 2012. The thought of personally shooting even a varmint makes me kind of queasy, so the thought of ever having to shoot an unjust aggressor is quite an unpleasant one. But I have 5 kids; and, God help me, you bet I’d pull the trigger (multiple times, as I have 30 rounds to work with) in order to defend them. My prayer is: Lord, please let me never have to fire this thing at another human being; but if I do, please help me not to miss.

      Liked by 8 people

      • JeanE says:

        Mick, thank you, that would be my prayer as well. As my husband said even seeing or knowing there is a gun will scare most people away before it comes to a shooting fest and I can certainly agree with that!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Noah603 says:

        Mick,

        My wife and I have owned guns for about three years. We got them after a gruesome home invasion in the affluent little town next to our (not-so-affluent) little town. We also got our concealed carry licenses. But the only time I ALWAYS carry my gun, sadly, is when I go to Mass. I feel that this is the most likely place that I’d ever experience encountering a deranged gunman. We go to a big parish in a medium-sized city and I feel that the risk is real. Every Sunday morning, when I open the safe to take out my gun, I pray: “Lord, I don’t want to do this. But I feel a sense of duty as I own this weapon and have training to use it. I pray that I would never point this gun at anything except paper targets, tin cans, and water melons. But if you call me to defend my family and your other children, I pray that you would give me a clear shot and good aim.”

        Liked by 4 people

        • Mick says:

          Noah, thanks for sharing your story. My husband and I also got our concealed-carry permits about 3 years ago. The reason we got them is because the 26-year sheriff, who wanted yet another tax increase to support his horribly mismanaged budget, threw a hissy fit and made good on his threat to gut the sheriff’s deputy staff if the tax increase didn’t pass. So, in the sheriff’s jurisdiction of 429 square miles, there are only ever 2 deputies on duty at any time. In other words, we effectively have no police protection where we live. Case in point: A lady about 3 miles from us was home alone during the day, when she heard an intruder making his way around her house. She hid in the bathroom and called 911. It took the deputies several HOURS to show up. Thank God the intruder didn’t find her.

          Anyhow, my husband used to carry at Mass (with the pastor’s permission, of course), for the exact reason you stated. However, several months ago, our otherwise excellent bishop declared that no one is allowed to carry a firearm on any property owned by the diocese. This, in spite of the fact that the diocesan see (which is in the state capital) is less than 90 miles from the city with the second-largest Muslim population of any city in the United States. Our bishop’s decision was publicized in the largest newspapers in the state, and even made it into one of the UK papers (the Guardian, I think). So now, everybody with an ax to grind against the Catholic Church knows that those and in the parishes and the Catholic schools in our diocese are sitting ducks.

          When at Mass, I sometimes find myself scoping out the exits. And I often “war game” in my head, imagining what I would do if a gunman came through that doorway, or that one, or… And I try to imagine and pray about what I would do in such a situation. May God grant that I, and you, and everybody here, never have to face that situation.

          But if you do have to, I pray with you that God make your aim true. Center mass…

          Liked by 2 people

        • Petra says:

          Noah603: Bless you guys for sharing this attitude, because owning or having a gun is a dilemma for me. I personally hope never even to have to hold one, or be around them. But I know for self defense, I may have to. I have put the thought of them out of my mind, but I will listen if Our Lord would have me use one. You telling us the prayer you say before you handle it is a great help. It instructs me in the way one should act if forced by circumstances to handle a gun. Thank you.
          God bless.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks you have a way with words that says all that I would say

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Kim Sevier says:

    so many I know are getting messages– Holy Spirit promptings, I mean! It is remarkable.

    Liked by 3 people

  7. Shirley Bachmeier says:

    After watching the carnage in Paris, the immediate response was plans of retaliation with vengance against the perpetrators. I immediate saw my inner self the picture of Peter cutting off the ear of the slave of the high priest. Jesus’ word was to put away your swords; He healed the ear and surrendered to the throng that were there to arrest them. It is easy to sit were I sit not having watched my people being assasinated and the normal life and expectations being ripped from the guts of the French people. We experienced this after 9/11 but we searched for our broken rose-colored glasses instead of heeding our loving God’s warning to change our lives and encounter His grace and peace that surpasses all understanding and reality. Have mercy on our souls.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. NancyA says:

    My sons enjoy that genre of music SOUND, however, I am so very pleased when my younger son (18) comes to me all fired up to ask me to listen and to see the lyrics of the songs he most likes… wouldn’t you know, there are Christian “screamo” and heavy metal bands. The latest he came to share with me was about confessing the Man… ends with something like “I would die for that Man.” (tears spring to my eye)

    Liked by 3 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      That is so sweet. The USCCB had a movie review page and rated movies for moral content. I referred to the site’s reviews before allowing my children to see a movie. I did not allow my daughter to watch Titanic as a result, when she was in elementary school. Of course *all* of her friends got to see it. We ended up watching two amazing and obscure movies, Straight Story, https://vimeo.com/144571622 and The Spitfire Grill, produced by The Sacred Heart League, both appearing on the USCCB top ten movie lists and they both became family favorite films.
      My children would still always ask to watch a movie and my daughter would say half in jest, we’ll have to wait for mom to check with the pope first. All we can do as parents is lay the foundation. Sounds like you’ve done a great job Nancy!

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Gail Cohee says:

    Even in the hideous, there is beauty.

    I love you Sam.

    >

    Like

    • naisy says:

      Gail,
      Peace to you, and to Sam. Your post rings true to me. The Crucifixion, in all of it’s horror, brought Life to the world. The pain of losing our loved ones may be God plucking them for their/our best good in His Perfect timing. I hope to catch glimpses of eternal perspective, always remembering that God IS Love and His Mercy Endures Forever, even if I can’t see it with human eyes and understanding. Fiat.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Quick correction: my husband knows this bands music. It’s a rock blues band, not a death metal band. The name is supposed to be ironic/funny. Make of it what you will…

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s supposed to be funny because the lead singer heard their sound compared to the band “The Eagles” but of the death metal genre. Of course those two can’t be combined. Anyway, I feel like some Christians are imagining a room of dark metal head heathens being killed in the Bataclan. If I was in Paris and had free tickets, I would have been at that show. It’s fun upbeat music you’d hear on a top 40 station. These were everyday young adults in there, not that it matters either way… Just trying to fill in the lines of the picture being painted. Thanks!

      Liked by 1 person

      • NancyA says:

        When I heard of the sort of concert it was (not the genre, necessarily) I could imagine my son at a concert like that (he’s just gone to a couple at smallish venues recently) and my heart broke for the parents who worry when their young adults go off to a concert where there might be some rough behavior, some dangerous element, but not THIS. ugh.

        I appreciate you taking time to clarify and give us a clearer idea of the band.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Joseph77 says:

        mommymentorcurlyq,
        Michael Brown on Spirit Daily, in a lead article today, has a very different view of The Eagles of Death which is diametrically opposed to your post

        “There is also the mystical component of “coincidence”: The material used to make the bombs in Paris was triacetone triperoxide and is nicknamed “Mother of Satan” (due to its extreme volatility) and a band from California called “Eagles of Death” was seven songs into a concert at that hall when its performance of a song called “Kiss the Devil” was interrupted by gunfire Friday (the 13th, 2015). Band members had to flee through a backstage exit, and on Saturday nixed the remaining dates on a European tour. Heavy metal. Brushing up against the devil. Inviting it, often unknowingly. (Look, left, at the concert-goers and the raised “sign of the horns” hands moments before attack.)

        Like

      • Joseph77 says:

        mommymentorcurlyq,
        The link to Michael Brown’s lead article, 11-17-2015, http://www.spiritdaily.com/Frenchapocalypse.htm The Eagles of Death were singing a song calling on the satan and it answered with death…Not at all “funny”.

        Like

        • I completely agree that that song, and maybe more of their other songs, is blindly misguided at best or diabolical at worst. The lyrics in much secular music is highly questionable which is why I typically listen to Christian music. However we are all on different stages in our faith walk and my dear husband who is early on in his faithwalk, his hobby is music of all types. So I know a lot about secular music and the guys in this band are member of other bigger bands. This is a side project for them and it is most definitely not metal. I can understand the painful irony of the song that they were singing and the timing of the attack. I think it is presumptuous to intimate that these concert goers were in any way deliberately participating in the demonic. Many don’t look beyond a catchy beat and a night out with their friends. They were victims.

          Liked by 2 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Just a note to say that MMcurlyq here does know the music scene very well. Even looking at the picture from just before the shooting began, I got the sense that these were spiritual children who had no clue of the seriousness of what they were invoking. Hip irony is more dangerous than most know.

            Liked by 4 people

    • SanSan says:

      their music is evil…..read the lyrics below.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. kris says:

    Sort of calls to mind the image that was in the national papers right after the twin towers were hit by planes in NYC. The image was of an evil face rising out of the fire and smoke on the side of the tower. Fr. Corapi once said that as evil becomes more emboldened it will no longer be hidden by a veil but let its face be seen vividly. Jesus Mercy

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Becky-TN says:

    Jesus, I trust in you!

    Like

  13. El ingeniero de Tepeyac says:

    Mr. Johnston, it appears to me that the “Rescue” as you call it will start before the “Storm” has finished. It seems that God in his infinite goodness has initiated a year of mercy in 2016 though the Vicar of Christ, the Pope Francisco.

    God is Good, all the time

    Liked by 3 people

  14. Josh in IN says:

    FWIW, the band name is Eagles of Death Metal, though they are not actually a true heavy metal band, and definitely not a death metal band. They are a rock group that thinks it’s funny to be ironic about death metal. They are not devil worshipers. They are ironic, post-modernist hipsters. (Which probably makes them self-worshipers.) Anyone who can sing “Kiss the Devil” either doesn’t really believe in the Devil or worships him. These people and their most unfortunate fans are in the former group. Much more Spinal Tap than Black Sabbath.

    Anyway, I write this because there seems to be an undercurrent in some of the Christian commentary I’ve read about this that seems to imply these people got what they were looking for (death/devil/etc.). Whatever their cultural, political, and personal sins were, all the victims of this attack are innocents in terms of what happened to them. As Charlie points out, there is a terrible irony here. But we should run from the idea there is a poetic justice here.

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Bingo, Josh. But it is something I have long since ceased to even joke about.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Josh in IN says:

        Definitely not something to joke about.

        I may not have been the profligate public sinner in my past, but I drank deeply at the poisonous font of irony and “intelligent mockery” for about 10 years of my life and what a mistake that was. I’d trade it for the obviously “bad” stuff any day. It’s nihilism masquerading as wit and it will harden your heart. It hardened mine. I still see it in my life, but thanks be to God He is the God of two-thousand-four-hundred-twenty-second chances!

        Liked by 9 people

        • JeanE says:

          Josh, I have tears in my eyes I am laughing so hard..I can’t tell you how much I love what you said about second chances! That was the best! God is so wonderful- I bet this made even Him laugh! St.Padre Pio made Jesus and Mary chuckle once too… I love it!

          Like

        • ann says:

          How wise your words are Josh. You’ve traveled in that stark and arid country called “intelligent mockery” and by God’s grace made it out again. I’m oh so familiar with it. Some comedy “news” shows are very popular in this family and I get a kind of spiritual heart burn now when I listen. I keep thinking of the Psalm “Lord let me not sit in the company of the insolent”–and that mocking spirit is rampant now. You’re right it does harden the heart. But it seems so clever and innocuous, right? If only others could gain the grace and wisdom you have received from God. God bless.

          Liked by 2 people

    • SanSan says:

      hopefully after what the band witnessed they will all change their tune. no pun intended.

      Liked by 2 people

    • You said it much better than I did. Thx!

      Like

    • Lake Johnson says:

      To me it’s a thin line between calling evil where you see it and “blaming the victim.” It’s often the case where we do something to bring evil upon ourselves, and in that case we are partly to blame, but that doesn’t mean we “deserve” the specific result. The people at that concert were playing with spiritual fire by being in an environment of darkness, and sometimes that darkness also results in physical violence. But of course it does not mean that they deserved to be blown up. Darkness just draws darkness which is why it is so important to avoid explicit evil and temptation because we can’t predict the result except that it will be bad. Sometimes people get blown up at church as well, so obviously there is no perfect correlations here. It’s just better to avoid darkness period.

      Liked by 1 person

      • charliej373 says:

        I think we have to look at our own culpability, too. The satan has persuaded many that he is some kind of cartoon character – so people do not take him seriously. Many of those who take such things lightly are like children playing with guns. What they do is hideously dangerous, but we have not done near as an effective job as we should have of teaching them that. So most of those killed were largely innocent. We will have to account for why we did not do a better job of teaching how dangerous, deadly and malicious the satan always is.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Beckita says:

          Amen. We share culpability at so many levels for what ails our society and Church. For example, when I hear, experience or express dismay concerning a type of abuse, I am compelled to speak truth with charity and then to pray for those involved. Dorothy gave beautiful witness to this way of response when she chose to write to her daughter’s religion teacher and first share the letter with her priest.

          Liked by 1 person

        • zeniazenia says:

          I have learned in the Scott Hahn book the Lamb’s Supper, it is the Heavenly Liturgy and our keeping the Covenant with God which binds and looses satan. Jesus spells it out clearly in the Seven Letters to the Churches in Revelation. We are called to be Witnesses (can be bloody). All those Churches perjured themselves and their lampstands were removed (although I always thought Smyrna did not). The blessings and curses of God correspond with the binding and loosing of the satan. And you Charlie have told us the Mass, the Rosary and the Chaplet of Divine Mercy are our prayers for the Storm and Rescue.- Jane Thank You

          Liked by 1 person

  15. Thanks, and I look forward to your thoughts on the matter. I see naive fecklessness as a temporary setback, but the arrogant assertions along the lines of ‘this is the good I’m going to insist on’ (even though it’s virtually devoid of truth), are deeply troubling to me.

    Like

    • YongDuk says:

      Docile on this end for sure! Things have changed much since I was overseas and that was even after 9-11 …

      Like

      • You’re right, YD. I need to be more docile too. I’ve just been running hog wild after catching a piece of the G20 with that fella spewing the usual nonsense, crinkling eyebrows petulantly, pursing lips, rolling eyes, etc. I should wait on the Lord, and I won’t have time to be deeply troubled!

        Liked by 1 person

        • YongDuk says:

          Wait, you saw me on TV where? I try to stay out of the way of any camera as it is.

          My problem: I give people the benefit of the doubt.

          Other people’s problem: They compromise.

          Love means helping your brother not too sin or be deceived.

          I don’t think I am feckless. I just expect people to be honest with themselves. And there is only so much you can do.

          Meh. (Self-reflectively said)

          I like Mother Theresa and I like what I have seen of Charlie in that ability to draw people to yourself and then to God with their smiles!

          The root of humility is self-knowledge – St Catherine of Siena

          Liked by 2 people

        • ann says:

          MIchael Patrick, I absolutely know what you mean. My solution is to pray for him every time he gets on TV because otherwise it would be an occasion of sin. I keep telling myself he is a prisoner of war, not the enemy, and I pray for his freedom, “the glorious freedom of the sons of God.” It’s a struggle. Sigh.

          Liked by 1 person

  16. Centurion_Cornelius says:

    Paris: Take note of what one woman said about the attack.

    “Miss Wilson, 49, originally from New Orleans, also told how she witnessed the gunmen deliberately targeting concert-goers in wheelchairs. The gunmen hunted down disabled people who were sat in an area specially set aside for wheelchair users.”

    http://www.captainsjournal.com/2015/11/16/the-bataclan-and-the-death-of-the-globalist-secular-utopia/

    Like

  17. Fr. Frabk says:

    Listening to lots of news. You were right, Charlie. US and Russia will inevitably be allies in this. Even secularists at NPR acknowledge it’s where Mr. Obama is headed. He just needs to find a way to save face. The Consecration of Russia was accepted by the King and Queen of Heaven.

    Thank you again for the time we had together in Baton Rouge.

    Fr. Frank Bass

    Liked by 5 people

  18. Devotee of Mary says:

    Charlie: Do you think freedom-loving people everywhere should demand more than lip service?When will leaders of the U.S. and all other sovereign countries demand that Muslims and Muslim leaders eradicate ISIS and other radical Islamist terrorist organizations? Muslim leaders can be strong when they want to be. They know the terrorists and they know where to find them. It is total hypocrisy for a few Muslims to condemn terrorist acts, like the Paris attack on Nov. 13, 2015, while going about their business and ignoring the monsters in their midst. They should be confronted until they back up their words with solid actions and provide specific examples of their progress in wiping out or imprisoning ISIS and everyone who sympathizes with them. As for us, we will keep praying for all involved.

    Like

  19. James Donovan says:

    The terrorists’ killing at the the Bataclan theatre, where fans were listening to a song by the Eagles of Death Heavy Metal Band. Here are the lyrics to that song, entitled:

    “Kiss The Devil”

    Who’ll love the devil?…
    Who’ll song his song?…
    Who will love the devil and his song?…
    I’ll love the devil!…
    I’ll sing his song!…
    I will love the devil and his song!…
    Who’ll love the devil?…
    Who’ll kiss his tongue?…
    Who will kiss the devil on his tongue?…
    I’ll love the devil!…
    I’ll kiss his tongue!…
    I will kiss the devil on his tongue!…
    Who’ll love the devil?…
    Who’ll sing his song?…
    I will love the devil and his song!…
    Who’ll love the devil?…
    Who’ll kiss his tongue?…
    I will kiss the devil on his tongue!…
    Who’ll love the devil?…
    Who’ll sing his song?…
    I WILL LOVE THE DEVIL AND SING HIS SONG!…

    This is beyond irony, although many won’t think so, that a rock band and their minions, singing a song about loving Satan is attacked by a group of immoral maniacs who believe they’re doing the work of Allah by killing anyone who they feel is an infidel. God help us all.

    Liked by 1 person

    • JeanE says:

      The kingdom of hell is divided..not surprising at all! In hell there is no love, no loyalty, nothing but hatred for God, for self, for others…how sad. More eyes that need to see! Lord have mercy, I wonder if they have any idea what they are doing? Sure sounds like it to me. I am going to offer my Rosary and Divine Mercy for them.

      Liked by 2 people

    • MarieUrsula says:

      The lyrics are beyond icky; far beyond.

      Holy Michael Archangel,
      Defend us in the day of battle;
      Be our safeguard against the wickedness and snares
      Of the devil.
      May God rebuke him,
      We humbly pray;
      And do thou, Prince of the heavenly host,
      By the power of God,
      Thrust down to hell satan
      And all wicked spirits,
      Who wander through the world
      For the ruin of souls.
      Amen

      (From The Catholic’s Manual, 1906)

      Liked by 7 people

  20. Gwenyth says:

    The devil was already in that theatre. Praying for them all

    Liked by 1 person

  21. vkmir3 says:

    I am really struggling with the news that 10,000 Syria refugees have arrived in, I believe, New Orleans without clear information of the means used to be clear exactly the status of the refugees that have arrived, whether they are actually families that need help or whether they are men who were sent here to infiltrate and destroy. I have seen one too many video reports of what is taking place in various European communities where Muslim refugees are demanding complaining about their accommodations, bullying and attacking the citizens in those communities to the point where the police refuse to intervene and the citizens that once welcomed them to their countries are now frightened for their safety. How is God calling us to be in this situation? Why didn’t we bring the persecuted Christians here as refugees when the persecutions began that are now living in refugee camps/tents in the Middle East? So many questions. I am praying for guidance and trusting in God, trying to taking the next right step as the area where I live in is show as one of the places where refugees are to be sent. I know Jesus asks us to welcome the stranger. Anyone else having these same struggles? God bless all here!

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      I don’t have solid answers, Vkmir – but you are definitely asking the right questions. That, my friend, is the beginning of wisdom.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Kathleen from NJ says:

        Hi – I don’t know if this will help, but during my prayers with the Lord this morning I spoke to Him about the refugee situation. I pretty much told Him Jesus I don’t want those people here. And the Lord presented me with the thought that even He welcome Judas as one of His followers. Fully knowing who Judas was. Hmmmm.
        Like I said – I don’t know if this will help, but it certainly calmed me down and put the Lord front and center in my thoughts once again.

        Liked by 6 people

        • N W says:

          My thoughts: As the Holy Roman Catholic Church suffers with the betrayers (Judases) in their midst, I expect the domestic church will suffer in the same way…family members and those we may try to help, may turn against us. It is better to die doing good to others, than to die hiding our Light under the fear of being killed while doing good to others. From the blood of the martyrs springs conversions .
          Acknowledge God (pray to do His will), take the next right step, and be a sign of Hope to those around us….never fearing death. Pray for prudence in who to help while protecting ourselves and others against evil.

          Liked by 4 people

          • marcyc48 says:

            It is mind boggeling that the President became visibly upset when a reporter asked why we couldn’t bring the Christian refugrees here instead of the refugees who might have an affiliation with ISIS! This gentleman’s opinion was that terrorists would not be among the Christians from refugee camps. “That’s discriminatory and oir nation was not built on principles like that!”, Obama said.
            I recall a Dominicam nun from Iraq, who was denied the opportunity to obtain a temporay visa to the USA. She was to speak before Congress about the pIght of Iraqi Christians. The State Department basically said she was a liar. They believe she would not return to Iraq, but rather she would stay here illegally!
            My state, Ohio, is among many who are refusing to take the Syrian refugees. I heard they will not have a choice in the matter. Dearborn, Michigan, about 60 miles from where l live, is well knowm for it’s Middle Eastern population and is # 2 on the governments list for kmown terrorists. Near by Hamtramick, a city settled by Polish immigrants in the 1890s, just elected a city council made up entirely of people from the Middle Eastern. Many are afraid.
            For much too long our elected officials have sat back and done nothing , despite putting new people in office and this is madness! Even worst, is the fact that we LET them! Now it may be too late.
            Maybe this is all part of God’s plan, His permissive will. We must get down on our prayer bones (knees), take up our weapons (rosarys), read our Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth (Bìble) and trust that our loving Father in heaven will make all things work together for those who love God, and are called according to His purpose (Romans8:28).
            God bless you Charlie for all that you do to help us on our journey through the Stòrm.

            Liked by 4 people

      • Mick says:

        Charlie, in your article on Islam, is there a chance that you’ll b addressing the issue presented in the following article?

        http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/patrick-goodenough/syrian-christians-are-greatest-peril-least-likely-be-admitted

        When Syrian Christians are afraid to go to the refugee camps run by the UN, because they suffer violence and persecution from many of the Muslim refugees in those camps, it makes one wonder how it makes any kind of sense to be resettling Muslim refugees (and some who may be terrorists rather than refugees, as happened in Paris) in a country like the US. I mean, if parents have a duty to protect their children from threats from unjust aggressors, and if a government has a duty to protect its citizens from threats from unjust aggressors, and if the Muslim world is producing a huge proportion of the world’s unjust aggressors, then….

        Am I missing something?

        I want to do my Christian duty. And I see that (at least, as the media are reporting it, so who knows?) the Holy Father has called upon the West to help the migrants even though there may be Muslim terrorists among them (please correct me if I’ve gotten that wrong). But at what point do we have a duty to say, “I’m not OK with allowing that danger into my house/state/country”? It’s one thing for Jesus to allow Judas into his inner circle, because Jesus knew that Judas’ betrayal would really only endanger Him and no one else. But when we know that a particular group of people may contain individuals who pose a very real and severe threat to our country and our families, how do we reconcile our duties toward our families with our duties toward that group?

        Can you help me out? I’m really struggling here.

        Liked by 5 people

    • NancyA says:

      for the little it is worth.. I do not believe that 10,000 Syrians are suddenly in New Orleans. I think that is an urban myth type of report. The governor of LA says he will not accept them. They can’t “slip” 10,000 people in. How would they have been transported? Where ARE they? It makes no logical sense to me in the way that it is reported. I think (but may be wrong) that the number TOTAL that Obama’s admin has said will be accepted is 10,000. I have not delved deeply into it, because I don’t need to… just adding this for others to ponder.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Tarja says:

      God bless you, too!

      I’m sorry but I have to say this was too simple interpretation of this problem we are talking about. I really know something of “them” because my son-in-law works with refugees. It’s true that there are a lot of young men amongst of refugees, but WHY? Because they did not want to die in their country’s army or be taken by force to some grazy militant group. Some of them come ahead to seek a a safe place for their families who could not travel.

      It’s dangerous to simplify that all young men are some kind of terrorists. They have their faults – and quarrels of money and so on – in those centers BUT we would not be much better in those circumstances. And they don’t for example drink a lot as Finnish men do !!!

      My son-in-law and his friends are going to organize a tea party for those refugees (men) on next Thursday. With cakes… And they are going to chat and get acquainted with them as normal human beings. And I wholeheartedly pray for them a very nice evening together…

      Sorry if I was rude, but we Finns use to speak out if necessary. There is too much hatred already towards innocent people. We Christians are not alike, Muslims either.

      Maybe my post don’t get much likes….

      Liked by 11 people

      • the phoenix says:

        Hi Tarja,
        I like your post, and will join you in praying for your son-in-law, his friends, and the refugees, that their meeting next Thursday lead to peace.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Julia says:

        Tarja, I like your post.

        Thank you for sharing a very good Christian philosophy, which we are all required to hold and practice.

        I think our concerns are because we all wonder what we would do if we were confronted by people of a faith that has an historical intolerance for anyone who does not convert to their belief system. Christians have to pay a ‘fine’ to exist in muslim countries.

        Their war cry was famous. “Death to the infidel,” and we are to them the infidel.

        Never forget we enjoy muslim friendship while we are the majority, once their numbers rise, our existence will be a thorn in their side until they wipe us out like the Christians in the Middle East. Make no mistake on this reality.

        I believe it will be through the Triumph of the Immaculate Heart of Mary that this present crisis will be resolved. In the meantime it is God’s will that we show mercy, compassion and tolerance to those who can’t live in peace with each other and certainly would not be able to sustain civil, peaceful coexistence with Christians, Jews or any other belief system.

        Our guaranteed dignity and strength is in Trusting Jesus and His Commandment to love our neighbour as ourselves. Christ will sort out the problem when the time is right, I believe. Of course if someone muslim or otherwise tries to kill us, we would be entitled to defend ourselves. Not all muslims are running around with knives or guns. Thank God.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Tarja says:

          Thanks for your friendly answers! I am relieved that some of you understood my thoughts and feelings. Refugees just are a part of our every day life here in Finland nowadays: 50 refugees, 20 of them children, came to our little town last Friday, and they were exchausted and cold, they had travelled through many countries, walked carrying children and so on. They live in a hotel, and already some townspeople here complain and talk hate speech. But others, THANK GOD, are going to collect winter clothes for them because it’s snowing here and they don’t have enough warm clothes… It’s amazing how this all divide people!

          I thank for your prayers, too! They are needed, because my son-in-law told there are already tensions at the center…. Could it be otherwise… I rememberd this verse, it fits so well with the time we are living now.

          Luke 12:51 Do you think I came to bring peace on earth? No, I tell you, but division.

          Many of the refugees ARE those peaceloving Muslims, and they want even to help authorities to find dangerous persons amongst them. After this massacre in Paris some refugees here in Finland announced publicly that they are going to help police. And they honestly told that there are terrorists among them travelling on those same routes to Europe. These decent people only want to integrate and live in peace with their family here in Finland. They fear now that public opinion is going to change against them totally. But that will not happen: for example our police commissioner said that police has zero tolerance with racism here in Finland. I’m so proud of them! Heart and reason, that is the answer….

          Liked by 2 people

      • audiemarie2014 says:

        Tarja, I am smiling because I have a friend who is a Finn and he speaks his mind as you do. I appreciate that. Thank you!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Beckita says:

        Praying with you, Tarja. Thank you for your witness.

        Liked by 1 person

      • ann says:

        Tarja thank you for giving us the voice of Christ in this situation. I heard an old priest once say “whatever the question, love is the answer” and I think that is how we proceed until we can’t any more. You’ve helped to give me an “attitude adjustment” and I thank you. God bless.

        Liked by 1 person

  22. Donette says:

    Charlie, You are not the first person who allegedly was told that the Muslims will convert sometime in the future. And we are not the only nation who has been told that Islam is a peaceful religion. I suppose with time, we will know God’s Will for the Muslims, but ” the peaceful religion” label just doesn’t fit if one truly studies its history. Therefore, I do hope if you plan on saying anything on that subject, it will not be said in the platitudes that we hear today as is spoken by politicians and those who know nothing.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Donette, I have said on this site many times that most Muslims seek God in the only way they have ever been taught, but that Islam, itself, is a satanic deception. Do me the favor of not warning me away from spouting empty platitudes until I actually spout an empty platitude.

      Liked by 9 people

    • marcyc48 says:

      Father Mitch Pacwa wrote an excellent article in 2014 that includes the history if Islam .It is called “Christianity & Islam: Are We At War”. If you google the name of the article, it will take you to it.
      I don’t think you can go wrong with anything Fr. Pacwa has written. He has studied in the Middle East and speaks 12 languages fluently, one of which is Arabic.

      Liked by 2 people

  23. Laurie says:

    Is the film “Sergeant York” a good example of the “Quo Vadis” principle?

    Like

  24. Patrick of South Dakota says:

    Hi Charlie and everyone!

    Here is a very appropriate link about OUR LADY of TEPEYAC, Mother of Conversion, from the Catholic Register:

    “After Nearly 500 Years, Our Lady of Guadalupe Reveals Her Secrets Again”

    Read more:
    http://www.ncregister.com/daily-news/after-nearly-500-years-our-lady-of-guadalupe-reveals-her-secrets-again/#ixzz3rgngg86h

    God bless you all, every one.
    Patrick

    Liked by 4 people

  25. What I’m about to say might be completely off-the-mark, or even factually incorrect, and it might offend many. But I still feel I must point this out.

    In a crowd of 1,500 people, there apparently wasn’t a single man there willing to rush these few shooters?

    Those who would attend a “death metal” concert are clearly in need of great conversion; and if there’s one thing those in need of conversion do not want, it is to die. No one who lacks a clear conscience can really face death with courage.

    I am nearly certain that if these shooters tried to attack worshipers at a Catholic Mass — or at any service at a God-fearing church — they would be rushed by a large portion of the able-bodied men in attendance.

    So I say this first of all to the world: let this be a sign of the cowardliness of those who revere the devil instead of God. And let that cowardliness be a sign of the errancy of their ways and the errancy of their beliefs.

    I say this also to my fellow Christian men: If you are at a packed event and shooters show up and start killing; know that they are not their to take prisoners or to negotiate. They are there to kill. Say, with all your heart, “Jesus, I trust in You. Thy Will be done,” then rush those poor souls as you counter their “Allahu Akbar” with your “LONG LIVE CHRIST THE KING!!” Let the holy example of the Maccabees in the next first readings at Mass the next few days be your inspiration.

    Liked by 10 people

    • Beckita says:

      WOW, Daniel. Amen.

      Liked by 2 people

    • JeanE says:

      Amen to that Daniel. I’m a Grandma and I would run over and push the nearest gunman down and at least sit on him until someone helped. I’m getting a bit crippled up here but I know I would do it again because I’ve done it before to a man beating up on a pregnant woman. He was going after her with a broken beer bottle to cut her up- so he was screaming and when I heard and saw what was happening I said a prayer, called 911 and went after him and it stopped him long enough for the police to finish the job. God gives courage in the strangest ways and I might add…to the strangest people! 🙂

      Liked by 7 people

      • Kim sevier says:

        I was having lunch with 3 girlfriends today. We discussed the attack at the concert. Hard to know what one would do in such a situation. I could see me frozen in shock, but who knows? I pray I would take the NRS! However, as a mom, if someone came after my children/grandchildren I am sure my momma bear instinct would kick in to high gear.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Josh in IN says:

      You have no idea what transpired there or what was going on in the hearts of those present to justify your judgement of their consciences or their courage.

      Here’s a reminder: the people giving and attending the concert were the victims. You (and others here) can judge them for their taste in music, make assumptions about the band (which you can’t even be bothered to research a little), and separate the sheep from the goats in your head, but these people are victims of agents of Satan. I’m sure some were probably cowards, but it’s likely some were not. Some were probably in need of conversion, but it’s likely some probably weren’t.

      (PS. I’m not justifying the band, but people are making assumptions that are ignorant of the facts and flow from prejudice, not reason.)

      Like

      • I’m just trying to use this as a teaching moment, Josh. Obviously I don’t know what actually transpired (I think I acknowledged that in my comment). Reality is always more finessed than our analysis of it can possibly arrive at; that should not stop us from looking to it for lessons.

        Liked by 5 people

        • (And if I have passed judgment on anyone in particular; forgive me, for it was not my intention. But sometimes we do need to take an objective look at *situations* and judge them.)

          Liked by 3 people

          • Julia says:

            @Daniel. Your observations are noble, Christian and first class. But when you think of it, it is all down to our nature. Some will be Flight mode, some will be Fight mode and some will Freeze. That is life I believe, and the way we are made.

            I do agree with you, and have for a long time come to believe that if we cultivate Faith, God fills with a natural courage the place in our hearts that fear tries to dwell. And that could produce honourable selfless bravery without self preservation mode kicking in.

            I heard one story about that slaughter in Paris which I believe is more relevant than any posted on this thread.
            A friend of a friend has a daughter studying medicine in Paris at the moment. She normally goes to that restaurant of a Friday evening with friends, where people were also killed. She was so upset because she could not go last Friday as a result of twisting her ankle and had to rest for a few days. That young women would have been there but for the Grace of God. And how often do we hear that someone was saved by circumstances I put down to our Guardian Angels. We used to be told as children our Guardian Angel will inspire us to exit by a window if necessary, should trouble be about to enter through our doors. So devotion to Guardian Angels is a very handy way to survive these times.

            Liked by 10 people

          • Well, as someone who was in the wrong place at the wrong time once upon a time I can speak from experience on this. I witnessed a mass shooting that took place in a restaurant some 20 odd years ago. 23 killed, 27 wounded. Oh God, how do I convey what happens to you at that moment and what it does to you later? Heroic action at a time like that requires one of two things: either training ( in which case you react on auto-pilot) or an extraordinary grace. I tried so hard to remember how to pray the Divine Mercy chaplet but couldn’t. I was in a state of shock. With each gunshot I could only say the word “Mercy” as a plea for each soul. At work about a week later my co-workers commented that seeing such a thing would affect you forever. I piped up, with arrogant bravado, “It didn’t affect me.” Instantly, everyone burst into laughter. My supervisor gave me the most compassionate look and said gently “Yes it did. It did. Maybe you can’t tell but we can. You have been a zombie for a week.” How many times I beat myself up for not doing something heroic. But what? Even now I can’t figure out what that would have been. My brother, who survived a terrible tour in Viet Nam, looked at me knowingly one day and muttered “Ah, yes. Survivor guilt. How well I know”. And even though I know it is irrational, I still feel that way. Some things, Daniel, are beyond the control of iron will and rational thought. Having said all of this, I don’t disagree with you in principle. But in order for people to react well at a time like that they must prepare their minds ahead of time, train themselves ahead of time. That is what Charlie is doing here for us. Some advice to all: (1) get in a state of grace and stay there; (2) Read Luke 13: 1-5 and (3) everywhere you go, scope out all the exits and sit near them. You are not going to be a mere spectator to the Storm.

            Liked by 13 people

          • charliej373 says:

            God bless you, Singing. I would imagine you still watch for exits wherever you are. I know I unconsciously look for cover wherever I drive – a holdover from my walking days. What a searing episode to be imprinted on you.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Petra says:

            Singingflowers: Wow. I can’t even imagine.
            On 9/11 at about 8 am Central Time I was on a plane waiting to take off from O’Hare in Chicago when word came we were going back to the gate. I asked the flight attendant why, and he said, “because of what happened in New York.” He ignored my question, “What happened in New York?” and kept walking toward the back of the plane.

            After 9/11 (I worked in a tall office building at the time) I walked around the floor looking carefully at every exit, and I bought something called an EvacU8 hood, that covers your entire head and gives you 15 to 20 minutes of breathable air in case of smoke. I carried this thing in my computer bag so I had it with me at all times. I also looked for hiding places in the office, and at cabinets and file rooms to figure out where I might squeeze in and not be seen. One time during a drill we were told if the alarm sounded we should wait at our desks for instructions, and I thought, “Like hell I will.” I knew I would immediately grab my mask and my gym shoes, and start down the stairs.

            Because at the time I was traveling weekly by airplane with my job, I would try to sit near an exit row, but if I couldn’t I would always count the number of seats to the exit. I would look to see if there was an exit behind me that was closer. I had my EvacU8 in my computer bag.

            With a situation as you describe, I can imagine you never forget to note where the exit is or to sit in a place that is more defensible than another. Too often we relax and are not thinking at all about those things. I’m sorry in your life you had to go through such a horrendous trauma. I pray God will lessen the aftereffects you may carry with you.
            God bless.

            Liked by 4 people

          • God bless you, singingflowers! Remember that prayer is the greatest Work of Mercy — and simply asking God for “Mercy,” as you did, is among the best prayers. I am sure you did your part well during that horrible event; likely far more so than most in attendance!

            Liked by 4 people

          • Beckita says:

            Thank you, Singingflowers for sharing this wisdom from experience. I’m also grateful to you, Daniel, for the initial and succeding posts and to all who commented in this discussion. So much to ponder in all that has been said. It seems each setting and situation will require its own demand for response and I’m aware my mental skill set in this area is quite empty. I, too, look forward to what you are preparing next, Charlie.

            Like

        • Josh in IN says:

          I agree that there are lessons there. Definitely. I appreciated the rest of your comment (should have said so–my apologies). I pray that I will be courageous like you describe in a shooter situation. I’ve lacked courage in many ways and I’ve never faced a real-deal attacker, but with God’s help there’s a first time for everything and I hope I’ll be brave!

          Liked by 3 people

      • audiemarie2014 says:

        Josh, I get what you are saying too. I don’t know how I would (will) react to a similar scene. I hope I have courage to do the right thing.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Bob says:

          As for taking action, the above comment that some run, some freeze and some fight is well taken. My karate instructor used to say that we need to mentally consider what we would do in similar situations, by considering in our mind and perhaps practicing some defense actions, in case of need. Our class had these discussions after 9/11 and considered how we would act if we had been on one of the planes. We must think and practice and ask God for the grace if we ever need it lest we run or freeze and cower when we should act.

          Liked by 3 people

      • Julia says:

        @Josh in IN. I agree it is not fair to make assumptions about the attendees of that concert in Paris.
        For a start the shooting was totally unexpected. In fact I believe some thought it was a stunt at the concert, and only realised after some shooting that it was some sort of attack. It would make sense to hear people there, men or women did not have time to think. After all they were out for the evening and many may have had a drink or two. How sharp would that make anyone.

        I do however feel you need to be more open to the reality of what this type of concert is offering. It is nonsense to say they were having innocent fun. Someone printed the words of the song that was on when the shooting started, so please give us a break. That was pure evil.
        I also read there were people in the audience giving that salute I have come to know as the satanic salute with the two finger horns effect.
        You do know that the band on stage scenario in the blackened room filled with doting attendees is known as a soft version of satanic worship. But many music lovers don’t even realise what they are doing when they attend.
        Even you must realise some of those who died will more than likely not have been in a state of Grace, some probably in mortal sin. So you can be assured some will have kissed the devils bum by the time the shooting finished, and will rot in hell forever. God willing some will have been saved by the Mercy of Jesus, and one day reach Heaven.
        The minute I realised what was happening, I turned off TV and Internet and said a Divine Mercy Chaplet, asking Jesus to save the souls of those who perished. Please God they will all be saved; but we have to be realistic.

        Some of us have been round the block, made out mistakes and lived to regret and repent. We have to accept some of those at that concert were not going to be saved, and they went out having a good time. Is that not how the devil wants it for us all.

        Like

        • Josh in IN says:

          Julia, you read too much into what I wrote. I never said they were having “innocent fun” and I did not deny “some of those at that concert were not going to be saved.” That band sounds terrible and I don’t defend them. My point was that it is presumptuous to make judgments about the concert goers, whether it’s that they’re “cowards,” that they “revere the devil,” or, per your response, that some “were not going to be saved, and they went out having a good time.” It’s presumptuous not because such judgments about particular people are correct or incorrect, but because it is not given to us to make them. And it’s especially distasteful when we’re talking about victims of such a horrible, demonic crime only days after the fact. What does this talk of the victims gain us? Nothing. It gains us nothing.

          Even if they were actually at real “death metal” concert (which they weren’t) and we knew 100% of the audience did “revere the devil” (my guess is that the great majority probably didn’t actually believe in the devil), what good would it do villianize them? The only result is the soft suggestion that they deserved what happened to them, which is absurd. To borrow a phrase, to not villianize does not imply consent.

          Regarding the band, I know it doesn’t make sense to say they don’t worship Satan given the lyrics posted and the pics of them on the Internet. But people, especially “hip” pop-culture people often intentionally say things they don’t think are true. It would be like if a band dressed up as monks and nuns, sang about bleeding statues of Mary, made all sorts of off color jokes about morality, etc. as part of a “Catholic shtick.” It would be terrible and offensive, but it wouldn’t be Catholic. We wouldn’t say, “wow, those people are weird Catholics.” So too with this band. What they’re doing is bad but we have an obligation to talk about these things (if we choose to do so at all) as they actually are, as the “artist” (I use that term very loosely) intends them. I won’t say anymore about the band. It is what it is.

          You were right to commend them to God. It would be great if everyone in the world had that instinct.

          Like

    • YongDuk says:

      As one who offends regularly (lol), know that I am not offended in the least!

      Adam should have rushed the “bullets” to save Eve long ago. He didn’t. But…

      Felix Culpa

      …Christ did and so I rejoice if you, My Judge is God, have the Fortitude and maybe we will see the Times, that St Louis de Montfort spoke, of the Great Martyrs once again. And help each other.

      We speak to give our hearts, but we often renege. Would be great to serve in that way. I rejoice at the fruits. And the Joy in Heaven.

      Let us leave our comfortable abodes for the sake of each other to live out Heb 3:13.

      .
      .
      .

      I knew a Carmelite who desired to die a Martyr in Rwanda where she was serving Orphans and could have easily She was ordered to leave under obedience. A true mystic she never lived on Earth after that, heart-broken, she knew her calling and served til God called her.

      She mentioned that St Maria Goretti got her through that experience and somehow I had a first class relic of hers in my pocket. I gave it to her–not saying this to boast, but to show God’s Providential Care that swaddles Innocency–so that she could rejoice in the hope of God’s reward for her service despite her having to leave.

      Not sure where I am going with this but to say God is Good, be courageous, but if don’t die a Martyr, God sees your intention.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Jim M. says:

      Daniel,

      We don’t know whether there was such a man or were such men that tried to intervene. The only witnesses to that would likely be among the dead, with the rest fleeing in sheer panic.

      Grenades and automatic weapons, machine guns. The police use flash bang grenades to disorient subjects during raids. And they work wonderfully. For time enough to subdue their targets. Throw in the added carnage of a real grenade, where blood and flesh fill the air.

      The shooters were strategically positioned to create an optimal killing field. Positioned so as not to shoot each other. The terrorists knew what they were doing.

      To face and run into that kind of slaughter requires a LOT of training. Soldiers go through drills like this, with explosions and gunfure simulating mayhem. Over and over again, until the natural human flight response is honed into a fight response.

      Still, when a situation comes up in the real world, some freeze, others balk and others flee. It in difficult to describe just how fast things move. So fast, that one extremely well trained sees time slow down. Reactions need to be reigned in by split second thoughts and decisions. The one thing you never prepare for in training is the smell. I’m not talking about gunpowder and smoke. I’m speaking of the smell of blood, of vomit, bile and excrement. The smell of death. A close second is the sight of another human being being killed before your eyes.

      Even some hardened combat vets reach a point where the accumulated experiences cause them to break.

      It is easy to Monday morning quarterback, and to speculate on why people did nit respond as one in the safety of thier comfortable home posits how they would have acted or what heroic deeds they would have done. There is no glory in war.

      If you have the stout heart that would allow you to break free of natural human flight response and the presence of mind to rush an attacker that you have mere fractions if a second to locate, identify assess and respond, I commend you from the bottom if my heart.

      I beg you, though, do not judge others without all the facts. People were slaughtered, and we know not and probably will never know who among them answered the call. Until you experience the mayhem in the crucible of death, you will never know for certain how you would react.

      God bless you Daniel! I do believe your faith would drive you toward a mortal threat. It is the fear component you’ll never know. Peter vowed he’d never abandon Christ, yet denied Him thrice when put to the test. We are all human.

      Liked by 12 people

    • Gwenyth says:

      I think that it would be difficult to tackle a terrorist with a automatic weapon in a dark crowded room. The band was still playing when the first shots were fired. It would have been chaos.

      I used to go to a lot of concerts. Rock concerts mostly. Even before my reversion, their was a voice in the back of my mind telling me that it was strange to make idols of people and to scream for them. The atmosphere always seemed off. The devil was already in that concert hall, just based on the lyrics alone.

      However, I cannot judge the victims or the survivors. I pray for them and us all.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Petra says:

      Daniel: What you have said reminds me so much of the way people reacted after 9/11, when they resolved to take action if anything strange happened on a plane, or in any large gathering. But I expect even that has faded in many people given the amount of time that has passed. We all relax into a sort of “normal” that doesn’t expect violence as we go about our lives, and so don’t mentally prepare for it. And I expect young people at a night club or in a theater or even on a college campus (except because there have been such happenings maybe they think more about how to intervene or protect themselves) are relaxed and do not expect a violent deadly occurrence. I think of how casually I go about my business in a grocery store or in a shopping mall. Would I react with determination if I heard shooting, or would I be confused and duck for cover or look for an exit because of the shock of it all?
      I guess we should all allow ourselves to think about these dangerous scenarios, and hopefully save as many people as we can given where we are and what is happening.
      With regards to the those in that circumstance last Friday, there but for the grace of God go I.
      God bless.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Barbara Dore says:

    I said a chaplet of “Jesus, Mary, I love you , save souls.” for those hostages and I asked Jesus to touch these heads with his Holy Thirst. I reminded him of his holy thirst for souls! when he was crucifixed on the cross… I hope they are saved! I think I said it before they got killed…

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Barbara Dore says:

    Servant of God Sr Consolata Betrone -Victim Soul – Mystics …
    http://www.mysticsofthechurch.com/…/servant-of-god-sr-consolata-betrone.ht...
    Feb 14, 2010 – It says- ‘Jesus and Mary, I love You. Save souls.’ It is very simple, but oh it carries a lot of weight.” -Mother M Angelica of EWTN Birth and early …

    Consolata Betrone – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Consolata_Betrone
    The messages asked the recitation of “Jesus, Mary and Joseph, I love you! Save Souls!”, an ejaculate prayer which Betrone says to release a soul from …
    Sr. Maria Consolata Betrone – “Jesus, Mary, I love You, Save …

    http://www.medjugorje.ws/…/maria-consolata-betrone-jesus-mary-love-save-so...
    May 5, 2006 – One such inspiration was given to the Servant of God Sr. Maria Consolata Betrone (1903-1946, Italy) after reading St. Therese of Lisieux’s Story of a Soul. … Offer an unceasing act of love from the heart: Jesus, Mary I love You, Save Souls! … He invited Consolata to intensify the …

    Liked by 4 people

  28. Patrick of South Dakota says:

    Hey Daniel,

    The seeming complacency of the victims bothers me too, but we see it so often. We are cowards at heart, I suppose. It may be indicative of the mentality of the French people, or humans in general. Guns are illegal there, and even most French cops don’t carry a Peacemaker.

    After the Virginia Tech shooting, I was sitting in a lecture hall with my two friends and we agreed to rush a shooter, hoping at least one of us would be able to stop the attack. It’s easy to talk a big game though, so if something terrible actually unfolds, just how courageous would any one of us truly be? (The kind of question that can’t be answered from an easy chair).

    Our university had a “Gun Free Zone” policy, but I assured my two friends that if I needed a weapon, one would magically appear in my hand.

    Be prepared. Be vigilant. Pray that we will never need to use deadly force to protect the innocents.

    Patrick

    P.S. I don’t know if “cowardly” is the right word to describe these Jihadists: they knowingly go into a situation were they will most certainly die. It is a twisted mindset to us, indeed, but there is a sick element of bravery in their warped and heinous actions. They bravely serve the devil into the gates of Hell.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Doug says:

    I look forward to the piece.

    Like

  30. Dear Friends,

    Instead of adding to the debate above (the comment indents are getting a bit confusing), please permit me to simply start again! For as usual, I eagerly jumped into commenting without sufficient reflection first to ensure I worded my point prudently and precisely.

    I am most definitely NOT imputing guilt, cowardice, or whatever else, to any individual person at that concert. Above all I am NOT saying that if I were there, I’d be some hero. I do not think I am particularly brave, in fact. (Pray for me.) Additionally I am DEFINITELY not saying that those concert-goers somehow “got what they deserve.” What a horrible thing that would be to say! God forgive me if I gave that impression.

    But what I am doing is simply looking at a situation from the objective, known facts, and trying to figure out what Godly lessons can be taken from it: for ourselves, and for the world. Of course I do not know all the gory details, nor do I care to know or discuss them. I do know that the police did not arrive with their own guns and flashbangs for almost three hours, and that in that time, 89 people were shot and killed out of a group of 1,500, and that the mere three gunmen apparently were not attacked by anyone in attendance.

    We all do make these analyses all the time. Allow me to give some examples. (One commenter — whom I much admire, by the way! — said “I beg you, do not judge others until you know all the facts.” To that I respond: “Goodness no! We can NEVER judge others, no matter how many facts we have! That is why there’s a Judgment Day. But — and even before we have all the facts, because we can never have all the facts — sometimes we do need to look at what transpired in a situation and ask ourselves honestly why/how it happened, based on what we know… and see if there are any lessons we can draw from it”) So, the examples:

    — When we see the utter discord and hatred among and between Planned Parenthood employees, don’t we all rightly point out that, since they are so closely involved in grave evil (even if they’re just receptionists), that evil is almost guaranteed to have an effect on their demeanors?
    —When a new video surfaces of gay pride activists harassing Christians giving peaceful witness, are we not all quick to point out that living and promoting perversion (homosexuality) inevitably robs one even of the ability to practice simple charity?
    —When Obama’s plans fall flat are we not all quick to point out that a president who is so incredibly anti-Christian, anti-God, anti-Justice, and anti-Truth inevitably is only going to reap failure after failure?
    —When videos surface of Planned Parenthood selling baby’s body parts, are we not all quick to point out that the deadening of their consciences in murdering babies makes them very open and willing to also selling these babies’ body parts?

    So what is wrong about me pointing out that being a follower of “death metal” probably means you have issues of conscience that need to be dealt with, and said issues will place in your heart a fear of death — a fear of death that would automatically prevent you from rushing a gunman? That is all I’m doing; and I’m looking at what transpired last week because it seems to demonstrate that.

    I know I am treading on thin ice here; for I do not want to pretend I would be better, and I do not want to judge any individual. But I think we lose much by refusing to point out the obvious. I for one am very grateful for Michael Brown’s top article on SpiritDaily.com right now!

    Anyway, I do appreciate the criticism, for it is at least a reminder to me that I need to be more careful. God’s blessings to all of you!

    In Christ, through Mary,
    Daniel

    Liked by 3 people

    • Actually, I’ll grant one more concession :-). I shouldn’t be implying that the scenario played out as it did definitely due to the lack of clear consciences… I should’ve just pointed out that’s one very possible (if not probable) explanation.

      Like

    • SanSan says:

      I believe that when our consciences are well formed, we learn who to hang out with, Whom to look up to. We stop going to questionable concerts, stop watching TV, stop looking at tabloid magazines, and stop our immoral behaviors. We start behaving as Jesus would.

      Like

  31. Mack says:

    I’m looking forward to your piece on Islam. All that’s been happening with ISIS has made me realize how necessary the Crusades were. Before I felt like we had to apologize for them, but no more. I fully agree that Islam is a satanic deception. As the Church father Tertullian said, satan plagiarizes the sacraments, and everything else that is holy. Only the satan could come up with the abominations we have been seeing from ISIS. All of this has gotten worse this year, after Charlie said he had seen the vision of the devils coming out of hell. I pray for the day when they will be shut back up in the abyss.We are in the novena to Christ the King, our hope and our Victor King.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Phillip Frank says:

    “And what about the eighteen people who died when the tower in Siloam fell on them? Were they the worst sinners in Jerusalem?I tell you, no! But unless you repent, you too will all perish.”
    Remember this scripture passage before passing judgement on anyone who dies.
    Jesus Himself called out this error to the people to help them remove the plank in their eyes and see inward towards their own errors to avoid the “eternal” death awaiting all who do not repent from personal sin.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Bob says:

      And on 9/11 I prayed asking God what He would be saying about 9/11 and i opened my Bible and it came to this passage. And i never before had regularly studied that passage, and I was taken back with “Wow, God I guess you are saying we need to repent!”.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yes Phillip, that verse came to my mind right away as well. But it’s important for us to realize, Jesus did NOT respond to that by saying “You judgmental fools! How dare you consider a physical disaster to be a Chastisement! How dare you imply that there could have been one morsel of guilt in those 18 people who died!”

      Rather, the Lord’s response was the absolute opposite. He pointed out that, indeed, sin reaps its harvest. And, in light of disaster befalling others, we should carefully examine our own consciences to be sure we have no part whatsoever in evil. That is what I always do when I see or hear of disaster befalling people who clearly were not ready to die: I try to redouble my own efforts to make sure I am prepared to die. For example (and please believe me that I have no judgement whatsoever on this man’s soul. I hope and pray he accepted the Divine Mercy in his final moments.), I look to this video as an example of a man who faced sudden, unexpected death, and was totally unprepared. It motivates me to seek detachment from the world and a desire for the next life. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLW0jKKRXMo (I hope that doesn’t embed the video in the comments. I only want to link to it.)

      (By the way, I’m not disagreeing with you — just expounding)

      Liked by 1 person

      • jlynnbyrd says:

        Daniel, that video clip is so sad in many ways. I have studied under Anthony Robbins and he was working a convention and filming in Hawaii on 9-11. His video, which was part of our curriculum, from that day is a great story of forgiveness between warring cultures. It is long, but well worth watching. https://youtu.be/o9Hmr7-c5dk

        Like

      • SanSan says:

        Excellent Daniel. When the “unknown” strikes–be prepared. Redouble our efforts to be in a state of grace. Jesus always taught for us to be ready. Don’t be asleep. Wake up. I don’t fear death–I trust in Our Lord with all my heart, all of my mind, with all of my energy. I try to live under the mantle of Our Blessed Mother. I try to take the NRS. I try to be a sign of HOPE to others. He gives me peace in my heart. I am a repentant sinner.

        Like

      • SanSan says:

        Oh gosh Daniel. I have never listened to the 911 calls on 9-11. So very distresing to hear these poor souls. I pray that I may have the courage when needed. I recall how the adrenilin in our bodies hits and it really throws you for a loop–Dear Lord, help me to perserver so I can help those around me.

        Like

  33. Anne says:

    Just saw denver is under blizzard warning……. Good writing weather Charlie!!

    Like

  34. June1 says:

    Just something interesting about Jesse Hughes, lead singer of Eagles of Death Metal… he’s an “Independent Catholic bishop,” whatever that means…

    http://calgaryherald.com/entertainment/music/jesse-hughes-gives-the-devil-and-his-lord-their-dues-with-eagles-of-death-metal

    I was shocked when I first read this article back in September (I found it because I was looking something up about the band, Queens of the Stone Age, led by Josh Homme, who plays with Jesse Hughes. I’m technically a fan of QOTSA but as I grow deeper in my faith, I’ve started pulling away from music and influences like theirs; it just does nothing for your spiritual life but plant sinful thoughts into your head) but it did give me hope that maybe a spark has been ignited in Jesse’s soul and he will find his way–truly find his way–to the Lord, especially during/after the storm. Please pray for this band and all celebrities who are enveloped by sin and evil.

    Liked by 1 person

  35. Phillip Frank says:

    Yes Daniel, death is always a time for the living to contemplate their own end.
    I see it at funerals, especially if a young person is taken before their time.
    But we are all taken before our time as death was never ment to be for us humans but entered through the jealousy of the devil. So death is a consequence of evil, both from the Satans efforts and our own cooperation with evil which the saints say causes us to ” deserve” punishment.
    I too hope and pray to not be ” put to the test”. I was in a situation similar to those in the concert hall, and if I had a gun, I would have murdered those gunmen in an instant, but not out of justice, but out of feeble, frantic fear for my life….not very heroic! It made me think hard on who I was and if becoming like them to defeat them is a ” Christian” ideal, at least for me.
    In the fight of flight reflex, I’m an attack monster, but being ferocious is my “natural” response not a supernatural one.
    So I gave it over to God and asked Him not to place me in such a situation because I WILL kill or be killed. But His will be done.
    If I am ever needed, He knows I will be there.

    Like

    • Mick says:

      Your points are well taken, Phillip. I would just like to make a few points, if I may.

      You said that you would have “murdered those gunman.” No, you would not have murdered them. Murder is defined as “the killing of another person without justification or excuse, especially the crime of killing a person with malice aforethought or with recklessness manifesting extreme indifference to the value of human life.” Defending your life by taking the life of an unjust aggressor, according to this definition, is not murder.

      Also, you mention “feeble, frantic fear for my life.” Again, using deadly force to defend one’s life against an unjust aggressor who is intent on harming you is not immoral, even if your use of deadly force is out of fear for your life. We must never strike out of hatred or revenge, because that would be sinful. However, to defend one’s life and the lives of others against an unjust aggressor, by using deadly force if necessary, may very well be both one’s duty and an act of heroism–even if one acts out of fear.

      Lastly, this does not mean that we are “becoming like them”; there is no moral equivalence in such situations. Violence in and of itself is not evil; otherwise, Jesus’ admonition in Luke 22:36 (“… And the one who has no sword must sell his coat and buy one.”) would mean that Jesus was advocating evil. As I’m sure you know, self-defense and just war are both allowed under Catholic teaching.

      I’m not trying to lecture you or be a pain. If that’s how I came across, then I sincerely apologize and ask your forgiveness. It’s just that many people (not necessarily including you) don’t understand the difference between justified and unjustified violence, or between justified and unjustified taking of life; and I thought that it might help if I spoke up.

      God bless you and yours.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Linda2 says:

        It helps a great deal. Thank you, Mick. And thank you to all who have taken part in this intelligent and respectful dialogue. Very enlightening.

        Liked by 1 person

      • jlynnbyrd says:

        The CCC states regarding Legitimate defense

        2263 The legitimate defense of persons and societies is not an exception to the prohibition against the murder of the innocent that constitutes intentional killing. “The act of self-defense can have a double effect: the preservation of one’s own life; and the killing of the aggressor. . . . The one is intended, the other is not.”65
        2264 Love toward oneself remains a fundamental principle of morality. Therefore it is legitimate to insist on respect for one’s own right to life. Someone who defends his life is not guilty of murder even if he is forced to deal his aggressor a lethal blow:
        If a man in self-defense uses more than necessary violence, it will be unlawful: whereas if he repels force with moderation, his defense will be lawful. . . . Nor is it necessary for salvation that a man omit the act of moderate self-defense to avoid killing the other man, since one is bound to take more care of one’s own life than of another’s.66

        Liked by 2 people

      • Beckita says:

        Mick, you have helped me in this area in which I have much to learn and discern. Thank you!

        Like

        • Mick says:

          Glad to be of service, Beckita. It’s a rare occurrence when the student is able to help the master a bit. 🙂

          Like

          • Beckita says:

            HAHAHAHA, Mick! You are soooo silly. Do you know the story of the time when Pope St. John XXIII paid a visit to a Rome hospital? There was an order of nuns, Sisters of the Holy Spirit, on staff. When the Holy Father arrived, the Mother Superior was to have greeted him but was caught up in surgery. Compelled to complete her duty (man her post as dear Charlie would say), she was quite flustered when she heard the Pope was waiting to meet her. She bustled out of the completed surgery and in haste these words burst forth as she bowed and kissed his ring: “Your Holiness, I am the Mother Superior of the Holy Spirit!” With that wide grin, Pope St. John XXIII bowed in return and replied, “Well Mother! I am merely the Vicar of Christ!”

            Seriously, I had a gut-wrenching moment yesterday thinking of this: If one must defend with deadly force, what the heck do you do with the dead body? This lead me to great sorrow, not stuck there, not debilitated in the emotion, but just plain sorrow that God creates each of us from Pure Love and to end in a dismembered adult body or dismembered baby body ripped from the womb (and I see a definite connection between both acts of violence) must unfathomably grieve the Heart of God. Hence, Charlie’s selected image for this piece…

            Like

          • Mick says:

            Beckita, what a great story about Good Pope John and the Mother Superior of the Holy Spirit!

            About your other point: Not to be macabre, but I’ve also wondered what one does with the corpse after being forced to use used deadly force against an unjust aggressor. Additionally, I’ve pondered how my kids would react to and be affected by such a situation were it to occur in our home or on our farm (or anywhere, for that matter). I pray to God that I never have occasion to find out the answers to these questions.

            Liked by 1 person

      • It’s a tough spot to be in, mentally, spiritually, morally, isn’t it, Phillip? I wished I had had a gun in my situation and, though I know self-defence is justified, I still felt terrible about wanting it. And then my brother recently pointed out something I hadn’t thought of: the police arriving on the scene, seeing me shooting at someone, would likely have shot ME thinking I was the shooter! That’s when I stopped trying to second guess myself. I understand perfectly how you feel. Such feelings are pretty common in these situations. Don’t worry about it; it goes with the territory.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Mick says:

          Singingflowers, thank you for sharing your story. I can’t imagine what you went through, or what I would have done if I’d been in your place.

          God bless you and yours. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

  36. Doug says:

    We are putting our heads in the sand if ignore France and let the refugees in. Realistically, how will you vet them? Will we call up Asad?

    Here is a Web site that is very informative on Islam:http://www.politicalislam.com

    Check out book section, audio books, 14 chapter series (not as long as you think) and down load.

    Islam is falsely called a religion. To call it a religion is the same as calling Satanism a religion. To be frank, when it is fully undestood, Islam is evil. It really is that simple when you understand it which the leaders of Islam have been very good at hiding from us in order to dupe us.

    Now, this does not mean that all Muslim people are bad. I want to make a big distinction here. There are some nice people who are not fully practicing Islam for what ever reason. The key here is they are not fully practicing. This means they would be ignorant or reject many parts of it. The thing to keep in mind is Islam can’t and won’t change of its own accord. If it did. This would be like the Pope saying that the trinity is no longer a dogma. It will take us humans to contain it or a miraculous intervention from our Lord. I always offer up the 5th Glorious Mystery for peace in the Middle East and peace in our hearts.

    Like

    • Charlie’s “Soldiers of Christ, Missionaries of Mercy meditation was on point and deeply stirring. Oh Lord, help us to see as You see and love as You love! As Catholics, we have been given so very much. As a result, much will be expected of us.

      I’ve got 24 hours in a day to work with and I often squander it with tangiential thinking that is not fully aligned with Christ’s. Difficult to overcome sometimes, but with Christ living in me, He can work beyond my limitations.

      What do I focus on? Who do I see? Who do I love?

      Just some thoughts I was having when I awoke this morning, and for no one in particular, but they did seem like fair questions.

      I was tempted to just go running this morning as usual where I would no doubt encounter a bunch of comforting little critters (including squirrels). Then I thought, “nah, that’s just being lazy.”

      God bless.

      MP

      Liked by 1 person

    • Teri says:

      Doug, I have met Dr. Warner and he is the real deal. A wealth of information. Thanks for spreading his info, God Bless!

      Like

  37. Teri says:

    Saw this headline this morning and thought about what Charlie has said about a US/Russia coalition. http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/nov/16/obama-takes-heat-over-isis-strategy-as-francois-ho/

    Liked by 1 person

  38. Bob says:

    As for refugees from Syria as 90% are single males, would be to take the good ones in to boot camp, train them, and send them back to Syria with full military support and allow them to take back their country if they are men enough.

    Like

  39. Patricia says:

    Daniel,
    I have not had the time this morning to read all the comments following yours but I would like to add a story that might help explain more of the thought in your original comment. A year or two ago, I read a story about young couple who were attacked and forgetting the details, the author of the story bemoaned today’s metro sexual male. The author said that boys today have been brought up to not play with guns, not to play rough and tumble, to be “nice” so to speak. As a result, he said, many of these guys have never been in a playground fist fight, never had their nose bloodied etc. (How could they? They were not allowed outside to play- they had playdates.) Consequently, the results are that we raised a generation of young men who, maybe in the future will rise to the occasion, but today do not have it in them because of our culture. They did not have John Wayne as a hero or Ronald Reagan as a President. (The current occupant of our highest office is a great example of this younger generation albeit he is a bit older than they are.) If boys are not allowed to be boys then they will not be the men we need when we need them. The end of the story that started this comment is that the author said in his day the young male victim would be dead before he would have allowed anyone to touch his young wife. The author is the one that put forth this thought or view, if you will, and he did it in a very clear manner far better than I am doing now. However, I believe it to be true and I believe that is what is underneath what Daniel was saying. The military is still molding men and that is why the American guys rushed the Islamic attackers a few months ago on the train in France or England, where ever it was.

    Liked by 7 people

  40. Charlie I will hold that quote in my heart. I often wonder if I could shoot or not so I keep wasp spray handy to cause pain. If I can say you are standing in the spot I am about to shoot I think I would feel better. I know it is serious but you just put some relief in me.

    Like

    • Patricia says:

      Sonya,
      I am a bleeding heart for any little thing but if someone was about to hurt my family or even me, I would shoot to kill and so should you if you need to. I pray every day I will not have to.

      Liked by 1 person

  41. I’m posting a link from the Guardian (UK) where the husband of a woman killed in the Paris carnage shows us all Jesus. His is a Jesus response which shows up my weaknesses. Blood of Christ be upon this brave soul and his wee son.

    http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/nov/17/bataclan-paris-victim-helene-muyal-husband-antoine-leiris-killers-open-letter

    Liked by 3 people

  42. David Aguilar says:

    Gunmen in Mali, attacks in Nigeria, tel aviv, Kenya, Lebanon, Paris, the current resident of the White House obstinately refusing to admit there is a problem, is it just me or is the pace quickening?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Mick says:

      David, Charlie has told us a couple of times in the past couple of weeks that the pace was going to quicken. It looks to me like he, and you, are right. God save all here. (Hat tip to CrewDog)

      Liked by 1 person

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