What’s the Matter With Texas?

By Charlie Johnston

I don’t get Texas. It is among the best at protecting life in the first stages…and among the worst at protecting it in later stages.

Christopher Dunn, a former Sheriff’s Deputy and Homeland Security officer is on life support. He is also fully conscious. He wants to live. But the “Death Panel” at Houston Methodist Hospital where he is, has ruled that his quality of life is unacceptable – so they want to give him a fatal drug cocktail that will kill him. Amazingly, Texas law allows such death panels that can act entirely contrary to the wishes of a patient and his family – and their decisions are non-reviewable.

Some pro-life organizations in Texas are trying to get a court to review this law, which seems blatantly unconstitutional. As Joe Nixon, Dunn’s attorney says, “A criminal on death row in Texas has more rights than a patient in a Texas hospital.”

How a supposedly Christian hospital can come to such a determination is astounding. This is what “compassion” that is not centered in Christ actually looks like.

Lifesite News ran a video of Dunn being questioned about wanting to live.

You can contact Houston Methodist Hospital at:

Houston Methodist Hospital
Dr. Marc L. Boom, President and CEO
mboom@houstonmethodist.org
713-790-3311
6565 Fannin Street
Houston, TX 77030

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
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212 Responses to What’s the Matter With Texas?

  1. Mark Gaylord says:

    Thank you for making this more widely known.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Sally says:

    Until people, especially Christians quit killing in unjust wars, contracepting children they don’t want and stand against euthanasia, we won’t see respect for life. A famous priest from Ave Maria University told my daughter that he believed that sterilization is worse than direct abortion or abortion though contraception, because the parent is not even open to human life in any way, shape or form. I’ve never heard this before, but our Catholic faith is the truth ! Life is a gift from God, to be safe guarded by all. There was an interview on Tru News over a week ago, with a Catholic priest from Iraq who said he has heard from American military who apologized for killing people in his country, causing so much suffering to the Christians there. The priest told the soldiers, we will forgive you, but you must speak out against the evil. Many are not speaking out against the abandoning of parental and spousal responsibilities and duties and neglected supervising our the youth 24/7. Can we expect things to get better ? I recall an interview Mother Angelica had with Joey Lomangino back around 1990 Joey said around 70 percent of minor children in NYC come home from school to an empty home with no one waiting for them. This speaks volumes to the Why’s. The answer is true repentance and it begins with me first.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Becky-TN says:

    Lord, have mercy!!!!

    Liked by 3 people

  4. audiemarie2014 says:

    Thanks for spreading the word, Charlie. Just sent an email to Dr. Boom. Don’t doctors still take an oath of some kind???

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      Apparently not. Otherwise, how could there be so many abortionists?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Kelli says:

      I sent an email too. This is unconscionable!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Snowy Owl says:

      audiemarie, it’s called the Hippocratic Oath and I don’t believe doctors are actually legally bound by it. Though they certainly should be!

      Liked by 1 person

      • marcyc48 says:

        Doctors are no longer required to take the Hippocatic Oath ; a few still do and practice it! Unfortunately the vast majority of new doctors, neither have it offered to them, nor wish to take the oath!
        As an RN, who formerly worked in ICU, l wrote a letter to Dr. Boom also. I find it absolutely abominable, that a patient who is aware of his surroundings, his family, and his condition, would have no say in his medical decisions and plan of care! Apparently his does his Mother, who is he had appointed to carry out his medical advanced directives
        Maybe a letter to pro-life Governor Greg Abbott would also be a good idea!

        Liked by 2 people

        • marcyc48 says:

          Should be ” Apparently neither neither does his mother, who he had appointed to carry out his medical advanced directivès.”
          It is quite possible that his insuranc company, be it private or one funded by the state, has said he is paliative care and we will no longer pay for a critical care bed.
          Similar case was the little California girl who bled out after a tonsilectomy and was considered brain dead. The hospital ethics board wanted her remòved from the ventilator and refused to do a tracheotomy or place a feeding tube in a “dead body”. The family said she had some purposeful movement. They fought to find an extended care facility that would take her, finally with the help of the Terri Schiavo Foundation they found a facility in New Jersywilling to accept her.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Snowy Owl says:

          Thanks Marcy, I also find this absolutely abominable! I think your idea of sending Gov. Abbott an email is a great idea! I am going to look it up.

          Like

  5. Paula Haberer says:

    While this is inhuman and tragic, the claim in the life site new article is that life support will be removed with no mention of the administration of a fatal drug cocktail. Can you provide the source for this claim?

    Liked by 1 person

  6. little one in PA says:

    Done Charlie! I’ll keep writing him. I hope he reads his emails!!

    Liked by 2 people

  7. RMD says:

    Charlie, sad to read that this law was passed while Bush was governor years ago. How many others, not conscious, have been killed? I emailed Dr. Boom to listen and defer to Mr. Dunn and not to the hospital panel’s decision, which was likely made because he has no health insurance. .

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Mack says:

    I just emailed him too. This is astounding and very strange. Will pray.
    I was just thinking of how last year on this blog there was a discussion about how Christmas would not be “normal.” This year, it is even less “normal” than last year, and I suppose next year will be worse.
    Had a thought about Trump’s role in this. Not supporting him, but he is important because he is changing political speech. Some topics that were formerly taboo are now on the table, like the role of Muslims in this country, etc. National Review had an article about this today. I think that the way Trump has changed the political game is helping people realize that things politically are not “normal” either. Perhaps in God’s Providence this is a way of giving people hints that there will not be an election next year, as Charlie has told us. Those who have the eyes to see will not be totally surprised, even if they’ve never read this blog.

    Liked by 4 people

    • jaykay says:

      Mack: I’m in Ireland and won’t make comments about candidates/politics in your country but, from the sidelines, yes, it does appear that Mr. T has quite ripped open some of the (paper) walls around their cosy little consensual safe spaces. Needless to remark, he’s excoriated by our bien-pendant media over here, ever willing to leave the stone firmly in place if what it’s concealing should challenge the “correct” worldview. Fearless in the pursuit of truth, don’t you know!

      We have no such resource as National Review, of course. Breitbart London is about the nearest we get and, with qualifications, I like it. It does have the odd contributor from Ireland. I’m a fan of Jonah Goldberg on NR. But believe me, the evil being done to this unfortunate man will NOT be reported in the mainline media, online or dead-tree, over here, unless in terms that firmly uphold the Party (Partei) line. Four legs good…

      Liked by 1 person

      • jaykay says:

        I do beg pardon…mobile devices. If Charlie will permit me to add that while your election is yet a year(ish) away, ours is upon us in two months time. As another poster, Siobhán, from my country said recently, they’re buoyed up on seeming success and are striving mightily to advance the death culture. First up is unlimited access to abortion but, in the context of this particular post, they’ll try to advance the “mercy” agenda as well. Yes, we’re a small insignificant place but precisely because of our well-known Catholic past we’re the poster child for their dreams of showing how “repressed” societies can progress (hah) to the uplands of their version of … well, we know.

        So we’ll have some sort of new government (deliberate lower case) very soon but, well, as my mother used say: “man proposes, God disposes”. Yes, 2016 will be some year. God bless you all in the US. J.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Beckita says:

          jaykay, I have some beautiful Irish friends, now living here and teaching at the local university, who are fed up with the homeland’s deterioration. Remembering you and all the faithful Irish as we’re in this mess together and we’re in the process of being rescued together. Praying for you, jaykay!

          Liked by 1 person

      • charliej373 says:

        Over at National Review, Kevin Williamson has become a must-read also. And for anyone wanting to know about Islam, Andrew McCarthy is a veritable font of knowledge on it. He was the prosecutor in the first world trade center bombing in ’93 – the Blind Sheikh case. He started out thinking that was a perversion of Islam, but as he studied to prepare for trial, he discovered to his horror that death and destruction are an authentic mainstream expression of Islam. Kind of like I did almost a decade later.

        Liked by 4 people

        • jaykay says:

          Yes, Charlie. I always think it’s funny how the ’93 bombing is always glossed-over, coming as it did within the first two months of the Clinton presidency. And yet, 9/11 is forever a Bush failure of protection in the progressive mythology, despite Pres. B. only having being in office for a short time. You’ve all seen it on the discussion boards of course, and over this side of the pond it’s accepted “fact” also. And not going into U.S. politics. Yet the one true fact that can’t be discussed, it seems, is how the religion of death… ooops, peace… annihilated Christian (and Jewish) civilisation across the middle east and north Africa, even into Europe, in the century following the revelations of their “prophet”. I realise that’s probably hate-speech, of course. Thank God for Don Juan of Austria and John Sobieski of Poland. And don’t even mention Armenia in 1915. But how many kids even learn that anymore?

          “Dim drums throbbing in the hills half heard…” No teacher could validly teach that as literature anymore; it might, just might, be in a Uni. course but probably as an example of imperialism, or some other guilt trip. We read it aged 11, and loved it. God bless Father Moore S.M, my Latin and English teacher.

          Liked by 2 people

          • charliej373 says:

            How are the young supposed to make good decision when we have imposed ignorance on them? It is amazing how much knowledge has been lost in just a few generations. And as people become more ignorant – and intellectually lazy – they get more strident about their opinions, which are mere prejudices divorced from facts, evidence and logic.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Mick says:

            Thank you, Jaykay; you’re giving me an education today. I had to google the quote “Dim drums throbbing in the hills half heard,” because I’d never seen it before. Turns out that I actually own a copy of Lepanto because me older kids had to read it for one of their high-school English courses. I know the story of Lepanto well, but I’ve never read Chesterton’s take on it. I’m going to have to do that (maybe over Christmas break).

            Like

        • LukeMichael says:

          Also Robert Spencer and William Kilpatrick. WK a regular on Crisis Magazine

          Like

        • janet333 says:

          Charlie you wrote…”Islam will be converted to Christianity. (Sadly, the latter will not be completed until we have met Islam in a great and bloody clash).”

          How is this to be done Charlie?

          Like

      • zeniazenia says:

        Do you mean ‘the donald’ ?

        Like

      • Mick says:

        I appreciate the reference to Animal Farm, Jaykay; it was quite appropriate. And you had me laughing with your reference to Mr. T. I don’t know if you’ve ever seen the movie Rocky III or the 1980s American TV show called The A Team. Both of them had an actor who’s stage name is Mr. T. His on-screen persona was that of an arrogant, quarrelsome, touchy jerk-of-a-bully with a frightful temper. His trademark line was, “I pity the fool.” Yep, sounds like a pretty accurate description of Donald Trump.

        Like

        • jaykay says:

          Yep, Mick, “I pity the fool” has entered the lexicon all over the Anglosphere. The A Team was huge over here in the 80s/90s, as were the Turtles et alii. Not that I watched, I was working!

          But it’s good to know that your kids did get exposure to Chesterton; all is not lost. That said, over here they republished the 1970s Senior School (High School in US terms) poetry book as used by us back then for the school-leaving cycle, last two years before final State exams i.e. for kids aged 15-17. It was done as a sort of nostalgia trip with a limited print run. What they didn’t expect was that it immediately became very popular and as a collateral showed-up the paucity of quality of what’s now being used. I don’t particularly like the expression”dumbed down” but, well, it was appropriate. It turns out that “our” book was regarded as practically University level by today’s standards. We didn’t find it all that difficult, challenging yes, but you were just expected to cope. Says a lot.

          Like

  9. Kim sevier says:

    Horrifying. Continual demonstrations of the culture of death. Exhausting. Devastating. Heart wrenching. Mind numbing. Nightmarish. Murder incorporated. Deliver us.

    I emailed them. As painful as it is to know this stuff, can’t put head in the sand, but ignorance is bliss. Not right to be blissful through ignorance. Thank you, Charlie.

    Liked by 3 people

  10. SanSan says:

    California is moving in this same direction. We’re trying to block the recent “Assisted Suicide” bill that was railroaded in by collecting signatures so we can get it on the ballot in 2016 and have it overturned. Remember the fight when Obamacare was being pushed? There won’t be any death panels……what a lie. Such a bummer to have reached retirement and now we have to make sure we don’t end up any where near a hospital.

    Liked by 3 people

  11. the phoenix says:

    I have also sent an e-mail and am praying for Christopher Dunn.

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Beckita says:

    Contact made… prayers ascending for Christopher Dunn and all concerned…

    Liked by 1 person

  13. luvadoxi says:

    Removing life support is one issue that can be argued here. But I don’t see, just based on the letter, whether or not the drugs are comfort care to ease his pain (in other words, what kills him will be the result of removing life support) or a “death cocktail.” Bearing false witness is a sin–more information, please.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      READ THE FIRST LINK, the Breitbart article. Christopher’s WIFE says that the hospital proposed giving him a cocktail of morphine and another drug that would kill him within three to five minutes. Now if she is “bearing false witness,” take it up with her. This is the second such bit accusing me of making something up. Perhaps you are new readers who do not know that I do NOT make provocative statements like that without including sourcing directly. Or perhaps you are apologists for the culture of death. People sometimes properly correct me on something. But before you presume to correct me, read the material fully. When you don’t and just jump on a hair trigger, it makes me suspect your motives. Best case, you are used to prowling sites where they make up their own “facts.” I don’t do that here – and you should take your own advice and not bear false witness when you clearly did not read or flat-out ignored the sourcing I provided in the first link.

      Liked by 5 people

    • marcyc48 says:

      I know from working as an RN in ICU, that when a patient that is actually brain dead, or as in the case of a patient I cared for who was terminally ill and requested requested to be removed from a ventilator; a small but NOT lethal dose of Morphine is given prior to removing the vent. It’s purpose is not to kill, but to decrease the patient’s air hunger. We know that Morphine does this, because if a patient has 14 or less respirations per minute we DO NOT GIVE Morphine as it depresses the respiratory center of the brain, causing the patient to take less breaths per minute. If a patient is pain is on a vent, its not a problem , the vent will be set to automatically give so many breathes per minute. Patients often fight the vent and need medication to relax them?

      Liked by 1 person

      • jlynnbyrd says:

        Marcy, bless you for your compassionate work as an RN. I received an email today from the American Life League about a Pro-life Healthcare Alliance in formation to combat the emerging and growing culture of death. Their concerns tie in well with what several of our NRS family have been speaking of here about the challenges on the medical front that we are faced with in the Obamacare era. The link to this site is http://www.prolifehealthcare.org/

        Liked by 1 person

  14. THERESA TWIST says:

    Dear Charlie, what a sad,sad day this is . We have lost the value and respect of human life . We have compromised our basic humanitarian skills . Why is this the level and quality of life we have succumbed to . Abortions and assisted suicide killings . My Dear Savior in Heaven come to our rescue please . This is all so wrong and we cannot just sit back and take it .

    Theresa Creasia- Twist

    >

    Liked by 5 people

  15. jlynnbyrd says:

    Thank you Charlie for the contact information, I will be communicating with the doc. Unfortunately this sort of thing had existed for decades. In the 1980-2000’s I was in healthcare business/finance management. I used to sit on panels where doctors would carve out a patient’s treatment based on how much the HMO/PPO would paid and how many days of care were “allowed,” in a Catholic Hospital, at the time being run by laypersons. I have worked for four doctors in differing fields of medical specialty and each one committed insurance fraud to varying degrees. One employed a spouse whom was paid $500.00 a week for working 2 to 6 hours weekly, “in order to inflate the spouses earnings for their impending Medicare benefit consideration.” This family lived in one of the most influential cities in our state and all of America. They purchased and rented out their log cabin in New Buffalo, Michigan to local celebs and dignitaries on a weekly basis. Maintaining the property with the third parties running the show is what the spouse did most of the time for their few hours *work* at the clinic. The sad thing is that I have not been able to escape the moral decay and avarice in leadership while working in corporate USA either. We are living in a world fraught with selfishness, and greed. We’ve largely become a disposable society. Parents replace lost, misplaced, broken cell phones, I-pads and gaming devices, for their children without batting an eye more frequently than I would get new clothing growing up. Employers are less concerned about loyalty. In a recent employment workshop I attended, the speaker indicated that unlike out parent’s generation whereas an adult would have one to two jobs in the adult lifetime, the norm is now seventeen to nineteen jobs in 3 to fives different fields of work. My husband’s current employer requires workers to complete 12 months of full-time before they qualify for any benefits, including sick and personal time off with pay. As much as I foresaw O-Care as a dangerous slippery slope, where we are on the moral compass, has been a long time coming.
    That being expressed, it is surely right that we speak out when we see such horrors. Thank you again for providing the means to do so! Let us be the voice in the wilderness as we posture to become the pep-rally squad for Team Triumph ~ Go Squirrels!
    Happy Feast of the Immaculate Conception and Happy New Jubilee Liturgical Year of Mercy!

    Liked by 9 people

    • ann says:

      Your post JLynn is very disturbing but informative. I have worried for a long time that the health industry functions like any other industry–$$ and expediency. We certainly are a disposable society and have been for a long time. It has moved from products to children. You are right it has been a long time coming. Now it gathers force and speed and darkness and I am sure if we could see with spiritual eyes it would terrify us. God is good that we don’t comprehend the spiritual forces around us. I will pray for Christopher Dunn and I will email Dr. Boom. I know the prayer will count but I doubt the email will. Kim Sevier mentioned above being exhausted, discouraged, overwhelmed in the face of this constant onslaught of the culture of death. I think of fighting forest fires….when the wind is against you and more and more fires crop up. Sometimes we are like those exhausted fire fighters but (I tell myself)we have to keep at it. I just didn’t want to go to the local abortion clinic tomorrow (the day we usually go to pray), just didn’t! Some inner resistance in me hammering away, but I prayed and then–a moment of grace– I said “yes put me on the schedule” and so I go tomorrow. Sigh. I know there are others like me who have their bad days in this fight. I guess we gotta “cowboy up” huh? Remember the old song from the 50’s “Mama said there’d be days like this, there’d be days like this my Mama said…” 😉 Mama was right!

      Liked by 5 people

  16. Laurie says:

    Charlie, thank you for drawing attention to this travesty. I just put in “my two bits”. Like Mother Teresa said, “It takes just one drop to overflow the bucket!”

    Liked by 8 people

  17. MarieUrsula says:

    Thank you for alerting us, Charlie. I emailed Doctor Boom.

    It’s no surprise to me that when the media et al glamorize assisted suicides like Brittany Maynard’s, then people start to think that killing innocent, vulnerable people is a good thing.

    O Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee.

    Liked by 5 people

  18. Monica Joseph of the Blessed Sacrament, OCDS says:

    Email sent.

    Liked by 3 people

  19. lordprotectyourlittlemess says:

    Hi Charlie and all here:
    I attended a prayer service for upholding life this evening at our Church, geared towards saving the unborn, however I lifted Chris’ fight for life to Christ during that service. I get home to this post. My heart aches, really for all involved in this. It is, at least to my sometimes too ‘black or white only’ eyes, just an economic issue. This has the possibility to put the ethics committee where Pilate stood, to some degree. The pressure will be upon them greatly, with such responsibility on their shoulders, and the blood of this man. I keep thinking of Pilate just wanting it to go away, and in the end to wash his hands of it. In the end, my thought is that we must pray. AND not just pray for Chris and his legal team, but to pray, pray, pray for those that hold this decision in their hands. Part of my routine prayers involve asking God for some borrowing of His eyes, heart, and hands. I am asking to see beyond my reaction, to extend HIS love to each of His children, and bring Jesus hands to those who need His touch. So, remembering that each person involved in this is precious to Our Father, I thought we may encourage those making this choice to do the RIGHT thing.

    Dear Dr. Boom,
    Please accept my prayers for you and for each individual that has any responsibility toward upholding the life of Chris Dunn. I understand that the proposal is “legal” in Texas, however I pray that you each may understand that “legal” is not what defines right and wrong. I pray for illumination, compassion, wisdom, and a decision that will allow each conscience to rest in peace that the right decision was indeed made.
    Thank you,

    Charlie, this is my first post here. I admit that I am nervous to hit the unassuming little button on the right bottom of my screen now. If this is going to start some debate that shouldn’t be started, or prove that I don’t understand at all….please just hit the delete button.

    Lord, I thank You for the awesome gift of this extraordinary year of Mercy. I beg you to look with Mercy upon Chris Dunn, his mother, and his legal team. I also ask for You to whisper into the minds, ears, and hearts of each person that has “control” of this man’s life. Increase in each of them the innate call we are each born with to serve You, help each of them to see that “legal” does not define right, that definition is Yours. Lord, I apologize for the way we have treated life in this country, as if it is not the MOST PRECIOUS gift given so amazingly by You. Please help us to come together as Your Body to fight for You, to serve You, and to comfort and strengthen Your precious child.

    Liked by 11 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Welcome, Little – and this is the right tone here. WE are glad to have you.

      Liked by 2 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      Little, you have encouraged me to correspond with the doctor out of love vs. shock. I knew yesterday that I needed some time to think first. I try to allow myself at least 24 hours before having a knee-jerk reaction.
      Your email and prayers on Chris’ behalf are filled with mercy, love and compassion and really quite beautiful. Thank you for sharing.

      Liked by 2 people

      • jlynnbyrd says:

        Social media circles are on alert to respond to Dr Boom and my email has been sent.

        Dear Dr. Boom,

        I have had the opportunity to learn a bit about you and your wife, Julie online. One 2012 event that stood out for me was the ISCC-Good Samaritan Award that you both achieved. The ISCC, Interface-Samaritan Counseling Centers in Houston, website boasts about caring for men, woman, and children’s hope and healing, despite insurance limitations….

        I have been in healthcare my entire adult life and I am imploring you to set aside, pride, ego and bottom lines as a CEO “title” may require of you. I challenge you instead turn to your Christian faith and meditate on the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37) while you contemplate all that you can and should do on behalf of the fine servant, officer, man, son, brother in Christ, and your patient, Christopher Dunn and the actions your Creator desires for you.

        Despite what other committee members may have declared, someone I consider a good and wise man has said, “…We will be judged on the quality of our love, not our knowledge. …God has a plan – and all will see it soon enough. Woe to those who have abused their gifts.…”

        I pray that Christopher Dunn will receive the medical treatment and care needed to give him the best quality of life and ability to recover fully, and that you will do all that is within your power to see to that, whether or not that care comes within the Methodist Hospital or an alternate medical facility.

        God Bless,

        Liked by 2 people

    • Snowy Owl says:

      Little, welcome here and your letter is very good! 🙂 God bless you!

      Like

    • Beckita says:

      Welcome, littleness! This is your home too. You have beautifully prayed with us. Thank you. As jlynn has commented, these issues are pervasive throughout our medical system, so, in the Divine Will, I have been praying much like you. Keep hitting that “post comment” button please.

      Like

    • Sandy says:

      Thank you, Little, for your prayerful response in the message to Dr. Boom. I hope you don’t mind that I used it as a template for my email I just sent him. God bless you.

      Like

    • ann says:

      Thank you Little–you have set the right tone indeed. Jesus died for Dr. Boom and all the panel as well just as He died for us. In this Year of Mercy its good to be reminded we must radiate that mercy. I have prayed your prayer above–lovely prayer to pray for Christ Dunn and all those involved.

      Like

    • Mick says:

      Welcome, Lordprotectyourlittlemess. I love your screen name, and I really appreciated your comment.

      Like

  20. CrewDog says:

    With all the confusion, distraction and horror that assails us, it seems, hourly it might do us well to get back to basics. Come Lord Jesus and eradicate this Culture of Death. AMEN!!

    HeartLight Daily Verse – 9 December

    John 15:5-8
    [Jesus said,] “I am the vine; you are the branches. If a man remains in me and I in him, he will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing. This is to my Father’s’ glory, that you bear much fruit, showing yourselves to be my disciples.”
    Thoughts on today’s verse:
    We take on Jesus’ character (bear fruit) by remaining intimately connected to him. The distance between heaven and earth is not so great when heaven lives within us. In John 14, Jesus reminded us that if we will obey him, he will come and live in us and will reveal himself to us. So as we obey him, we know him better. His life becomes real in us.
    Prayer:
    Precious Lord, I want to obey your word, your will, and your example. I want to obey you to honor you, to love you, and to know you. So please, help me come to know you better as I walk more closely in your steps. Help me to know what it means to live your life in my world. Amen.
    Visit heartlight.org for more

    GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Liked by 4 people

  21. zeniazenia says:

    Good morning Charlie and TNRS!
    May Our Lady of Tepeyac help us.
    In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit Amen.
    By the power of Our Lord, Jesus Christ; to the honor of Our Lady, the Immaculate Conception; in service to her Immaculate Heart; we pray for the State of Texas and for the pro-life organizations in Texas which will get a court to review the unconstitutional “compassion” law. Thank you for hearing our prayer. We ask for the intersession of St. Juan Diego and St. Raphael to teach us the meaning of compassion. Thy will be done. Amen.
    We give it over to God entirely with trust.
    In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit Amen.
    Praise God for visiting us all in the Eucharist ! — Jane

    Liked by 3 people

    • Mick says:

      Thank you, Jane. I was planning to say the PMT for Chris, through the intercession of St. Juan Diego. Then I saw your prayer and the addition of St. Raphael and thought, “Perfect!” So I prayed the PMT along with you.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. bflocatholic says:

    E-mail sent to Dr. Boom. Continued prayers for Mr. Dunn and for those who would take his life.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Phillip Frank says:

    Morphine is a dangerous drug even whithout being mixed with other drugs as a- Death Cocktail.
    Already week patients can easily be over dosed with morphine and it is common knowledge that being kept ” comfortable” and slipping away ” quietly” are synonymous for termination with extreme prejudice these days.

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      During the days of the Inquisition, Church authorities would sometimes tell secular authorities to “deal tenderly” with someone who had been condemned. That was a specific code phrase, meaning to burn them alive. Strange how the greater the atrocity we formally commit, the more innocuous the phrases we use to order it. I suppose it reveals some vestige of a conscience that san’t bear to speak candidly about what we are doing.

      Liked by 4 people

  24. tim says:

    Thank you, Charlie, for this heads-up. My experience in the hospice field tells me to be on edge when a “bioethics committee” gets involved in a situation. While much good work is being done, there is a growing “preferential option for death” in hospice and the culture at large, and it seems people can be put on “nothing by mouth” status very easily and then (with a wink and a nod) given morphine and ativan every hour—and before long they are gone. May the Lord have mercy on us and help us. This is a result, as you put it, of wanting to good without reference to God.

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Yes, it has not escaped my notice that formal “ethics committees” have risen as actual ethics have nearly vanished. Retain the form while abandoning the substance.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Mick says:

        The “ethics” farce is true in the training of lawyers, too; at least, that was the case at my law school. Our mandatory Professional Ethics course was not about ethics at all; it was basically about how to cover your backside. It was pathetic.

        Liked by 1 person

      • YongDuk says:

        Reminds me the day I plopped myself before a New York State Bishop and told him of his local Catholic Hospital and “Uterine Isolations”.

        Beckinita says it best!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Patrick of South Dakota says:

      WHOA!!

      Morphine and ativan do not terminate a person’s life, nor do they expedite it. The many people and even nurses who erroneously believe this troubles me. Even primary care physicians are astonished by the doses of morphine we may need to administer in the hospice setting. The level of morphine a human body can withstand even near the end-of-life is extremely high — the trick is to manage side-effects like respiratory depression and constipation. So yes, we routinely administer high doses of morphine – with care and intense follow-up – but never, ever with intent to kill. That is counter to hospice philosophy and is, obviously, against the law.

      Worked for years in hospice, administered plenty of those very wonderful drugs, and we never did so with the intention to expedite a person’s death. We didn’t even joke about it.

      So when you meet someone who claims that “hospice killed my grandma with morphine,” tell them the disease or illness killed grandma and that the morphine simply kept her comfortable. (With a little more sensitivity, of course.)

      Regarding ethics, however, we could discuss many things. Made some assumptions about the details of the case, but I don’t know enough to fly in and make a statement.

      The ONLY thing that gave me pause was what appeared to be the patient’s ability to still communicate, a demonstration of decent cognitive functioning (though a bit delayed), and the expression of his desire to live. That should be the end of the discussion for the hospital. The patient desires to live. Further, if the patient is cognitively impaired, the spouse or power-of-attorney also wants him to live as long as possible. Terminating ventilation, which is considered an extraordinary life-sustaining measure, would likely kill him.

      But again, I don’t know enough about the case. What’s the prognosis? Is the family being realistic about his chance of survival? Should he be on hospice care? etc., etc., etc.

      God bless
      Patrick, MSN, RN

      Liked by 3 people

      • tim says:

        Patrick, my own experience in a hospice inpatient setting was that, depending on who the physician or APRN was, over time there developed a tendency (only with some patients) to overdo on the morphine and ativan in the name of keeping the pt. quiet and safe, so that he did not strike out at people, or just to keep the patient quiet overnight. Abuses were creeping in. I used to assure worried families in the very words you used above, but in my location, overdosing was occurring at times. The Association of Hospice and Palliative Medicine in 2007 issued a statement saying it would assume a “studied neutrality” regarding assisted suicide in the wake of the Terri Shiavo debacle. It appears to me that the nurses who were taking courses in APRN school were taking a fairly casual approach to the sanctity of human life and the rights of patients and families to object to too much medicine being given or even to question what was happening. My impression is that the culture of death is making real inroads into hospice and palliative practice. Let’s join in praying for the hospice movement to return to its Judaeo-Christian roots.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Patrick of South Dakota says:

          Hi Tim,

          Thanks for your take. I’m sure this type of “assistance” in hospices exists and has been increasing significantly in recent years. I’ve worked on 3 hospice IPUs and saw nothing to suggest this was going on, though.

          The battle for providers in the very near future will be having to decided if they will be coerced by the government into offering to patients or families — or actually administering — life-ending treatment. Or perhaps the battle is already here. Hospice is supposed to be comfortable quality of life, but it is about to add one more treatment option, of which I (and I’m sure you) will refuse to play a part.

          Thanks again. Love to chat more about this, my favorite subject. But it looks like Charlie’s got a new post!

          Patrick

          Liked by 3 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Keep chatting, Patrick. I love it when people with deep expertise in a subject illuminate it more for us all here. When I was doing politics, I always had great relations with various doctors’ societies – and was deeply enriched by their expertise. I love having real experts in so many fields here.

            Liked by 3 people

          • LordprotectYourlittlemess says:

            Hi Charlie and all here:
            I am called to defend “morphine” here, and share a story. I am a PharmD (Doctor of Pharmacy), and have worked for 16 years at a retail pharmacy and then through one of those doors that only God can open, I have been in a hospital pharmacy for the past 11 years. The stories that I am about to tell you are foggy at best, in fact, I had forgotten about them completely until I got a little reminder to tell them, so the exact numbers will be approximate. When I was pretty new at the hospital, I was staffing in the Intensive Care Unit and got an order for morphine IV one time, I’m guessing 30 mg. Again, I was new there, so I used my “phone a friend” option and called another staffing pharmacist. Then I called the nurse, yep that’s what the doctor wants, was the answer, or something close to that. I just continued to not “feel” right about it, anyway long story short, this went all the way to my director, the ethics panel, and the dose was not allowed. Thankfully, this was many years ago, when the right people were local, our leadership was Catholic in more than name only, which seems to be slipping away with changes in the last several years. On the other side of the coin, I have seen a chronic cancer patient who required about 360 mg of oral morphine twice a day, PLUS 45 mg of morphine every 4 hours as needed. This patient was alert, breathing, etc. This dose would straight up kill most of us here, but with chronic use, tolerance builds. My point is, that it is not the drug that is the danger. I would ask that, if you are in the situation that this drug is needed, pray for the caregivers to be competent, responsible, God-fearing individuals who will answer the calls of the Spirit and give care that is worthy of caring for the Body of Christ.

            Lord, thank You for today. Thank You for each servant You have called to be Your hands on earth, especially those in health care. Lord, Your vision is simple, take care of each other, love each other, use the gifts and talents that You have given us so freely to care for one another. Please help us to stop complicating all of this with pride or power. Lord, I apologize for each time that I have failed to see You in a patient that needed more than my medical knowledge. I ask for You to touch each person that I have ever filled a prescription for, counseled, dispensed, verified medications or attended a code, in those possible last minutes of those lives, accept my prayers in that moment and now on their behalf. Again, Lord I thank You! I praise You! I place all of this in Your hands, that You may ever so full of Mercy tip the balancing scales back into place in this oh so broken world. Through the tender and loving heart of Mary, and the merit of Jesus. Amen.

            Liked by 4 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Thank you for this witness, Littlemess. A very good friend of mine is a prominent doctor in northern Illinois. At luch once, he told me that diagnosis is much art as it is science – that you start with some fundamentals, but it is not quite a blueprint. Every person is unique and their system reacts uniquely, so it is critical to get to know as much about each patient and their particular system as possible, for what is palliative for one is a death sentence for another – and what is a death sentence for one is a desperately needed palliative for another. When I think of all the various allergies that some have and others don’t, I can see the wisdom of this…and how difficult and sometimes terrifying it can be for doctors. If they don’t give enough, their patient can be in excruciating agony. If they give too much, their patient could die. And each patient has a unique need that is not immediately evident. I sympathize with your task – and give thanks for all those doctors who give the best care they can from love. What a time for our government to decide doctors can only spend minutes with a patient while spending the bulk of their day filling out reports and reimbursement forms if they want to stay afloat!

            Liked by 3 people

          • Petra says:

            Amen! Amen! Amen!
            Your prayer is so very beautiful. I hope someone like you is working in a hospital or pharmacy when I need those services. God bless you!

            Like

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Lpylm, I am heartened by your work ethic and greatly appreciate that you keep God in the equation of your vocation. Bless you as you are one in a million, in my eyes. 😉

            Like

          • Beckita says:

            WOW, Littleness! Thanks for sharing your expertise and witness. Amen to your beautiful prayer. Lifting you and your work in prayer and asking St. Raphael to hover round you in constant intercession.

            Like

          • Charlie wrote: “A very good friend of mine is a prominent doctor in northern Illinois. At lunch once, he told me that diagnosis is much art as it is science”.

            A doctor is actually not a scientist but an artist. Medicine is one of the earliest disciplines taught at universities since the Middle Ages. In Dutch it is called “geneeskunde” which literally means the art (or ability, or capacity) to cure. Doctor in Dutch is called “arts”, some type of artist. In German it is called Arzt.

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            I did not know that, Sapper. Thanks.

            Liked by 1 person

      • luvadoxi says:

        Patrick, this is so sensible and compassionate. I personally worry that I wouldn’t be given sufficient pain relief out of a misguided sense of Christian ethics. And like you, I don’t know the specifics about this case in question. But I’m concerned we are going too far in the other direction and leaving patients in more pain than they need to bear. When my dad was in his last months, a nurse even told me and my stepmom that “there’s no such thing as pain.” There seems to be this mind over matter philosophy going around. Another nurse told me that there are some children in cancer wards whose pain cannot be controlled. I’m not a medical person so I don’t know if this is the case or not. Just some of my worried thoughts…..

        Liked by 1 person

  25. Bobg says:

    So the hospital is a “faith based values centered organization” but so was Hitler’s Third Reich “faith based and values centered”, but the question is whose values, the values of life or death and whose faith, the faith of valuing God and the life He has made or the faith of demons centered on life having no value if it isn’t “productive”?

    Liked by 2 people

  26. prayingflower says:

    This is just awful. Oh, so very much to pray, pray, pray about. Last week I met a single Mom in a parking lot and, without going into detail, I must tell you I missed the next right step big time. So I have been imploring the Lord to show me how best to recognize it. This morning while I was doing the nsr by attending Mass a man, whom I have known casually for a short while, and only at morning Mass, came up to me after Mass. I recognized in him two needs: transportation to and from a medical appt. and being alone on Christmas day. So, thanks be to God, we will take care of those two needs. Then I realized anew that the next right thing is responding to what and whom the Lord places in our path and to “do what our hands find to do.” Pretty simple, really. Thank you, Charlie. I think this Year of Mercy will be very powerful. God bless my squirrely NSR family.

    Liked by 6 people

  27. narnialion54 says:

    Just sent an email to Dr. Boom.

    Dear Dr. Boom,

    You have said that patient care is your topmost concern. As a former ICU nurse I ask you to reconsider the case of Christopher Dunn. Instead of taking his life, why not give him life? It may not be in the interests of your bottom line, but it will weigh heavily in your favor on the day you meet your Creator.
    Sincerely
    Ann S. (gave my full name and location)

    Liked by 3 people

  28. Kathleen Vacheresse says:

    I have sent e-mail to mboom and 8am praying for all involved to acknowledge God take the next right step and be a hope to those them. God bless

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Kathleen Vacheresse says:

    Sharing some good family news but need prayer my nephew Jodi and his wife Heidi expecting frist baby just found they are expecting triplets please pray for health for mother and baby and safe delivery we certainly have a God of surprises. Prausethe Lord

    Liked by 3 people

  30. prayingflower says:

    Sorry, forgot to say that the next right step here is obviously to email the Governor, which we will do.

    Like

    • Mick says:

      Prayingflower, that’s a great idea about e-mailing Governor Abbott. He is a devout Catholic, is fiercely pro-life, and will have great empathy with Chris Dunn because of his (Abbott’s) personal experience with tragedy and subsequent disability (and hospitals).

      For anybody interested in contacting Governor Abbott, the following link lists his official e-mail address, various phone numbers, and a mailing address:

      https://gov.texas.gov/contact/

      Liked by 2 people

  31. Kathleen Vacheresse says:

    Sharing some good family news but need prayer my nephew Jodi and his wife Heidi expecting frist baby just found they are expecting triplets please pray for health for mother and baby and safe delivery we certainly have a God of surprises. Praise the Lord

    Liked by 1 person

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      How joyous and concerning! I will pray in the name of The Blessed Trinity for Jodi & Heidi’s 3 blessings.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mick says:

      Whoa, Kathleen! My grandmother always said that good things come in threes. Congratulations, and prayers are on the way.

      Like

    • Snowy Owl says:

      O Almighty God, in Your wisdom You have entrusted (Jodi and Heidi) with three souls to rear for Your honor and glory. It is a great responsibility, O Heavenly Father. (They) are proud and a little afraid but (we) trust in your fatherly goodness and the intercession of Your own Mother, Mary, who knew all the hopes and fears of one who is expecting a child, (in this case three little souls!). Give them courage and fortitude when in need, dear God. Let them be born strong and healthy and filled with heavenly grace, Amen.
      Adapted from ‘All day with God’~ (my little black prayer book) 🙂

      Like

  32. Snowy Owl says:

    I am nauseated by this. I was devastated when they did this to Terri Schiavo. How is it that our Nation- “one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” DO THIS to a completely helpless soul? America, who has full access to God, in every way, and all He teaches, do this with out a second thought?
    “Whatever you DO to the least of these……..you DO to Me.” Jesus, the Protector of the helpless.

    Like

    • Snowy Owl says:

      I should add…Thank God for the Storm that will sweep away all of this hideous, murderous evil being committed. Come Lord Jesus!
      I don’t even euthanize my dying animals. I put them in God’s hands and trust Him to take them. None of them have ever suffered, they have all gone peacefully. God alone is the God of Life.
      Shame on those who play at being God and would do this to a precious human being. Oh they will wish they had never been born when they answer for this IF they do NOT REPENT!!!
      Lord have MERCY!
      (sorry guys…this is just so upsetting to me)

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mick says:

      Snowy, as horrendous as the Terri Schiavo case was, this case may be even worse in at least two respects. First, in the Schiavo case, the power-of-attorney (her evil husband) wanted her dead; and a court complied. In Christopher Dunn’s case, the power-of-attorney (Chris’ mother) wants him to live, so the hospital has gone to court in order to have her decision-making authority stripped from her. Secondly, in the Schiavo case, blood relatives (Terri’s parents) tried to challenge the decision-making authority of the power-of-attorney based on evidence that he had tried to physically harm her both before and after she ended up in her debilitated state. In the Dunn case, an unrelated party (some hospital goon) is trying to challenge the decision-making authority of a blood-relative/power-of-attorney whose only “crime” is fighting for the life and medical treatment of the patient.

      Dear Lord, with regard to the Storm, I hate the thought of billions of people suffering; but could You “bring it” already? Because this madness has to stop, and You’re the only one who can stop it.

      Liked by 6 people

      • Snowy Owl says:

        Now that was really well stated! Wow! again, thank you, Mick

        Like

        • Mick says:

          You’re welcome, Snowy. Cases like the Dunn and Schiavo cases really hit home with me because of my own experience with my mother, who was severely disabled for the last 20 years of her life because of a stroke suffered when she was 49. For the last 20 years, she was partially paralyzed, almost blind, and unable to read or write or talk. The last 2 1/2 years she spent in hospitals and sub-acute facilities because of a catastrophic reaction to chemotherapy (for a cancer “diagnosis” which turned out to be false–much like the Dunn case). On two occasions that we know of, doctors and hospital administrators took steps to prematurely end my mother’s life; in one of those instances, they actually lied to us about their plans and actions.Only the grace of God, “coincidences,” and a smiling but unmistakable warning from an attorney made them back off.

          Through it all, my mother kept her wits, her faith, and her sense of humor. She taught me so much: how to love and value those who aren’t “perfect,” how to fight even when the deck is stacked against you; how to live with joy and humor in the midst of suffering, illness, disability, and pain; how to join one’s suffering to Our Lord’s and offer it up for others. She made me a better person. That’s the effect that the infirm, disabled, and “different” have on those with open eyes and open hearts. And that’s why the satan works so hard to close the eyes and hearts of those faced with interacting with the “imperfect”: he knows that many of them are saints, and that they help us become saints.

          Lord, please open eyes and hearts during the Storm, so that as many people as possible may become saints.

          Liked by 9 people

          • Snowy Owl says:

            Mick, this is absolutely beautiful! You are amazing, you brought tears to my eyes. God bless you!
            I just found out, recently, my mom has Alzheimer disease, so did both of her parents. She has spent the past 30 years going to Mass and Adoration daily, to pray for her crazy huge family and she is just fine. She trusts God completely with what is happening to her and when she gets nervous she calls me and we both end up laughing like little kids. I had 5 sisters growing up and we took in both of her parents to care for them for as long as possible and we will all care for my parents now. My father is also very sick with lung issues. One of my sisters was born deaf and we all got involved with the deaf community. We have several children with Autism in our family now and they are wonderful. My mom has 42 Grandchildren and 12 Great Grandchildren (and counting) 8 of which are my own Grandchildren 🙂 ) We all, every single person in our family, feel we are blessed by God. God is and has been so very good to all of us!

            Liked by 9 people

          • YongDuk says:

            Amen

            Liked by 1 person

          • Beckita says:

            Your passion born of personal experience is inspiring, Mick. Your mother must be a powerful intercessor as well. I find your sharing also be profound. Thank you.

            “Lord, please open eyes and hearts during the Storm, so that as many people as possible may become saints.” Amen. Alleluia! Come, Lord Jesus, Come!

            Liked by 2 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Mick, that is so beautiful. My father was critically sick for many years. He used to joke that he could beat the odds in surviving all of his infirmities, but he couldn’t win the lottery! I leaned many of the same virtues from him. A blessing indeed.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Mick says:

            Thank you, Snowy. And your family sounds amazing. What a gift to have a huge, crazy, close-knit Catholic family. I will pray for your parents and their health; and I will pray for you and your sisters and the rest of your family as you care for your parents.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Mick says:

            Beckita, thanks for your kind words. Mom seemed to have a special “in” with Our Lord while on earth, and I definitely count on her intercession–my family must keep her busy! And I have a sneaking suspicion that your husband and my mom are pretty good buds up above.:)

            Liked by 1 person

          • Beckita says:

            WOW, Snowy! Beautiful sharing.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Petra says:

            Mick: AMEN!!! I took care of my non-ambulatory, left size paralyzed, incontinent mom (from a stroke) in her home for the last 15 1/2 years of her life. I can attest to what you are saying about those who suffer prolonged illness, and the graces it bestows on their caretakers.
            I also know the fear one can have of medical personnel who seem to want to hasten a person’s death, especially the most vulnerable. But God prevails.
            I hope my mom is sitting next to your mom in heaven. I think they’d like each other very much! 🙂
            God bless.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Beckita says:

            Ah Mick! Bring on the tissues. May they intercede for all of us!

            Like

          • Beckita says:

            Prayin’ for your parents and your family as they tend to your mom and dad’s needs.

            Like

          • Mick says:

            Jen, it sounds like your father was a great man. I love his sense of humor; I’m going to have to remember that line about the lottery. 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          • Mick says:

            Petra, first let me say that you’re my hero. The stories of how you took such loving care of your parents and fought tooth and nail with medical professionals… man, those touch me deeply. And also, you’re Polish; and what’s not to love about that? I’m not Polish; but I was married in a historically Polish parish (St. Mary of the Angels), and my brother and sister both married people of Polish descent. So, doesn’t that make me Polish-by-marriage?

            Yeah, your mom and mine are pals. And if I know my mom, the two of them are sharing some fascinating conversation, some Texas sheet cake, and some Bailey’s Irish Cream. 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Ha Mick…you could be a Super-Minority: an Afro-Polish-American woman…let the grievance-mongers top THAT!

            Liked by 4 people

          • Kim sevier says:

            I LOVE it!

            Like

          • Petra says:

            Mick: 🙂 I can just see them eating cake and sipping the Bailey’s. I never heard of Texas sheet cake, but my mom never met a confectionery she didn’t like, so I’m sure she’s all in. And her favorite liquor was Amaretto, so I’m sure there’d be a taste of that too.

            Mick, you are a dear, a real sparkling gem. And yes, I think getting married at St. Mary of the Angels and having Polish in laws does make you Polish by marriage. 🙂

            Thanks for your kind words about my stories of my experiences with taking care of my parents and dealing with all that goes with it. I tell of those experiences because I know when I was going through it, hearing about what others in similar situations went through or were going through helped me so much. It also gave me courage and made me able to know my experiences were not uncommon, and often hearing the stories of others consoled me. And lastly, when I read what others went through, it often informed me of what may happen, and allowed me to make better decisions regarding my parents’ care.

            You sharing what your poor mom went through, and even briefly saying that she was at risk in facilities entrusted with her care will help others to make more careful decisions about whether to place their parent in a facility or consider the possibility of caring for them at home. It is not always possible to care for someone at home, but people need to understand facilities are sometimes not the safe haven of care they imagine them to be.

            God bless you Mick, and your fine husband and all your wonderful kids.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Mick says:

            Charlie, that was hilarious! But then, three of my nieces ARE Afro-Polish-American women, so… I’ll have to settle for wanna-be (or poser) status. 🙂

            Liked by 4 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Well, you know, with my black former son-in-law and grandkids, I can claim a single degree of separation from minority status. Oh, and I am 1/8 American Indian (since I am partly redskin – hee hee – I can call myself what I want and the grievance-mongers had best mind their manners). But what would those clowns call my grand-kids? Native-African-Americans? That’s almost universal.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Marita says:

            Dear Mick,

            You are an inspiration to me, and Petra too! I, along with my siblings, but mostly me, because I live with my mother, we are climbing that awful mountain. My mom just turned 95 and she doesn’t have any major health problems, there are severe pain issues that are a mystery, even after two hospital stays and I certainly see more mental confusion, and she is just becoming very, very weak. What a heartache! But my priest friends keep telling me, what a blessing it is for me to be her caregiver in the last stages of her life. I guess, I just don’t see it. I have a feeling she won’t be around too much longer, and believe me she wants to go home to Heaven!

            Liked by 2 people

          • Petra says:

            Aw, Marita, I think of you and your mom often, and say a little prayer for you both when I do. I remember the funny image of you saying something about running from the chaos pushing your mom in a wheelchair down the street. 🙂 Made me laugh.

            I heard something from Fr. Rick Simon on Relevant Radio recently that really struck me. He said most people don’t understand love, because the kind of love that Jesus is talking about is sacrificial love. And in sacrificial love, you never get back what you put in. It’s the love of moms and dads for their kids; it’s the love of good husbands for wives, and vice versa, its the love of caregivers for the ill. It’s the love of Jesus for us. You will never get back the amount of care and sacrifice you put in. And when we love that way, we are imitating Jesus. It often does not feel good. It often feels very painful. But it’s right.

            One time in confession I was confessing some anger and resentment toward my siblings who were not helping with my mom, not because they couldn’t, but because they didn’t want to. The priest said to me sharply, “So you’re angry because of the extra merit before God you’re getting?” (God love him!! I love that priest!) I actually laughed out loud, and said (a little facetiously), “Yes Father, that’s it. I’m mad because I getting more merit than them.” But after that I got over my resentment. It didn’t bother me anymore.

            My brother who was caretaker with me and I used to say sadly to each other, there’s only one way this is can end. So we did what we could to make my mom’s life as happy and cheerful as we could. We prayed often, we told her dumb stories about our day, we complained about stupid things (like dumb drivers) and just involved her as much as we could in everyday things. She opened the mail every day (even though I often had to go making sure I had all the bills and things that had come in the mail, because they’d get shuffled into the newspaper!)

            I know the sadness you feel Marita.

            But one day a couple of months ago I was just vacuuming, thinking about nothing, and suddenly a thought came into my mind, as if my mom was speaking to me, and she said, “Oh, Petra! Do EVERYTHING you can to get to heaven. You cannot imagine how beautiful it is!”
            Maybe my own pious thoughts. I don’t know. But it made me smile.

            Love your mom as much as you can while she’s with you. Show her how grateful you are for her giving you life and loving you unconditionally. Forgive her any human failures she may have. You will never be sorry.
            God bless.

            Liked by 4 people

          • charliej373 says:

            My relationship with my Mom was often rocky. She often resented me – but also wanted to impress me and was intimidated by me. It was just often awkward. Once, she complained that I gave everyone else really funny cards on special occasions, but always only gave her flowery ones. So for her next birthday, I got her a card that said “I wanted to wish you a Happy Birthday…” (next page) “But I don’t want you to think I think you’re getting old…” (next page) “But I don’t want you to think I forgot…” (next page) “But I don’t want you getting all depressed…” (final page) “I just don’t want any trouble.”

            My Mom squealed with delight…said it captured our relationship perfectly. She actually framed it and kept it the rest of her life.

            After she died (and her last week and a half was an amazing source of conversion for many) I have often called on her intercession. Now this was NOT a vision, but once when I faced a difficult matter, I asked her intercession by saying, “I need your help figuring out what to do, Ma. You know, you’re smarter than me, now.” I could swear I heard her giggle at that.

            Liked by 3 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            After our mother’s death, my siblings and I shared caregiving for my father for 16 years. My sister a nurse, moved back to our childhood home and married and had her family there. I helped mostly with the financial and medical paperwork, and our brother was the muscles of the establishment. Dad was blind, had lost the nerve function to be able to stay balanced, and in the later years had a leg amputation due to his diabetes. He was a handful.
            It helped me to remember Matthew 18:3 – And said, Verily I say unto you, Except ye be converted, and become as little children, ye shall not enter into the kingdom of heaven. Dad was so very childlike and totally dependent and I took great comfort in thinking I was helping him make his way to heaven in the process.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Mick says:

            Marita, God bless you and your mother.

            Like

        • Petra says:

          Charlie said, “Ha Mick…you could be a Super-Minority: an Afro-Polish-American woman…let the grievance-mongers top THAT!”
          Ha! 🙂 🙂 😀
          Mick, you and your clan are welcome in my clan any day of the week!
          God bless.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Mick says:

            Charlie: Ah… where to start in responding to your comment?

            “I can claim a single degree of separation from minority status.” That was funny. ‘Cause being a minority is oh… so… AWESOME. (Cue the eye roll, snicker, and silly grin). Let’s see: Black? Check. Female? Check. American-Indian? Check. Polish-by-marriage? Check. Catholic? Check. Conservative? Check. Concealed-carry permit-holder (lump the last three attributes under “bitter clinger”)? Check. Gave-up-a-career-to-be-a-stay-at-home-mommy-who-farms-and-homeschools (lump this under “broke, barefoot-and-pregnant, and possibly insane”)? Check. And, Charlie, your personal checklist is rather similar to mine in many respects. You and I both have the kind of “checkered” past that makes liberals’/grievance-mongers’ heads explode. And admit it, Charlie: isn’t it so much fun watching their facial expressions go from smug, to befuddled, to irritated, to infuriated? Extra points if you can see actual smoke billowing from their ears.

            And as to what these clowns would call your grandchildren? Naturally, they’d call them “future supporters.” The grievance-mongers would surely presume that your grandkids’ ethnicity(ies) would make them susceptible to being convinced that they are aggrieved, persecuted members of a victim class or two; and that therefore they are entitled to be angry and to be appeased (and to vote Democrat, of course).

            And regarding “redskins”: I loathed the Washington Redskins when I was a kid growing up in the 1970s; they were the perennial nemesis of my team, the Cowboys (whom I have loathed since they fired the inimitable and most excellent Tom Landry, but I digress). However, since the whole dust-up over the Redskins’ “insensitive and racist” name, I have found myself cheering for the Redskins whenever they play, well, just about anybody.

            Liked by 4 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Heap good comment Mick. Worth much wampum!

            Liked by 1 person

          • Kim sevier says:

            Oh Mick! You are so awesome! Can’t wait to meet you. Oooo how I wish I had been a stay at home mom on a farm. I love everything you do/are/profess. God bless and thanks for sharing!

            Like

          • Mick says:

            Petra, thank you for your kind words and for your prayers for my family (you and yours are in my prayers, too). And thanks for granting me Polish-by-marriage status. That made my day!

            Now, if I could just figure out how to make decent golumpkis….

            Like

      • barb129 says:

        What a beautiful story Mick!!! Thank you so much for sharing….
        Sorry this comment is so late in coming but I can’t keep up with the comments these days…I’m three days behind. I’ve got over 400 emails from Charlie’s blog in my inbox every time I bring it up these days…hehe..
        Reminds me of those early days reading your blog, Charlie, when there were just a few of us commenting….the times they have changed! I don’t know how you’re doing it Charlie…the dear Lord must be multiplying your time. =)

        Liked by 2 people

        • charliej373 says:

          Boy, the Good Lord must be. I was on the road for a few hours today to visit with my volunteer assistant, Mary and her husband…and when I looked in, there were 67 new comments.

          Liked by 1 person

          • barb129 says:

            I was laughing tonight because I was reading emails as fast as I could, trying to catch up. Suddenly, I noticed new ones being added faster than I could read the older ones!! Mark was laughing at me because I kept saying, “How does he do it so quickly?!!”
            Praying for you, Charlie and wishing you a blessed Advent season…

            Liked by 1 person

        • Mick says:

          Thanks, Barb. By the way, were you able to get one of those squirrel ornaments? I sent the link to my husband and asked him to order one for me; he said he would, so I assume he did.

          Liked by 1 person

  33. Mick says:

    Not trying to hijack this thread; but here is somebody else that could also use our prayers and help.

    Short story: 5-year-old girl who 2 years ago lost her entire family in a house fire due to arson. Although her father died trying to shield her from the flames, she was severely burned. All she wants for Christmas is Christmas cards from around the world.

    Please, if you can, say a prayer for her and her aunt (who is raising her), and send a card. Thanks.

    http://www.redstate.com/2015/12/09/burn-victim-orphan-wants-christmas-holiday-wishes/

    Liked by 2 people

  34. Kris says:

    Charlie, I remember Joey Cronin’s ordeal and wanted to know if the same people who helped him get out of texas could be contacted again for this poor man? I am not connected with these resources, but it seems that the same big guns could be brought in to help here.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      In this case, many are already involved. When Joey Cronin’s situation arose, I initiated attention to his plight and others then came forward. In this case, I am supporting the efforts that others have followed. Texas Right to Life, one of the best in the country, is already on it big time.

      Liked by 2 people

  35. mary says:

    Human life is precious, may in our society seem to have forgotten that. I remember Terri Schaivo and what happened to her, oh how we prayed for her life to be spared, but to no avail. I will pray for this man, in fact, I already did as I watched him pray with folded hands for his life. I hope his attorneys can do what needs to be done so that justice prevails and life is victorious. Our Lady of Victory, pray for us.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Patrick of South Dakota says:

      Hi Mary,

      This case in Texas does parallel Terri Schaivo’s case, which was also painfully tragic to watch. Terri, unlike Christopher, was determined to be in a persistent vegetative state. Certainly no justification for what happened to her, though, because there were plenty of people were willing to care for her. Christopher’s situation is even more terrifying because he seems fully aware.

      I’ve got one bumper sticker on my truck: “Life is precious”

      Patrick

      Liked by 1 person

  36. Carmen says:

    I have also sent an email and will pray for ALL involved. I have to remember that our God is a God of miracles and conversions… We do our little part, He takes care of the rest.

    Liked by 1 person

    • zeniazenia says:

      FYI– Interesting article–Neurologist: Jahi McMath Is ‘No Longer’ Dead
      New court documents fuel controversy around the 15-year-old who has launched the accepted definition of ‘brain death’ into a tailspin.

      by CELESTE MCGOVERN 11/30/2015

      FREMONT, Calif. — Several doctors, many pre-eminent ethicists and a California judge all pronounced Jahi McMath “brain-dead” almost two years ago, and a county coroner issued her death certificate. But a document filed this month in the Superior Court of California claims a world-renowned pediatric neurologist has spent hours with the 15-year-old girl and determined that she “no longer fulfills standard brain-death criteria” because she responds to verbal commands.

      If proven true, the case will be the first in which a person correctly declared “brain-dead” according to accepted diagnostic criteria was then shown to have improved to no longer meet the conditions of death — and is alive. As such, McMath’s case is potentially explosive in the medical, legal and ethical end-of-life arena, where a host of diagnoses, including “brain-death,” are increasingly untenable.

      Liked by 4 people

  37. Mary-Louise says:

    Is Bishop Gracida part of this campaign too? A very holy man. Perhaps the Vortex would be interested in covering this, or EWTN.

    Like

  38. luvadoxi says:

    Hi Charlie–calm down honey! I’m a new reader. And in the article I read I didn’t find what you are saying; I don’t disbelieve you at all–I just haven’t found that article or didn’t see it. I will go back and look. For what it’s worth, I tried removing the “false witness” bit before posting, but it was too late. Anyway, I love your site and trust your judgment–any fraternal correction poorly attempted on my part was just that–trying to make what is great even better. I do get frustrated when some sites, like Lifesitenews, often put a sensation headline that twists what’s in the article a bit–puts a slant on it. We have the truth-no need for that! Anyway–I apologize for not reading carefully enough.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Again, no problem. Unfortunately, I do get some trolls. If they seem like they might be sincere a brisk (heh heh) answer seems to separate the wheat from the chaff. Either they go away or reveal themselves in a new rant – or they hang in there. You hung in there. Thanks and welcome to the site.

      Liked by 1 person

  39. luvadoxi says:

    Just wanted to say–I read what the mom said in the first link again and admit it sounds bad. But I’ve been taught to try and look for good motives–to see both sides–and the way she phrased it, it is possible the drugs would not be the cause of his dying within a few minutes, but possibly the removing life support. The way it was phrased–there is a little uncertainty there. I’m just trying to be a good Christian and hoping that they aren’t advocating euthanasia by these drugs, but just comfort care. I really am not a troll but a reader of your site and pro-life news. I think you may have jumped to conclusions about me unfairly, actually. It’s understandable because it’s so upsetting an issue. But that’s why I’m trying to bring some calm into the situation. Does that make sense?h Can we be friends again? 🙂

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Fair enough, luv. But I think you are engaging in a false even-handedness. There is no moral equivalence between those who seek to end innocent life and those who seek to defend it. There was no dispassionate debate on the validity of the claims of Stalin and his victims in the Gulag, or Mao and hi victims of the Cultural Revolution, or Hitler and his victims in the death camps. Some things must be objectively true, or we have no standards at all save the standard of what is most convenient for those who are most powerful. So when it comes to a man asking to live and the medical “professionals” who want him to die, I will neither be neutral nor listen to their sophist arguments on why he should die.

      Like

      • luvadoxi says:

        Hi Charlie–thanks for writing back. I watched the video. I guess I’m just confused by the allowed ethics of the church–that no one is required to remain on life support–the whole from conception to natural death thing. And I’m troubled by how my father in law checked into the hospital, suffering from terminal illnesses, and was sedated and died a couple of days later. I just don’t know where the line is regarding comfort care. I remember when the Karen Ann Quinlan case was the big news–regarding removing a ventilator; years later it was Terry Schiavo and food/water removal. When Terry was first in the hospital, my mom was too, and this nurse ran up to me when I came to visit asking if they could discontinue food and water. Very strange. And at the time, Terry was just beginning to be discussed. I didn’t authorize anything since I didn’t have her power of attorney, and my uncle who did said keep the feeding tube in. Thank God. A few months later the future Saint John Paul II firmed up the teaching regarding food and water, but at the time it wasn’t clearly defined. It seems to me there are times when hard decisions are made and it isn’t necessarily evil or unethical. It’s not as clear always as Stalin, Hitler or Pol Pot. Just my 2 cents. I appreciate your comment about false even-handedness. That’s a fair point. It’s hard for me to tell good from evil sometimes.

        Like

        • Petra says:

          luvadoxi: I agree this is a difficult area to discern. When I was in the position (holding the medical Power of Attorney) for my dad, and then later, my mom, I simply authorized reasonable procedures that gave them a chance to recover. In my mind I felt I needed to keep the door of healing open to God to heal them, without going to outlandish and improbable remedies or procedures.
          My dad had a GI bleed at age 85, 1 year before he died. It wouldn’t stop and all the doctors could suggest was removing his colon. Or perhaps doing a colonoscopy to see if they could find the source and cauterize it. I would not authorize removing his colon (I thought it would kill him) but did authorize the attempt to cauterize it. My dad had a priest administer the Sacrament of the Sick. The cauterization attempt failed, but my dad’s bleed stopped on its own, and he lived another year.

          My mom got pneumonia (at 98), and so yes to antibiotics, yes to a nasal feeding tube, no to intubation, yes to pressure oxygen. When she stopped responding to the antibiotics, I insisted they continue to administering them, in spite of her not responding. A big NO to a morphine drip. But yes to minimal (and I mean minimal: 1/2 mg per dose) morphine injections WHEN NEEDED (obvious discomfort or gasping.) (They wanted to give her 4mgs every 4 hours. NO WAY!) And she received the Sacrament of the Sick (twice!). But it was her time, and God took her.

          So each case is somewhat different. My standard was that I would do nothing to hasten death, and do everything to give God every normal possibility to heal them (including getting her the Last Rites (I know, I know, it’s the Sacrament of the Sick, but I’m thinking of the more traditional prayers at the end of life)), and accept whatever happened. In my mind, it’s about being pro-life while acknowledging God’s role in death.
          God bless.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Nancy says:

            Petra, I did the same things for my Dad, Mom and my husband and they all died peacefully in their (our) living rooms with family there. We took care of them (and I realize that isn’t always possible). God worked everything out for us.

            Liked by 3 people

          • luvadoxi says:

            Thank you, Petra, for sharing your very personal experiences. My dad had Parkinson’s and then bone cancer subsequent to prostate cancer he had had years ago (back when the radiation treatment wasn’t as targeted and effective). He had hospice care, and I always wondered whether sufficient pain meds were given, because it’s so hard to know when the patient can’t tell you (due to his Parkinsons). The decision was made not to treat the cancer, but that was a hard balance, I think, because of the severe nature of untreated bone cancer. I can’t say the decision was wrong, though. (He lived in another state and my stepmom made the decisions.) He died at age 89. A couple of weeks before his death he was able to kiss my hand. Hard decisions. I like the way you balanced authorizing treatment with hopes of helping but not deliberately hastening death. I think that was done in my dad’s case. I know the Church allows pain meds even if they hasten death if the intent is to relieve pain, not hasten death. When the culture turns away from God, it’s hard to know what the ethics of the medical personnel are. I don’t want to be in terrible pain, but I do want to go to heaven.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Petra says:

            luvadoxi: So sorry for the loss of your dad, and for how painful it must have been to know he was going through that. For me, cancer is a unique case for the administration of pain meds. I absolutely think 100% of the time the pain meds should be given to end stage cancer patients in whatever doses are necessary to alleviate the pain, even high doses. The dosage needed cannot always be precisely determined, and so the risk does exist the dose given may hasten death, but that can never be the intention in the smallest degree. That being said, it seems to me this protocol has now been extended to non-cancer terminally ill elderly patients, that can hasten their death. It seems to be crossing the line to me, and I would not allow it for my own parents.

            It is a very difficult to make sure to stay open to life and health when someone is so ill. And you are so right when you say when the culture turns away from God, it’s hard to know what the ethics of the medical personnel are. Because you don’t know if they are telling you the truth about the person’s pain status, or are leading you down the primrose path. In my own case, whatever failures I made in having to make those decisions, I know God could see my heart, so I know He knows my intentions were for life. So whatever happened, I take as His will. I guess that’s the best any of us can do.
            God bless.

            Liked by 2 people

          • LukeMichael says:

            I have medical power of attorney for my 91 year old mother who is a saint I’m sure. When I first found out about it and expressed some concern, she said, “Don’t worry about it God is in charge. So there I am. Always obey your mother.
            She still works 3 days a week, hits the pool 4 days a week and goes to daily Mass!

            Wisest and kindest person I’ve ever known!

            Liked by 3 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Luke, what an inspiration she is. God bless her soul!

            Like

          • Petra says:

            God bless her heart!!! And you too, LukeMichael. Don’t worry, really. You’ll do the right thing. God will guide you, I swear He will. I promise. Just never, ever sign a POLST, for your mom or yourself or anyone you love, because it negates and overrides your Power of Attorney for Health Care. And it follows the patient from facility to facility. It allows doctors and medical personnel to determine what to do next without getting consent from the patient or their Power of Attorney.
            Bishop Gracida on Abyssus Abyssum Invocat (http://abyssum.org/) has published lots of articles on end of life issues. Make sure you are informed before it all happens.
            God bless.

            Liked by 1 person

          • SteveBC says:

            Petra, I’ve heard of living wills and healthcare directives, and more, but I’m not familiar with a POLST. What is it, and why would anyone sign it or ask someone to sign it? Is it something hospitals have you sign upon admittance?

            Liked by 1 person

          • zeniazenia says:

            Dear SteveBC– http://www.cathmed.org/assets/files/POLST_Paradigm_and_Form.pdf
            for your review. Use ProLife Patients Rights Council, Steubenville, OH, USA.

            Liked by 1 person

          • SteveBC says:

            Zeniazenia, thank you so much. I’ve saved the document and will read it. Petra, you’re off the hook!

            Thank you both.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Petra says:

            Thanks zeniazenia. The article you linked to is a very detailed and in depth description and discussion of the POLST (Physicians Order for Life Sustaining Treatment). It’s very helpful.
            Here’s a good article I have seen on Bishop Gracida’s site by the National Catholic Bioethics Center on Health Care and the Life Sciences that I found very informative as well. You can read more on his site by typing in POLST in the search box there.
            http://abyssum.org/2012/01/10/catholic-healthcare-and-polst-a-new-threat/
            I think in these areas our best defense is to be very informed. It’s best to understand the issues before you face the crises, so you can think clearly when under duress (the stress of a loved one’s illness.)
            God bless.

            Liked by 2 people

  40. Tom says:

    “Whatsoever you do to the least of my brothers ( Christopher Dunn ), that you do unto me.”
    We can put Christ to death any ‘ol day in our society by proxy, and nary a person cares.
    A long time ago, my dad told me something that really hit home. He explained to me that even at 186,000 miles per second, a ray of light that started at one end of the Milkey Way glalaxie has only traveled 1/50th of the way across the Milkey Way since Christ was born 2000 years ago. Big galaxie, huh? Billions of planets in it. And, he explained, there are billions and billions and billions of galaxies. But despite this incredible creation, of which, size-wise, we a re nothing, we ( including Christopher Dunn ) are the most important thing to Christ. I think when people go messing with God’s gift of life, and deciding who lives and who dies, and when, they had better have a very good attorney on judgement day.

    Liked by 2 people

  41. Anne says:

    wrong number posted Mr. Johnston. I called and they said they were a hospital in Arkansas and not affiliated with Houston Methodist Hosp.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      So sorry, Anne. I picked the number up from another publication rather than checking myself. It was a toll-free number (which really doesn’t matter much any more) so it is tricky to check, anyway. I have edited it to put the regular hospital number up. Thanks for letting me know.

      Like

      • Mick says:

        Hmm… I called a number that you had up yesterday, but the lady didn’t tell me that I had the wrong number. Did you have multiple numbers yesterday, and might one of them have been correct?

        Maybe I should call again, just in case.

        Like

  42. Another Karen says:

    Thanks for the heads up. I sent an email, one of I hope thousands that will prompt the hospital to reconsider if only to avert the bad publicity (though I would rather the emails stir the moral consciences of those who make such decisions). So much for the doctors oath to first do no harm!

    Liked by 1 person

  43. Kathy Miller says:

    Thank you sharing this Charlie. The video of Chris really moved my heart. I called Blessed Sacrament church in Houston and they had a mass said for him. Others are uniting in prayer. God Bless you!

    Liked by 3 people

  44. luvadoxi says:

    And the gentleman did ask to live. That’s a big thing.

    Like

  45. Sally says:

    By the grace of God, my husband and I were at The Pinellas Park Facility, the day Terri Shavio died. There were a number of helicopters hovering over us and the police were every where. We were told we could not stand still on the side walk, or we would be taken out, we had to keep moving. I offered a police officer a water bottle and he reacted in shock. Maybe it occurred to him he was helping the wrong side. There was an older priest saying Mass on a small space of grass. In his homily, he asked, Where are the Christians ? Where are the Church Leaders ? I came home with an understanding as to the seriousness of raising up my kids to not join the military to fight and kill people in unjust wars, or to take jobs, like those in the police force or medical area where they would be told to kill off innocent people, especially if they were too weak in faith to quit their jobs instead. if people choose dysfunctional spouses to vow their lives with and won’t stay with their dysfunctional families for better and for worse and financially support their spouses and children, and break up the unity of the family so children have to pick a side, it is no coincidence why children grow up so confused and are willing to kill. They learned unforgivneness from their parents and why would anyone bother keeping vows if that was what was the primary example in their lives ? Sister Lucia from Fatima said that anyone standing up for marriage would be attacked. And many have said one reason St Joseph appeared in the vision at Fatima October 13, 1917, with Mary and holding The Baby Jesus, was because of the many fatherless homes families were and would be suffering from.
    The battle is for the family, this is the place we begin and praying together and staying together is harder than all the fasting and sack cloth we can don on, even if a good priest allows a separation, being faithful with the motive of working and trying to get back under the same roof is a place some can begin. God is so great, all things are possible, especially because of the Sacraments, especially Matrimony. If we do not love and take care of our families and keep our commitments, things will only get worse, because God loves us and He wants us to finish the job we are here to do. He will allow things to shake us in to repentance. Thank you all for the contact info. I made my call and sent my email to petition for the life of Christopher. I suggest in the next election, people seriously consider who is 100 percent pro life, no exceptions. I worked for the Alan Keyes campaign back in 2000 and since this time, I have been shocked that Christians still continue to support the two major parties whose candidates are not 100 percent pro life. If Christians had the faith the size of a mustard seed and supported those unknown holy candidates, we would not be in the mess we are. We need to stop supporting those candidates who still support some abortions. Evil is evil. Alan Keyes told us there is no such thing in the Catechism as voting for a lesser evil. We will be accountable for supporting anyone who supports murder and the break up of the family. And again, this all begins with me first ! Be blessed and a blessing, people of God !

    Liked by 2 people

  46. Anonymous says:

    Pro-life means protecting life at ALL STAGES. That seems to be something some people just don’s seem to get. When you CHOOSE not to protect life, you become pro-choice, which can mean that murdering anyone is a valid choice.

    Liked by 1 person

  47. ckelleyrich says:

    Email sent.

    Like

  48. audiemarie2014 says:

    At first, I thought this might be about Christopher Dunn, but it’s yet another person wanting to live when declared “brain dead” or whatever they want to declare.
    http://www.infowars.com/man-in-3-hour-armed-standoff-with-doctors-to-prevent-them-pulling-plug-on-brain-dead-son-who-survives/

    Liked by 2 people

  49. Mick says:

    Sad news: Chris Dunn has passed away. Please pray for the repose of his soul, and for his family.

    http://www.lifenews.com/2015/12/23/patient-shown-in-shocking-video-begging-to-stay-alive-dies-after-hospital-tried-to-kill-him/

    Like

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