Betrayal or Trust

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(Late in the 90’s, in one of my little visions – a stylized type that always ends with a pithy angelic comment – I was told, “Betrayal comes from one you love and trust. Begin to offer reparation for him now.” It was striking to me I was not told to defend myself against it, but to pray for the one from whom it would come.

Mother Ellen Neufeld is an Anglican Priest, known on these comment boards as EllenChris. She and her husband, Fr. Mike Neufeld are assigned to St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Scotia, New York. They were my hosts when I visited the Albany area last summer. She is a deep and profound student of Christian history. When she submitted this article to me about the devil using betrayal – and a sense of betrayal – to spread despair in this year, it struck a chord with me.-CJ)

By Mother Ellen Neufeld

All of the people I have met at this weblog – diverse as we are – have a few things in common. We all believe in the one true living God, and we are all in relationship with Jesus Christ whom Christians know to be savior and Lord. I would also say that just about all of us have great love and gratitude for Our Lady, St. Mary, the Blessed Virgin Mother of God for Her gracious help in our lives. The other factor that we seem to have in common is the struggle each one of us is working through, by God’s Grace, in this already very difficult time.
A little over a year ago Charlie had a powerful and frightening vision of a sort of spiritual exploding volcano which was spewing out demons like lava and sparks from an eruption. Charlie posted this statement on January 1 and again on December 27 of 2015: “I have been deeply concerned with the visitation I briefly referenced from the early morning hours of December 20 [2014]. In part of it I saw a great multitude of demons, spewing up as if from a great fountain and spreading across the whole earth. Their primary target in this year, knowing their time is short, are those who are most overtly pious and faithful. If they can cause despair here, they can destroy many. Their primary method of causing despair is to reveal to the most overtly pious that things are not as they thought they were. Think here of the crucifixion.” (What came to my mind was particularly Judas’ betrayal of Jesus in the garden).
We have all felt some of the effects of this onslaught. We, ourselves, as well as family members and friends have had difficulties on the physical, emotional, intellectual and spiritual levels; some of these have been devastating. We struggle to be faithful while wondering how to get some sense of understanding of all this turmoil.
At the beginning of this past December (2015) I went through a very severe personal struggle. It came on very suddenly and unexpectedly just when things seemed to be going really well on all levels. Over a five day period it seemed to me that God had just dumped me out into a bottomless pit of pain, anger and hopelessness. Finally, I had a conversation with my “Anam Cara” which is the Irish term for a “Soul Friend” or someone who walks with us in mutual support and encouragement on our spiritual journey. The Rev’d Brenda is someone I have learned over the years is totally trustworthy with a deep and wise heart. I complained to her, “I feel so betrayed!” And she was silent for several long minutes.
“That is the word: Betrayal!” she finally said. And we talked this over for quite a while. As fellow clergy in our branch of the Church, she had been hearing this word used very frequently by people who were coming to her for counseling and spiritual advice. She had been trying to help people through situations in which they either felt betrayed by circumstances in their lives or were actually being betrayed by someone close to them. We realized we were seeing this pattern of feelings of betrayal everywhere. Our conversation turned to the way in which this dynamic of betrayal in people’s lives related to our current involvement in The Storm and the possibilities for how this might work out as the full force of The Storm erupts.
Together, we came to an understanding that the great demonic onslaught which Charlie had seen and described to us is characterized primarily by this particular form of attack: the sense of being betrayed. In discussing this with Charlie he expressed his sense that this is indeed a large and central focus of the demonic attack on God’s people that he had seen for this time.
By the end of my conversation with Mthr. Brenda, the attack that had overwhelmed me was broken. I was able to return to repentance and prayer with a new deeper, stronger and clearer sense of God’s unrelenting Love and Providence. I experienced deep healing. Over the next weeks leading into Christmas Brenda and I continued to ponder this insight.
As we discussed The Storm, it became clear that its havoc would not be merely a matter of one falling domino following another, but something much more immediate. Mthr. Brenda said, “This is like a tree in a huge fire. The sap super-heats and suddenly explodes, and sends showers of sparks igniting all the trees around it.” TreeExplosionBetrayalWhen a person feels betrayed – whether the betrayal is real or merely felt in that way – that person then experiences a sense of helplessness which quickly turns into anger and a need to lash out. The betrayed person cries out for justice, but then feels entirely justified in wreaking vengeance and hurt on those whom he perceives to have betrayed him. The betrayal may, indeed, be real, or the source of the temptation may be with the betrayer. It may be that someone who has been hurt is tempted to ascribe this hurt to the malice of betrayal on the part of the person who inadvertently caused the hurt without realizing it. Either way, what is most important is the nature of our own response in these kinds of
situations.
Dominoes fall one at a time or in small groups. The tree exploding with fiery sparks immediately sets on fire all the trees around it, which then ignite all the trees around them. Such a forest fire will cause a huge conflagration in only a few minutes. The betrayed person justifies his own behavior in hurting others in his desperate need for vindication. He ignites the anger of those he believes have hurt him by hurting them. Like the flaming trees in the fire, these people then spread their own anger and vengeance to those around them until an entire area is filled with hate and revenge. We are seeing just this scenario being played out in so many areas around us. This is the how The Storm explodes. But there is an alternative.
Throughout the Holy Scriptures we see stories about the forgiveness of God. In the Second Book of Samuel, chapter 11 we read of King David’s betrayal of his friend Uriah to his death in order to take his wife, Bathsheba. Through the prophet Nathan God brought David to repentance for his sin; He then forgave and healed David through the death of Bathsheba’s son. Again and again, God used the prophets to call His people to repentance, and He forgave them. A large and central focus of Jesus’ Gospel message is concerned with forgiveness. Perhaps the most succinct statement is found in the Gospel of Matthew chapter 18, verses 21 – 22: “Then Peter came up and said to Him, ‘Lord, how often will my brother sin against me, and I forgive him? As many as seven times?’ Jesus said to him, ‘I do not say to you seven times, but seventy times seven’” (ESV). Every time we pray the Our Father, the prayer that Jesus gave us, we acknowledge that we are forgiven by God as we forgive others.
Only forgiveness can stop the whirlwind of betrayal and vengeance; only forgiveness can extinguish the flaming tree of rage. Peter was able to trust the forgiveness of God after he denied Jesus at His trial, while Judas rejected the possibility of forgiveness and restoration due to his lack of trust. Only if we truly trust in God’s love and healing can we begin to forgive and let go of our hurt and anger.
Once you see a pattern, it becomes almost impossible to un-see it. Over the past weeks my ears have pricked up to the words, “betrayed” and “betrayal” time and time again. News commentators on the radio and TV use it constantly. Even the tabloid headlines we read on cash register lines scream out that this or that celebrity has been “Betrayed again!” People everywhere are experiencing a sense that social, political and even Church structures are betraying them. This is the demons’ strategy against us.
This situation leads us to a deeper and more important aspect of this issue. In feeling betrayed by people and situations, whatever their real intentions may be, we can be quickly led into anger against God, Himself. The question, “Why did God allow this to happen to me?” can all too easily become an enraged cry, “How can I believe God loves me when He has allowed this?” or even, “God Himself has betrayed me!” This is the subtle snare of the terrible enemy of our souls. He desires to throw us down into his own pit of despair and rage against the One Who created us, redeems us and loves us totally. By creating this sense of betrayal around us and in us, he is trying to draw us away from God’s faithful love by accusing Our Father of being the source of all our pain. I had a bitter taste of this on that first weekend of December. Yet God is faithful: He showed me His purpose in bringing me through this experience, and He healed deep wounds from my past in even deeper and more all-encompassing ways as He brought me out of it.
God’s purposes and plans for us are all and only good, and whatever happens to us occurs in His loving Providence to bring us into the fullness of His Life, Glory and Joy. God will never harm us. If we seem to feel that He is causing us pain,

Mother Ellen and me.

Mother Ellen Neufeld and me

it is only the pain of pulling out the thorn, cleaning away the infection or cutting away the cancer of our fears. The only way we can grow in this knowledge of God’s total Goodness is by looking past what we think we see into the loving eyes of His tender Mercy. We must ask for His Grace and learn to trust Him in all things. The opposite and antidote to this temptation to turn from God to vengeance is this one great grace and decision: Trust! “Jesus, I trust in You” is the essential choice to allow God’s love to heal us and to extinguish the fiery darts of the evil one.

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
This entry was posted in Family of God, Guest Columns, Satan, Solidarity, Spiritual Preparation, The Storm and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

468 Responses to Betrayal or Trust

  1. Laurie says:

    Dear Mother Ellen,
    Thank you for blessing us with your teaching. I grew up in Cazenovia less than 100 miles from Scotia, and it’s so good to see the light of Christ shining brightly through you there. I am a cradle Catholic, now living in the northwest, but I still feel like a New Yorker.
    Somewhere in St. Faustina’s diary she wrote (and I’m paraphrasing), “Silence is the sword that slays the demon of deception.” This too has helped me on many occasions.
    Your “neighbor”,
    Laurie

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Cheryl says:

    Betrayal. rage. abandonment. atonement…. This has been spiritually one of the most trying and difficult of my entire life completely escalating on Divine Mercy Sunday last Easter. I have had to battle my way out of the abyss ~ from being what I thought was a person of great faith and love for God to someone battling Atheism. Between this blog, and that of Mark Mallet I think I am understanding what has been happening to me. I am so clumsy and infantile in my ability to climb out of the abyss. This battle is not for wimps that is for sure, and is truly painful. I have given away probably over 1000 Miraculous Medals, and professed to those broken souls that they are beloved children of God. Encouraged them to turn and trust the Mother of God imploring and trusting all difficulties to Her. Trust that they are Her beautiful children and that She will shepherd them and lead them, if they ask, to the full armor of God. The medal to me is a light in the dark. A promise that heaven will never abandon us. Why couldn’t I believe that of myself when I felt abandoned by those who should of protected me and didn’t ( even God ?). I have had to learn that faith is just that ~ faith. It isn’t what we see. It isn’t what we feel. It is what we believe, and is truly found in emptiness and darkness. Do we believe the words of God? Do I believe that when everything is black and empty that HE will not leave us orphaned? Do I trust that I am a beloved child of God, because HE said so ~even when those around me cannot see it? Do I trust that even though, as I have realized, I do not love God the way I should that He still loves me the way HE promised? I feel like a giant weight has been lifted from me ~ maybe just for a little while. I feel like I can breathe again a little…. and now maybe I can start to atone for my unbelief, my lack of trust, my pitiful ability to love.

    Liked by 12 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Thanks be to God, Cheryl. How marvelous the steadfastness of your determination to take the next right step in spite of the dark night of the soul you have undergone. I have said a few times to people who say that if they could see (miraculous things) then they would do that they have it backwards. You must do – and that is what progressively removes the scales from your eyes. You are living it and my prayers go out to you.

      Liked by 7 people

    • EllenChris says:

      Dear Cheryl — several years ago I was in exactly the same place. It really is the “Dark Night of the Soul.” The only way out of it is just to abandon ourselves into God’s hands — no matter what. This is very much like Charlie’s prayer of miraculous trust. God’s Grace brings us out of this when He knows it is the right time. Strangely enough, this is actually a gift. The dark night works trust in us that cannot happen in any other way. In the face of all the feelings of despair, you are still here: do not let the enemies of our souls try to make you carry guilt that is not yours to carry. Just thank God for His mercy and grace and rest in Him. St. Therese of Lisieux went through this same thing — she called the accusing voices “the hissing snakes.” If there is any kind of monastery or priests near you who can give you some good sensible spiritual direction, do everything you can to connect with that. Prayers for your peace.

      Liked by 8 people

    • Doug says:

      Cheryl,  on my second trip to Medjugorje in 1991, I, being a new Catholic, took home that my walk would often be a desert experience.  Why?  Because that is often how we mature and grow; it is how we learn to love and trust.  If we had the spiritual high all the time, wouldn’t that be a one way relationship?  I say this not so you become discouraged, but just because feelings are not there, does not necessarily mean you do not have faith or believe.  It may be a little hidden, but your faith may be more deep than you realize.  You have not given up.  It can be a daily grind.  I trust God will honor your faithfulness in this way and lead you deeper into a knowledge of him and you more fully understand his deep desire for you.  God bless you for hanging on!  I commend you!

      Sent from my T-Mobile 4G LTE Device

      Liked by 4 people

    • canada1nw says:

      Cheryl, I can relate very much with you. We know that satan watches the faithful, with an intent to destroy their faith. I picture him asking God, as he did with Job, to take away the Goodness which they were accused to, to test their love and faith in God. It is a hard walk especially when Job’s comforters abound and direct betrayal and rejection happens. I can remember the day my dark night started, twenty years ago. Our steel screen door blew off and our vaccuum cleaner died the same day. That was not an unusual life event but I felt and unusual storm brewing – it continued for twenty years. More doors slammed shut and more relationships broke/died than I could imagine. Yet God will use it all for good if we hold fast to Him. Joseph, who was sold by his brothers, could have become bitter, but he became better. It is just one letter in the difference, but oh what a difference that one letter makes when we choose the “E”, only by God’s Grace. I continue to try to choose the “E” and take the next right step. Confession is a great way to erase the wrong step. I thank God for His help and His helpers.

      Liked by 4 people

  3. EllenChris says:

    Thanks and blessings to everyone.

    This is not a vision or locution or anything like that. This is a collection of thoughts in my head that formed into a little parable that I would like to leave here for your prayerful consideration.

    Once upon a time there was a lovely country; in the center of this country stood a great and beautiful Mansion in which there lived a large family. They loved each other and feasted at the table together. They grew a garden of fruit trees and grain fields around the house. As time went on the members of this growing family added on extra additions and wings onto the house. There came a time when the family members who lived in one of these wings got into a dispute about the setting of the clocks and the folding of the napkins. Angry words were said on both sides. The family living in the main building and those living in the wing broke down the connecting corridors and built a high thick wall between what had been sections of the same house. They no longer had dinner together.

    The elders of the family had taught their children a lot of wonderful things about truth and goodness. Sadly, after many, many years, some of the children began to notice that these principles of truth and goodness were not always being followed in their house. When they tried to point this out, a big and angry argument broke out. The elders of the house said, “You are no longer welcome in this house; you must leave; you may never eat dinner here again.” The children of the house said, “Alright then, we don’t want to continue living here anyway.” And they all parted company from each other with bitter resentment on both sides.

    The children who left the house built houses of their own. Some of these were large and beautiful, and some were crooked and drafty. They also taught their children all that they could remember of their lessons about goodness and truth. They planted gardens of fruit trees and grain fields around their own houses.

    After many more years, the great- great- great- grand children who no longer lived in the first great mansion all looked out of their windows and wondered why no one from the other houses ever had dinner together. “After all,” they thought, “Don’t we all come from the same family?” But when they asked each other to dinner, all that everyone said was, “We will not eat dinner together until YOU apologize for YOUR behavior.”

    Finally one day, many of the great – great- grandchildren filled up baskets of good fruit and made loaves of bread from their grain and took them to the Great Mansion.

    Just as they were arriving, a great and terrible Storm broke out. There was awful thunder, lightening, wind and hail. All the houses creaked and groaned and shuddered in the onslaught. Some of the people were blown away in the gale and lost. But most of the people gathered and huddled and clung together to try to save each other from the terrible wind and hail. Just as suddenly as it had begun, the Storm ended. Everyone looked around in great surprise.

    All of the houses, even the great mansion, had been completely blown away. All the people were even more surprised to discover that the fruit trees and grain fields had not been harmed at all. But they were most astonished to see that where the great mansion had been there now stood a huge and glorious Castle with golden battlements and shining banners. As they gaped at it in amazement, a Voice called out to them from the Castle’s highest tower: “All of you, My children, gather your good fruit, bake loaves from your good grain. Come into My Castle and feast together!”

    And they did.

    Liked by 9 people

    • canada1nw says:

      I love this EC! I grew up in a mainly Protestant town. My paternal grandmother was a Presbyterian, her daughter a Baptist. I was blessed to go to many “sings” in the parlours of many old ladies in the community, with these women.The men usually stayed in the kitchens, talking. I learned and loved all the “protestant” hymns. While my aunt was dying, in the hospital, myself and my six sisters sang those hymns to her. Most of us were nurses by that time.The other patients enjoyed our singing in this ward. I often think that they must have wondered why we didn’t know all the words since we seemed so “religious”. We knew the heart of this aunt and I believe that knowing the heart and humming along when we don’t know the words was very pleasing to her in a comatose state. I know it was pleasing to the other patients and to God. This woman who was a wonderful nurse gave her life to serving the poor. Her name was Nellie. A young child of her(protestant) friend called her Nunnny, she loved it and when she became an aunt she called herself Aunt Nun. She became know by some as Mother Teresa of ….. County. We say in our family that she was the first Baptist nun ! I believe we will all be one when that Storm is over, or maybe during it. Meanwhile we can hum along with what we know is good.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Tarja says:

      Thank you EllenChris and everybody who answered me! You are so friendly here, I don’t “much” feel an outsider…. but only a little. It’s okay, I understand why. And that’s why I said I feel sad – I know these barriers to exit in so many Churches, denominations, dioceses and parishes.

      In Finland we Orthodox have experienced SO MUCH pressure of another denomination, Lutherans. After war Orthodox Carelians were hardly considered to be Christians with their odd habits, some Lutheran people thought they were even ridiculous… How many tears, loneliness, shame those young Orthodox (still uncertain of their identity) had to experience for example in the school! Well, now, for couple of decades, our Church has been in vogue (a la mode) and many artists and authors have converted to Orthodoxy. At the same time many reforms have been introduced by them or our liberal members of the Church – and the battle has began and is in full force. I am a conservative Orthodox and so is my son-in-law, a priest, thank God! But we will see many sad things to happen in the future and breakdown will become deeper. What is to be a real Christian? It seems not to depend of belonging to some denomination but keeping your heart pure with the help of God. And keeping your heart pure EVERY DAY. There is so much to do for each of us….

      I want to give you the words od Our Lady of Soufanieh which I love so much because they are so true and clear:
      ……..
      “The Church that Jesus adopted is One Church, because Jesus is One.
      The Church is the kingdom of Heaven on earth.
      He who has divided it has sinned.
      And he who has rejoiced from its division has also sinned.
      Jesus built it.
      It was small.
      And when it grew, it became divided.
      He who divided it has no love in him.
      Gather!
      I tell you: “Pray, pray, and pray again!”
      How beautiful are My children when they kneel down, imploring.
      Do not fear, I am with you.
      DO NOT BE DIVIDED AS THE GREAT ONES ARE. (my emphasis)
      You, yourselves, will teach the generations THE WORD of unity, love and faith.
      Pray for the inhabitants of earth and Heaven.”

      Fifth apparition, Fourth message – Thursday, March 24, 1983, 9:30 pm
      http://www.soufanieh.com/ENGLISH/eemess.htm

      I have all the time understood what pope Francis is trying to teach us, it seems to be easier to an Orthodox person. Of course I have been sometimes worried, too, but not nearly as much as you… his way to teach and approach people is familiar to me. This field hospital thing reminded me of our teaching: Church is like a hospital.

      I know that pope was the last authority to give his advice and guidance in difficult desicions during the first 1000 years. What could be better even now! But it demands so much wisdom, humility, understanding, respect and real love of everybody! Hope we – and our Great Ones – have them some day after the Storm. We need this Storm to do it for us!

      And thank you Ellen Chris, of your brilliant story about that beautiful Mansion, it is so insightful and to the point! That’s the wisdom we need, in my opinion.

      And now Peace and Pax for everybody!

      Liked by 8 people

      • Beckita says:

        Dearest Tarja thank you for this comment. As a Roman Catholic person, I, too, feel very sad for the divisions we have endured and continue to experience among Christians, with non-believers, and with spiritual people who do not profess Jesus as God. As Ellen mentioned, these divisions have also been very painfully experienced within the RC Church. (deep and sorrowful sigh!)

        When my soon-to-be thirty-four year old daughter was nine, we had house guests and lived in a small home so my husband and I gave up our bed for the couple visiting and each of us slept with one of our children at night. One night after my little girl had fallen asleep beside me, I continued praying and found myself wiping away tears for the de facto schisms within the RC Church which have continued to intensify to this day. I whispered to Jesus a cry to somehow be an instument of healing. Out of my child’s sleep, she clearly said, *not* in a child’s voice, with both tenderness and firmness, “I will show you the way.” She had no idea this had occurred.

        The way has included much bridge work between the divided clergy in my locale as I was on staff at a parish for a long while, yet the greater portion of the way has been via prayer and sacrifice.

        A great day is coming, Tarja! Amen to: “We need this Storm to do it for us!” Thank you for: “And now Peace and Pax for everybody!” Amen. Alleluia!

        Liked by 6 people

    • Doug says:

      Beautiful Story Ellen!

      Like

    • janet333 says:

      Hi EllenChris..Thank you for your little parable, however I am still trying to work it out. ( I am a bit slow at times). Who are you referring to here?. ” Sadly, after many, many years, some of the children began to notice that these principles of truth and goodness were not always being followed in their house. When they tried to point this out, a big and angry argument broke out. The elders of the house said, “You are no longer welcome in this house; you must leave; you may never eat dinner here again.”

      God Bless You

      Like

    • Barb H says:

      Mother Ellen,

      Beautiful parable! May it be so!!!!

      Equally loved your original post. I pondered it and thought…..Because at first I didn’t see how this related to my life currently until suddenly I realized that it did fit a specific and ongoing event that was more of a water torturing betrayal….you know drip, drip, drip! No huge big fat betrayal, more like tiny drips (digs) that aren’t much but build up over time as well as the resentments that go with it. Haha, I was plotting my ‘revenge’ while driving to work today when suddenly your post made perfect sense in my life.

      Thank you for that! It became VERY clear that I had much work to do forgiving and realizing that satan had me right where he wanted me. Oh my. Much more work for me to do. 😱 Satan had me so complacent that I didn’t even recognize it!

      Hugs and thanks for helping me get this plank out of my eye!

      Barb H

      Like

  4. Phillip Frank says:

    I heard all who are properly baptised are Catholic? So I guess we are just arguing amonst ourselves about the 50,000 different denominational hiccups that have divided us over the centuries.
    Since every man has the ten commandments written in their hearts, we all get a fair judgment on the last day based on our response to knowing this truth.
    But “if today you hear His voice, harden not your hearts” implies that for those who go seeking truth better listen when they find it because to deny this revealed truth (voice) is in essence, to deny “your very self” who carry this truth in us awaiting its revelation.
    In the end, when we stand before the Divine Truth, when the fullness of truth is revealed to us, when the veil is lifted, all doubt is removed, all our actions and inactions fully remembered in the light of this truth, we will judge OURSELVES as we will know ourselves as we really are.
    Have mercy Lord, for I am a sinful man!

    Liked by 4 people

  5. SanSan says:

    THE STORM IS ENVELOPING MY HOME> DISCONTENT ABOUNDS> EVEN MY KEYBOARD IS STUCK IN CAPS> MONDAY THE PAIN BROUGHT ME TO MY KNEES> TODAY I SHOULD BE EXPLODING DUE TO THE HURT IN MY HEART> BUT IM OFFERING IT UP> HOPEFULLY TOMORROW WILL BE A BETTER DAY> WOW SOMEONE IS KEEPING ME FROM THE NEAREST BRIDGE> THANK YOU JESUS>THANK YOU BLESSED MOTHER>

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Robert Cunningham says:

    SanSan

    There may be something quite wonderful waiting for you. Not that bad things happen so that good is always followed but it has been my experience in the spiritual life that God allows a “storm” to come (not caused by him) to a soul that is seeking him so that we draw closer to him and open our hearts. This can be painful. The Greek Fathers called this kenosis. It means “space” in Greek but it is related to the enlargement of the heart. The soul has a marvelous capacity to be enlarged in order to make more room for the indwelling of the “Most Holy Trinity + eternal and co-equal in essence” (Maronite Liturgy).

    “‘“Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, [then] I will enter his house and dine with him, and he with me.” (Rev 3:20)

    Liked by 5 people

  7. Kris says:

    Dear YoungDuk and Ellen Chris. My heart goes out to both of you as I felt in every word written, an act of charity trying to express your love of the One True God to each other. That included your desire to keep people from being led away by a poorly laid out plumber’s line. Ellen I so enjoyed your article on Trusting in the Lord and letting Him take on the work of dealing with betrayal in our lives. The mystery of suffering in moments that hurt us can so quickly be absorbed into the one act of salvation if we allow it to be and then we are free to see things differently. Thank you. And on a more humorous note: Yes I can tell you have a flair for spouting off!! Tee Hee!! YoungDuk, I resonate with each of your words because I too feel your great love to offer something that the Catholic family shares only within the Church and that is the real body and blood soul and divinity that is possible only from the Apostolic priestly lineage, of which you are one. Thank you for that tender desire so well expressed that all could come to know and love LOVE incarnate and substantial in this greatest of all the sacraments. Ellen please hear this from me as well. When I first moved to my home State that I now live in I met a high Anglican priest convert now a Roman Catholic priest who opened my eyes to many things about Anglicanism. He told me of his great love of the liturgy, the music, the beauty of the church building that lifted the soul to the heavens and of sitting for hours in adoration at his parish as an Anglican priest and how when he converted he realized that the true presence of Jesus in the blessed sacrament now had taken on so much more power for him due to Holy Orders that now had changed him and he was privileged now to be able to adore our Lord in Truth before the True Presence. Yet he knew his years of adoring Our Lord as an Anglican priest had not been ‘false’ for the love he had given to Our Lord in spirit had been true and had given Jesus honor and glory even though he now knew that Christ had not been physically present in the eucharist of his Anglican ordination. It is so hard to try to put words together to express these mysteries, but the Love you express in your words is very real and Our Lord loves you and is waiting to lead you and me into the fullness of His presence. Please accept this as an act of love from me and all Roman Catholics that one day we will truly all sit in His presence and worship him in Truth. In the mean time we are all going to need to hold hands and put out into the deep and trust our Lord to lead us into the storm and trust each other to hold us up. Blessings

    Liked by 4 people

    • Beckita says:

      Thank you, Kris, for this. “… one day we will truly all sit in His presence and worship him in Truth.” We truly are almost there!

      Like

    • YongDuk says:

      When I was at University and I was a kung fu-teaching fallen away Catholic, I started going to Mass and then daily Mass, due to my Protestant friends as I mentioned before.

      It was one of those Communities where they used the honey/salt/sugar bread. It was hardly valid as I later found out (and we stopped going and found an Antiochian parish to go to.)

      I was doubting one day God’s love for me. I said to the Lord going up in the Communion Line, “Do you really love us and me so much for the Eucharist to be true?”

      As I received, I did not hear the priest say, “The Body of Christ”, but very clearly and poignantly “I did this for you!”

      I never doubted the Eucharist and Christianity again.

      However, notice, God did not limit Himself in term of the symbol that that invalid bread / “eucharist” was. He did speak to the validity of the Eucharist qua Eucharist, even if that eucharist there was invalid.

      I forgot about this experience till last night during my Holy Hour and I think that answers my question on Anglican Eucharist (since reading McAll’s book) and what my Anglican-priest converts now tell me.

      Liked by 6 people

      • canada1nw says:

        This reminds me that spiritual Communion actually IS Holy Communion. The Blessed Trinity is present in al the souls of the baptized. How we connect with God sometimes is a matter of what we have learned. He is always pleased when we do connect with Him 🙂 I think God looks at what we know and how we respond to that knowledge. It would be wonderful if all Christians were interested in loving the Lord and believing in His Presence in all His forms, His Word, His people and His Sacraments, especially the Blessed Sacrament, so named because we (RC’s) believe He is the most present in the Eucharistic at Mass. Our souls should respond to our love and belief, helping others to want what we have. We see so many good souls in all the Christian denominations. The Storm will ‘straighten OUR crookedness and fill OUR emptiness’, and cause us have a brotherly love which will be evident inside and outside of ourselves. Maranatha!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Kris says:

        So beautifully put, expressing what I believe is a promise from our Lord that when the shepherds fail the flock, He himself will lead. (I believe the book of Daniel expresses this so well) This does not wipe out the role of the Church which cannot fail nor can it be destroyed. What a mystery! I regularly help Catholics in my little town who suffer from questionable administration of the sacraments leading one to ask ‘was it invalid’? We have a priest , who in confession will not give absolution, or he will say ” I am ordered by the Church to say these words”…..Or at Easter time the local parish will have parishioners make homemade bread, thankfully with only whole wheat and spring water, yet it creates such concern in parishioners that they refrain from going to communion. We have lived with nuns who , as parish administrators, conducted communion services on Sundays even though a priest offered to come say Mass and these nuns simply stated they would do the communion service instead, thus refusing the parishioners their canonical right to the Sunday Mass. And yes, our local ordinary was aware of all this. At the end of Mass every Sunday the local priest will ask , “May the Lord Bless us” not “you” turning the final blessing into a personal blessing rather than a priestly blessing. The parishioners once more feel betrayed. Yet, this is old news in a sense and as Ellen Chris stated in her article, trust in the Lord when betrayal happens for he will and does write straight with crooked lines. I have an inkling that all of this has been training for trusting in our Lord to carry us through when the storm happens for real. When all trusted structures may leave us He will be there to carry us through. I thank you for your faithfulness and willingness to bring clarity to tough places. I pray the the Holy Spirit continues to give you the grace to be a Man of Courage in our times. Thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

        • ann says:

          Kris, this is a real heartbreak to read of what you must endure in your parish. On and off over the years we too have had some bad times like this. By God’s grace we are currently blessed with some very good and orthodox priests who do everything “by the book” with love and even zeal sometimes. When things were very bad back in the day I had friends who opted out and went with a schismatic Catholic organization. I prayed about this. The temptation was great. I think “great” actually isn’t large enough a word. But it seemed to me that Our Lord was showing me that if it hurt me, how much more it hurt Him and that remaining faithful in that darkness was a reparation. “Stay the course and don’t leave the foot of the cross,” seemed to be the message. You have to pray to discern if the Sacrament is valid. Cookies and yeast bread certainly not! Harder to discern when it’s home made pita. If there’s any hesitation to participate then I simply offer a prayer for spiritual communion and refrain from receiving. At one Mass the priest didn’t say the right words for the Consecration. He very obviously changed the words. My teenage son turned to me and said “He can’t do that!” None of us received that day. It really does require being as gentle as doves and as wise as serpents. As to the nuns, yes we too have had some of those. Again, I pray for them and all consecrated souls. Here’s a recent example. A regional prioress for an order of nuns in our area where I sometimes go for Mass (wonderful Eucharistic priest!!!) on the Feast of Epiphany announced that the Wise Men were a myth. I said no they aren’t. And she said “Oh, you take the Bible literally?” with a slight smile. I replied, “I am well versed in scripture studies and yes, I certainly do believe in the Magi.” In my heart I was thinking of Jesus’ words, “Unless you become like a little child…” and I thanked Him in my heart for the awesome gift of faith. (there but for the grace of God go I…)This poor woman. I pray for her now. Sadly so many nuns lost their way after Vatican II. Nuns who advance this arid “theology” are mostly always older. The young vocations are all going to the orders who are alive with faith. Slowly slowly, under ground like beautiful seeds, the faith is growing, vocations are growing, one soul at a time. It seems so painfully slow sometimes and for those of us who must dwell in the desert it is excruciating. God bless you and your parish of faithful Catholics. Truly this is a martyrdom. “These wounds I received in the house of my friends.” I think that your sadness and anguish and betrayal are a share in the agony of Our Lord. I just keep thinking of this line from the psalms. “Shouts of joy and victory in the tents of the just.” By God’s grace we will all be there for that some day. (and if Charlie is right, sooner rather than later) 😉

          Liked by 3 people

          • Kris says:

            Hey Ann, thanks for your post. I wanted to emphasis that what I spoke of at the problems in our parish, and I know in many, can and actually are a means to bring holiness back to the Bride of Christ. If we let it. Mary at Fatima did tell us that a great apostasy would take place, a great testing for the Church. This seems to be that time. In order to help sanctify the Bride (which we are part of and need our own cleaning up) we must love her all the more when she is going through ‘cancer treatment’ , no? This is why Ellen Chris’s article resonates so well with me, betrayal can be the means of seeing a little deeper and in Trusting Our Lord we can grow into humble servants who not only give comfort to Our Lord but help the Bride regain her beauty. So please see what i described as problems as just that, a means to love our Lord more and help Him sanctify His Bride. That is a joyful path!!

            Like

        • Beckita says:

          Kris and Ann, There have been many abuses in my neck of the woods as well… sometimes leading to invalidity and sometimes resulting in a valid sacrament illicity practiced. I’m thanking God the abuses and confusion will soon come to an end as the Storm hits its fullness and we’re all purified for a glorious New Beginning!

          Liked by 2 people

          • ann says:

            Thank you Beckita. And Kris, I did read your comments exactly the way you explained them. This truly is a reparation for Our Holy Mother Church and an intercession for her renewal for sure, and for our own renewal for God knows how many ways I have betrayed her or failed to stand up when I should have. It is a joyful path but getting all the way to the foot of the cross isn’t always easy. That’s why I’m so grateful to have The Blessed Mother holding fast to me and keeping me with her every step of the way. I always think that St. John was the only Apostle who made it there and he was the only one who stayed with Our Lady. Can’t have a better road map than that!

            Liked by 3 people

        • canada1nw says:

          It was the same in my area for years, but the Liturgy is getting better. PTL ! We have had a prayer group to pray for our priests for over twenty years, it is finally taking effect….slowly. We say the 20 decade rosary, in front of the Blessed Sacrament with the intentions for our priests.
          We also have been asked to say these prayers, (With ecclesiastical approbation.), given to a visionary, Claire-rose Champagne, from the “Brides of the Most Blessed Trinity” by Our Lady of the Bayou at the beginning of Her visit to Theriot, LA.USA 2/24/01 who’s mission is to pray for priests. Claire-rose, her husband and priest spiritual director came to my home city a few years ago, in eastern Canada. She is an Acadian descendant and my area is part of old Acadia ,where the French Acadians were expulsed in 1755…many settled in Louisiana.

          MORNING OFFERING

          Holy Blessed Trinity, I offer You all my prayers, works, joys and
          sufferings of this day. No matter what little thing I do, I offer it to
          You. In reparation for holy priests. For the conversion of priests. For
          more priests. For the return of many priests who have left the priesthood.
          For the priests still in Purgatory, especially those most in need.
          I offer myself this day (optional: and hereafter until my death) as an
          offering for holy priests, in union with the Suffering, Death and
          Resurrection of Jesus.
          And in union with The Sacred Body and Blood of Jesus, Consecrated daily on
          all the altars of the world by your holy priests. I make this offering
          freely, trusting that You will take care of all my needs, spiritual and
          temporal for the state in life to which You have called me. I make this
          offering through The Immaculate Hands and Heart of The Blessed Virgin Mary,
          Mother of Divine Love, that She might take this imperfect prayer and
          present it to Her Son, Jesus, that through His Sacred Heart, He might
          perfect it and present it to Our Father by The Power of The Holy Spirit.
          Through Jesus Christ, Our Lord. Amen.
          (With ecclesiastical approbation.)

          CHAPLET OF DIVINE LOVE FOR PRIESTS

          Chaplet of Divine Love for Priests Our Lady gave us this simple Chaplet for
          priests. She asks that it be said often throughout the day & night and that
          praying it will release many Graces for priests.

          The Chaplet is to have a Crucifix, one bead, then a medal with Our Mother of
          Divine Love, Patroness of Priests on one side and the Holy Blessed Trinity on
          the other side.

          Next are 33 beads that represent the 33 years Jesus spent on earth to join
          at the medal.

          To pray the Chaplet:
          Begin & end with The Sign of the Cross.
          Pray the Creed on the Crucifix.
          Pray the “Our Father” on the first bead.
          Pray the “Hail Mary” on the medal.
          Pray “O Jesus, Son of the Living God, have mercy on us and on all our
          Priests” (or you may name a priest) on the 33 beads.

          On the medal Pray:
          “O Sacrament Most Holy, O Sacrament Divine, all praise and all thanksgiving
          be every moment Thine. “(May be sung)
          “Blessed be the Holy and Immaculate Conception of the Most Blessed Virgin
          Mary, Mother of God, Mary Most Holy.”
          “Mary, Queen of Divine Love, Patroness of Priests, pray for us.”
          “God Our Father, please send us Holy Priests, all for the Sacred and
          Eucharistic Heart of Jesus, all for the Sorrowful and Immaculate Heart of
          Mary, in union with St. Joseph.”
          “Ave, Ave, Ave Maria. Ave, Ave, Ave Maria.” (May be sung)

          Pray the “Glory Be” on the single bead.

          Pray the “St. Michael Prayer” on the Crucifix. Amen.
          __._,_.___

          _________________
          Call on the angels! Especially this day. Call them with kindness! Send them before you in every situation and watch your circumstances improve and problems resolve in ways you could not have imagined.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Simone says:

            Hi canada1nw,
            I also live near Acadian communities in Nova Scotia (and am one myself!!) I have never heard of this devotion. I will look it up.

            Like

          • ann says:

            Canada, thank you SO much for these prayers. I have felt a call to pray for priests most specifically and especially and have flailed around looking for ways to do it besides the Rosary and morning offering. This is just what I needed.
            You wouldn’t by any chance be from Cape Breton? We know Cape Breton very well, have friends there going on 40 years and have visited frequently. In fact we’ll be there this summer for a wedding. I ask because I know a lot of Acadians lived there and were sent away by the English. Thanks again for sharing these prayers.

            Liked by 1 person

      • Doug says:

        My understanding is Catholics belive in transubstantiation and Episcopalians (I assume Anglican until Ellen answers my question) believe in consubstantiation. Not trying to debate; just pointing out the difference.

        Liked by 1 person

        • EllenChris says:

          Sorry, but no, Doug. “Consubstantiation” is a word used by Lutherans.

          Like

          • YongDuk says:

            Ellen, I looked at the untrustworthy Wikipedia, and it does contribute a plethora of confusion to the beliefs of Anglicans including consubstantiation.

            My favorite superscripted “footnote” in that “article” was “[who?]”. Maybe you could go in and add an exclamation point and tidy the entry some in your assuredly very busy schedule.

            Like

          • Doug says:

            Hmmmm

            Like

          • Doug says:

            Thanks for the clarification Ellen.

            Like

          • YongDuk says:

            Oh, please know, I wasn’t being sarcastic. I like Wikipedia to see who refines what and who edited [under the edit section] what to see what is trending or what was refined. It’s not great, but it is interesting and then compare that to ones own trusty materials that might have a Roman bent.

            Like

  8. anne says:

    keep your eyes on the calm in the centre where there is Jesus, San san.
    will pray.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. ann says:

    I have been prayerfully reading these comments and I am so struck by the raw faith all of you express, persevering in the darkness, taking one step and then another, trusting that He will never leave us nor forsake us. I have wondered whether to share this. I share it now only in the hope that it may comfort someone. I wrote this several years ago in the midst of a “storm” that seems quite minor in the face of what we deal with today. I felt that the Lord “gave” it to me as a kind of reassurance that I wasn’t whistling in the dark, that He really was there!
    I trust the Lord, I will not be confused
    Nor confounded, though my heart may shrink
    And tremble in this storm of fear I choose
    To hope in Christ Who stands upon the brink
    Of every danger waiting there to clasp
    Me to His Sacred Heart; I will not fall.
    My Savior’s love is sure and firm His grasp
    And He will bear me up. I gather all
    My hurts and hopes, my doubts and fears, and He
    Says “Child give them to Me. I will keep
    Them fast. Now be at peace. You are with Me.”
    The Guardian of Israel does not sleep
    Nor slumber. He will hide me safe from harm
    Beneath the shelter of His holy Arm.

    Liked by 12 people

  10. motherjackie says:

    Thank you, Mother Ellen for your insightful piece. I have felt betrayed by my daughter’s cutting off communication with me. Now I see it as a demonic attack. I will pray for
    God’s grace and mercy, for forgiveness and a restoration to His peace and joy. Charlie, thank you for sharing Mother Ellen’s wisdom with all of us.

    Liked by 6 people

  11. Jim Martel says:

    It’s seems like this post was written specifically for me. Perhaps it was. 🙂

    Oremus pro invincem (Let us pray for one another),
    Jim
    Galveston County, TX
    <

    Liked by 3 people

  12. Is this not a beautiful picture to meditate on betrayal or trust? Think about it…do we see him as a man merely performing a task or as the one who represents the Magisterial teaching authority of the Church leading the people? Here he is not facing us with his smile. Here we see Pope, not Francis.

    Like

  13. Snowflakesdancing says:

    Charlie, I’m sorry you will be betrayed. I love that you are praying for your betrayer now. It is so much better to be betrayed than to betray… but it sure hurts! It also offers that excruciating pain to offer to God for the betrayer which could lead to the conversion of his/her heart..maybe the only way for this to happen! So much like Jesus.

    Liked by 2 people

  14. janet333 says:

    “As also in all his epistles, speaking in them of these things; in which are certain things hard to be understood, which the unlearned and unstable wrest, as they do also the other scriptures, to their own destruction!” 2 Peter 3

    BY EDWARD PENTIN 01/11/2016

    CANTERBURY, England — The Anglican Communion stands on the verge of formal schism this week, as its leaders began meeting Monday to discuss the issue of homosexuality and other matters in Canterbury, England.

    The five-day meeting, called by Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, is seen as a last-ditch attempt to keep the ecclesial community together following a long-running dispute over homosexuality and deeper differences over how Anglicans should interact with today’s largely secular, post-Christian society.

    The global summit of 38 primates of the Anglican Communion, which claims to have 85 million followers worldwide, is usually held every two years, but it hasn’t convened since 2011, principally because of the dispute over homosexuality. This week’s meeting will also discuss other issues such as religious violence and climate change.

    Since 2003, when Episcopalians (the American branch of Anglicanism) made an active homosexual bishop, divisions have deepened between largely Western Anglicans, who would like to see greater acceptance of homosexuals in the church, and those, mostly in Africa and Asia, who argue it is contrary to Scripture and 2,000 years of Christian teaching. Tensions increased last year when the Episcopal Church moved towards solemnizing same-sex “marriage.”

    Pressure has also been building in the run-up to this week’s meeting with more than 100 Anglicans, including the dean of St Paul’s Cathedral in London, sending a letter to the archbishops of Canterbury and York urging repentance for treating homosexuals as “second-class citizens.”

    “The time has come,” they wrote, for Anglicans to acknowledge that they have failed in their duty “to care for LGBTI members of the Body of Christ around the world.” The Anglican Communion, they added, needed to “apologize” for not “challenging ill-informed beliefs about LGBTI people.”

    The signers of the letter said they understood there are “differing ways of interpreting the Scriptures” but urged the primates to be “prophetic” and “Christlike” in dealing with “our LGBTI sisters and brothers who have been ignored and even vilified for too long.”

    The Anglican bishop of Oxford, the Rt. Rev. David Ison, even argued for change by seemingly equating those opposed to acceptance of homosexual practices with ISIS. “The sexuality divide focuses the big question facing the whole of humanity,” he told Christian Today. “How do we treat people who are different from us? The forces of Daesh (ISIS) in Syria seek to eradicate difference and make everyone else like them, through violence and the threat of death.”

    Vocal Opposition

    But other Anglican leaders have been equally vocal in their opposition to the move. As the Anglican Communion cannot excommunicate people or provinces, bishops in favor of Christian tradition have formed a group, the Global Anglican Future Conference (GAFCON), which is threatening to break away entirely unless “godly order” is restored.

    Reports say Anglican archbishops from Uganda, Kenya, Nigeria, South Sudan, Rwanda and Congo will probably stage a walkout within a day or two of the inauguration of the summit. They are calling on British and U.S. prelates to publicly give up their support for same-sex “marriage” and actively homosexual bishops.

    The Rt. Rev. Michael Nazir-Ali, the former Anglican bishop of Rochester, England, said he does not agree with the argument that there can be “different interpretations of Scripture” on the issue. “The Bible is clear on many things, including its teaching on human sexuality, and the Church has upheld that teaching for 2,000 years,” he said.

    Of the 38 Anglican provinces, only eight are in favor of acceptance of same-sex unions: the U.S., Canada, Scotland, Wales, New Zealand, South India, South Africa and Brazil.

    Since becoming archbishop of Canterbury in 2013, Welby has tried to keep some semblance of unity, most notably by appointing a Nigerian, Rev. Josiah Atkins Idowu-Fearon, general secretary of the Anglican Communion. Unity in the Episcopal Church has also been helped by having an African-American evangelical, the Rt. Rev. Michael Curry, as its presiding bishop since last November, although some do not believe his election will be of help. Furthermore, Welby has already said he thinks it might be a good idea to effectively dissolve the Anglican Communion and replace it with a much looser grouping.

    Vatican Perspective

    The Vatican, meanwhile, is watching events in Canterbury closely. It argues that, for dialogue between Rome and Canterbury to effectively continue, the Anglican Communion must stay as one, but it recognizes that its dispersed authority model makes that an almost impossible task. It is perplexed at Anglicans’ wish to allow local and regional bishops to decide on doctrinal matters without seemingly having a sense of what is owed to the communion as a whole, but recognizes that Welby is not, as he has said himself, an “Anglican pope.”

    Some see the problems affecting the Anglican Communion as similar to those facing the Catholic Church and all Christian denominations. Father Ed Tomlinson of the Anglican Ordinariate of Tunbridge Wells in England has argued that what is dividing the body of Christ is a more fundamental issue than just homosexuality. Rather, he contends, it is being caused by “modernists” who have “lost their faith but do not wish to lose their Christian culture and identity.” The miracle that is needed, he believes, is for the Church to “wake from slumber, stand for truth and refute error.”

    For Lord Christopher Monckton of Brenchley, author of Anglican Orders: Null and Void?, the only doctrine in the Church of England “is the doctrine that there is no doctrine.”

    He told the Register Jan. 11 that since Anglicans began “openly to defy” their belief in “even the sola Scriptura to which they once clung — for instance by manufacturing a homosexual ‘bishop’ in contravention of the biblical teaching that homosexuality is wrong because it is medically dangerous to its practitioners — they abandoned even scriptural doctrines and thereupon ceased to be a ‘religion’ in any recognizable sense.”

    He said that is why the churches in Africa, which still adhere to the scriptural doctrines, “no longer recognize Anglicanism as their own.”

    “The Anglican religion is no longer anything much to do either with England or with religion,” he said. “It has a questionable past, an uneasy present and no future.”

    For now, the Vatican is hoping and praying that Welby can hold the Anglican Communion together, but if there were to be a definitive split, it would try to continue dialogue across the divisions, speaking to both parties if necessary.

    Edward Pentin is the Register’s Rome correspondent.

    Read more: http://www.ncregister.com/daily-news/anglicans-communion-on-the-brink-of-formal-schism/#ixzz3xB5PFwew

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Yes, the Anglican controversies sound very similar to many of the synodal controversies. In every communion, the question is becoming clearer: will you keep faith or accommodate yourself to the world instead of evangelizing it. Sadly, in every communion there are powerful voices calling for accommodation.

      I was already painfully aware of this, which made me admire all the more those who are trying to preserve the faith. It is good that we should see just how comprehensive the satan’s attack on the faithful really is, so long as we don’t let it seduce us into merely becoming the accuser of our brothers. I am saddened to see some formerly responsible Protestant voices joining in now with the anti-pope apostasy started by some malicious, deluded Catholics. Let us use these sorts of reports to live solidarity with our brothers who fight to keep the faith, wherever they may be.

      Liked by 4 people

      • EllenChris says:

        **Sigh** I do not know what Janet’s purpose was in posting this here. We are all keenly aware of what is going on in Canterbury right now, and there is much prayer going on for God to have His Way. I don’t need a “heads up” to become aware of the whole drama. It is extremely distressing, to say the least — faithful Anglicans are suffering a lot from all this.

        The political complexities between and among the various Provinces within the Communion are much too confusing to try to sort out here. But I suppose that this may make it a tiny bit clearer:

        There are essentially two positions here: those who understand that Truth is one and changeless, and those who have been deeply infected by Relativism. The relativists say to the orthodox, “Well, why can’t we just agree to disagree and all get along?” The orthodox position is, “Truth has no fellowship with a Lie.” So the modernist/relativists think that we just don’t understand *yet* and try every trick of “dialogue” and *reconciliation* to try to “wake us up” and get us on board with their agenda. We pray for them and point out Holy Scripture and try to get them to understand that accommodation is, in itself, apostasy. And on and on it goes.

        The Global Anglican Futures Conference — GAFCon for short — is the coherent body of the orthodox,comprised of bishops, clergy and people from everywhere that there are Anglicans. In some of the national Provinces, there are only GAFCon members. In the USA, the original Episcopal Church (TEC) is the group which started the whole ruckus, while the newly formed but flourishing “Anglican Church in North America” is the group recognized by GAFCon. The Episcopal Church (TEC) does not participate in any way with GAFCon. Technically speaking everyone has some relationship with Canterbury as our “Patriarchal” church although this relationship used to be a whole clearer than it is now.

        Not that anybody really cares about our tangled situation.

        The primatial archbishops of each of the 38 national provinces have not met for several years because the GAFCon group refused to sit down with TEC until and unless they repented of their sin and came back to orthodox Christian Faith. The present adn prvious Archbishops of Canterbury have been dancing as fast as they can to try to keep everyone at least talking to each other. However, the schism that everybody keeps predicting has actually been in effect for quite a while. The Anglican genius and Achilles’ heel is that people think it will all just go away if we keep talking with each other over sherry and biscuits and nobody mentions the elephant sitting on the tea table.

        No surprise: that ain’t working out.

        I am SO SO weary of having to waste time on the political shenanigans. I testified against the ratification of Bp Gene Robinson’s election as bishop of Vermont at our TEC General Convention in 2003; I came home to be a kind of voice in the wilderness ever since. All I can do is entrust my life and ministry into God’s Hands, take the next step in front of me with the people I have to care for, and Hope that the Light will shine.

        And just BTW: Anglicans have never been “Sola Scriptura” people — those are the Lutherans. We are very much “Lex orandi; lex credendi” people, and we have traditionally obeyed the first 7 Ecumenical Councils of the Universal Church before any schisms, and put a very high premium on the witness of the Fathers of the Church and the voices of the first specifically Anglican theologians, such as Richard Hooker, John Jewel and Jeremy Taylor. Up until now, instead of enforced legalism, we have relied on our Common Prayer and common experience to hold us together under the light of the Holy Spirit. Our “gentlemen’s agreement” is our gift and our Achilles Heel.

        May I earnestly beg our dear brethren here to spare me from the, “Well, then why don’t you just become a Roman Catholic?” stuff. I am staying where God put me until and unless He tells me otherwise, and so far He has NOT. And offering rosaries on my behalf will not change His mind until He is good and ready to change it for His own reasons.

        As I write this some of the Provincial Primates have already walked out of the meeting. Archbishop Welby tried giving TEC another little slap on the wrist, but they were not impressed. We have our family squabble out in the open, so people are able to kibbutz from the sidelines. But — *Sigh*

        These same issues are going on in *every* church, including the RC Church. The Storm is beating on all our houses. Only the Kingdom of God will prevail. Please,
        Rescue, you can’t happen soon enough.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Bob says:

          We Catholics struggle with these things too, the fight to hold to truth Vs relativism. The one thing we can hold onto is God’s promise that Peter is rock and the gates of hell will not prevail but the storm will beat on the rock but we must hold firm. And dear one, Ellen Chris if you are faithful God will lead you. I know you trust in that.

          Liked by 4 people

        • jlynnbyrd says:

          Mother Ellen, it is truly a sign of the times and why the Rescue is imminent. Thanks be to God.

          Liked by 4 people

          • EllenChris says:

            Gosh! I can hardly wait. I think that the Anglican Communion and especially The Episcopal Church USA are going to be early casualties of the Storm. The relativism is present in every Church — our battles are just more public.

            Liked by 3 people

        • janet333 says:

          “**Sigh** I do not know what Janet’s purpose was in posting this here. We are all keenly aware of what is going on in Canterbury right now, and there is much prayer going on for God to have His Way. I don’t need a “heads up” to become aware of the whole drama. It is extremely distressing, to say the least — faithful Anglicans are suffering a lot from all this.”

          Hi EllenChris….well one of the reasons I posted the above is because I am English living in England, where Anglicanism began. I was also showing that Satan is at work everywhere.

          It has also been mentioned in here what our own liberal bishops are doing, as you quite rightly pointed out…..”These same issues are going on in *every* church, including the RC Church” This happens when they fail to follow the Churches teachings..the “Pillar and ground of truth” 1 Tim 3-15. Instead they search the scriptures, failing to study them in light of the apostles teachings, in order to find something that ‘seems’ to back up their erroneous beliefs – hence the reason I posted “As also in all his epistles, speaking in them of these things; in which are certain things hard to be understood, which the unlearned and unstable wrest, as they do also the other scriptures, to their own destruction!” 2 Peter 3

          I have Anglican friends who tell me that Scripture is their rule of faith, but if it isn’t read in light of the apostles teachings then it can lead to destruction, as St Peter tells us This is why God gave us a central teaching authority.

          God Bless You

          Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            That helps explain, Janet. I think part of Ellen’s frustration is that it seems you can’t make your point and then move on agreeing to be allies in the bigger picture despite some differences. I suspect the frustration of being a Catholic in England creates a sort of reflexive defensiveness similar to that of being A Catholic in the American Bible Belt. Your posts on this subject have had a bit of a running subtext that Catholics rule, Anglicans drool. It is not a good way to forge alliances to confront the common threat all Christians face in these times. Maintain your faith without conceding any doctrinal points, but a little less pointing out to allies of where you think they are deficient would help solidify a unity now that we all need to confront the forces of the Storm.

            Liked by 2 people

          • janet333 says:

            Hi Charlie,

            I made the point that we do need a central teaching authority so that we can have somewhere to go when we need answers, because self interpretation of Scripture is forbidden in scripture. I also pointed out that some of our own bishops have also forgotten this rule. I didn’t intend to make it a ‘they’ and ‘us’ situation regarding Catholics and Anglicans, rather a ‘they’ and ‘us’ situation regarding liberal bishops who are betraying the gospel.

            God Bless You

            Liked by 1 person

          • janet333 says:

            Hi Charlie… I had to examine my conscience… and yes you are right. I was being defensive. 😦

            Sorry EllenChris…as Charlie says we are equal partners in the storm. 🙂

            Liked by 5 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Thanks, Janet, you are a class act.

            Liked by 3 people

          • zeniazenia says:

            Dear Janet, You have my fasting intentions today. You are always in my prayers. Let us pray to St. Thomas More, St. George and St. Michael for Peace, Joy and fortitude. — Love, ZJ

            Liked by 2 people

          • janet333 says:

            Thank you Zenia Jane 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            Janet, I did not know you lived in England! I love England 🙂

            Liked by 3 people

          • janet333 says:

            Hi snowflake..Have you been here? 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            janet, no, I wish! My grandmother is from England, grandfather Scotland. His family, going way back, used to own a castle on Barra, (that one of my cousin recently visited- I’m was so jealous lol). I grew up hearing all of these stories and later, through reading the Saints, fell in love with the rich history of the Church! 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • janet333 says:

            That’s great! I bet you have had a wonderful time researching the family history. After the ‘storm’ and the ‘mopping up’ is done you never know you might get the chance to visit in person.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Beckita says:

            Janet, you’re a sign of hope to me today. Thank you! XO

            Liked by 1 person

          • SteveBC says:

            I hope I’m not adding anything problematical here, but it occurs to me that we have an extremely weird reverse symmetry here. This is exactly the same debate at the core of Islam and its place in the world. Only with them, we are rooting for the apostatizers. We *want* it to come apart, and we want such forces to have real power to help free those in that religious tradition. Reversing that yet again, we can see how following this path of relativizing our own religious traditions can be so damaging to them as well.

            Liked by 2 people

          • YongDuk says:

            SteveBC, I think I follow what you are saying and you are precisely right The difference is, I think, that finding common ground in the Storm will help us lay down the pride that fosters the divide and see the truth of the need for being united.

            Liked by 5 people

          • Doug says:

            Yes YD, although we belive in the Magisterium as the church as the final authority in matters of truth and morals and we believe this has been ordained by Christ via the chain of apostolic succession and the chair of Peter, it is not for us to flaunt this or throw this at someone’s face as this would be a form of pride and abuse. I think that one of the main purposes of the Magisterium is more so we have confidence in the source of our faith as well as it guards our faith. I am an electrical engineer in the field of test engineering. One of the critical aspects of test is what is called metrology. It is dealing with standards. In other words, what defines a volt or Amp or gallon or meter. All test equipment has to be calibrated and traceable back to the standard which is the National Institute of Standards (NIST) in the U.S. which is in colorado (ironically where Charlie is). In test equipment, drift or error will naturally occur over time. If the traceability is cut off or lost at some point, then error can never truly be recalibrated or corrected. Over time, the equipment will slowly drift out of calibration. The Magisterium is like NIST in regards to the faith. It protects and guards the faith with proper interpretation and keeps it from drifting over time. It is also a mystery almost as much as the Eucharist since it is perfect in its function, but run by imperfect men. This can only be accomplished with the Holy Spirit.

            This is where the statement “all salvation is through the Catholic Church” can be stated which I actually firmly believe. This is NOT the same as “only Catholics can be saved” which is a common misinterpretation. The church clearly teaches in the CCC that God in his mercy makes MANY provisions for man to be saved without professing to be Catholic. It also teaches in humility that all humans have inherent worth and dignity. So we should treat every human being with the same love and respect. We who profess to be Catholic must do our best to live up to a higher standard of love and humility in order to witness for Christ.

            So why would anyone want to be Catholic if there is more responsibility and you can be saved even if not professing to be Catholic? My understanding is that the fullness of graces are offered within the Catholic church. I think of it like the difference between having a ham sandwich versus a big steak dinner with all the fixings topped off with creme Brule for dessert. The ham sandwich will keep you alive, but I prefer the steak dinner. So it comes with a responsibility, but also with much reward.

            For me personally, I have fallen in love with the Catholic church. It is my home. It is where my first love is in the Eucharist. It is where the Blessed Virgin Mary is honored and returns her love. I dance and sing and court with Jesus at the banquet of the Mass. Jesus physically Comes to me in the Eucharist. I endure suffering and it gets put in context with Jesus suffering so as to not despair. It is about saving souls in the process so we can all share and be a big family in heaven with all the other heavenly squirrels and play Charlie’s heavenly version of baseball.

            In no way do I want to malign anyone who knows Jesus outside the Catholic church. My conversion started outside the Catholic church and I have very close strong Christian friends that are not Catholic that I can also openly talk about the storm. I trust in God’s saving mercy for us and the whole world as St. Faustina would pray. What a beautiful place here and what a beautiful family.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Petra says:

            One time years ago now, I got into a conversation with a woman at work I admired very much for her goodness, kindness, and obviously lived Christianity. I felt she was a kindred spirit, so to speak. But on this particular day it was apparent she felt the need to evangelize me. She told me she was very worried for my soul. (She was Baptist.) She told me as a Catholic I was going to hell. She told me since I was not baptized in the name of Jesus, as St. Paul said, I could never go to heaven. Since I called a man *Father* I was disobeying Jesus Himself. And many other things I can’t remember now.

            What she didn’t know is that I had been catechized as a Roman Catholic for all my grade and high school years. And that I had fallen away in college, but after six years of that, had had enough of satan’s version of life, and came back home to the Church. And coming back I battled many internal and external demons, kicking them out of my life one by one, and she did not know that I had not found Truth in the Church I returned to, but heterodox beliefs that were as bad as the ones taught at the secular university (If you know Chicago, it was Heterodox-Central back in the day.) Long story short, by the time I met this woman I had battled for years to learn the Truth, to keep to the Truth, and to find resources so that I followed the Truth and not heterodox beliefs. I was not a newbie.

            So when she told me all this I felt only love in my heart for her, in that she had no idea how long and hard and for so many years I had fought to hang on to God and serve Him in many hostile situations. And she was worried for my soul. I know I could have easily crushed everything she told me, because by that time I used to open the door on Saturday mornings to Jehovah Witnesses just for the sport of it. (Sort of naughty, but kind of fun. 😉 ) So I could have started quoting Scripture back to her, and flipping her around, and asking her doctrinal questions to show how wrong HER faith was. But I didn’t. I really liked this woman, and saw she cared about me too. So to help her know I wasn’t damned I told her one thing. I told her, look, I was baptized in the Name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, the words Jesus Himself told his disciples to use to baptize the whole world. Whose words are more true, those of Jesus, or those of Paul? She had no answer.

            But then I told her the thing I want to say here. I told her, look, we Christians, you and I, should not be spending our time treating each other like the enemy, trying to convert one another, when our true enemy is out there destroying the souls of our loved ones and neighbors, making them turn away from God. We Christians should be working together to fight our common enemy, the devil. If we both believe Jesus Christ is Lord, then we should realize we’re on the same side, maybe just in different branches of the military, if you will, and we should not be pointing our weapons at each other, but out of the trenches at the ones denying God and leading our children and friends astray.

            I don’t think she was convinced. But my point is, I have a lot fewer issues with those who at least believe in God and pray to Him and worship Him than I do with those who deny Him outright, or subtly deny Him (like the kind, Roman Catholic nuns no less, who say the Magi were a “myth.”) and who have gained the power within the churches to teach others to do the same. That’s why when Charlie says many, including all Christian denominations and Jews and others too, will be part of the Rescue, it means the people who actually believe in God and love Him in their hearts will be on one side, and the ones who hate Him (even if dressed in priestly garments or carrying a stack of Bibles) will be on the other. And we know who will be on the winning side. The SQUIRRELS! 🙂 Oh, sorry, no, no. (lost my head for a second there!) 🙂 No, the ones on the winning side will be those who love God with their whole heart, their whole soul, their whole mind, and their whole strength, and their neighbor as themselves, no matter what denomination or faith they practice. Praise be Jesus Christ!

            God bless.

            Liked by 10 people

          • janet333 says:

            Thank you Petra…You said all that needed to be said! 🙂

            God Bless You

            Liked by 5 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Amen! I too open the door our local Jehovah’s Witnesses.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            So wonderfully said Petra!

            Liked by 2 people

          • SteveBC says:

            Janet333, I agree with you. Petra rocks! 😀

            Liked by 3 people

          • SteveBC says:

            Doug, NIST is an excellent analogy. One of the things I find truly miraculous about the Church is the fact that it has remained true to its mission for 2000 years. I can’t think of another human organization for which this is true. I believe such an accomplishment is impossible for humans running a human institution.

            Liked by 6 people

          • YongDuk says:

            Petra, as always, I love your crispness.

            Doug, you too! As an engineer of the chemical sort turned biochemical and onwards… I appreciate what you are saying.

            I will refine my understanding that the grace of being a Catholic is that I can participate all the more meritoriously and thus efficaciously in the sufferings of Christ for the sake of His Body, that is His Church, for the salvations of souls and reparation to the Father, etc.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Thank you YD, this squirrel is most graciously humbled by you. I learn much from you as well as I am greatly encouraged by you. You have a big responsibility like Charlie and I am very grateful for you as a servant of the church. I really want to encourage all our shepards. You have the hands that turn bread and wine into the body and blood of our Lord. You also have authority in persona Christi to forgive sins on earth as Jesus gave this authority to man. How blessed we are for such great gifts and mercies!

            Today we will pilgrimage from our parish to the diocesan Cathedral to walk through the Holy Doors (no accident this time). I will still bring Marie in Copenhagen (I try to keep my squirrel promises) and Denmark along with you, friends, family and all TNRSers here with me. God bless all here!

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Me too YD. Me too….

            Like

          • YongDuk says:

            Oh, yeah, my mom laughs when they come around to her house and I am home. I come in and pull out my Bible and I start with the Beautiful Book of Tobit and the Glorious Archangels 😀

            (I love preaching on the Angels… Today, however, I preached on Saul seeking the Seer, Samuel, and Samuel going out seeking for Saul in comparison to Saul seeking out the Witch of Endor.)

            Liked by 3 people

        • zeniazenia says:

          Dear EllenChris, You have my fasting intentions today. You are always in my prayers. Let us pray to St. Thomas More, St. George and St. Michael for Peace, Joy and Fortitude. — Love, ZJ

          Liked by 2 people

    • EllenChris says:

      There are explanations and commentaries from our own Anglican perspective at Anglican Ink and kendallharmon/t19

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Bob says:

    My wife was recently betrayed by a sister she thought she was getting closer to. This sister presented as having engaged in ” pleasantries” but told my wife now that their mom is dead she doesn’t want further contact with her or myself. I had wanted to respond to this sister not in anger but in sadness due to her holding onto what ever anger, grudges, etc she was holding on to, but my wife suggested i remain silent, so I have but talk to God for His mercy for her. Of course, the business of forgiving is easier for me as I am several steps removed.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. peppermill says:

    I’ve been thinking a lot about this post over the past few days. My elementary-aged son was “betrayed” by a teammate who verbally and physically accosted him at practice the other night. It was a shock because this boy, who is one of the older and more skilled players on the team who, until this moment, had been the one to watch out for and protect the younger ones like my son. My husband who assists in coaching (but wasn’t there that night) and another coach had a tough time believing who was involved because it was so out of character, but the proof was there. While I also didn’t see it happen, I was there in the aftermath and saw my son devastated by what happened, which broke my heart. He’s a tough kid, but he looked like his world had come crumbling down as he’d looked up to the other boy. I found myself not mad, but so incredibly sad. However, after I got my son home and settled and made sure his injuries weren’t serious (they weren’t, thankfully), all I’ve been able to think about is what Holy Mary felt when she saw her Son after he was betrayed. My sorrow about what happened at practice to my son is *nothing/zero/zilch* in comparison to what Mary went through. I nearly can’t stop crying over it, and I just want to apologize over and over for what we did to her Son.

    I had been praying the Rosary every day until Christmas activities hit and now I’m back at it with a renewed vigor as I contemplate the mysteries even more deeply. I didn’t think of betrayal possibly being a gift until now. But, in this case, it has been.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Beckita says:

      Praying for your son, Pepper, and all of our children and grandchildren as they learn the lessons of mercy and forgiveness. Your son is so blessed that you are his mother!

      Liked by 2 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      Peppermill, it is difficult to comprehend the level of cruelty in youngsters at school. When my children were betrayed, our stance was to seek revenge by killing them with kindness (and don’t let them see you sweat.)
      This happens routinely to my nieces, one who is my goddaughter, in High School basketball and volleyball while mom and dad are both there volunteering, and still the coach(es) are passive in and this is in a Catholic HS. It is a tough cookie to swallow, but can yield valuable lessons.
      I on the other hand was humiliated from K – 12 because I do not have an athletic bone in my body and was always the shortest child in gym class. I was chosen last for teams, except once or twice when I was second last to sweet little Eileen.
      On the flip side, my maiden name began with an *A* and that is when I got to be first in many cases. This was good, unless I was called first to read aloud or answer a question. Sigh.

      Liked by 3 people

    • zeniazenia says:

      Be sure he prays for the boy who hurt him. Love ZJ

      Liked by 2 people

  17. ann says:

    Petra, thank you for sharing about your Baptist friend. My experiences are so very similar to yours, it’s uncanny. After much straying and struggling I received the grace to return home to the Catholic faith and discovered, as you did, a heterodox mess and wondered almost in the words of St Mary Magdalene, “They have taken away my Lord and I don’t know where to find Him” and like you I worked it through and like you found so much faith in my Protestant brothers and sisters, so much genuine lived charity that I could never berate them even though they too gave me the party line about Catholics. But at least, in spite of that, I could share our love for Jesus and the scriptures. When I found the Charismatic movement in the Church I found priests who were like the priests I remembered from my childhood–orthodox, prayerful, serious–and then the Marian Movement of Priests and bit by bit some wonderful nuns as well. I began to understand the whole concept of the remnant. One of the first things I read from Charlie that rang so true was the joining together of all people of faith because I think those who truly seek the truth, uphold the truth as they know it, and sacrifice to maintain it are brothers and sisters under the Fathership of God. And yet I grieve for those who don’t have the bliss of the Holy Eucharist and the Holy Sacrifice, Eucharistic Adoration, a loving Mother who walks with us every step of the way, Guardian Angels and our saint intercessors in heaven. They are missing the best part of the Wedding Feast but I trust God to sort it out. Thanks again for sharing.

    Liked by 9 people

  18. zeniazenia says:

    While there is an enemy out there destroying the lives of our loved ones and beyond, I am convinced that those enemies (or brothers and sisters) are monitoring this site. Many people with lots and lots of unanswered questions are very likely reading and watching these discussion without posting…yet. Our words are meant for them, bringing each discussion, with it’s stick figures and/or thesis and everything in between, along so God’s children at all stages of conversion, can find a nugget of Truth /God to grab onto. If we evangelize in a manner that looks and feels more like sport, then we have ‘turned off’, possibly rejected, all those people with PTSD feelings regarding life and God, who came here for love- and our selfishness will be weighing heavy with lack of peace starting in our souls. If a lack of love does happen, okay, we continue to evangelize. We shouldn’t discontinue out of fear, just because there was a recent nearby failure. We look at the failure with love and we move forward in love. We have seen the nakedness in the family but we do not take advantage of it. Success at picking ourselves up by our bootstraps may be very useful during the Rescue. All true Charity, wherever it is found, should be recognized with dignity and of course, tested. There are many ways to offer Charity to the world, and building comradery will be the natural result. Beware of the imposters. The Pharisees were good at that. This is an ark that we are steering, and naturally there is a lag time when the course needs tweaking. Don’t lose Hope. The world needs both Love and Truth –‘both/and’. Love -ZJ Rev. 2: 3 I know you are enduring patiently and bearing up for my name’s sake, and you have not grown weary. 4 But I have this against you, that you have abandoned the love you had at first. 5 Remember then from what you have fallen, repent and do the works you did at first. If not, I will come to you and remove your lampstand from its place, unless you repent.

    Liked by 4 people

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