Darkness and Light

christmas drawing

A Christmas drawing from young Catherine in Southern California.

By Charlie Johnston

I hate Microsoft. Sometime during the night while I slept, they took over my computer and upgraded it to Windows 10. Every time they do something like that, they invariably eliminate a feature I really liked. After a few weeks, I usually figure out how to use the new program as well as I did the old…and I have to concede it usually has some improvements. But I am getting to be an old curmudgeon, I guess. I hate having to figure out a new system every few months, it seems. But EVERY program on my computer is sluggish and stalls since the change, including Microsoft Word and Office. Another friend told me he had the same problem after taking Windows 10 – and ultimately had to delete some programs entirely to resolve the problem. (Update – I have spent most of the day working with a tech from Microsoft to fix the problem. Cris D. did, indeed, get it fixed, and was most courteous and diligent in doing so. But you should know that if you are on a Windows system, you will be eventually be upgraded whether you ask for it or not. Hopefully, they are solving the compatibility problems as they go along.)

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I love my NRS family, though. I am busy sending cards and notes out. Several readers sent lovely little gifts to me – to Mary, my assistant or to Lisa who owns the Full of Grace Supply House. Judy of Lubbock, Texas, sent me a beautiful hand-made quilt in the blue of Our Lady and purple of Our King. Beckita sent  me, yes, a squirrel ornament. It is amazing…I have never lived so joyfully well as since I began living on God’s providence and living mission. It is, of course, exhausting…but I remember the most joyfully exhausting period of my life was raising my kids. There is a lesson there – joy comes when we put our whole heart into something we truly love, fully in the sight of God. The most joyful part of this is that I see I have been a sign of hope to many of you, because you are so extravagant in being a sign of hope to me. Thank you.

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As you know, I don’t put up generalized charitable appeals…only those things I personally know to be legit or an appeal made by a trusted reader. One long-time reader, who came to one of my talks last summer, works for the state of New Jersey. He sent me this appeal. He asked me to keep some details confidential. He a solid, credible man – and the immediate need is great here. Here is a local news story on what happened. Here is the site that is accepting donations for the wonderful grandparents trying to give those children a life.

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Janet Klasson, better known as Pelianito, sent me this link concerning the ongoing conversion of many Muslims in Syria. It is a hopeful sign. Of course, these Protestants doing this brave work warn the converts not to “worship” saints – clearly a misinformed poke at Catholics and Orthodox – but we take good steps and leave it to god to sort out the unity.  Kind of reminds me of when I was a very young man. I almost exclusively dated Democrats – so I could get a twofer…get a conversion to the GOP while I was enjoying my social life. I only failed once, but that woman was an avowed Marxist. It wasn’t a complete failure, though. By the time we were done she was an ordinary Democrat. Small steps are better than no steps.

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Finally, though there has been some talk about it here, I will end with the full text of this Radio Vatican report on a compelling statement of solidarity between Christians and Jews.

Orthodox Rabbis issue groundbreaking statement on Christianity

Pope Francis prays at the Western Wall in Jerusalem during his visit to the Holy Land in May 2014 - EPA

Pope Francis prays at the Western Wall in Jerusalem during his visit to the Holy Land in May 2014 – EPA

10/12/2015 17:15


(Vatican Radio) For the first time since the Second Vatican Council changed Christian teachings toward Judaism and the Jewish people 50 years ago, a group of Orthodox rabbis have issued a public statement advocating partnership with Christians and appreciating the religious value of Christianity.

Published on December 3rd on the website of the Center for Jewish-Christian Understanding and Cooperation (CJCUC) in Israel, “To Do the Will of Our Father in Heaven: Toward a Partnership between Jews and Christians” is signed by over 25 prominent Orthodox rabbis in Israel, United States and Europe and calls for cooperation between Jews and Christians to address the moral and religious challenges of our times. The proclamation’s authors are inviting fellow Orthodox rabbis to join in signing the statement.

“The real importance of this Orthodox statement is that it calls for fraternal partnership between Jewish and Christian religious leaders, while also acknowledging the positive theological status of the Christian faith. Jews and Christians must be in the forefront of teaching basic moral values to the world,” said Rabbi Shlomo Riskin, one of the statement’s initiators, and founder of CJCUC, member of the Israeli Rabbinate and the Chief Rabbi of Efrat. While not a direct response to the Church’s 1965 “Nostra Aetate,” “To Do the Will of Our Father in Heaven” was clearly influenced by Christianity’s new affirmation of the eternity of the Jewish covenant and the respect that Christian leaders have demonstrated toward Judaism and Jews in contemporary dialogues and religious encounters.

“Jewish thinkers have previously crafted statements like Dabru Emet in 2000 on Jewish-Christian relations and theology, but few Orthodox rabbis could go along with those theological and practical claims in light of their understanding of Jewish tradition. This proclamation’s breakthrough is that influential Orthodox rabbis across all centers of Jewish life have finally acknowledged that Christianity and Judaism are no longer engaged in a theological duel to the death and that Christianity and Judaism have much in common spiritually and practically. Given our toxic history, this is unprecedented in Orthodoxy.” said Rabbi Dr. Eugene Korn, Academic Director of CJCUC.

The statement cites traditional opinions by past rabbinic authorities to justify partnership with Christians and religious appreciation of Christianity. “We understand that there is room in traditional Judaism to see Christianity as part of God’s covenantal plan for humanity, as a development out of Judaism that was willed by God,” said Rabbi Irving Greenberg, perhaps the most active Orthodox theologian in Jewish-Christian dialogue and covenantal theology. Another of the statement’s initiators, Jerusalem’s Rabbi David Rosen, International Director of Interreligious Affairs of the American Jewish Committee, added, “We need to work together to meet our common challenges: the assault of radical secularism, religious extremism and moral relativism on the heritage and dignity of humankind.”

Please find below the full text of the Orthodox Rabbinic Statement on Christianity

December 3, 2015

To Do the Will of Our Father in Heaven:

Toward a Partnership between Jews and Christians

After nearly two millennia of mutual hostility and alienation, we Orthodox Rabbis who lead communities, institutions and seminaries in Israel, the United States and Europe recognize the historic opportunity now before us. We seek to do the will of our Father in Heaven by accepting the hand offered to us by our Christian brothers and sisters. Jews and Christians must work together as partners to address the moral challenges of our era.

1.     The Shoah ended 70 years ago. It was the warped climax to centuries of disrespect, oppression and rejection of Jews and the consequent enmity that developed between Jews and Christians. In retrospect it is clear that the failure to break through this contempt and engage in constructive dialogue for the good of humankind weakened resistance to evil forces of anti-Semitism that engulfed the world in murder and genocide.

2.     We recognize that since the Second Vatican Council the official teachings of the Catholic Church about Judaism have changed fundamentally and irrevocably. The promulgation of Nostra Aetate fifty years ago started the process of reconciliation between our two communities. Nostra Aetate and the later official Church documents it inspired unequivocally reject any form of anti-Semitism, affirm the eternal Covenant between G-d and the Jewish people, reject deicide and stress the unique relationship between Christians and Jews, who were called “our elder brothers” by Pope John Paul II and “our fathers in faith” by Pope Benedict XVI. On this basis, Catholics and other Christian officials started an honest dialogue with Jews that has grown during the last five decades. We appreciate the Church’s affirmation of Israel’s unique place in sacred history and the ultimate world redemption. Today Jews have experienced sincere love and respect from many Christians that have been expressed in many dialogue initiatives, meetings and conferences around the world.

3.     As did Maimonides and Yehudah Halevi,[1] we acknowledge that Christianity is neither an accident nor an error, but the willed divine outcome and gift to the nations. In separating Judaism and Christianity, G-d willed a separation between partners with significant theological differences, not a separation between enemies. Rabbi Jacob Emden wrote that “Jesus brought a double goodness to the world. On the one hand he strengthened the Torah of Moses majestically… and not one of our Sages spoke out more emphatically concerning the immutability of the Torah. On the other hand he removed idols from the nations and obligated them in the seven commandments of Noah so that they would not behave like animals of the field, and instilled them firmly with moral traits…..Christians are congregations that work for the sake of heaven who are destined to endure, whose intent is for the sake of heaven and whose reward will not denied.”[2] Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch taught us that Christians “have accepted the Jewish Bible of the Old Testament as a book of Divine revelation. They profess their belief in the G-d of Heaven and Earth as proclaimed in the Bible and they acknowledge the sovereignty of Divine Providence.”[3] Now that the Catholic Church has acknowledged the eternal Covenant between G-d and Israel, we Jews can acknowledge the ongoing constructive validity of Christianity as our partner in world redemption, without any fear that this will be exploited for missionary purposes. As stated by the Chief Rabbinate of Israel’s Bilateral Commission with the Holy See under the leadership of Rabbi Shear Yashuv Cohen, “We are no longer enemies, but unequivocal partners in articulating the essential moral values for the survival and welfare of humanity”.[4] Neither of us can achieve G-d’s mission in this world alone.

4.     Both Jews and Christians have a common covenantal mission to perfect the world under the sovereignty of the Almighty, so that all humanity will call on His name and abominations will be removed from the earth. We understand the hesitation of both sides to affirm this truth and we call on our communities to overcome these fears in order to establish a relationship of trust and respect. Rabbi Hirsch also taught that the Talmud puts Christians “with regard to the duties between man and man on exactly the same level as Jews. They have a claim to the benefit of all the duties not only of justice but also of active human brotherly love.” In the past relations between Christians and Jews were often seen through the adversarial relationship of Esau and Jacob, yet Rabbi Naftali Zvi Berliner (Netziv) already understood at the end of the 19th century that Jews and Christians are destined by G-d to be loving partners: “In the future when the children of Esau are moved by pure spirit to recognize the people of Israel and their virtues, then we will also be moved to recognize that Esau is our brother.”[5]

5.     We Jews and Christians have more in common than what divides us: the ethical monotheism of Abraham; the relationship with the One Creator of Heaven and Earth, Who loves and cares for all of us; Jewish Sacred Scriptures; a belief in a binding tradition; and the values of life, family, compassionate righteousness, justice, inalienable freedom, universal love and ultimate world peace. Rabbi Moses Rivkis (Be’er Hagoleh) confirms this and wrote that “the Sages made reference only to the idolator of their day who did not believe in the creation of the world, the Exodus, G-d’s miraculous deeds and the divinely given law. In contrast, the people among whom we are scattered believe in all these essentials of religion.”[6]

6.     Our partnership in no way minimizes the ongoing differences between the two communities and two religions. We believe that G-d employs many messengers to reveal His truth, while we affirm the fundamental ethical obligations that all people have before G-d that Judaism has always taught through the universal Noahide covenant.

7.     In imitating G-d, Jews and Christians must offer models of service, unconditional love and holiness. We are all created in G-d’s Holy Image, and Jews and Christians will remain dedicated to the Covenant by playing an active role together in redeeming the world.

Initial signatories (in alphabetical order):

Rabbi Jehoshua Ahrens (Germany)

Rabbi Marc Angel (United States)

Rabbi Isak Asiel (Chief Rabbi of Serbia)

Rabbi David Bigman (Israel)

Rabbi David Bollag (Switzerland)

Rabbi David Brodman (Israel)

Rabbi Natan Lopez Cardozo (Israel)

Rav Yehudah Gilad (Israel)

Rabbi Alon Goshen-Gottstein (Israel)

Rabbi Irving Greenberg (United States)

Rabbi Marc Raphael Guedj (Switzerland)

Rabbi Eugene Korn (Israel)

Rabbi Daniel Landes (Israel)

Rabbi Steven Langnas (Germany)

Rabbi Benjamin Lau (Israel)

Rabbi Simon Livson (Chief Rabbi of Finland)

Rabbi Asher Lopatin (United States)

Rabbi Shlomo Riskin (Israel)

Rabbi David Rosen (Israel)

Rabbi Naftali Rothenberg (Israel)

Rabbi Hanan Schlesinger (Israel)

Rabbi Shmuel Sirat (France)

Rabbi Daniel Sperber (Israel)

Rabbi Jeremiah Wohlberg (United States)

Rabbi Alan Yuter (Israel)

STATEMENT SOURCES

[1] Mishneh Torah, Laws of Kings 11:4 (uncensored edition); Kuzari, section 4:22

[2] Seder Olam Rabbah 35-37; Sefer ha-Shimush 15-17.

[3] Principles of Education, “Talmudic Judaism and Society,” 225-227.

[4] Fourth meeting of the Bilateral Commission of the Chief Rabbinate of Israel and the Holy See’s Commission for Religious Relations with Jewry, Grottaferrata, Italy (19 October 2004).

[5] Commentary on Genesis 33:4.

[6] Gloss on Shulhan Arukh, Hoshen Mishpat, Section 425:5.

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
This entry was posted in Call for Help, Musings, Solidarity, Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

318 Responses to Darkness and Light

  1. tim says:

    Simply wonderful news! This is the sort of development that both gladdens our hearts and signals the new era that is soon to be brought about on the earth. Praise God! It really does feel as though we are “watchmen” on the castle wall, looking for signs of the coming new dawn of Mary’s Triumph, just as Pope St. John Paul spoke about some years ago. He quoted Isaiah 22 (I think) and the words, “Watchman, how much longer the night?”.

    Liked by 8 people

    • “Faith is the bird that feels the light and sings while the dawn is still dark.” – Rabindranath Tagore

      Liked by 12 people

      • Joseph77 says:

        Singingflowers,
        That quote is AMAZING! Would you believe, a year ago I was at a Chinese restaurant when I broke open a fortune cookie and there it was: “Faith is the bird that feels the light and sings while the dawn is still dark.” I thought it was one of the most beautiful sayings I have ever read on faith and meditated on it for a very long time. Thank you for sharing it with us, you made my day!

        Liked by 4 people

      • Connie says:

        Thank You, So So much, Singing Flowers, for sharing that quote. I just asked my daughter in law to read Phillipians 4:8 to help sustain her in her own ministorm. I sent her this quote because it seems to dovetail perfectly with the message I wanted to convey to her.

        Would that ALL our loved ones would follow Charlie’s Blog for all the treasures hidden in them.

        Liked by 3 people

  2. Snowy Owl says:

    Charlie, I had the same thing happen to me about a month ago, I immediately switched back- they give that option for one month after they hi-jack and download it in secret at night…the rats! I then went to windows update and switched it from automatically download and install updates to the option to allow me to choose what and when. Hope this helps anyone having to deal with this. Now I have to go back and finish your new post!

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      I spent several hours with a tech who fixed it. Hopefully I will begin to like it better after I figure out how to navigate it.

      Like

      • YongDuk says:

        Android did that to my dumbPhone.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Old curmudgeon, Charlie? Definitely NOT!

        Like

      • Joe says:

        It installs W10 without removing the existing W7 OS (hense the ability to revert back). Remove the 7 OS from the computer and you will free up about 10-15 GB of RAM, which should also speed up the computer.
        Additionally, with 10, they automatically make Microsoft Edge as the default Internet Browser. You can open IE in Edge, just click the 3 dots in the upper right corner and select “open in Internet Explorer”, then pin IE to the taskbar….or the smarter route would be to make Chrome the default browser. 10 works fine and the search function in the lower left will be your friend

        Like

      • Petra says:

        I have to say I have been shaking my proverbial fist at Microsoft ever since I began working with computers and they would “upgrade” and invariably take away some feature that I absolutely loved and knew how to use. The worst was in Windows7 when the standard “tree” look of your computer directories and files were replaced by “Libraries” and “Homegroups” and the search feature was completely changed. I still can’t figure out how to easily search for a file that I know exists on my computer! Damn you Bill Gates. I hope you roast in hell! (Okay, not really, but it is maddening).
        I’ve done everything I can to avoid Windows10, but I know, like death and taxes, it’s inevitable. Sigh. 😦
        God bless. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

  3. Jim M. says:

    I saw the statement from the Orthodox Rabbis, and noticed how it coincided with the Church’s statement to avoid actively converting Jews. It seems like a next right step by both faiths bringing us closer to oneness.

    Perhaps the billion plus Christians in this world are a sign of salvation for the Jewish people. While they rejected our Lord when He was in their presence, Christianity may be there as a second chance.

    Jesus, after all, was born a Jew, and died a Jew. We cannot love Jesus without embracing who He was and making that part of us.

    I have often wondered, and continue to wonder, why we don’t follow and celebrate Jewish holidays. True, Christ’s coming eliminated blood sacrifice, by His blood. But Jesus celebrated Jewish tradition right uo until the Last Supper.

    I imagine there is some answer long ago made and followed. But Christ did say he came not to change the law or displace it, but to fulfill it.

    We embrace the Old Testament as the true Word. We follow the Ten Commandments written by the finger of God. So why would we not add to Jewish Tradition in our Christian lives, rather than eliminate it?

    Catholics are already down to to one annual Confession as a requirement, which seems mighty close to a day of atonement.

    As I said, people wiser than I have no doubt provided a definitive answer, but I struggle with “why not?”. More days to remind us of God’s infinite love and mercy. Anything that helps keep us centered on God doesn’t seem like such a bad thing.

    Liked by 11 people

    • Sr Lorraine says:

      As St Paul said in Galatians, the Old Law was like the pedagogue who brought the children to school. Now we are in the school of Jesus Christ. So we don’t celebrate the Jewish holidays as such because they were the prefiguring. We celebrate their fulfillment. For example, the Easter Vigil is a beautiful rundown of God’s mighty works for Israel. We now celebrate the true Passover, which is Jesus’ death and resurrection, in the Mass. We are justified by faith in Jesus Christ, not by the works of the Mosaic Law: “For we hold that a person is justified by faith apart from works prescribed by the [Mosaic] law.” (\Rom 3:27).
      The Gentiles do not have to adopt Jewish practices; that debate was resolved in the early Church.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Mick says:

      Jim, when Charlie said that both Protestant and Catholics would recover much of what each “side” had lost due to the Reformation, I wondered: If after the Rescue, Jews will “recover” the Messiah, then will Christians recover/discover some of the Jewish feast days? Personally, I think that that would be awesome.

      Charlie, what say you? Any possibility of that, you think?

      Liked by 3 people

      • charliej373 says:

        My job is just to get folks to the picnic grounds where that family reunion will be held. After that, it’s your job how to proceed (with a little wisdom from above, I am sure.) Within a few months after the Rescue, my work is entirely done except for raising support for the Shrine.

        Liked by 3 people

    • zeniazenia says:

      ‘…salvation comes through the Jews.’

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Snowy Owl says:

    Reading the series ‘Poem of the Man-God’, gave me a very deep respect and love for the Jewish people, the way they lived..and the Old Testament when I was first newly back to the Church. I found the series, started reading it and once into it, was told it was on the Vatican bad list… I had to quit reading, until a little later when our wonderful Defender of the Faith (at that time) Cardinal Ratzinger, removed the books from the “bad-list” God bless him. I loved those books! I also loved when Pope John Paul ll called the Jews our elder brothers. I thought that was just beautiful.

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Yes, the Vatican determined it is fine to read as long as you read it as literature – and not prophecy or mysticism.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Snowy Owl says:

        Yes, Charlie I just loved the way it depicted the daily life of the Jewish people. I had a similar experience reading a book about the Lakota Indians. It just opened the door for me to see that other cultures are filled with many of the same joys and fears we all struggle through. In a nutshell, it helped broaden my views, remove biases. Didn’t really matter if it was true or fictional. Does that make sense?

        Liked by 1 person

    • Barbara Dore says:

      Snowy Owl, I read somewhere that Our Lady of Medjugroje said, read it…. when questioned by Vicka ? or other visionary…it was ages ago and I could not recall everything.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Snowy Owl says:

        Barbara, thank you for telling me this, I can fully understand why she would recommend this series…there is something very special about it and I know what it did for me! I have always wondered if the Church will end up taking a second look into this series. Maybe after the storm, Mary will clear a few things up, like this!

        Like

      • Doug says:

        Yup. I heard first hand from Marija back in 1991 that she was reading it.

        Liked by 2 people

  5. mary says:

    I have heard it said that “The New Testament is hidden in the Old, and the Old is revealed in the New.” As a Catholic, I have always had a love for the Old Testament even as a child. I realize as an adult it was Jesus in the Old Testament that I was loving. My hope and my prayer is that one day our elder brothers will “fall in love” with Him as well. Thanks for the post.

    Liked by 3 people

    • zeniazenia says:

      Hi Mary,
      ‘… Christians read the Old Testament in the light of the New, in the conviction expressed by Augustine in the indelible formula: “In the Old Testament the New is concealed and in the New the Old is revealed” (Quaestiones in Heptateuchum 2, 73). Pope Gregory the Great also spoke in the same sense when he defined the Old Testament as “the prophecy of the New” and the latter as the “best exposition of the Old” (Homiliae in Ezechielem I, VI, 15; cf. “Dei verbum”, 16). ‘ Taken from the The Gifts and the Calling of God are Irrevocable (GCGI), It is so good, I cannot get enough of God’s Word I always want more and more! And in that way it really doesn’t disappoint. “an ant can wade and an elephant can drown”(now who said that?) 🙂 –Jane

      Liked by 2 people

  6. James Ignatius McAuley says:

    Charlie,

    To follow up this wonderful statement, I would like to quote Father JOhn Hunwicke, late of the Church of England and now a Priest of the Holy Catholic Church, Oridnariate of Our LAdy of Walsingham, from his erudite blog, “Father Hunwicke’s Mutual Enrichment.” However, to other readers I would advise you that Father John has a twinkle in his eye, being an old Latin Don of Oxford University in merry old England. This is part of his analysis for the new Vatican document, “The Gifts and the Calling of God are Irrevocable.” Anyways, Father John Hunwicke!:

    Supersession and Sacrifice

    There are two omissions which I find trying in the new ‘Document’ about Catholic-Jewish relations; the second is the failure to discuss the function of Biblical Typology in articulating supersession-in-continuity … about which there is something in my series of reprinted posts about Nostra aetate. The first omission is the failure of the Document to make any real attempt at historical contextualisation. It is so obsessed with rapprochement between third millennium Catholicism and Pharisaic Rabbinic Synagogue Judaism that it almost seems unaware that, in terms of the ‘New Testament Period’, Judaism was a Temple-centred, Sacrifice-based, Religion. The Document is so concerned with questions like “Does Christianity supersede Judaism?” and “Will Christians pervert Jews from Jewry?” that it pays little attention to the more down-to-earth question ‘Exactly what is supposed to be superseding, or not superseding, exactly what?’ I think this is a fairly massive lacuna.

    Rabbis, very naturally, are preoccupied with anxieties that we might steal their congregations from them (if only they knew how useless we are at Mission!). The worry “Might these Catholic Priests stop Jews from going to make the appointed animal sacrifices in the Temple at Jerusalem” very rarely (since there hasn’t been a Temple in Jerusalem for nearly two thousand years) seems to keep them awake at night … you wouldn’t expect it to! But Catholicism in fact claims to be the fulfilment and hence (in terms of day-by-day, year-by-year, cultic actions) the replacement, of the Temple’s Sacrificial system.

    Some thirty years ago, the great Ed Sanders, a self-described “liberal modern secularised Protestant”, pointed out that the meaning of the Lord’s Palm Sunday ‘Cleansing of the Temple’ is most obviously seen as the replacement of the Temple. And after all, Jesus does refer to himself as the Temple. And in 1989, Rabbi Jacob Neusner, a prolific American writer upon First Century Judaism, offered his own, brilliant, refinement of Sanders’ argument. The moneychangers, he explains, were there to facilitate the payment of the Temple tax which “serve[d] through the coming year to provide the public daily whole offerings, in the name of the community”. So:

    ” … the overturning of the moneychangers’ tables represents an act of the rejection of the most important rite of the Israelite cult, the daily whole-offering, and, therefore, a statement that there is a means of atonement other than the daily whole-offering, which now is null. Then what was to take the place of the daily whole-offering? It was to be the rite of the Eucharist: table for table, whole-offering for whole-offering. It therefore seems to me that the correct context in which to read the overturning of the money-changers’ tables is not the destruction of the Temple in general, but the institution of the sacrifice of the eucharist, in particular. It further follows that the counterpart of Jesus’ negative action in overturning one table must be his affirmative action in establishing or setting up another table, that is to say, I turn to the passion narratives centred upon the Last Supper. That, at any rate, is how, as an outsider to scholarship in this field, I should suggest we read the statement. The negative is that the atonement for sin achieved by the daily whole offering is null, and the positive, that atonement for sin is achieved by the Eucharist: one table overturned, another table set up in place, and both for the same purpose of atonement and expiation of sin.”

    I have highlighted in blue the words in which Neusner the Jew expresses his discernment of how the Eucharistic Sacrifice ordained by Jesus of Nazareth was intended to supersede the Temple Sacrificial system.

    I don’t think we Catholics should be grabbing or claiming to supersede the synagogue-based Rabbinic Judaism of the last nineteen centuries. That would be sheer theft. The rabbis invented it; how could we possibly have any right to it? But the Temple with its system was the construct ‘in possession’ at the moment at which they and we, two competing heirs of Second Temple Judaism, began to go our two separate ways. What they took with them on their journey is for them to say; what we took on ours was the Daily Sacrifice of the Lamb. Deus qui legalium differentiam hostiarum unius sacrificii perfectione sanxisti …

    The Temple hosted the private sacrifices of individuals and families between the Morning and Evening Sacrifices of the People of God. I can think of nothing more like this in spirit as well as in sacramental reality than a great Catholic church in the Medieval or Baroque period. At the High Altar you see the formal prescribed ritual of the Act of Immolation at the public Capitular Mass, a rite not performed either to teach or to impress but simply as the Sacrifice done because the LORD who is Torah Incarnate so prescribed. And at the side altars, you hear the murmur of the private Masses laying before YHWH the private intentions of individuals and families; all those oblations – One Oblation, the One Lamb.

    Yes; the rabbis are more than entitled to undisturbed possession of their own lawful property. All we claim is the propitiatory Oblation which sums up and fulfills and enfolds and transcends all the Temple Sacrifices … as well as the thusia typike of Our Patriarch Abraham … and the munera, ‘dutiful offerings’, of God’s Righteous Servant Abel at the dawn of time. If they have no wish to take all that from us, what is there for us both to squabble about?

    End of Article – please note the reference to Abraham and Able -as found in the ancient Roman Canon, a Eucharistic Prayer I suggest many of reread and see that it is nothing but Temple Judaism.

    Another point is Rabbi Neussner was quoted with favor by Pope Benedict XVI.

    Finally, if you read the life of Saint James the Just, Brother of our Lord by Joseph’s first marriage as found in Saint Jerome’s Life of Illustrious Men, you will see that the connection between Temple Judaism and Christianity.

    Love, hugs and prayers to all.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Matthew says:

      James:
      Absolutely BRILLIANT. I have developed my own version that argues that Old Testament Judaism DIED in AD 70 with the destruction of the Temple. Out of this destruction two religions were born Christianity and Rabbinical Judaism. The real debate should be which of these is the TRUE successor to Old Testament Judaism NOT whether Christianity supersedes Rabbinical Judaism.
      Matthew
      PS: I wonder how the authors of the recent non-magisterial document on Judaism would have viewed Paul’s preferential option to first preach in the synagogues before turning to the Gentiles.

      Liked by 1 person

      • James Ignatius McAuley says:

        Matthew,

        In response to your comment regarding the author’s of the new Vatican document, “The Gifts and the Calling of God are Irrevocable,” I would suggest that a false dichotomy has been drawn up in regards to Pope Francis’s words condemning proselytizing. I would further suggest that something has been “lost in translation,” as the saying goes. In the English language, “to proselytize” does not necessarily carry with it negative baggage. At the same time, we do hear Pope Francis encouraging envangelization and missionary activity. Now, in English, “to evangelize” and “to proselytize” both carry positive connotations as missionary activity, as well as negative associations (think of certain religious/faith groups who go door to door and harass people). Having clarified things by this distinction, therefore, I do not think preaching in Synagogues as Paul did is now forbidden by either Pope Francis or the author’s of said document. Now, you and I, presumably not being male Jews, do not have the right to enter in the Synagogue and read from the scroll or preach. However, Paul had such a right as his birthright from the Tribe of Benjamin and as a Pharisee.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Ditto. Absolutely brilliant!

      Like

  7. Doug says:

    Now this is amazing!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. The Orthodox Rabbis have issued an amazing document! I almost can’t believe what I read. It has brought so much joy to my heart to read that document. It is the beginning of our formal and eventual reunion. “And so all Israel will be saved.” (Romans 11:26)

    Liked by 3 people

  9. A “twofer”…oh, that gave me a great belly laugh. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. zeniazenia says:

    Hi Jim, The importance of Jesus’ sacrifice and resurrection is the completion of ‘the Law’– the Mosaic Law which could not forgive sins nor give life. We belong to the new and everlasting covenant with God, We cannot be centered on God if we are not keeping His New Covenant. Our Traditions must be Jesus’ Traditions- He died for His Bride the Church- not Moses’ old laws. Jesus’ Traditions are His Resurrection, Life, Power and Authority.This is the life-giving Truth He presents to everyone! .–Jane

    Like

    • Jim M. says:

      Yes indeed! It is what Jesus himself said that He did not come to change the law, but fulfill it! And as Sr Lorraine so eloquently stated, our faith reflects that fulfillment.

      Paul’s discourse on the law is fascinating. Definitely some high calorie spirituality that must be taken in small bites. In Christ, we are not bound or led by the law, but by the Spirit. That does not mean we can disregard the law, for it we are led by the Spirit we naturally embrace the law. If we love God with all our minds, heart, strength and soul, the last thing we would ever want to do is to hurt the one we love with every fiber of our being.

      I understand we are not compelled to observe Judaic tradition (Paul again, in his discourse in circumcision of the body and heart makes that clear), but why wouldn’t we? Christ Himself told all to sin no more, and that the greatest two Commandments were to love God totally, and to love your neighbor as yourself. Those are two directives right out of the law of Moses. The first being contained in the 10 Commandments, and the second in Leviticus (19:9-18).

      We cannot ignore that heritage, and if not, why not embrace it?

      The Jewish holy days are constant reminders of God’s infinite mercy and love. In this year of mercy, it seems fitting to make use of all the reminders we can.

      Liked by 2 people

      • YongDuk says:

        One of the saddest things about the Enlightenment and Biblical Scholarship that suffered from it (e.g. even Darwinistic thought being applied to the so-called evolution of the Synoptic Gospels! [Oh, yes, you, Seminary Professors, I am still pietistic these two or three days later!])

        With that was the evolution of Catholic Feast days as if borrowed from pagan feasts. My least favourite–or the most heinous in my opinion–is the Date of Christmas being blamed as a Christianisation of the Winter Solstice and Saturn.

        Thus, it is missed that there are indeed the roots of Catholic Feasts in the old Jewish Feasts. They are just set to the Solar Calendar moved from the Lunar Calendar.

        Good and very simple analysis of the Book of Daniel in comparison to the Books of Maccabees clearly shows that both authors are writing about the same events and the prediction of Daniel corresponds to that of the Re-Dedication (Hannukah) that occurred on the 25th of Chislev and of course that is very closely conjoined/connected to the Promised Messiah.

        Sort of bizarre that Judas Maccabees would declare that 25 Chislev was to be held in perpetuity and suddenly Christians dropped it, when we hold the other major Jewish Feasts in perpetuity as the Torah says.

        The Byzantine Churches begin their liturgical year in September — Rosh Hashanah, as did the Civil year before it was moved to January 1.

        Sept 14/15 – I find a parallel in Yom Kippur)

        [Oct 31]/November 1 – Booths

        Dec 25. Chislev 25.

        Feb 2 or Ash Wednesday/Ash Monday might find their parallel in Purim. (I haven’t found a good truly convincing parallel, so if anyone has any insights on a parallel, I would love to hear it.)

        It is also quite interesting to contemplate why Oct 31 is such a huge satanic feast day reflecting on Rev 12: While there may be truth to the Celtic Druid history of that date of Oct 31, it seems mighty coincidental that it is the Vigil of the Feast of those against whom Satan went off to wage war!

        Liked by 3 people

        • MarieUrsula says:

          “With that was the evolution of Catholic Feast days as if borrowed from pagan feasts. My least favourite–or the most heinous in my opinion–is the Date of Christmas being blamed as a Christianisation of the Winter Solstice and Saturn.”

          It’s very cool that Charlie’s angel, Gabriel, was delighted that we got the date of Christmas right. 🙂 So it wasn’t simply a Christianization of a pagan observance.

          Liked by 4 people

        • zeniazenia says:

          Thank you Yong Duk Feb 2 is Candlemas Day. In pre Christian times it was known as the festival of lights. Halfway through as winter gives way to spring. Christians thought of Mary’s purification 40 days after giving birth to her Son. That all I could find today. –Jane

          Liked by 2 people

        • Doug says:

          Why October 31 is a great celebration as it is my wife’s birthday. I am very content to skip all the other stuff associated with Halloween in the US. 🙂

          Liked by 3 people

      • zeniazenia says:

        Dear Jim, Temple activities and feasts are fulfilled by the New Covenant feasts and activities. Now we rejoice in the Temple of Jesus’ Body and Blood, His Mysteries (7 Sacraments) and His Church. The 10 Commandments are God’s Natural Law and were always true from the time of the creation of Adam—always written by God on our stony or fleshy hearts.
        Matthew chapter 5:17 “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets. I did not come to abolish the law of Moses or the writings of the prophets. Although not abolished, these laws were most definitely fulfilled and changed by Jesus. Metanoia means repent (first words of John and Jesus in Matthew ) which also means- do a 180, turn around, change direction, go the opposite way. Be obedient first, repent – then believe the good news. It was new. Changed.
        The Pharisees built fences around their laws—protection against any possibility of committing sin, ever widening – numbers growing outwards exponentially. (i.e. ‘Do not boil a kid goat in its mother’s milk’- expanded to become—‘All dairy in the home needs to be kept in a separate kitchen’), bigger and longer fences. They figured we were just that weak. It would be impossible to keep the laws without the forgiveness of sins. Make more laws. But that was not God’s perfect way.
        Jesus, on the other hand fulfills the Law and the Prophets by moving His flock in the new direction. He teaches us how to live in a shockingly new way when He preaches His Beatitudes Sermon. He tells us to look inward. No more fences. Now, this is freedom. Nothing in this world is unclean, only sin that comes from our hearts. Now we look secretly and deeply into our own thoughts and actions. His Law for His life in us, is about Love always, seeking God, forgiveness, humility, other centeredness, righteousness, accepting persecution for the sake of the Kingdom, rejecting earthly wealth, earthly power, earthly esteem, and of course we must be willing to believe and eat His Body and drink His Blood, an old covenant (Noah) no-no if there ever was one! Jesus changed it. He made it perfect. His laws are managed by His Grace in our personal individual souls, so we alone know how well we have confessed our sins to be ready to receive Jesus, and we can never judge anyone else’s sins. This now make us (collectively) His beloved Church, a Temple resembling our Lord, the Perfect Man. Love– Zenia Jane

        Like

  11. JoyInTheLord says:

    I just watched the Journey Home with Marcus Grodi and guess what —his guest was Jessica Stewart, a Jewish girl who converted to Catholicism. When asked if she missed the Jewish faith, her answer startled me: she found the fullness of her Jewish roots in the Catholic Faith. She saw the continuity of the Blessing of the Bread and Wine, of the Passover in the Mass. Prominent in her conversion was the role of the Blessed Mother, whom she said was a Jewish girl like herself. Here’s the program: http://www.ewtn.com/tv/live/journeyhome.asp

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Interesting. When I came into the Church, it felt not so much as a break with the old – but a fulfillment. I used to tell people it was kind of like the Wizard of Oz Movie. My experience in the faith prior to my conversion was in black and white. Afterwards, it was in glorious technicolor.

      Liked by 3 people

  12. Paul says:

    Charlie,

    Good posting – Thank you. FYI, regarding your comment “if you are on a Windows system, you will be eventually be upgraded whether you ask for it or not”, there is a way to delay the Windows 10 update and the nagging if you have not been updated already. If you are comfortable with IT or know someone who can help you, I suggest the “GWX Control Panel” http://blog.ultimateoutsider.com/2015/08/using-gwx-stopper-to-permanently-remove.html As with any software, read and use at your own risk. It worked for me but I am also very comfortable with IT.

    Blessings from Katy, Tx.

    Paul

    Liked by 2 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Ah, I wish I had been feeling better while I was in Katy. I really enjoyed Houston during my walking pilgrimage and would have loved to visit the sites where I had made camp. But I was on the edge of a serious cold, so when I wasn’t talking or visiting with people, I had to hole up to shepherd my strength. Thanks for the internet tip.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Petra says:

      Thank you, Paul. I went to the site and downloaded the software and it is working well and seems to be innocuous. That Windows 10 icon has been bugging me since it appeared, and I’m glad to be rid of it. I looked around the blog and I appreciate you linking to it. These goodhearted honest computer geek types are one of my favorite kind of people. I learned so much from them over the years, God bless their hearts. so thank you for the lead to this blog. I’ll be visiting there quite often, I think.
      God bless.

      Like

    • Snowy Owl says:

      Paul, I downloaded the stand alone installer and it cleared 100’s of MB of space and all W10 computer-hog stuff- gone- how wonderful is that! Thank you for posting this!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Arby says:

    Wow! pretty cool. love you man.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Beckita says:

    My Goodness, Charlie, how ever do you keep up with posting all the comments!?! Plenty more than 1K in only a few days! Overwhelmed, I simply deleted all and will mosey around the comments in the next few days because the discussions are always rich with insight, understanding, clarification and joy. Feeling like a groundhog rather than a squirrel tonight, coming out of my hole instead of scampering across the trees. We’ll get there. Keeping everyone tucked in this heart of prayer.

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      It is amazing how big the comment board has become, Beckita! If I take a nap, when I come back there are anywhere from 50-100 waiting for me to clear them. But glory! What a lively community it has become. The thing I am proudest of on this site is the quality of the comment boards. People can talk candidly about what they really worry about without fear of ridicule; people can make an impassioned case for different points of view so long as they do so in full recognition of the humanity of those with whom they disagree…we learn so much from each other – and so many genuinely learned people in a multitude of fields have come on board…and through it all, the affection we all have for each other shines through. This is, already, I think, an archetype of the types of communities we will live in physically after the Rescue. It is a great joy to me.

      Liked by 9 people

      • Beckita says:

        Amen and we can join the “… multitude of the heavenly host praising God, and saying,
        Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace, good will toward men.” Luke 2:13-14 (from KJV just for you, Charlie.)

        Liked by 3 people

        • charliej373 says:

          For those of you who are cradle Catholics, you really should read the King James Version sometime. Alas, it is missing some books in the Old Testament, but you will be staggered by the elegance and poetry of the language…and I assure you, it is a solid translation. The Psalms are just absolutely sublime.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Patrick of South Dakota says:

            I like to have a variety of translations of the Bible for that reasons. Although the translation may not be the most precise, sometimes the KJV just says it so beautifully.

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Exactly. I cringe every time I hear any translation of the 23rd or 27th Psalm that is NOT from the KJV.

            Like

          • LukeMichael says:

            Charlie

            In the pre politically correct days English departments at the college level actually studied scripture for it’s stories, allegory and poetry. The KJV was always preferred. It is beautiful!

            Liked by 3 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Isn’t it amazing? The literature, art and music that Christianity has inspired – and will endure. Long after all have forgotten the impoverished trash that plays at being modern art, literature and music have been forgotten – or viewed as a bizarre curiosity of a benighted time, Handel, Bach, Michaelangelo, da Vinci and the Bible will still be viewed with wonder and awe…and people will take inspiration from them.

            Liked by 5 people

          • JB says:

            I am so glad to hear you say this! there are several phrases that are just more beautiful in KJV- and this is one of my favorites- the NASB just does not compare in some cases! And since I have several of my favorite verses painted on my bedroom walls- I selected the most beautiful version of my favorites- with a little guilt if it wasn’t from a Catholic version. Now I can be at peace about it!

            Hebrews 13:2King James Version (KJV)

            2 Be not forgetful to entertain strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares

            Liked by 4 people

          • Meriadoc says:

            FYI, the original King James Version included ALL the books of the Catholic Bible. Nowadays, the KJV of so-called Apocrypha can be purchased in separate volumes. I bought a two volume set a few years back. Those interested might be able to find them at Amazon. The volumes include Wisdom, Maccabees I-II, Tobit, the whole lot. They are indeed beautiful reads.

            Liked by 3 people

          • charliej373 says:

            I know. I discovered that during my walking pilgrimage. At the central library in San Antonio, they had an original First Edition King James Bible from the 1600’s. To my astonishment, it was open in its glass case to the Maccabees – a book Protestants don’t generally accept.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Petra says:

            JB said a favorite Bible verse is: “Be not forgetful to entertain strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares.”

            My great aunts (my mother’s aunts) were remarkable, in my mind, for their hospitality. If you arrived at their home anytime of the day or night, even at two in the morning, they welcomed you like long lost children. My Aunt Helen had a farm in Pennsylvania, and her farmhouse was drafty and heated by wood burning stoves. Even if we arrived late at night, she’d be scurrying about making beds, lighting stoves, putting huge pierzynas (feather *beds* or thick quilts) on the beds with huge soft pillows (nothing so cozy as that!) Then in the morning she’d be up at the break of dawn milking the cows and bringing in eggs so we could have breakfast, bustling around assuring we had everything we needed or wanted, so excited for us to be there, ready for us to stay a week if we wanted, ready to kill the fatted calf if need be, and so genuinely disappointed when we got ready to leave. Her sister, my Aunt Bessie, was the same way in her home in Wilkes Barre, PA. My dad said my mom’s grandma, their mom, was, in his mind, the most saintly woman he ever met.

            Every time I hear that verse, “Be not forgetful to entertain strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares.” I think of my aunts. Through their actions I saw this verse in application (even though we were relatives).

            God bless.

            Liked by 9 people

          • Beckita says:

            Thanks for sharing the beauty of your great aunts and great-grandmother, Petra! May they and all our relatives who have gone before us intercede for us as we make our way through this Storm.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Petra says:

            Beckita, I wish I could adequately describe just how much I admire these women. I do not know if my impression of them was because I only saw them through the eyes of a child, or if they were truly the incredible women they seemed to be. They were like bears; strong and fierce in the face of adversity, yet gentle, protective, and overwhelmingly self sacrificial in their treatment of family. They were not perfect by any means. But these are the kind of women I thought of as women of the highest caliber, with strong characters, even if they had no education to speak of. I know these sorts of women, these towers of strength and goodness, exist in every ethnic background. We’ve all known them (if we’re lucky). I was blessed to know them and be able to model myself after them. I only wish I had been older before they passed on. Yes, I am certain they intercede for us. Love like that can’t die.
            God bless.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Mick says:

            Petra, you said that your wonderful aunts had “no education to speak of. ” Heck yeah, they had an education… masters’ degrees from the University of Real Life. Your aunts could do things that only a fraction of a percent of people in first-world countries can do today. Your aunts remind me of my dear grandfather (the one who prayed and cajoled me back to church). He didn’t have a lot of formal education. But he was such a fantastic cook that he owned his own restaurant for years (he made soul-food… and “Polish,” which is what the black folk in downstate Illinois called kielbasa, I guess. Man, was it delicious!). He was as strong as a bear. He could build a house out of bubble-gum wrappers. He knew how to garden. And he prayed. There was nothing he couldn’t do, once he put his mind to it.

            I remember one weekend that I spent with my grandparents. I was in law school at the time. I sat listening to my grandfather reminisce about all the different things he’d done in his life, and I thought. “Here I am, with all my fancy education, and I don’t know squat about how to do anything that really matters. And here’s Grandpa, who has spent a lifetime learning and doing really important things, like how to be self-sufficient and survive in tough times.” That realization threw me into an existential crisis of sorts. I decided then and there that somehow, someday, I was going to learn how to do stuff that truly mattered. Thus the homesteading, preserving, cheesemaking, knitting, gardening, homeschooling, etc.

            Yeah, I’m positive that your aunts were way ahead of me and my law-school colleagues.

            Liked by 5 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Cold Mountain is a novel that explores this as a sub-theme…useful knowledge. I must confess it amuses me more than a little that many who consider most of America flyover country are going to have to depend on the people they consider rubes to get through the worst of the Storm. God is setting ALL things right.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Doug says:

            Mick, this is really heart warming.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Petra says:

            You said it, Mick. These people did know about how to live, how to survive, and what is really important. They weren’t puffed up with themselves, and they probably had forgotten more stuff than ever I knew! I’ve often thought, all of us in my generation with all our years of education and fancy degrees; we’re hosed if we’d ever have to raise our own food or build our own shelters or make our own clothes. I wish I knew half of what these “uneducated” but very skilled people knew about agriculture and home life.
            God bless.
            P.S. I just have to ask: do you have that kielbasa recipe? (And now the truth comes out…you ARE Polish!!!)) 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          • Mick says:

            Petra, I about fell over when I read your comment. One of my grandpa’s favorite expressions (usually said when he was talking to somebody about his son, my father) was: “He done forgot more than I’ll EVER know!”

            Ah, so my Polish cat is out of the bag. I trust that my secret is safe with you? 🙂

            Alas, I do not have my grandpa’s recipe for Polish. He closed his restaurant when I was maybe 12 or 13, and he never made Polish at family gatherings (because most of the family preferred the soul food, I guess). In heaven, I hope to dine on Grandpa’s Polish on a regular basis (that, and my mom’s Texas sheet cake). Hey, I have an idea: I bet that if you, Ed, and I asked reeeally nicely, Grandpa would cook up some Christmas Polish for your mom, Ed’s mom, and my mom. Maybe they can do a pot-luck. Yum! 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • Petra says:

            Mick said, “Hey, I have an idea: I bet that if you, Ed, and I asked reeeally nicely, Grandpa would cook up some Christmas Polish for your mom, Ed’s mom, and my mom. Maybe they can do a pot-luck. Yum! :)”
            I’m DOIN’ it!!!! 🙂

            God bless.

            Liked by 1 person

      • Petra says:

        It’s a great joy to me too, Charlie. I think it’s the internet as God intended it to be. So many can come here and drink deeply from the wisdom of the humble souls that inhabit this place. We are like birds, flitting and flying in and out, finding nourishment and rest for our souls. God is good.
        God bless.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Snowy Owl says:

          Petra, the story you told about your Aunts was so wonderful, everything about it, it is my hope and dream that this is the way it will be with all people after the purification/storm!! That story made me tear-up! Just so simple and beautiful! Can you imagine life being like this all day, everyday with everyone? It would be like Heaven on earth! Thank you for sharing that!!!

          Liked by 4 people

          • Petra says:

            Snowy Owl said, “…it is my hope and dream that this is the way it will be with all people after the purification/storm!!”
            Yes, Snowy, now that you say it, yes, that’s it exactly! People won’t be perfect or unable to sin, but their hearts will lead them to do good and be generous and to “love without counting the cost…” What those ladies gave to me in terms of happiness and feeling loved and safe cannot be measured.
            God bless.

            Liked by 4 people

    • Funny, but I was actually thinking about ground hogs this morning since it’s unseasonably cold here.

      With regard to the growing comments, there’s always the casual forum that was set up for us as well, but I always felt like I was being gently ushered to the kid’s table (however practical and appropriate). Don’t pay any attention to me though. As a kid, you couldn’t keep me away from the adult table, and now as mature adult, you’re just as likely to find me at the kid table… sharing stories and enjoying their great company. The fact is, I just keep losing my login credentials for that forum.

      JLB mentioned her pinterest boards highlighting her garden and orchard, and that also got me to thinking about the various other channels where folks can easily connect. YD was also wondering about the options for providing theological guidance and so forth.

      It’s easy enough to add various site/social media links to your WP and/or Gravatar accounts. Upside: folks can share all sorts of valuable stuff without diverting from the important topics here. Downside: I would have missed Doug’s squirrel stew recipe if he would have shared it only on his facebook page. Also, I don’t want to miss a lick of Young Duck’s musings/insights, or anyone else’s.

      I suppose there’s no perfect solution, but I like everyone’s contributions. It’s like a great big feast with festive luminaria from here to Timbuktu.

      Liked by 5 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      It is great to see you scampering about again Beckita and hope and pray that you are back to feeling 100% better. You were missed.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Mick says:

      Groundhog! Oh, Beckita, that’s funny. If I’m not mistaken, a groundhog is the same thing as a woodchuck. Therefore, I can’t help myself and must send this to our new NRS woodchuck:

      Liked by 7 people

      • Beckita says:

        Too too much, Mick!!! Love it. LOL! Groundhogs are, indeed, known as woodchucks and also whistle pigs. YD, ready for a woodchuck stirfry? Doesn’t have to be roadkill this time and you pick the sauce. Get this, Doug: they belong to the group of large ground squirrels known as marmots. SteveBC, there’s YouTube footage of an obnoxious groundhog who keeps calling, in a British accent: “Steve, Steve, Steve, Steve, Steve…”

        Liked by 5 people

        • Doug says:

          Hmmmm. Ground squirrels. I wonder if they taste good…..

          Liked by 1 person

          • Snowy Owl says:

            Doug..hahaha! I am wondering if all the critters get ‘et up, how will deep fried worms taste? eeewwww 😛 Speaking of squirrels, I learned the other day we can eat acorns and even make flour out of them, if dried and ground up, and they are highly nutritious…but you have to soak them in water for 48 hours to remove the tannin or they can make you sick. I also learned we can eat highly nutritious Nettle plants- (itch weed) but you have to steam the leaves to remove the stinging barbs.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Doug says:

            I have plenty of acorns where I live. So I guess I will be ok 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • Beckita says:

            Could you give them a try and let us know, Doug? 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Maybe if I am desperate enough. I might eat the acorns first 😦

            Liked by 1 person

          • Mick says:

            Snowy, when you steam the nettles, be sure to save the cooking water ( you could drink it right then, or chill it for drinking over a couple of days, or freeze it, or use it as an addition to soup stock), because nettle tea is one of the most healthful and nutritious teas on the planet. Among other nutrients, it contains a lot of vitamins A and C.

            Liked by 2 people

        • YongDuk says:

          I will try anything once, as long as it is not a creature I knew prior.

          Liked by 3 people

      • JoyInTheLord says:

        Nothing related to any thread, but just for everyone’s info —I was with AAA for auto and home insurance for 14 years until this summer when I learned that local AAA supports Planned Parenthood. I just changed to GEICO for auto and Farmers for home and I am very happy with the savings.

        Liked by 1 person

    • zeniazenia says:

      Beckita–It is better that I cannot post from my work office. You would have double the numbers. Glad you are up and around. Take care of yourself while we pray for your good health! Jane

      Liked by 1 person

  15. ” We recognize that since the Second Vatican Council the official teachings of the Catholic Church about Judaism have changed fundamentally and irrevocably.”

    This is a rather provocative statement. I didn’t think Church teaching — regarding the path to salvation, above all — can change. Here, it is stated that it has changed “fundamentally”.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      I think it was an awkward turn of phrase, Aquinas, but the bulk of that relationship revolves around disciplinary matters of practice rather than doctrinal matters, I think. On the other hand, I thought some statements coming out of Rome on the subject recently wandered carelessly and perilously into the doctrinal realm.

      Like

  16. Pawel says:

    Charlie, I am not sure whether this question has been asked before – will the Jews, like Muslims, convert to Christianity/Catholicism after the rescue? I know it was said that Catholics and Protestants will be reunited but can’t remember what it was like with the Jews. I was also wondering if the reunited church will be still called Roman Catholic or perhaps just Catholic? Have a blessed Christmas!

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Good questions, Pawel. But I was simply told that we are to treat all Christians and Jews as full and equal partners in the work before us – and all people of good will of any faith or even no faith as true neighbors…that God, Himself, will see to the unity. He did not share with me how He will do this, only that He will. So I presume it is not my business…and frankly, I have come to enjoy and anticipate the little surprises He brings. It’s kind of like Christmas. We will unwrap those gifts when Dad gives them to us.

      Liked by 5 people

      • milliac says:

        Thanks so much for these words: “and all people of good will of any faith or even no faith as true neighbors…that God, Himself, will see to the unity.”

        I have struggled with coming to terms with my husband’s Hindu faith. He attends mass with me and our son about 75% of the time. I He has come close to considering RCIA, but it’s much too deep for him. I try to be a good example, and quietly lead him the beauty and truth of our faith, which I believe most all people are seeking. I have finally trusted his conversion is between him and God. In the meantime, I focus the common virtues between our faiths.

        Liked by 4 people

        • charliej373 says:

          One of my favorite people is my sister-in-law, Tomoko. She is Buddhist, a Japanese citizen. She is always kind and thoughtful to me. During my walking pilgrimage, she and my brother, Steve, came up to spend a few days with me at Yosemite. I had spent the Christian holidays with them – and Tomoko took delight in bringing Cherry Coke, Lay’s Sour Crème and Onion Potato Chips for me. To top it off, she brought stuff to make corned beef hash and eggs for breakfast – my favorite breakfast. She is always thoughtful in little, delicate ways.

          Now Steve had been reticent to tell her what I was doing. When I went out to California, I asked if he had told her yet, as she was eager to go hear me speak. I teased him that, boy, was she going to get a shock if he didn’t talk to her. Then I told him that she is a very shrewd woman – that I bet she already long knew. I was right.

          When thinking of these things, I want you to remember the parable of the two sons…the one who said he would go and then did not…and the one who said he would not but did. It is those who do the Father’s will who please Him. Tomoko lives the Gospel well and with refinement. If the Lord should ever reveal Himself to her, there is little she would have to then do she is not already doing. Trust God.

          Liked by 10 people

          • milliac says:

            That is great consolation. How timely was today’s gospel reading? My in-laws are also very much like your Sister-in-law.

            Every day I thank God that I was born into this faith, and that I didn’t have to journey too far. I have great empathy for those of other faiths. I can’t imagine how difficult it is for those of various faith traditions to actually be completely moved by grace, after living their whole life believing something different. This world needs a Tepeyac event.

            From the CCC: “Those who, through no fault of their own, do not know the Gospel of Christ or his Church, but who nevertheless seek God with a sincere heart, and, moved by grace, try in their actions to do his will as they know it through the dictates of their conscience – those too may achieve eternal salvation.”

            I am hoping for some clarification. Recently Pope Francis has told worshippers in a mosque in the capital of the Central African Republic that “Christians and Muslims are brothers and sisters”. Pope John Paul II referred to Jews as our “elder brothers”. I always understood that all people are creatures of God, but it is through baptism in our Lord, Jesus Christ that we become his sons and daughters.

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            I don’t know whether it was helpful or not, but the Pope did not say we are all brothers and sisters “in the Lord,” he merely said we are brothers and sisters – which is true. He said more fully, “Christians and Muslims are brothers and sisters. We must, therefore, consider ourselves and conduct ourselves as such. Those who claim to believe in God must also be men and women of peace.” He went on to call for”…an end to every act which, from whatever side, disfigures the face of God…” Sounded like a nicely crafted diplomatic rebuke, to me. Shoot, I could have written it under the circumstances.

            Liked by 4 people

          • YongDuk says:

            Mmmmm… Does she do natto, raw egg, multi-grain rice too? (I stopped reading at the end of paragraph about food, obviously.)

            Like

        • Steve says:

          Milliac, I am Steve, the brother that Charlie mentions. When I converted to Catholicism, I worried about my marriage and my wife, Tomoko. It was a struggle for me and I sought out anything I could to help me find comfort in the fact that my wife had no desire to become “Christian” or “Catholic”. Finally, someone directed me to 1 Corinthians, chapter 7 verses 12 – 14. “12To the rest I say this (I, not the Lord): If any brother has a wife who is not a believer and she is willing to live with him, he must not divorce her. 13And if a woman has a husband who is not a believer and he is willing to live with her, she must not divorce him. 14For the unbelieving husband has been sanctified through his wife, and the unbelieving wife has been sanctified through her believing husband. Otherwise your children would be unclean, but as it is, they are holy.” The most important verse to me is 14, as it states that my belief sanctifies my wife. I found comfort in this, but also realized that I now have a much bigger responsibility. My faith is not just for my sanctification, but that of my wife’s, as well. I hope this helps!

          Liked by 12 people

          • milliac says:

            That is very helpful scripture. I appreciate it!

            Liked by 1 person

          • Sandy says:

            Thanks, Steve! My husband is also Japanese and was received into the Catholic Church 13 years ago, Praise God. At that point, we were married over 30 years, so never, never lose hope! He went with me to hear Charlie six months ago, but does not accept the prophesies, nor does he want to read anything related. It has created a bit of a tension for us, but just like his conversion took time and patience, I pray God will help us.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            No need to worry. The storm will speak for you. Since he has the faith, he will most likely step up to the plate when the time comes. This is an opportunity to trust your husband because of who God is. God bless!

            Liked by 1 person

        • Doug says:

          Hi Milliac, it sounds to me like you are taking the next right step with your husband. Your patience and sincere love through your example will go a long way. God bless you!

          Like

      • Doug says:

        I love the Christmas analogy. Thus has just answered some life pondering in different areas. Thanks Charlie.

        Liked by 1 person

  17. lilia florentiae says:

    Charlie, what an amazing thing! Muslims converted through dreams of Jesus ! I had researched the internet on this subject. There are many articles about it if you type ‘muslims dream Jesus’ on Google. I really thank God for his merciful tenderness.
    Thanks for your post.
    how does one send cards to you? Is there a box mail?
    Greetings
    Lilia

    Like

  18. LJD says:

    From the bottom of my heart, thank you Charlie.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      LJD is the man who made me aware of the need of the grandparents whose house was set afire. Thank you for letting us know, LJD, and let us know later how they are doing.

      Like

      • LJD says:

        Hey Charlie,
        Just wanted to give a quick update on the family. They found a rental home and are moving in today/tomorrow. They are greatful for all the donations and prayers.
        The task of rebuilding their home is still daunting, but they will no longer have to spend the holidays in a hotel room.
        My sincere thanks to all here who have stood up and became beacons of hope for the McGuire family! Merry Christmas to all here!

        Liked by 6 people

  19. EllenChris says:

    This statement by the rabbis gives me a huge amount of joy and hope. St. Paul looked forward to the day when the People of the Covenants of Abraham, Moses and David would at last come together with the Gentiles in the once-for-all definitive Covenant in Jesus Christ. I have heard and read many eye-witness accounts of Orthodox Jews coming to recognize Jesus for Who He really is. This part of the Rescue and Awakening is most dear to my heart. Our Lady of Tepeyac — Our Lady of Conversion, pray for us all to come together in your Son.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Joseph77 says:

      Saint James the Just, Brother of our Lord by Joseph’s first marriage? My reading of the New Testament is, St. James, brother of the Lord, is brother of St. John who were sons of Zebadee.

      Liked by 1 person

      • zeniazenia says:

        Hi Joseph., Here is a good explanation from Wikipedia– read about the women and their sons in Gospels according to Matthew Mark and John.

        Salome was a follower of Jesus who appears briefly in the gospels and in more detail in apocryphal writings. She is sometimes identified as the wife of Zebedee, the mother of ”James” and John, two of the Apostles of Jesus, and sometimes also as the sister of Mary, mother of Jesus. Salome is counted as one of the Three Mary’s.

        Mary of Clopas the wife of Clopas, was one of various Marys named in the New Testament. Mary of Clopas is explicitly mentioned only in John 19:25, where she is among the women present at the Crucifixion of Jesus: Now there stood by the cross of Jesus His mother, and His mother’s sister, Mary [the wife] of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene.
        According to some interpretations, the same Mary was also among the women that on Easter morning went to the tomb to anoint Jesus’ body with spices. Matthew 28:1 calls her “the other Mary” to distinguish her from Mary Magdalene, while Mark 16:1 uses the name “Mary of “”James”, most probably derived from James the Less”. The Latin version of that name, Maria Iacobi, is often used in tradition. Stephen S. Smalley (1982) says that it is “probable” (but not virtually certain) that Mary of Clopas is Mary the mother of James son of Alphaeus.
        For detailed explanations, please see: Brothers of Jesus and James the Just.
        The expression Mary of Clopas in the Greek text is ambiguous as to whether Mary was the daughter or wife of Clopas, but exegesis has commonly favoured the reading “wife of Clopas” (as reflected in above translation). Hegesippus thought that Clopas was the brother of Saint Joseph. — Zenia Jane

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          It can all be confusing as in ancient Israel, any close relative was often called a brother or sister. Difficult to find the exact family relationship in that respect.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Joseph77 says:

          “Thank you Zenia! Your comment on the relationships of the women and their sons in the NT Gospels is music to my ears. My investigation and research for a paper on Marian devotion in the New Testament with reference to Mary’s perpetual virginity has led me to the same conclusion.. It is rather long to post here, but if you would like a copy of my paper, Foundations for a Marian Devotion in the New Testament, you may send me your email, name, and address through Charlie. Thanks again I enjoyed reading your comment with great interest. Joseph77

          Liked by 1 person

    • Doug says:

      Yes. It is so wonderful Ellen!

      Like

  20. Another Karen says:

    Charlie,
    It is so good to know that you receive joy from your mission to ‘feed’ us during this storm as you bring incalculable hope and joy to us all here! What an amazing community! Have a blessed and joyful Christmas!

    Liked by 3 people

  21. Bob says:

    MY wife and I once attended a conference by the Association of Hebrew Catholics http://www.hebrewcatholic.net/ as one of her theology professors is a member and I asked one of the speakers why it often seems that Jews who come to Jesus have such strong experiences of grace, infused contemplative experiences, etc. (See some witness statements here, http://www.hebrewcatholic.net/hc-individuals/ and he responded quoting Paul 1 Corinthians Ch 1 vs 22 of how “Jews look for signs and Greeks seek wisdom” and he speculated that there seems to be something to that in that Jews often need to be shown more directly than by reasoning to the truth. If this is so than as Charlie says, than perhaps our “elder brothers” will soon have the sign which will bring many of them to faith, but this document shows the fruit of the work of our last several popes and others to create greater unity between us.

    Like

  22. prayingflower says:

    I did not receive this post for some reason. Just found it accidentally and am glad I did. You look so happy in that picture, Charlie! It’s nice you have so many friends and are a friend to so many. God bless you, Charlie.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Marita says:

    Hi Charlie,
    This has nothing to do with the post, which was marvelous, but I have been wondering what has happened to your sister Kim? I miss her comments, she has a very warm heart!

    Liked by 2 people

    • charliej373 says:

      She is doing well…concentrating on the home front. I know at one point she felt a little intimidated by the erudition of so many who visit the site. She got past that, but with her MS and other things, she is concentrating on the homefront. This is a bit more challenging than it looks.

      Liked by 4 people

      • jeanO says:

        I asked that a while back, too. It was when I began to feel anxious about Charlie. He made a comment describing a little boy that I care for in my parish’s Sunday morning nursery. He described him as “pugnacious”. Wrong. I think Charlie means well, but he makes promises he means but fails to keep. Over and over again. He does not mean to do harm. Jesus warned against prophets who attempt to fix times…no one knows…not even the son. You said your angel puffed up when you questioned him. That may not have been a good angel…other Saints have likewise been deceived. Also Charlie, you were harsh on the locutionist from LTTW. Last Christmas you told us would be far different from all Christmases before and you have not yet explained how it was. I think this year is it. Rumblings from North Korea because someone’s ego has been insulted are concerning. Honest thoughts, here. Do with it what you will…God have mercy on us all.

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          Jean, I have explained the Christmas thing repeatedly here and at the MOG Forum. I will repeat the text from the last time I addressed it there:
          In 2013, even the administration and progressive left in Congress said “if” the IRS and other government agencies, including Homeland Security, had targeted Christians and some others because of their beliefs, it would be an outrage. By spring of 2014, most of those same people conceded that is what happened, but argued it was “the right thing to do.” So began the official persecution of Christians in America and the west – fines, bankrupting and putting out of business those who would not actively participate in celebrating homosexual “marriages.” For the first time in the history of the U.S., Christianity was an officially disfavored religion. As subtle as it might be for some who insist that a prophecy is not fulfilled unless there are fireworks and other big special effects, that was huge – and we are paying more consequences for it now. I wrote about what had happened in the rest of the world in this piece.

          I recently wrote this piece, Go Forth, summarizing my work. Unfortunately, there will be some spectacular fireworks before it is over. But for now, the progression of the Storm is as I have publicly described it the last few years. When one insists that nothing serious has happened unless it is accompanied by Star Wars style special effects, you will continue to be dissatisfied until we are in the worst of things.

          I thought about how or whether to respond to what has been asked and answered here once again today. I know many have criticized me for not giving more spectacular predictions and reporting that Our Lady and Lord are much harsher than they actually are – and want me to be more free in condemning people who aren’t traditionally pious and showy about it – or who depart from some traditional interpretations of accepted prophecies. That is fine. I have repeatedly said if you simply acknowledge God, take the next right step and be a sign of hope I am content if you reject me otherwise. But to continually re-litigate what has been asked and answered is a sign of restless malice. If you reject me and drop the malice, while embracing the three fundamentals, you will be fine. To act with vain malice against anyone, though, including me, is to deliver yourself to the Most High for rebuke.

          I have repeatedly told people to prepare with the three fundamentals…that their expectations are deeply flawed, The Lord does not send heavenly beings to give you a play-by-play, but to prepare you to endure and help others do the same as you come back to Him under the mantle of Mary. Many have taken that message to heart. Others demand their play-by-play and when one favored source falls, immediately turn to another, restlessly doing the same thing over and over again, with futile hope that they will get a different result. Change your expectations and you will begin to see the need that is right around you now. Quit restlessly making fractured interpretations of authentic prophecies and insisting it is “obvious” to anyone. I tell you that what counts is to do the right things with love, and you keep criticizing me because the play-by-play you want from me is not up to your expectations. Well, give me two thumbs down and be done with it – but do the things that build those around you up.

          If you regularly want fireworks and fiery language, you should look elsewhere. But you are probably weary from all the disorder, too…you want a big, spectacular immediate crash and things keep lingering and eroding. It is wearying for us all.

          Liked by 10 people

          • Mack says:

            It is wearying for us all, no doubt about it. Part of me is scared of the final crash, but part of me longs for it whenever some new outrage happens and the “new normal” sinks lower and lower. Really, who would have ever thought that Bruce Jenner, for example, pretending to be a woman would be considered the hero of the hour? If and when the final crash occurs, it will be a relief in some ways despite the challenges. I also think that God’s easing us along is a bit of mercy, too. Frankly I had thought we would have had the final crash by now, but I’m also relieved we haven’t. I firmly believe in the Rescue in two years, so each day that goes by means everything will be compressed in a smaller temporal time frame. Praise be to God!

            Liked by 10 people

          • Doug says:

            I’m with you Mack. When the big crash occurs, I’m going to do what Steve BC said he would do and sleep for 9 hours.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Nancy says:

            I understand the “wearying” because I suffer from it also, but I do appreciate “the lingering and eroding”. I feel it is an act of mercy that God doesn’t slam us with something huge. Fear would be our first and biggest reaction. I appreciate the chance to “do over” what I got wrong yesterday and build up my stamina by doing the things I know I need to do, especially spiritual things. I also see the common, everyday miracles that happen when God has a plan and I let Him carry it out.
            One of the things I noticed about the crosses I have carried is the fatigue (which seems to be a cross in itself). I have learned that it eventually goes away, especially if you don’t carry it alone. That is why I like this site–it always lifts me up.
            Thank you, Charlie. To you and all those who post comments and those who just read and all your entire families, may you and yours have a blessed and holy Christmas and God’s Mercy throughout the new year

            Liked by 10 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Yeah, sometimes I seem fatigued beyond all reason, Nancy. Then I finally quit worrying, chill out for a while, and then I am filled with new resolve and vigor. But it doesn’t come on the schedule I want sometimes.

            Liked by 5 people

          • Doug says:

            Ain’t that the truth Charlie!

            Liked by 2 people

          • Doug says:

            Yes. It is all God’s mercy. Merry Christmas Nancy!

            Liked by 1 person

          • Beckita says:

            To Jean: I’m sorry you’re frustrated. I do wish you peace. At the same time, I cannot be silent in the face of false accusations. I base my assertion on reading all the material from the beginning of the archived posts on this site, including the comments which accompany every major post, in addition to listening to the recordings made of Charlie’s presentations throughout his series of talks given from spring through autumn. I wish to respond to just a few of the outright false accusations.

            “I think Charlie means well, but he makes promises he means but fails to keep. Over and over again.” When? Where? How? I especially cringe on reading this line because it’s an attack on Charlie’s integrity, in my view. I have only observed and experienced Charlie’s faithfulness in living Heaven’s mission entrusted to him.

            “Jesus warned against prophets who attempt to fix times…no one knows…not even the son. You said your angel puffed up when you questioned him. That may not have been a good angel…other Saints have likewise been deceived.” Remember the angel puffed up in response to Charlie’s own discomfort about naming a “fixed time” for which you criticize him.

            I experience Charlie as the *servant* prophet. All I have ever read is that Charlie, again and again, refuses to play the game of spoon feeding us specific details. A quote from his 10-14-15 piece: “My goal since I began writing this has not been to tell you precisely what is going to happen and when (with the exception of the Rescue late in 2017), for those are the wrong questions, questions that can only give you a false sense of security.” There is consistency in the way Charlie continually refocuses us to what we CAN do: practice the Little Way (Acknowledge God, take the next right step and be a sign of hope.) so it’s internalized when chaos hits.

            Charlie was *not* harsh on the alleged LttW locutionist. Just one example of his charitable treatment, posted on 10-3-15?: “There is no shame in being deceived – particularly if the deceiver is likely sincere but errant rather than malicious. There IS shame in not stepping back and learning from the error rather than just continuing on the same path that led you to be deceived in the first place. LttW was perfect for this lesson. Though I may be wrong, I saw no intent to deceive – just someone who was deceived promulgating messages to people eager to hear them.”

            To Charlie: Thanks for sharing the MOG Forum post. The temptation to be weary is certainly there in the waiting. I feel a sense of disorientation living what I’m living and knowing what I know will transpire. But I come to my senses with the reality that, after all, I’m NOT God. I serve HIM. His Timing is PERFECT. A fitting holy order is my SUBMISSION to HIS WAY of fulfilling the prophecies.

            Further, I believe we all will be amazed when so much that is hidden now is revealed. In contemplation, I enter awesome wonder when I think of how we shall weep in gratitude at the ways each Person of the Holy Trinity continually worked behind the scenes, beyond our ability to be aware, with the details of the absolute messes in our lives as He(each One), in Sublime Humility, navigated the mystery of our human free will to bring the most glorious results from our best yet oh-so-dingy efforts and our imperfect yet fully heart-crying prayers. We who want what we want, the way we want it, when we want it will prostrate in repentance for whining and doubting His Pure Love, His Perfect Ways, His Perfect Timing and His Perfect Answers to our heart cries. And all this with the Mother of God’s intercession!

            Blessed be God forever! Ave Maria eternally!

            Liked by 6 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Thank you, Beckita. I actually appreciate it when someone disputes with me on what is actually true; I have grown weary with defending against accusations that are merely tendentious or made up. If you have to bear false witness to discredit another, you will stand to account for it in the end. I think Jean is better than this…so I am hoping she was just having a bad day. But thank you.

            Liked by 6 people

          • Doug says:

            Jean, Charlie went out of his way to encourage us to respect and treat with dignity LTTW and not be vociferous in our response when it fell apart. Also, with all the squirrel comments around here and squirrels being soft, fuzzy, cuddly animals, this is place of sanctuary and encouragement to build each other up. God bless you and Merry Christmas!

            Liked by 3 people

          • Josh in ND says:

            Yes, weary is a apt description of how I feel as well. I have become cynical that the divine chemotherapy will never come. I too want the big spectacular crash to snap me to my senses and hopefully everyone around me. I have become disgusted with my own sinfulness and apathy. I’ve let my prayer life erode to almost nothing. I know that God is loving, forgiving and merciful but I feel like there is something wrong with me that prevents me from accepting His graces.

            I have been spiritually catatonic for a few weeks. It surprised me last night when I had a dream of Pope Francis standing in front of a crowd, which I was a part of. The crowd was shouting “Crucify Him!”. When I shouted with the crowd, it startled me awake. I’m not sure what it means or if it was just a silly dream and meant nothing at all. But I have to say that the jolt felt good. I hope it jump starts me back to life. Please pray for me.

            Liked by 3 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Hang in there, Josh. I get annoyed at my down times…when I feel like I am accomplishing nothing and wishing we would just get on with it. But I have come to think of my down times as preludes to renewal and joy, so while they weary me, it is not as bad.

            Liked by 2 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Josh, you are in my prayers.

            Liked by 1 person

          • prayingflower says:

            Josh, I am so praying for you, my brother. Let Our Lady hold you awhile. She is very near. And you are very dear to her and her Son, Be at peace, Josh. All will come out right St. Jude is interceding. Be at peace. God bless you, Josh.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Doug says:

            St. Ignatius, I pray you intercede for Josh. Josh, no worries, we are all human and have these struggles. Main thing is don’t give up. Keep trusting God will help you. Believe it! Been there many times and it can be a daily grind sinning or feel like sinning over and over. Again, don’t give up! I will light a candle for you this weekend at Mass. Peace be with you!

            Liked by 3 people

          • Petra says:

            I’ll say a prayer for you Josh. All of us have ups and downs in the spiritual life. I think the reason I like having a set of written prayers I say daily is that I always do it, and afterwards I spend a little time in *conversation* with God. Sometimes my conversation with God (or Jesus, or Mary, or St. Joseph, et. al.) is just visiting, just spending time thinking of them, or speaking to them, not petitions, just relating.
            If you’re finding it hard to pray, just say small routine prayers. And take this problem to confession. The priest may have some good advice to give, and you may find yourself *back in the saddle* in no time.
            Regarding the Storm as a big spectacular crash: well, whenever I see pictures of Beirut, or pictures of cities like Mosul after ISIS has been there, I think of what it would be like to have that in my city, in my neighborhood. And I just can’t wish for it. I know we need something to turn us around, and I accept God’s will and plan. But I’m not looking forward to it. I guess I think of it like an operation I would need: I may know it’s necessary and I’ll be better off having it, but I wouldn’t look forward to it.
            God bless, Josh.

            Liked by 4 people

          • charliej373 says:

            It does not have to be like Beirut…and I dearly hope it is not. The cultural, political and economic underpinnings can collapse without things turning into a blasted out wasteland. I know so many people are caught up in zombie apocalypse or terminator scenarios – but that isn’t necessary. I have tried to damp that down, even while alerting people to the very real, but less showy, terror of systemic cultural collapse. Yugoslavia suffered catastrophic collapse and did not become Beirut (though it was terrifyingly awful for a time). The Russia of Revolutionary times completely collapsed – and there was real terror for a time…but it never resembled Beirut. We are so used to film fictional catastrophes that we think they are the norm for a collapse, but they are not. Even worse, some of us think that if it is not as bad as the film apocalyptic stuff, it is not that big a deal. That sanguine attitude is partly what has allowed us to get this far down the road to ruin…constantly, in the words of the late Patrick Moynihan, “defining deviancy down.” People’s expectations on just about everything are completely out of whack. That is a big part of what to deal with as the New Year comes.

            Liked by 5 people

          • Petra says:

            Thanks, Charlie. I know Beirut is a reality, and I feel so sorry for the people living in those kinds of areas. I often think about those cities where people had normal lives and routines and business and work and leisure, and now their streets are bombed out shells of buildings. I don’t mean to paint the darkest pictures, but since I haven’t had any visitations such as yours, and you, with good reason, are reluctant to be explicit in what you know, it’s hard to really know specifically what to expect, and so I imagine it could possibly be like Beirut. After all, the for the people there, it is real.

            As I was reflecting on the past few years, I have to say one of the most shocking and horrifying things to me (and I do not mean this in any joking way) was the rise of Barack Obama. I was horrified when he won the Presidency, and was horrified when they got Obamacare passed. I was horrified at Nancy Pelosi as Speaker of the House, and Hillary Clinton as Secretary of State. I was horrified at the HSS Mandate. I was horrified when Obama won a second term. Talk about a Storm! Truly, if it gets worse than these things, well, I just don’t know….

            I don’t know what “the Storm” really is. On this blog earlier there was much talk about bugging out and getting to safer places, like some locales would be dangerous to stay in, and to not go to resettlement camps if you could help it. So it’s easy to imagine war like scenarios.

            I guess I will just have to wait and see what happens.

            Thanks again Charlie, and God bless.

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            The time when the need for widespread bugging out has largely passed. The federal government has so forfeited credibility with the populace that there is no longer much risk that a serious Martial Law type takeover could succeed for very long. A year and a half ago, it probably could have. It is one of the graces in the delay of the full onset of the fullness of the Storm.

            Liked by 4 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Praise be to God!

            Like

          • zeniazenia says:

            Josh, If there is a monastery near you, you might ask there for help with spiritual direction. That might be what you need right now. You can talk and pray with someone who will listen and give you feedback. I’ll pray you can make a connection with just the right helper. –Love, Jane

            Liked by 2 people

          • Beckita says:

            Praying for you, Josh, and following prayingflower’s lead… asking Blessed Mother to wrap Her Healing Mantle around you. May Her Son’s Peace saturate your soul.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Josh in ND says:

            Thank you all for your prayers and encouragement. Being down in the dumps really was a prelude to joy. The last eight months have been a time of great change and challenges for my family. I have come to realize how much God has made us a sign of hope to others and tremendously blessed us at the same time. I now feel silly thinking about the despair I felt.

            Eight months ago, we lived in the city with a large new house, good jobs and the kids were happy in school. My wife, Dawn, is from a small town of 80 people about 90 miles away, which has been on the decline for quite some time. Fighting between the Hatfields and McCoys has plagued the town for some years. Her aunt & uncle owned the grocery store there and wanted to retire. Not a supermarket. Think long narrow brick building with wooden floors that creak when you walk on them. More of a country store. With a lot of prayer and deliberation, we decided to buy the store from them. That decision left a lot of people scratching their heads wondering why we would do such a thing. I have wondered the same thing many times since. Dawn and our four kids moved there while I kept my job in the city and join them on the weekends. I miss them terribly but have learned to cherish my time with them much more so than before. The last 8 months have been exhausting and have been a struggle emotionally & financially. I’d like to share with you some of the ways we have been able to be a sign of hope, even though we didn’t really intend to be. God has worked through our struggles even though we felt we weren’t accomplishing anything.

            There is a 12 year old boy in town who’s father is deceased and his mother is either sleeping or at the bar. He has had a lot of behavioral problems in the past. Since he pretty much fends for himself, he ends up in the store several times a day to grab a snack. Through this we have befriended him. He really is a wonderful kid. He now spends a lot of time at our house and has become like a big brother to our 6 y.o. boy. His behavior in school has much improved. He even tags along with us to mass once in a while. Usually on his own initiative.

            There are a lot of low income folks in the area. I have been guilty of looking down my nose on some of them who are unemployed and can’t seem to get their act together. Dawn on the other hand has become an advocate for them. Being a small town and knowing everyone, we allow people to set up a charge account which must be paid up every month or the privilege is revoked. I was quite upset when I found out she had set up an account for a gentleman who I did not view as trustworthy. She rightfully put me in my place and said she was going to trust him until he gave her a reason not to. Just like everybody else. He has paid his bill every month since.

            When we first moved, we purchased a 3 bedroom single wide trailer. It is actually quite nice, but it proved to be too small for our four kids and two dogs. God blessed us by allowing us to Rent to Own a wonderful cozy peaceful house across the street from the church which had once been occupied by a very holy elderly woman. About the same time, a very sweet disabled woman in town was told by her “slum lord” that she needed to find a different place to live. The house she was living in required to many repairs and was no longer liveable. She had been living in these conditions for many years and it finally came to a head. We were able to rent her the trailer for the same amount she had been paying and the trailer is a Taj Mahal in comparison to her old place. She is so happy she is beside herself.

            There are a lot of elderly people in town. It has been a great joy for all six of us to take care of them. Carry their groceries out to the car. Deliver their groceries if they are shut in. Or to just visit with them when they stop in the store.

            I had mentioned the Hatfields and McCoys. Dawn’s family was part of the McCoys. Us being outsiders and not having a bone to pick with anyone, we have made an effort to be friendly with everyone. We try to have a drink at the bar, which is frequented by the Hatfields, every once in a while and have come to really enjoy the company of the folks in there. People from both sides have chosen to patronize us in the store and I like to think the store has become a bit of common ground.

            The school only has about 25 students in K-12. There are several grades which don’t have any students. Enrollment increased by 20% when we came to town! One family had taken their kids out of the school and sent them to a neighboring town because they believed the school a lost cause. They saw us moving to town as a vote of confidence and decided to bring their children back.

            I hear about the secularization of society and I think our little town has been forgotten by time. Even though it is by far the smallest town of the three parishes our priest serves, mass attendance exceeds the other two hands down. The public school even allows CCD to be taught the last hour on Wednesdays. The CCD Christmas play was after mass today. Even the non-Catholic students were included in the play. It was truly a community event. Two of my children had major roles in the play. Afterwards so many people stopped me to thank us for bringing our children and breathing some life into the community.

            I had mentioned the house we Rent to Own across the street from the church. With everything else going on in our lives, the owners graciously agreed to rent the house to us until we are able to sell our house in the city. I knew that our land lord would be at mass so I brought the rent check with. When I handed him the check after the play, he tore it up and said “Merry Christmas”. My heart welled up with joy and my eyes with tears. When Charlie says that it will be like Mayberry after the storm, I truly hope this is a taste of what is to come.

            After seeing everything I’ve typed, I don’t want anyone to think that I am boasting about all of the wonderful things we have done. It really isn’t like that. It has been a struggle and usually we feel like we are fighting a loosing battle. Just last week we seriously considered throwing in the towel and moving back to the city. I don’t think any of the steps we took along the way necessarily felt like the right step but it was the step needed to keep going. What I really want to communicate is how God has worked through what has seemed to be an ill conceived boondoggle and richly blessed us at the same time.

            Liked by 7 people

          • charliej373 says:

            No, it does not seem like boasting, Josh. Frankly, I am choking back tears. The fiery trial of this year came upon you – and you lived it by trusting God, taking the next right step, and being a sign of hope. May we all live it so well. Thank you for this witness on how to live when you are carrying a cross, yourself.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Doug says:

            Josh, this is so inspiring. I did light a candle after Mass and asked the Blessed Mother to intercede for you. We all get discouraged every now and then. I/we are no exceptions. It reminds me when Elijah did amazing things and then became quite discouraged after. And, he was right in the will of God. I am going through my own dry spell of sorts, but I am often reminded what Peter said in John. “Lord, where else can we go? You have the words of eternal life.” Also, one of my favorite verses is Romans 8:28 “All things work for good to those who love God and are called according to his purpose”. This to me does not mean life will be hunky dorry, but there will be profiund meaning and God will use whatever situation to bring good even if it appears tragic. My wife is a 3 time cancer survivor and to me is a spiritual giant. I cherish every struggle we ever went through because it has brought us both closer to God and brought such deep meaning in our lives. Please also pray for me as I am also discerning some work changes with some discouragement. God bless you and Merry Christmas!

            Liked by 3 people

          • Petra says:

            Josh, I sincerely prayed for you, and more than once, after your request about finding difficulty in prayer. I notice many other people responded to your request too, and I’m sure there were many, many more who whispered a prayer for you who never mentioned so here.

            Your follow up is inspiring. All your acts, small in and of themselves, amount to a great deal of living true Christian lives. Yes, it’s hard. It can be very hard. And when the prayer gets dry and hard to do, and doubts fill our minds, then we wonder, what good am I really doing with all these sacrifices and in all this pain?

            But then the Light of Christ breaks through, and we get a measure of relief, of assurance, and we see a little joy.

            Rabbi Johnathan Cahn said something once I have never forgotten. I think I knew this was true before he said it, but he reminded me of it. He said that every time he and his ministry are about to accomplish something great, some breakthrough, the evil one really turns up the heat. All kinds of things go wrong, disaster looms, things seem to go awry. He’s learned to keep moving forward in spite of it, because, he said, the satan wants you to quit. And he is most anxious you quit right before you are about to accomplish something very important for God. Maybe it isn’t something with a big splash or apparent to anyone else, but it is significant in the spiritual world. So when you know you are on the right path, and everything seems to be coming against you, think of it as enemy “flak.” You’re near the target.

            I’m so glad you came here to ask for prayer, because I think the people reading here actually pray for those who request prayers! And thank you for telling us about how your mourning and discouragement has turned into joy, because it encourages all of us.

            May God bless you and your family in this new venture you’ve taken on. It really sounds like something out of a movie!

            God bless.

            Liked by 5 people

          • Doug says:

            Hey, I vote that this be the TNRS Christmas story of this season!

            Liked by 2 people

          • YongDuk says:

            Blessings Josh, you have been in my prayers at the Altar and I will include your beautiful wife and children now as well! Thank you for sharing this.

            Pax vobis,
            +

            Liked by 5 people

          • Mick says:

            Oh, Josh, thank you for sharing your beautiful story. May God continue to bless you and your family as you acknowledge Him, take the next right step, and continue to be a sign of hope to those in your small town. 🙂

            Liked by 4 people

          • audiemarie2014 says:

            I’m trying to find the correct place to respond to Josh in ND. Hopefully this will fit in where he can see it. God bless you, Josh! Your story has given me encouragement and inspiration. Thank you for sharing all that you did. I grew up in ND, so maybe we are related? That’s an old ND joke. I had just commented that I was so happy the other day and I’m just taking it one day at a time, finding joy, focusing on the rescue. Then, BAM! The weekend was full of heartache. Long story short, I drove 30 miles to the nearest Catholic church I knew of that had confession and Mass this morning. The young priest was absolutely wonderful. He told me that as darkness is covering the earth, I need to focus on Jesus and stay close to Him! I almost asked him if he knew Charlie by the way he spoke. So, I am focusing on Jesus as I look forward to the rescue through His Mother. Jesus, I surrender myself to you, take care of everything. I’m thinking there will probably be more difficult trials. I pray I can be a sign of hope to others like you, your wife and family, Josh. Merry Christmas, Josh!

            Liked by 5 people

          • Beckita says:

            Let’s see where this comment goes, Josh. I wish to join the others in thanking you for witnessing to hope. You and your family remain in my prayers, asking the Holy Family to intercede for you all.

            Liked by 1 person

        • CHADPRO123 says:

          JeanO

          I regularly describe my 2 year old as a lunatic and nutcase to friends and strangers alike. These expressions stem my from hyperbolic and clownish personality and not from any deep seated animosity towards my son. I’m sure Charlie meant no offense by using a boxing term just as I mean nothing by using psychological terms.

          Then again, if a stranger described my child as a “lunatic” or “nutcase” in writing i would probably squirm a little because detecting irony or sarcasm or subtlety is sometimes difficult to do with just print.

          Anyway, Merry Christmas from me and my little lunatic 😉

          Liked by 2 people

          • zeniazenia says:

            People could call us “squirrelly”!

            Liked by 2 people

          • LordprotectYourlittlemess says:

            Josh~I wish I could say that I cannot relate to this, but ever since I started the 33 day consecration to Mary, I feel as if I am in a spiraling swirl of sewage being flushed, and I too am not giving our Lord the time prayer or my heart as I should. I know, that often, when we are close to real growth towards our Loving Father, the evil one starts in full force. So, with that in mind, I have asked the Lord for strength and perseverance, discernment and obedience, wisdom and protection from deception for you, for me, for any and all that have a part of his/her heart reaching out to God with one word, “help”.

            It’s funny how it can be so much easier to fight for the loved one in our lives than it can be to fight for ourselves. I am nearing the anniversary of getting my husband back. He quietly slipped off over the course of years with my clueless negligence until I heard the word “divorce” (to this day, we have been in one fight). That was about 5 years ago, and in that moment, the Holy Spirit gave me the most incredible gift of His breath that said, it will be better than it ever was, one of the only such gifts I have recognized in my life. Somewhere along the way, as I was bellyaching about how my husband, who took vows, promised, etc, etc, etc, could “do this to me” when I finally realized I was not fighting my husband. I was fighting against the evil one who was fighting to take my husband from me. That realization opened me up to the true spiritual battle that included years of back to back 54 day novenas, meditations on Our Lady’s Sorrows, time with Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament, and submission to the spiritual battle that JESUS HAS WON for us. So, I guess my point is, 1)praise GOD that He fights for us, as I have already mentioned that I am swimming in the toilet and 2)Josh, you are not alone, and you are a target. Your battle is not with yourself, go to God, as I must and utter “help”. This week may be one of those times where our widows mite given might be time. Time we don’t feel we have to just sit with Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. I challenge us both to spend some time to just utter “help” this week.

            Seems I can’t shut up. Charlie, if this is too much, edit away. Last Sunday we had an incredible Catholic family day. We went to Mass, we went to a local Monastery to see nativity scenes from all over the world, and ended our evening walking through the Door of Mercy as a FAMILY! So, at Mass, after receiving Jesus in the Eucharist, I was thinking about my hardened heart, asking for help, meditating for Jesus’ touch. Here was my meditation. Jesus spent 30 years learning and perfecting the trade of carpentry from his earthly father, St. Joseph. I imagined my heart with a wooden shell, and Jesus holding His tools so lovingly to plane, chisel, work that wood until it was so beautiful and smooth. Thinning the shell with the love and perfection that only He has to ready me for the chisel to just find the right crack to break through. Then His Heavenly Father comes to offer the balm of His immense love and mercy for each “cracked” heart. I started to cry, well, really cry since my 3 year old and 8 year old each crowded in on either side of Mom to comfort me. I was thinking about pieces of Amish furniture I had swept my hand across over the years, and how I imagine Jesus more perfect work leaves that in the dust, when I thought about how it must have been for our Lord to accept the texture of the cross. I have thought about the weight of the cross, but I imagined each of our sins being another sliver that bit into the already gaping wounds of Christ’s back, and how He lovingly accepted each one for me. Then I really cried. Jesus has made that ugly, heavy, sliver laden cross beautiful and He will make our wooden, closed hearts beautiful too, if we give Him permission, if we just lift our heart to Him and utter, “help”.

            Liked by 6 people

          • Doug says:

            So nice!

            Like

        • Mick says:

          Praying for you, Josh.

          Like

        • zeniazenia says:

          Dear Jean,
          I often wondered how angry Gabriel became (‘I AM GABRIEL’ he said–wow) when Zechari’ah questioned God’s Will in Luke Ch. 1:18-20
          ‘And Zechari’ah said to the angel, “How shall I know this? For I am an old man, and my wife is advanced in years.”
          And the angel answered him, “I am Gabriel, who stand in the presence of God; and I was sent to speak to you, and to bring you this good news.
          And behold, you will be silent and unable to speak until the day that these things come to pass, because you did not believe my words, which will be fulfilled in their time.”
          I wouldn’t want to challenge him on the good news… Nope. 😦 May God bless us–Zenia Jane

          Liked by 5 people

      • YongDuk says:

        JeanO, I wrote to Charlie a day or so ago referencing St John of the Cross’s Ascent of Mount Carmel, Book 2, Chapter 22, Sections 11-14.

        Might be good to read and ponder.

        I was much harsher on LttW than Charlie and I know Msgr Essef and praised Charlie for his level-headedness with the Msgr. …

        +천자의 덕. 또는 뛰어난 덕

        Liked by 1 person

        • charliej373 says:

          Kind of funny, YD. I had been so adamant that LttW was NOT of supernatural origin before it imploded that a few people were puzzled I was so gentle with it afterwards. JeanO is the ONLY person since it imploded who said I was harsh.

          Liked by 2 people

          • YongDuk says:

            Ha! Funny, as in you got the Korean part as a joke? 🙂

            Doug, just give me a :-/

            Beckinita, very well said above!

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            Yes, I am familiar with a Yong Duk, (south Korean, I think) who was involved in some nuclear proliferation issues with the IAE a few years back. I thought you might be slyly teasing me on the matter.

            Like

          • Doug says:

            Yup. Other than I recognized that it is Korean, I’m clueless. :-/

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            If I had to hazard a guess, I would say it is a squirrel Korean joke.

            Liked by 1 person

          • YongDuk says:

            🙂 That’s certainly not me: I am a pacifist, squirrels and all! My friend calls me YongDuk in Korean and that’s where the spelling comes from… Or Young Duck from MP

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            Well, the Yong Duk I vaguely remember played a role in EXPOSING bad acts, not in making them…so you’re good.

            Liked by 1 person

          • jeanO says:

            Dear Charlie,
            I raised some controversy with my comments. My intent was not to be uncharitable. This is one of the few places where honest dialogue is allowed. I indulged my doubts and fears and in doing so unfairly burdened this community.

            you were so kind to excuse me by saying I may have had a bad day. I did.

            Liked by 6 people

          • charliej373 says:

            I figured so, Jean. If you are who I remember you to be, you have always had a healthy skepticism, but are a good person. So, though there was a little controversy, no one suggested banning you to outer darkness. I’m glad you felt safe enough here to vent a little frustration. I have asked St. Peter – who had a few bad days himself – to help brighten your day today. Thanks for hanging in there.

            Liked by 6 people

          • Beckita says:

            Jean, as a member of this community I didn’t feel burdened with your comment and I hope I didn’t overwhelmem you with my response. I will tell you, one Lenten season I had an image of me carrying a cross; it was an unusual shape and guess what? As I looked more carefully, it was me! Yep! I came to the realization that I was carrying myself as one of my crosses. Since that time, one of my prayers has been: Lord, save me from myself. In all love and support, praying for you, Jean. Would you please pray for me?

            Liked by 4 people

        • Doug says:

          YD, you speak Korean too?

          Like

  24. Jeff B says:

    Quick question for anyone willing to find it… I’m looking for a recent story on this site from this year that talks about “if there was no God”. It was a guest piece and I can’t remember the author.
    Thanks a million!
    V/R,
    Jeff

    Like

  25. El ingeniero de Tepeyac says:

    Mother Miriam of the Lamb of God, is a former Jew, who became evangelical Christian and then later converted to Catholicism. I think Charlie Johnston knows her. She was inspired to form her own order of nuns. Her website is here: https://motherofisraelshope.org/

    Liked by 3 people

  26. Ed Allison says:

    Hello all! I just wanted to post to tell everyone that I wish them a Merry and Blessed Christmas! I don’t post much as demands on my time have gone up exponentially. But I read as much of Charlie’s blog as I can and as many of the comments as I can. As part of our ‘preps’ I am now raising rabbits and quail. I am having much more success with the quail than I am with the rabbits though. Who knew it was so hard to breed rabbits!. We finally had one of our does give birth (kindle) to 9 baby bunnies (kits), only to have her reject them. None survived. I was so disappointed. But I seem to be able to hatch out as many quail as I want, and I am currently buried in quail eggs. We can’t eat them fast enough! And bacon wrapped quail on the grill is about as good as it gets! Anyway, I continue to pray for all here and all your prayer intentions. God Bless you all! Ed

    Liked by 7 people

    • Mick says:

      Hi, Ed! I was thinking about you a couple of days ago and wondering how you were. Glad to hear that you’re OK, just busy. I’m very interested in your quail and rabbit experiments. We had no success with rabbits when we tried them. But our chickens and ducks are great egg and meat providers. We’ve never tried quails, though.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Ed Allison says:

        Mick, when I’m reading comments, I usually look for your name first. I’m actually glad to hear that somebody else had trouble with raising rabbits. It makes me feel a little better about the difficulties we’ve had so far. After all, they should breed like…. well, like rabbits! Apparently, it’s not that simple. The quail, on the other hand, are super easy. They do have a high protein requirement which could be difficult to satisfy in a collapse. I try to keep 100-150# of feed on hand, plus I’m raising mealworms as a supplemental feed for egg layers. I guess if I ran out of feed, it’d be time to just eat the birds. I wish I could have chickens and ducks! But I’m in a residential setting and there is actually an ordinance prohibiting chickens, so I’m told by the township. My quail are in the garage and out of sight. Besides, sometimes it’s easier to ask for forgiveness instead of permission.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Mick says:

          Ha, Ed! I see from all of the comments that I’m not the only one around here who has missed your bright, smiley face.

          Raising mealworms?! Oh dear. That’s an idea I’d never heard of. I must admit that I’m kind of a Barbie when it comes to bugs and gross stuff, and the concept of raising what appear to be large maggots weirds me out a bit. But the thought of a do-it-yourself supplemental protein source for our chickens and ducks is too attractive to pass up, So, how do you do it? How does one start? Where does one get supplies? Details, man, details! 🙂

          Maybe this could be an ongoing science project for my school-aged kids…

          Liked by 4 people

          • Beckita says:

            Mick, primary-aged kids LOVE mealworms! I would discourage naming the little guys or they’ll become a heartbreaking feed. Yes, even mealworms can be adorable.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Yuck! 😦

            Liked by 2 people

          • Petra says:

            Oh, Mick! I’m with you about the gross out factor raising mealworms, but then I imagined you making the following announcement to your kids: “Ahem. Your attention please. Your father and I (notice how you share the blame with dad) have decided that before you are able to move out of the house when you grow up, you will each have to raise 100 lbs of mealworms to help feed the chickens.” I can just see their eyes get wide in disbelief. 🙂 The girls, that is. The boys will go, “Only 100 lbs?”
            It might make a good long term strategy to keep them at home! 😉
            God bless.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            That will be a family story the kids will all treasure some day!

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Only you Mick. It fits 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          • Ed Allison says:

            Mick, mealworms are super easy to raise. I’d be glad to send you some to get you started! First, but the smaller plastic concrete mixing tub at Lowes. They have 2 sizes, but the smaller one is perfect and about $6. Then go to Tractor supply and buy a 25# bag of wheat bran for about $9. Pour a 2″ layer of wheat bran in the tub, and dump in your live mealworms. They eat the wheat bran. Every other day, or so, you also have to provide something for moisture, as the wheat bran has none. I use banana peels, zucchini slices, a slice of bread, etc. I’ve read about folks using potatoes, but I found them to be too wet. You need to keep the wheat bran dry or it’ll mold. Things like bread will mold too, so take them back out after a day or two. The veggie scraps and banana peels can be left in.

            So the worms are the larvae stage of the darkling beetle. It’s a grain bug. They will eventually morph into the pupae stage where they resemble a grub instead of a worm. The pupae morphs into the darkling beetle. The beetles mate, lay eggs, and new larvae (worms) are hatched. The whole life cycle depends on the ambient temp (the hotter the better, up to about 100 degrees), but should take 4-5 months.

            I started with 2,000 live mealworms I bought on Amazon, and most of the Summer, my worms were probably numbered in the tens of thousands. They’ve slowed down considerably now that the temps in my garage are in the 50’s. I wanted to bring them indoors…… but my wife didn’t like that idea. So, production is down til Spring. If you want some, let me know!

            Liked by 3 people

          • Ed Allison says:

            Mick, I forgot to add, that the birds LOVE them! Your chickens and ducks would too. The quail are so funny. I usually feed the mealworms when I get home from work. When I go into the garage, they are all gathered in the front of their pens, chirping away and jumping around with anticipation. I have these small stoneware cups that I put a few dozen worms in and place it in the pen. As I open the door, they’re jumping onto the back of my hand to be the first to pick one out! It’s hilarious! So again, let me know if you want some mealworms to start with. Or even some fertile quail eggs to start with! I’m currently about knee deep in quail eggs! We can’t eat them fast enough.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Mick, aren’t you the one who made us all spiders? Sturdy garden spiders as I recall, and something about a golden web. You’re no Barbie. LOL

            Liked by 1 person

          • Petra says:

            Sorry to say, Ed, but I’m with your wife on this one (not bringing them into the house.) Oh my! But hey, maybe you could get one of those electric infrared heaters to raise the temp in the garage and raise production. They work great in small spaces and are very safe.
            (I cannot believe I’m chiming it to suggest ways someone can increase the number of mealworms they are raising. 😉 But I read your explanation with fascination, and am going to print it out. Somehow it’s something I think I’m going to want to remember how to do.)
            God bless.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Mick says:

            Ed, thank you for your kind and generous offer to send me some large maggots. I have talked it over with my 13-year-old, and he’s game. I just need to talk to my better half now. I’m thinking that we could raise them in his office–he works at home but in a separate building. It stays warm, and I would not have to share my abode with the critters. So I’ll get back to you. 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • Doug says:

            Who would ever think that maggots would be a great gift for Christmas?

            Liked by 2 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Only here. Good heavens, what have I created here?

            Liked by 5 people

          • Doug says:

            Gregoriuosly Laughing out loud!

            Liked by 1 person

          • Petra says:

            Mick: Ok, I gotta say, you are one of the most gracious, kindly people I have ever read on the internet. “Ed, thank you for your kind and generous offer to send me some large maggots….” LOL 😀 😀
            Thank you for the belly laugh!
            God bless.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Mick says:

            Michelle: Hahaha! Guilty as charged. I’d forgotten about that whole spider thing.

            Garden spiders I can handle. It’s all the other spiders in the world that give me the willies (and bean beetles, and potato bugs, and carpenter ants, and tomato hornworms, and…). 🙂

            Liked by 3 people

          • Mick says:

            Ha, Petra! Although I think the funniest exchange in this thread was between Doug and Ed. Behold:

            “Doug, you asked: ‘So do the [quail] hens get hot flashes when they use up all there cells for eggs?’ The answer is, of course, YES! At 350 degrees while wrapped in bacon!”

            The runner-up was the exchange between Doug and Charlie. Doug: “Who would ever think that maggots would be a great gift for Christmas?” Charlie: “Only here. Good heavens, what have I created here?”

            Love you guys (and gals)! 🙂

            P.S. Speaking of unconventional, awesome Christmas gifts… A few years ago, my husband decided to give me all firearm-themed gifts. He gave me a holographic sight for my rifle, an extra magazine for my handgun, and a concealed-carry fanny-pack (which actually is worn up-front, but whatever). The Christmas before that, he gave me a “day at the gun range,” complete with a few hundred rounds of practice ammo. Maybe one of these Christmases, I’ll score one of those guns which the left constantly mischaracterizes as an “assault rifle.” Personally, I prefer the moniker, “the Barbie doll for guys [and, might I add, for tomboys]”:

            http://www.apacheclips.com/boards/attachment.php?attachmentid=13310&d=1363257685&thumb=1

            Liked by 5 people

          • Doug says:

            Mick, a gun themed Christmas. What a great idea. Ammo for stocking stuffers 😉

            Liked by 1 person

      • Ed Allison says:

        In the last few months, I’ve been selling quail eggs and some live birds on craigslist. I’m not trying to sell you guys anything, I just want to show you the pictures that are in the ad. These are some of my birds:
        http://philadelphia.craigslist.org/grd/5360729820.html

        Liked by 3 people

        • jlynnbyrd says:

          Ed, they are beautiful!

          Liked by 1 person

        • zeniazenia says:

          What is the best way to keep ^ quail a- laying? seriously –Jane
          You may have seen these correlations or variations 🙂
          1 partridge/pear tree stands for Jesus
          2 turtle doves = Old & New Testaments
          3 French hens = faith, hope, love or the Holy Trinity or the 3 gifts of Magi (versions differ)
          4 collie birds = four gospels
          5 golden rings = Pentateuch (first 5 books of Bible)
          6 geese a-laying = 6 days God created the Earth
          7 swans a-swimming = the 7 gifts of the Holy Spirit (prophecy, ministry, teaching, giving, exhortation, leading, compassion . . versions differ on these)
          8 maids a-milking = the 8 beatitudes (blessed are . . .)
          9 drummers drumming = the 9 fruits of the Holy Spirit (“love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control”)
          10 piipers piping = the ten commandments
          11 ladies dancing = the eleven apostles, without Judas
          12 lords a-leaping = 12 statements in Apostles’ Creed

          Liked by 3 people

          • Ed Allison says:

            Jane, as you probably know, birds usually take a break from laying in the Winter. The shorter daylight hours are the cause. I keep the lights on in the garage until about 10:00 PM and this seems to do the trick. Each hen is hatched with the cells of every egg it will ever lay. If you use them up quicker by making them lay year round, the useful life of the hen is shortened. But considering these things start laying at 6-8 weeks old, There’s no shortage of new recruits coming up in the ranks. I also provide crushed oyster shell as a calcium supplement to make sure the egg shells are strong.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            So do the hens get hot flashes when they use up all there cells for eggs? 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          • Petra says:

            zeniazenia: I had to look it up:
            According to Hubpages:

            “It’s Colly Birds, Not “Calling Birds”

            The verse, four calling birds, is actually a corruption of the English word colly or collie . So, we are referring to four colly birds or four collie bird s (the words to the song were probably written before the creation of the dictionary, so the spelling of old words tends to be flexible).

            What is a colly bird? It is a black bird. In England a coal mine is called a colliery and colly or collie is a derivation of this and means black like coal. For a long time in England, blackbirds have been referred to as both blackbirds (as in the nursery rhyme Sing a Song of Sixpence ) and colly birds as in The Twelve Days of Christmas .”

            “…90% of all that is known we don’t know we don’t know!” Thank you, zeniazenia! Now I will never forget this, because I have spent all my life singing this as “four calling birds.”

            God bless you. 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            Could the collie birds still be calling? Or perhaps cawing? The next time I sing it I might say “Four cawing collie birds calling”

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Now wouldn’t a collie bird be the same as a dog bird? 😉

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            No, it would be a crow dog. We have a crew dog here…let’s ask him.

            Liked by 1 person

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Is this the making of a new tongue twister? 😀

            Liked by 2 people

          • Doug says:

            Yes! That’s it Jlynn!

            Like

          • Doug says:

            Wow. I’ve been singing it wrong for over 50 years. Well, never too late to learn 🙂

            Liked by 3 people

          • Ed Allison says:

            Doug, you asked: “So do the hens get hot flashes when they use up all there cells for eggs?”

            The answer is, of course, YES! At 350 degrees while wrapped in bacon!

            Liked by 5 people

          • Doug says:

            I love it! Can’t wait for those hot flashes to begin. Yum! 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • zeniazenia says:

            Nice Petra and thanks Ed -Collie birds, cool bit of trivia there! -Now I would love some quail to raise, mealworms and all. The eggs are beautiful and you say they are perfect on the grill. Good tip on the light/laying correlation. I will keep this filed away for future consideration 🙂 –Jane

            Liked by 2 people

          • YongDuk says:

            Hilarious, one and all!

            Liked by 3 people

        • Doug says:

          Quale looks like cantaloupe with a head and beak and tiny feet. Pretty cool.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Beckita says:

          WOW, Ed! Thanks for sharing.

          Like

    • zeniazenia says:

      Hi Ed, What are your ‘preps’?

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ed Allison says:

        Zenia, by ‘preps’, I mean the preparations we are doing so that we can survive in a collapse scenario. These include extra food, water, means of power generation, personal protection, seeds, berry bushes, etc. Of course, my preps would be shared with those around me, my neighbors, and those who come seeking help. Those who come with the intention of taking what they want, will meet with the personal protection preps.

        Liked by 3 people

        • zeniazenia says:

          Hi Ed, Oh yes– of course. Sounds good. I helped dispatch 60 chickens and two pigs at my son’s farm in VT (not on the same day). That was tough enough. I don’t think I would want to see the kindles and kits fail at reproducing. How disappointing. What will you do for preservation if the power for the freezers is out? Thanks– Jane

          Liked by 1 person

          • Ed Allison says:

            Zenia, I actually expect to be able to continue running my freezers. I bought 4 solar panels, charge controller, etc., which will keep my battery bank charged. I then use a 3000 watt DC to AC inverter to run the freezers. So, barring a EMP attack, which would knock out anything electronic, I should still be able to power my 2 chest freezers.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Doug says:

            Is this where you keep your frozen squirrel meat? 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • Ed Allison says:

            Doug, that’s funny. I am a hunter. My oldest brother was up for Thanksgiving from VA, and commented at the number of squirrels running around. He said, “That’s not like you, Ed.” (to allow so many tree rats to live). I told him that I’m saving them up until I need them. My father used to say that, “Many a true word is spoken in jest.”

            I’ve eaten many squirrels in my day. They make a wonderful shredded bbq! But with all the talk about squirrels around here lately, I’ve been holding back, from talking about letting the neighborhood squirrels live so that there’s fresh meat for the taking. 😉

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Shhhhhh. Don’t let Charlie know you have eaten squirrel or you may not be allowed to post anymore 🙂

            Liked by 3 people

    • Beckita says:

      Merry and Blessed Christmas to you as well, Ed, with all manner of blessings! Sounds like you’re already enjoying part of your Christmas Feast!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Ed Allison says:

        Thank you Beckita! I love your name btw.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Beckita says:

          Well, I love your sleuthing skills, Ed. I believe it was you who, this summer, found the link to Charlie’s Uncle Billy’s recording of “How Great Thou Art.’ See, I receive as much joy on this site observing people connecting and supporting one another as I do when personally making the connections as well as offering/receiving support. We are living the Joy of the Gospel here! God bless you and your family.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Ed Allison says:

            Yes, that was me. Even a blind squirrel finds a nut now and again!

            Liked by 3 people

          • Ed Allison says:

            Beckita, your wonderful comment deserves more than a one liner. This place is great, isn’t it? It is a blessing to all who participate. And even those who are only lurkers, are still participants! Those regulars who post and make those ‘connections’ with others on a personal level provide for the lurkers, that same feeling of connection and inclusiveness. I’m sure we would be surprised at how far and wide our little NRS family has spread. This site has become a sign of hope to many. I have NO DOUBT that you got quite a few ‘Amen’s by those who also receive joy and support when they visit here, even if they don’t post. God bless you and yours Beckita!

            Liked by 4 people

          • Doug says:

            Amen Ed! Ha!

            Liked by 2 people

          • Beckita says:

            Couldn’t agree with you more, Ed, concerning your observations about “lurkers” participating at a very real and important level. You see, I’m a retired educator and was always astounded, and joyfully so, by my students who were the quiet ones and would suddenly burst forth with insight which revealed they were very engaged in all that was happening in the learning process! God bless you and your family as well, Ed, and all your merry critters!!!

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Beckita, Still waters run deep…..

            Liked by 1 person

        • Doug says:

          Ditto on the name!

          Liked by 2 people

    • Petra says:

      Ed, so glad to hear from you. I do miss your comments. I think often of you and your dear mom, and say a prayer for her now that she has gone from among us. This will be our first Christmas without our moms, and already tears well up in my eyes. But perhaps I should think of how happy they are, because certainly due to their faith in Jesus Christ they are with Him now, and what more could I wish for than that?
      Merry Christmas to you as well, and to all your family. Sorry about the rabbits, and happy about the quail!
      God bless.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Ed Allison says:

        Thank you Petra! That really means a lot! I miss her terribly, but like you, I know that she was a woman of faith, and is with the Lord. That is, after all, the ultimate goal. We must run the race, and persevere until the final hour! Our moms were fine examples for us to follow. Merry Christmas!

        Liked by 3 people

    • LukeMichael says:

      I can’t wait for the lion to lay down with the lamb!

      Liked by 5 people

    • charliej373 says:

      We miss you here, Ed.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Snowy Owl says:

      Hi Ed, I used to breed rabbits and just about every other critter imaginable, if I can help, let me know.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ed Allison says:

        Hi Snowy! I appreciate the offer very much! But I’m not sure what you can do, other than to advise to get different does. They are just lousy mothers! We’ll try again in the Spring. It’s too cold for kits to be born here in Jan-Mar. If they reject (or worse!) their kits again, it may be time for different does. Thanks again!

        Liked by 1 person

        • Snowy Owl says:

          Hi Ed, we had the same issue until I did three things and then we had bunches of baby bunnies- no problems!
          1. We packed fresh straw in and all around the birthing box…packed it all the way to the top of the cage so it buried/hid the box and used my arm to make a hole to the opening in the box ( this made them feel safe so they did not abandon their babies.) So basically half the cage was filled with straw. Then we covered the cage on thatt end with plastic. Also, sure you know this, but momma rabbits only feed once, maybe twice and only at night..so they ignore the babies all day long. This is the way they do it.
          2. We moved the bucks out of sight…they have no time for the males after breeding and feel threatened by them.
          3 Fed large amounts of dark leafy greens ( romaine, beet greens etc) a lot of fresh crab grass and clover. Also gave them mineral blocks with calcium. Many won’t raise young on pellets alone.
          I used to be a Vet Tech and spent most of my life working with wild animals. Most animals are not bad parents, they just feel threatened by things we don’t see or understand, Give this a try, it worked great for us!

          Liked by 5 people

          • Ed Allison says:

            Snowy! Thank you so much for the advice! I have the ‘Storey’s Guide to Raising Rabbits’, and none of your 3 points are in there! I put the nesting box in on day 28, and fill it with hay. I’ve never heard of burying it with hay (or straw), but that sounds like an excellent way to do it! I do know that the mommas only nurse the kits once or twice, and mostly at night. But the last litter of 9 was completely ignored. I watched them get more emaciated by the day. Then when there was just 2 left, I couldn’t watch it any longer and I put them down myself. Starvation is an ugly way to die.

            I have one buck, and 2 does. They are in side by side cages, with the buck on the far left. There is a plastic sheathing ‘curtain’ that hangs between the buck, and the doe next door. It’s kind of opaque, but in no way clear. Is this ‘out of sight’ enough?

            We feed timothy hay in the morning and pellets at night. In the Summer, I was foraging in my lawn for dandelions, plantain and clover, which they all seemed to love. I don’t put any chemical fertilizer or weed killer on my lawn, btw. I also would give them garden clippings when they were available, and an occasional carrot. I’ve never given them a mineral block as I’ve read (in the book I mentioned) that the pellets are supposed to contain everything they need. I’ll look into getting some.

            Thank you again!

            Like

          • Snowy Owl says:

            Ed, if the pellets you’re feeding have everything I wouldn’t worry about the mineral block. If you continue to have problems, I would move the buck around the corner or across the room, you might even be able to just use some black plastic…it depends on the doe, some are more tolerant than others. Anyway, I hope this works for you so you get some bunnies! 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

  27. Rick says:

    Just a quick anecdote. Last weekend I visited my sister and her family in Texas as my niece was singing in a Christmas special with the children’s chorus with the Dallas Symphony. While we were walking around Dallas, we ran into a Muslim man at a booth distributing literature (which actually spoke very favorably about Mary and Jesus) about his faith. He was a very gentle and respectful man. After regretfully trying to ignore him, my sister convinced me to take one of his pamphlets if he would accept a Divine Mercy card, and my sister then told him that the Blessed Mother/ Our Lady of Fatima will unite us all . He was extremely appreciative, and when we saw him again a few hours later he smiled and waved the Divine Mercy card at my sister.

    Liked by 11 people

  28. jmst says:

    Charlie,
    Very sobering 60 minute audio on this Tuesday, 12/15/15 edition of TRUNEWS, host Rick Wiles greets Islamic Counter Terrorism Expert John Guandolo, to explain how radical muslims have successfully infiltrated the United States Government, and have plans to launch a ‘Zero Hour’ Jihad against America.
    https://www.trunews.com/tuesday-december-15-2015-john-guandolo/

    Like

  29. Chantal says:

    I’ve been thinking, about the rescue. Charlie you said that EVERYONE will experience desperation, also, my understanding is that the miracle, rescue Will also be experienced by everyone, so that includes China, North Korea. I don’t think they will understand so I guess after the rescue, the world will be in a state of chock. My mind just boggles at the thought, so it will be a revelation of God to the world. First Abraham, a revelation to a person which creates a nation, then Jésus, a revelation from a nation (whose rejection permits salvation to the gentils,) to the world and now there is to be a direct revelation to the world where ALL can live in relationship/know God.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Robert Cunningham says:

      Chantal

      I have for years thought that after the Warning (or the Storm) there would so many more people looking for God who did not know him before or had perhaps lost their way. The prophet says:

      “In those days ten people from nations of every language will take hold, yes, will take hold of the cloak of every Judahite and say, “Let us go with you, for we have heard that God is with you.” (Zec 8:23)

      It seems applicable to our time. We do the work of evangelization in front of us today, working hard under the hot sun with little success. However, when God brings us to our senses with the events to come so many souls will be open to him and we’ll need people like the folks on this forum to share Jesus with them. As our dear Lord says, “The harvest is abundant but the laborers are few; so ask the master of the harvest to send out laborers for his harvest.” (Matt 9:38)

      In my parish in Texas we have done dozens of ACTS retreats. 40 men put on the four day retreat and 40 attend and we often have priests and bishops too. The women have their own too. It is always a great joy to see many of the men who were stern-faced or rigid on day one become zealous lovers of God and neighbor by day four. From my little perspective, I see the ACTS retreats as a microcosm of the greater things to come. Yes, there may be difficult times to come but then great joy.

      Robert

      Liked by 4 people

  30. James Ignatius McAuley says:

    Charlie,

    I feel impelled by my Guardian Angel to give you the following quote from the great Church Father Origen, from the opening paragraph of his First Homily on the Book of the Prophet Jeremiah:

    “God is ready to do good but hesitant to punish those who deserve punishment. In fact. though He can inflict punishment on those whom He had sentenced without saying anything, without prior warning, He never does. For when He sentences, He says so, and the speaking is a way to turn the person to be condemned away from the sentencing.”

    Sounds like you are one of the Speakers!

    Liked by 6 people

  31. Snowy Owl says:

    Charlie, I just have to tell you that every time I click on this post and see your smiling face I start giggling and smiling because you look so truly happy! People can smile… but that smile of yours is so genuinely joyfully happy, it actually makes me happy! I love that picture! You should replace your little icon picture with that 🙂 it would draw the crankiest person in and make even the scroogiest scrooge smile!
    Merry Christmas Charlie!

    Liked by 2 people

    • LukeMichael says:

      Here I am liking this post. As difficult as it is during this Storm, I admit this is one of, if not the best, Advent and Christmas seasons I have ever enjoyed. Muchas Gracias, Charlie, mi amigo!

      Liked by 3 people

      • Snowy Owl says:

        LukeMichael, I agree! I have had some very hard Christmases these past few years and this year I just feel so happy, joyful…and thankful! That smile of Charlie’s says it all! I was thinking too, if something hard happens between now and Christmas, we will just remember what Mary and Joseph endured, traveling so far and trying to find a place to give birth to baby Jesus! That was so blessed yet so hard for them.
        I would love to tell a little story about my baby Jesus that I bought and painted one Christmas, many years ago. My kids were really young and we were struggling, things were not so good. We bought this beautiful plaster statue of baby Jesus in His crib but could not find Mary and Joseph, well the kids wanted to get Baby Jesus anyway, so we did and painted Him and set Him right under the tree. The kids played with Him and spoiled Him because they felt bad His Mom, Mary wasn’t with Him so they took care of Him. Kids are the best! Later that night, Christmas Eve, we were at the table and I noticed a bright light glowing under the tree and it was our little plaster Baby Jesus! It was surrounded by a beautiful white light and glowing so brightly! My kids were so excited, we all loved Christmas so much! “Mom! Mom!! Baby Jesus is excited about Christmas too- LOOK!” It was the best Christmas I’ve ever had! This one feels the same to me! Merry Christmas!

        Liked by 6 people

    • Doug says:

      Good point Snowy!

      Liked by 1 person

  32. audiemarie2014 says:

    http://www.barkvines.com/hallelujah-violin-cover/
    I just had to share this beautiful link. Hope you all enjoy it. God bless all here!

    Liked by 2 people

    • audiemarie2014 says:

      Better scratch the beautiful song/video above…I just watched it again and there are obscene ads on the side of the video and I don’t know how to get rid of them other than enlarge the screen. So sorry!!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Beckita says:

      Funny, Audie… I had the song in my FB feed today and viewed it with joy. Without being fully aware, it seems I’ve trained myself to ignore the extraneous junk. I agree with Charlie. It’s everywhere… but not for long. 🙂 Maranatha!

      Liked by 1 person

      • audiemarie2014 says:

        Beckita, I know! I had watched it several times and didn’t notice it until I watched it again after I had sent the link to it. Good grief. I have been happy today in the midst of so much dark news, as I’m focusing on the year of mercy and the rescue. I spent time in Adoration…such peace. It also helps so much that I talk to a few friends here in MN that I met through Charlie’s site. We encourage each other and they give me such inspiring advice. This good feeling might not last, but it’s good just for today. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • Beckita says:

          Amen, Audie! Praise God for today. I admire your choice of focus amidst the trials. All will be well, for each and every one of us struggling with whatever we are wherever we are. Praying for you, Audie, that the Lord strengthens you, brings you consolation and resolves the difficulties. May our Mother wrap Her beautiful mantle around beautiful you!

          Liked by 2 people

          • audiemarie2014 says:

            Thank you, Beckita. Your words are always wise and comforting. God bless you.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Beckita says:

            Thank *you* Audie. We’re kindred spirits in many ways, you know. We’re NRSers and you’re in MN while I was raised in northwest Iowa. We annually went to Blanche Lake, MN for summer vacations and get this, Audie: I thought I was quite well traveled from my protected childhood when my new husband and I drove to the Twin Cities for our honeymoon! Four years later, we were flying to West Africa to live and travel; over the years I was blessed to visit all but two continents. God bless you as well, Audie, in every way!

            Liked by 1 person

  33. zeniazenia says:

    Dear TNRS, This year on December 2nd the Hebrew University of Jerusalem announced the discovery of a nearly 3000 year old seal belonging to King Hezekiah who ruled in Jerusalem. It bears the inscription ‘Belonging to Hezekiah (son of) Ahaz King of Judah” and is thought to date 727-698 BC. It was found in a dump, which originated next to the royal building in the City of David.
    Then another archeological find, from a few weeks ago, has connection with Hanukkah. Tradition holds that a small number of Jews triumphed over Greeks who vastly outnumbered them– -the revolt of the Maccabees. Until now there was no scientific proof, but now there is evidence of a large Greek military presence in Jerusalem, called the Greek Acra, a garrison built by Antiochus IV. It was discovered beneath the Giviti parking lot of the City of David.
    Two thirds of the City of David has yet to be excavated –this is amazing for all of us who love and cherish Jerusalem. 🙂 –Jane
    The article titled ‘Digging for ties’ can be found in International Jerusalem Post Dec. 11-17, 2015

    Liked by 3 people

  34. Jose says:

    Well, it seems like 2015 is also ending without an economic crash. Another year gone and nothing about that. So many things need to happen in (less?) than two years! It seems almost unbelievable that we will continue for yet several months more with still nothing, that is to say, that things will continue “normally” for a few more months still. And then, in the twinkling of an eye Chaos, and in another twinkling of an eye Rescue. It seems to me that everything will last no more than 1.5 years (from “invasion of Poland” moment until the Rescue). It sounds like it will be very intense but that it will last little. A year passes by so quickly! It is truly mind blowing to think that so many major things will happen in so little time! I’m preparing to go to Confession soon after about 7 years! (more or less).

    Liked by 2 people

    • Beckita says:

      All manner of blessings be upon you as you prepare for a glorious confession in this Jubilee Year of Mercy, Jose!

      Liked by 2 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      Jose, what a joy that you are going to be reconciled in the Sacrament of Confession after a time away. After each confession I picture myself robed in a white gown (representing my soul) and do all I can not to get smudges or stains on it from sin. Our Lord, Jesus Christ is merciful and will be oh so glad to be with you in the intimacy of the confessional. Bless you.

      Liked by 1 person

  35. Patrick of South Dakota says:

    Charlie,

    I would like to wish you and your family a Merry Christmas. And thank you so much for your work and being that sign of hope to me and those in my little, newly-formed refuge in the Black Hills.

    Yours in Christ,
    Patrick

    Liked by 3 people

  36. Mack says:

    After the elections last year, Charlie said it wouldn’t make any difference that the Republicans won control of the House and Senate. That was confirmed just now with the passage of the budget bill that gave Obama everything he wanted. It even fully funds Planned Parenthood.
    Conservative Republicans are seeing this as a real betrayal, but we already knew it would happen, thanks to Charlie. It is no surprise; things are playing out just as he said.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Mick says:

      You’re right, Mack: It’s not a surprise that Paul Ryan sold us down the river. It makes me madder than all get-out, though.

      Liked by 4 people

      • charliej373 says:

        I am saddened by it. I liked Paul Ryan.

        Liked by 4 people

      • jlynnbyrd says:

        Ditto! On a more joyful note, it was great to see Blessed Mother Teresa’s canonization announced. We will shall stay afloat on that trip down the river Mick. 🙂

        Liked by 4 people

        • Doug says:

          Mother Theresa used your correspond with letters with a close friend of my daughter who lives a few miles from us. The friend’s name is Claire. Well Claire is now “Sister Claire Theresa” and my grand daughter’s name is Claire after her friend. I will be seeing my grand daughter, Claire, next week in CA. I am grateful how Blessed Mother Theresa has influenced my family!

          Liked by 2 people

        • Mick says:

          Jen, that was funny. 🙂

          Guess it’s time for me to learn to swim.

          Like

      • SteveBC says:

        Mick, before 2012 I thought Ryan was really trying hard to be a help and start getting things back on track. He was OK during the selection, but since then I’ve had increasingly bad gut feels about him. Something’s wrong there. I don’t know what.

        I think we would all agree that those who are on a good path these days rarely get to rise in the world, even as those who are inadvertently or deliberately going the wrong path get external rewards. Ryan has risen fast here, and that makes me wonder.

        Liked by 2 people

  37. Phillip Frank says:

    I may be a little late on the rabbit breeding forum, but first time mothers of ANY rodent species are a little new at it so they may abandon, eat, stomp on, or be afraid of their first brood.. People can be a lot like rodents sometimes too!
    Be patient and the rabbits will breed like rabbits soon enough.
    Quail are easier because they hatch out on their feet, eyes open and the mother just says, “do what I do” in her quail language.
    So much simpler.

    Liked by 6 people

  38. Phillip Frank says:

    One more thing.
    I had a reptile distributor who swore mealworms taste great…like nuts.
    He would walk around the bins yapping, grab up a few and pop them in one at a time like peanuts! He had the larger type called super worms but he said the smaller ones were just as good.
    I’ve never tried one but in a pinch…who knows?

    Liked by 1 person

  39. luvmercy5775 says:

    Matthew wrote: “I have developed my own version that argues that Old Testament Judaism DIED in AD 70 with the destruction of the Temple. Out of this destruction two religions were born Christianity and Rabbinical Judaism. The real debate should be which of these is the TRUE successor to Old Testament Judaism NOT whether Christianity supersedes Rabbinical Judaism.”
    Matthew, As true of you and others reading this blog, I’ve given much thought to this subject. My personal opinion is that both are correct. In respect to the family of God, I see the two as representing big brother, little sister. Possibly the fulfillment of Psalm 85:10. ” Mercy and truth are met together; righteousness and peace have kissed each other.” Two pillars of faith.

    Do a google search on The House of Israel and The House of Judah. You’ll be surprised at what you uncover as it becomes clear these represent two separate entities — two that, one day soon, will once again be reunited. Once you understand the difference, you may view Jesus as saying, “I have come only for the lost sheep of the House of Israel.” in a different light. I’ve come to believe that here He’s referring to the ten lost tribes scattered among the nations — the redeemed of which today comprise the body of believers known as the church. Hence, Christians truly are the new House of Israel, but Judah remains distinct.

    May everyone enjoy a blessed and Merry Christmas. To God be the glory…

    Liked by 2 people

    • Doug says:

      From a teaching perspective, I believe the levitical priest hood was formally the Magisterium of the church of the Old Testament. It may have been God’s plan to carry it forward to the new testament, but Jesus was rejected by the levitical priestly order. The Magisterium was officially taken away from the levitical priestly order and a new Magisterium was created where as it is ordained to run via apostolic succession through the chair of Peter. This would be confirmed in scripture. Matthew 21:43 “Therefore I say to you: the Kingdom of heaven will be taken from you and given to a people who will yield a harvest”. Thus, we have the new Magisterium which is governed by the Catholic Church, again, via apostolic succession.

      Liked by 1 person

      • zeniazenia says:

        Hi Doug, I agree. This is why Jesus’ mother Mary and Joseph both consecrated and redeemed Jesus, at the Presentation of the Lord.
        The consecration- (pre golden calf when each first born was a priest to offer sacrifice) “Consecrate to me all the first-born; whatever is the first to open the womb among the people of Israel, both of man and of beast, is mine.”
        The redemption- (post golden calf and the beginning of the Levitical Priesthood where we are compared to donkeys 😦 ) “you shall set apart to the LORD all that first opens the womb. All the firstlings of your cattle that are males shall be the LORD’s. Every firstling of an ass you shall redeem with a lamb, or if you will not redeem it you shall break its neck. Every first-born of man among your sons you shall redeem.”
        Mary and Joseph knew the days of the Levitical Priesthood were numbered with the birth of the Savior. It was the end of that Age. Jesus would be the one Great High Priest thus fulfilling His prophecy to Abraham (pre golden calf) That he would be the Father of all nations. This solves the puzzle for Israel. They would be brought back together by Jesus, though the tribes had been diluted, scattered and lost for so many years.
        Peter first speaks specifically to the Jews and those living in Jerusalem regarding Joel’s prophecy at the first Pentecost. He was not speaking to the tribes of Israel who offered sacrifice on Mt. Gerizim. They would not be so affected by the destruction of the Temple.
        Interesting to note, the definition of Hebrew -a member of an ancient people living in what is now Israel and Palestine and, according to biblical tradition, descended from the patriarch Jacob, grandson of Abraham. After the Exodus ( circa 1300 BC) they established the kingdoms of Israel and Judah, and their scriptures and traditions form the basis of the Jewish religion. The definition of Jew – a subject of the ancient kingdom of Judah. Thanks-Jane

        Liked by 1 person

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