The Divine Pattern

God_Adam_DNA

(I got a note from Focus TV telling me that some people may be having trouble viewing the video because they are being bombarded with visitors and it is slowing things down. So if you can’t get it to play, wait a while and try again.-CJ)

By Charlie Johnston

A couple of short thoughts today…

-When I first considered the implications of the discovery of DNA, I had an epiphany. I though, “Aha, that’s how resurrection works.” No, that wasn’t the epiphany – the epiphany was realizing how different my thought processes are from the mainstream. I thought that was the obvious and logical connection to make…and when I would excitedly talk about it to people, I would usually get a “Hunh?”

Think about it, though. DNA offers insight into what we are, a divine and unrepeatable pattern formed by God. The pattern, itself, is imperishable. In this world, the pattern is formed from perishable materials that are always passing away – and subject to the machinations of the satan, who is always trying to distort it. But at the resurrection, the pattern will be formed from indestructible, perfect and eternal materials – and beyond the reach of the satan. We commonly think of ourselves as, in essence, the materials used to form us in this life. It is the pattern that is the essence. Thus, at the resurrection, it is the pattern that counts, not the perishable materials that were used in its first iteration.

-I think a lot of the caustic division that stalks modern culture is a result of the near vanishing of large families. In a large family, you learn very quickly that you and your siblings are going to have a lot of arguments, disputes and contest. You also learn that just because you argue a lot doesn’t mean your brother doesn’t have your back. That sensibility has been lost in the modern world, mainly because a single child is accustomed to having his whims indulged – and regarding any who brook him as the enemy. I am convinced that large families play a vital role in developing real tolerance in society rather than the noxious kind that merely uses the term as a means to power and privilege.

-Most noble souls will do the right thing even when it is hard and even when no one is looking. But that is not the acid test of a genuinely noble soul. Are you willing to do the right thing even when, publicly, it looks like the wrong thing – and knowing it will bring out the criticism of good and honest people? A thought worth pondering. I addressed this about a year ago with a genuinely noble soul. He was really struggling, for to keep faith with someone he loved, he had to do something that would open him up to much criticism from those who did not know the circumstances. To do otherwise could have been, in the long term, very destructive to the person he cared for. He took the genuinely noble course – and most everyone is now thankful he did. But some who applaud him now were eager to claw at him at the time. Something  worth pondering.

 

 

 

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
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259 Responses to The Divine Pattern

  1. Vanessa Joy says:

    When The Other, becomes more important than others , we are on the sure path of taking the next right step. At the end of the day and the beginning of the day too, ” the opinions of others about moi is none of my business.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. YongDuk says:

    I have long pondered DNA and Satan. And healing and genetics and hereditary diseases. And the Enlightenment’s effect on Faith.

    I can’t resist like Doug and his Holy Hour recommendation:

    But never in terms of siblings and large families.

    I am sure many of us were reminded of Pope John Paul II’s words on the grace that large vs. single children/small families are by your words.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Mick says:

      YD, I have another question for you, if I may. I’m pretty lousy at science, so I have no clue about genetics. But (as I’m sure you’ve read on other threads), our baby has Down Syndrome. In the eyes of our family, she’s perfect; and if we could go back and somehow change things so that she didn’t have DS, we wouldn’t. And we’re not unique: I’ve read about many parents of kids with DS, and they’ve also said if they could alter their child, they would not opt for a “version” without DS.

      So, my question: will our children who have DS on earth have an extra 21st chromosome in heaven? I mean, I know that they won’t have cardiac or gastro-intestinal defects in heaven, and they won’t have lower-than-average muscle tone in heaven, and there will be no intellectual or speech disabilities in heaven (not all kids with DS have these issues, but I’m just saying). But since the extra chromosome is integral to the individuals that our children are, will the extra chromosome be part of their glorified bodies?

      I know you’re busy; so if you don’t have time to answer this, that’s OK. But as the curious sort who often wonders about stuff that ultimately doesn’t really matter, I have been pondering this issue. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

      • LukeMichael says:

        Mick
        These children are the most loving people! I believe they live eternally with normal human abilities but at a level in heaven that reflects unique capacities of love and grace. Who is like God!

        Liked by 4 people

      • YongDuk says:

        🙂

        Mick, thanks for your question.

        Looking at Metanoia, Kenosis, Dispassion, Adoption, Indwelling, Essence, Divinization, Immutability, Impassibility, Immortality, Theandric Love, Covenant, Unity. There is a movement of grace to the realisation of our participation in the Divine Nature, our Divinisation, and in that participation brought about by Christ Jesus and His summing up of all things in Himself, bringing all things back to Himself as head (recapitulatio).

        Oh wait, that is for Robert Cunningham…

        Mick, I don’t know what Heaven will be like. Charlie would be the one to ask. The beauty and order of our bodies will be out-shown and clothed by the beauty of our souls. Our glorified bodies will reflect our bodies here, but restored and recapitulated in Christ.

        I have heard of children who have seen Heaven and who said there were neither young or old, Jew or Greek, Minority or Majority, when questioned by a priest I know. When I heard that, it was not that there wasn’t. Rather, it was the differences we see here aren’t significant there. Rather, the Unity resounded and redounded.

        Thus, I would suspect to the Glory of God and the joy of your child, the body she has will share in that joy. I would suspect that she would not want otherwise as this body shares fully in our redemptive process, our sharing in the sufferings of Christ, our means to merit and to be glorified. Why wouldn’t an individual, yet alone God, not celebrate this body?

        Why wouldn’t an individual, yet alone God, not celebrate this body?

        Be it the tragically malformed body of an innocent suffering from a genetic disease or the tragically malformed body sharing the martyrdom of the soul by innumerable mortal sins overcome and redeemed at the Twelfth Hour? (God uses ALL things for our good!)

        In fact, that, the reunification of soul and body, is the final completion of the fullness of joy that souls long for in Heaven (and the final aspect completing the fullness of suffering of the souls of the damned).

        I have wondered about the Wounds of Christ and their remaining at the Resurrection. I am uncertain whom I asked or something I read, but that He retained His Wounds as a Remaining Sign of His Everlasting Hesed w ‘Emet.

        So to recapitulate, Robert Cunningham: It’s all about Love, given, received, shared with, in and through and between Christ’s Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity and our soul and bodies!

        oremus pro invicem,
        +YD

        Liked by 4 people

        • Beckita says:

          Proufound and glorious, YD!!!

          Liked by 2 people

        • Mick says:

          Thank you so much, YD!

          I gotta say, though, that I was relieved to find out that the first paragraph of your answer was addressed to Robert; as I was reading that paragraph, I was thinking, “Wut?” 🙂

          Liked by 3 people

        • Robert Cunningham says:

          Great reply to Mick YD. Mick has a treasure in his house.

          When I think of God and what Heaven will be like I think of intimacy, an intimacy beyond our understanding. There can be no greater intimacy than the union with God Himself.

          One of the first acts that God does in creation is perform a wedding when the first man and first woman are joined in holy matrimony in Eden and bring forth life. It was His plan and it was a good plan. Throughout the Old Testament God refers to Himself and his people in marital language such as:

          Is 54:5
          For your husband is your Maker;
          the LORD of hosts is his name,
          Your redeemer, the Holy One of Israel,
          called God of all the earth.

          Is 62:5
          For as a young man marries a virgin,
          your Builder shall marry you;
          And as a bridegroom rejoices in his bride
          so shall your God rejoice in you.

          Our dear Lord performs his first miracle at a wedding at the request of his mother (fitting that Mary is the Mother of the Bride, the Church). He refers to himself as the Bridegroom many times in the parables, especially in Matthew. He tells us of 10 virgins who await the Bridegroom (Matthew 25), five foolish virgins and 5 wise. In the last book of the Bible we read of a feast, but not just any feast – it is the wedding feast of the Lamb. If Jesus is the Lamb then who is the Bride? It is us! What is the meal at the feast? It is nothing short of His own Body and Blood which he gave to us in the Eucharist. What Intimacy!

          In the beginning God said, “That is why a man leaves his father and mother and clings to his wife, and the two of them become one body” (Gen 2:24). Then the Word Incarnate later quote that scripture and says further, “So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore, what God has joined together, no human being must separate” (Matt 19:5). Then the Apostle later meditates on that when he says,

          Eph 5:31,32
          “For this reason a man shall leave [his] father and [his] mother
          and be joined to his wife,
          and the two shall become one flesh.”
          This is a great mystery, but I speak in reference to Christ and the church.

          If the mother of the bride helps prepare her daughter as she goes out to meet the groom, how much more does our Lady, the Mother of the Church, help prepare us to go out and meet the Bridegroom? I think she has been doing this for centuries. Perhaps now in these last times before the Storm that Charlie speaks of, she is preparing us in an even more special way.

          Robert

          Liked by 3 people

          • YongDuk says:

            Hold on, is Mick a gentleman? I had him/her has a woman. (But I had Petra as a man…)

            Good insights, Robert! (Scott Hahn has some pieces on this, one on ETWN: First Comes Love.) Then the incredible fact of Mystical Marriage!

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            Mick is a lady – and a delightful one, at that.

            Liked by 2 people

          • zeniazenia says:

            Dear Robert, You wrote, ‘Our dear Lord performs his first miracle at a wedding at the request of his mother (fitting that Mary is the Mother of the Bride, the Church)’. Since the Bridegroom’s responsibility was to provide the wine for the wedding and Jesus took care of providing the wine (also considering the wedding couple are not named), Jesus would be considered the important Bridegroom at that wedding. :0) –ZJ

            Liked by 3 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Nice insight, Zenia!

            Liked by 1 person

          • LukeMichael says:

            Robert, this is really great catechesis! To amplify this mystery and provide much food for meditation read Sr Bernard of Clarveaux’s Sermon on the Song of Songs! Available as an Ebola for $.99 on Amazon.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Robert Cunningham says:

            Nice post Zenia and I like the name

            Sorry about the gender Mick. I know better now. I started chuckling out loud. I was just corrected by a bishop and a mystic. Who knew? I love it

            Liked by 5 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Ha ha, Robert…where could that happen with a chuckle except here at this website?

            Liked by 4 people

          • LukeMichael says:

            Just read my comment again. Ebook not Ebola! Spellcheck!😳

            Liked by 4 people

          • Beckita says:

            LukeMichael, I’m so glad you clarified. I was thinking Amazon might have developed a sort of blue light special, but I did take pause to wonder why it would be named, “Ebola.” Yah! Sign of greater thoughts to come.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Mick says:

            Wow, Robert… what a meaty post for us to chew on. Thanks.

            Charlie, thanks for your compliment; but when you were in Michigan, I was on my best behavior. Remember… I told you that my goal is to eventually achieve the status (stature?) of “old battle-axe.” Give me 20 or 25 years, and I’ll be there. 🙂

            Liked by 4 people

          • Mick says:

            Haha, Robert! No worries. It’s not the first time: I have been “accused” of looking like a teenaged boy on a number of occasions. 🙂

            The most hilarious time was when I was visiting my mom at the sub-acute medical facility where she was a patient at the time. She shared a room with a nice older lady whose college-student granddaughter was visiting. The granddaughter and I had been chatting for maybe 15 minutes when she got a puzzled look on her face and said, “Wait… so Toni is your MOM and you’ve got a HUSBAND?” I looked back at her, equally puzzled, and said, “Well… yeah.” She got really flustered and started to apologize. She said, “I thought that you were Toni’s grandson and that you were maybe19!” (I was 40 at the time).

            Just so’s you know, Mick is my real name (well, my real name is Michelle; but whatever). It’s what my family has called me since I was born; and since we NRS’ers are a family, I thought it appropriate to go by that name here. 🙂

            Liked by 3 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Well, I would not have mistaken you for a boy, Mick, but I would have bought the idea of a willowy college coed – if you did not have all those kids calling you, “Mom.” 🙂

            Liked by 3 people

        • Yong Duk says:

          Having been praying on this the last few days, I have been catching glimpses if that makes sense, those glimpses that stop your heart and take your breath.

          The Glorified Body will be perfect in its humanity made in the Image and Likeness of God.

          The crosses of that body and that it endured will not be lost, be it the sins overcome in the sense of martyrdom mentioned or the defects that the child or adult was asked to carry, but they shall be to the souls glory and will be recognisable, but like jewels upon a crown or a crown itself… but I say that metaphorically.

          Thus, the Body shall be the same, but different, perfected, but identifiable as such, not in a limiting or imperfect way, but in a way much more glorious than we could ever imagine.

          And here is today Feast the Glorious Sebastiano! For all our Southern Indian confreres especially, Happy Feast!

          +勇德

          Liked by 5 people

          • Whitney says:

            Very true! As Christ’s wounds were recognizable and present after He is Risen. I do like to ponder on the gift that my disabled son and genetically disabled (chromosome deletion) nephew are to our family and the jewels that will shine from their glorified vestments in heaven.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Mick says:

            Oh thank you, thank you, thank you, YD! This is exactly what I was hoping. Thank you! 🙂

            I’m going to go say an extra prayer for you right now. 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          • Julee says:

            How wonderful that would be–a special jewel in the crown of our special children, who endure so much and are so often marginalized here on earth. This goes along with what I’m reading in The Last Four Things concerning the final judgment of the elect, “After this, Christ will command His angels to bring all the saints (the elect) before Him. And as they come up to His throne, He will array each one in a garment of glory, brilliant and beautiful, so that they will shine like stars. On their heads He will place golden crowns of surpassing brightness, and into their hands He will give lilies, roses, palm branches and a scepter to betoken the victory they have achieved over the world, the flesh, and the devil.” I think this means the elect will recognize and rejoice in each others victories.

            Liked by 2 people

      • Julee says:

        Hi Mick! I hope you don’t mind me jumping in with my thoughts. I feel the same as you, I love my son and think he’s perfect, too, despite his disabilities of not being able to walk or talk or even eat normally. I think God gifted him with as pure a soul as one can have here on earth and he’s got a straight shot to heaven—something to be celebrated not changed! I don’t, however, think there will be any anomalies (for lack of a better word) in his glorified body. His physical disabilities are an integral part of who he is here on earth, but whether it was genetic or some sort of virus during my pregnancy, I think those are all earthly causes. Someday, I hope to have some wonderful conversations with him in heaven and hopefully he tells me I did a pretty good job and didn’t waste too much time drinking coffee and watching TV. 

        Liked by 6 people

        • Mick says:

          Dear Julee, I never mind hearing from you. 🙂

          And when you get to talk with him in heaven, I have absolutely no doubt that Justin will spend eternity singing your praises for all your love and care during his earthly live. You’re doing such a fantastic job (coffee notwithstanding… I hate that stuff). 🙂

          Liked by 3 people

          • Petra says:

            Mick: I can’t help but weigh in on how I think people with disabilities or genetic anomalies will be in heaven. I mean, we have no idea what heaven is like, but I believe all of us will be our most perfect selves there. And I imagine those who lived on earth hampered by a physical condition that limited their function will be freed of those limitations, but still will be absolutely themselves. I’m having a hard time thinking of how to describe how I imagine it, but maybe it’s like someone who spends the day inside one of those mascot costumes with giant heads and bodies – they’re clumsy, can’t see everything, hearing is difficult and no manual dexterity. When the costume comes off at the end of the day, all the normal function is possible.

            My sister-in-law’s sister had DS. She passed away a few years ago at age 52. She was funny and quite a practical joker. Although her outer self was hampered by DS, I always felt I could connect to her inner self, the person she was. When I imagine her in heaven, I imagine her at her fullest self, the thing that made our relating difficult gone, and we, in glorified bodies will have no more impediments to being with each other and knowing each other.

            No, I do not believe people with DNA that causes anomalies of function on the physical plane will have any such thing in heaven. Their *patterns* will be perfect, as God intended, and they will be as glorious and free of impediment as the rest of us.

            God bless.

            Liked by 5 people

          • Mick says:

            Petra my dear, please feel free to weigh in on my questions anytime! 🙂

            P.S. That was absolutely beautiful. Thanks.

            Liked by 2 people

          • prayingflower says:

            Hi Mick
            Please give your little precious another kiss on her other cherubic cheek tonite 😀 And a tender hug, too, when you tuck her in. pf Oh, btw, I went over to the forum looking for you tonite but didn’t find you. Took me awhile to figure out how it worked.

            Liked by 3 people

          • acseibert says:

            In 2006, I ended up sitting next to a nun while flying to Detroit. We ended up discussing my two boy with autism diagnnoses. She offered me words of comfort. All parents have an obligation to take care of the physical and spiritual needs of their children. The spiritual needs are the most important, because the goal is for them to spend eternity with God in heaven. God has blessed you. In exchange for taking on more physical needs here on earth, he has guarenteed your children will be with Him for eternity.

            This helped me put in to perspective all of the extra care they needed and continue to need.

            Liked by 5 people

          • Mick says:

            Prayingflower, I didn’t see your comment in time to hug and kiss the Yummy Baby for you before bed last night; but I hugged her and kissed her but good when she got up from her nap this afternoon. 🙂 Oh, and over at the forum, my screen name is MickeyMick (apparently just plain Mick was already taken when I signed up). I’m in the Midwesterners’ section.

            Acseibert, you’re right. God has given our family a huge gift in our little girl. Three or four days after the she was born, one of my husband’s friends (who has a sister with Down Syndrome and whose medical practice has lots of patients with DS) wrote my husband an e-mail that was so amazing that it made me weep. He said, “The job of parents is to make sure that your child is happy, and that he or she becomes a saint. With the birth of Anne-Marie, you have accomplished both. You don’t know it yet, but you are in for the best ride of your lives.” He couldn’t have been more right.

            Ed, I agree with you that our kids will be made whole in heaven. I’m only wondering if that wholeness for people with DS somehow entails still having the extra 21st chromosome while somehow having that extra chromosome perfected. It’s a bit of a mystery, but we Christians–especially the Catholic-flavored ones–are used to mystery, eh? And God bless you and yours, too.

            Bonnie… oh, my goodness! What you and your husband are doing is incredible, and your story just made my day. God bless you and your husband, and God bless the three beautiful souls in your care.

            Liked by 5 people

      • Ed Allison says:

        Mick, as a parent of a disabled child, I too have wondered about this. I have come to believe that these children will be made whole in heaven! I cannot wait to see my daughter made whole. We used to pray for her healing here on earth, but now we just pray for her protection from those who could easily take advantage of her. I was shown that my motives for asking for her healing were selfish anyway. But that’s a whole different story. Suffice to say, she’s perfect the way she is. God bless you and yours!

        Liked by 6 people

      • Bonnie C says:

        My husband is guardian of three developmentally disabled, now “senior” adult/siblings. With fear for their well-being in the hands of “the state” and in compassion, we stepped into the situation when my husband’s aunt, their guardian, passed away suddenly in 2007. They are not related to us at all – well, that is “biologically” :). A woman and her two brothers. I would consider them high functioning in that they eat, bathe, dress, ambulate – on their own, but unable to drive, or pay their own bills, know when to stop eating (like me!!!), take their medications, etc. without direction/assistance. They are very good at reminding us of day’s off from the workshop they go to during the week, or what items they need for their lunches, or money, etc. – things we sometimes forget. I am sure they have outlived what would have been considered a normal life span.

        There isn’t a real lack of understanding, even nuances in communication – they love soap operas – they all appreciate a good laugh, and can come up with some sharp and hilarious comebacks of their own. The situation is not without challenges, but I hope that I make it to heaven so that I can see them there! I know that the middle one, hates his limitations. He was, from what we were told, “picked on” by his father. I asked him one time if he has forgiven his father. He said, shrugging his shoulders, “He dead now.” The father was a coal miner. The mother, a stay at home mom. They had a little farm, a tiny house. They managed to save a very large sum of money that is in a trust for the care of the three. As you can tell, they were very concerned for the welfare of their children after they were gone. God bless them! Many sacrifices were made for them.

        I loved YD’s reply! Yes, Jesus still has His wounds. God bless all here.

        Liked by 5 people

      • zeniazenia says:

        Dear Mick, Babies, children and older folks with Down Syndrome have my heart. I love their beauty to pieces. I am attracted to them for their sweetness. I’m sure their perfection in heaven won’t be a disappointment to anyone. God is so good! –love ZJ

        Liked by 3 people

  3. BD says:

    Thanks Charlie. I am not surprised to hear Focus TV is being overwhelmed. That was a very good interview. For sure people are hungry to hear your message of hope in these troubled times. God Bless…

    Liked by 5 people

  4. vvtaranto@aol.com says:

    I love epiphanies! I have had a few myself and believe it to be Holy Spirit derived! To have one’s understanding increased….I get the DNA…God is sooooo amazing…I love His Great Wisdom and find it very exciting that He is our Awesome DAD! As for large families..I wish I had a few more kids myself (we have 2)… I believe there is so much learned in a larger family that can only be taught by experiencing it… unlike the “tolerance” that the public school system has been trying to brainwash my kids. The public High School down the street (Calif) now has a transgender bathroom and when I sometimes stop by the school, I see both boy and girls looking and dressing like they are so confused as to “who they are.” Sad, because you know they are trying to find their way…their purpose…but, are confused with the limitless boundaries that are before them.
    Lots to pray for! Love to you Charlie!
    Melanie

    Liked by 6 people

  5. johnmcfarm says:

    I think I get what you are saying re:DNA…the physical attributes God uses to make our physical world body and lives is not the substance of the essence of our souls…the physical world, is really the tinker toys part…I doubt if science will ever be able to actually “create” anything in the real Godly sense of creation. The spark or essence of creation is for God alone. Understanding more about DNA should bring critically thinking people closer to understanding the wonder of God…the impossibility of the “programming” and more importantly the impossibility of the powering of the programming and “machinery”.

    Liked by 3 people

    • EllenChris says:

      Yes, John. The sequencing of the molecules in a strand of DNA provides the information that produces new cells, organs and whole creatures. Meaningful information is language because it communicates something. Language — meaningful communication — cannot just happen at random by definition. So DNA is the best argument against the whole idea of random evolution. This truth drives the atheist establishment of the Biological sciences just insane with rage when faced with it. So it is a really great way to demonstrate not just the reality of God, but the necessity of God.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Judy says:

      I actually did not understand this brief writing about DNA and resurrection. Scientist are changing DNA in labs all across the world….As for doing the right thing while the public scoffs, I anticipate that this will be required of us. Maybe all of us. Jesus said that we should pray that we are never to the test. (paraphrasing). No one ever knows how they will hold up. But , with the power of the Spirit, all is possible.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. Cherie says:

    I experienced the same problem and wondered at the time if it wasn’ t being bombarded by viewers. I kept trying and eventually was able to view it very late in the evening and again with myhusband the next morning. Well, worth the extra trouble to access it….

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Mack says:

    Very good thoughts, Charlie. The point about large families is so important. It is like a school where we can learn how to get along with others.
    I also think that another factor is how people have gotten away from living on farms, close to nature. When we are in contact with the natural world, with animals, etc., we appreciate nature better. I would link this also to the rise of same-sex unions as if they are natural. People living close to nature can see more easily, I think, how such things are opposed to God’s plan of creation.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Mick says:

      I agree with you, Mack, both about the large families and about living life close to nature. We have a large family (5 kids) and live on a farm. We also homeschool, and my husband works from home (he’s a political-science, wonky type with an office across the driveway from the house); so we’re all in each other’s faces all the time. And even though our kids are normal kids that often fight like cats and dogs and occasionally complain about their farm and household chores, I know that they love each other deeply and value the life that we have here. And the lessons that they are learning–about family, farming, teamwork, and life–are so precious. It’s a hard life in some ways, but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

      Liked by 7 people

      • montanababydue says:

        My husband and I believe that Down Syndrome children exhibit the truest example of Joy to the world we live in. Their happiness & unconditional Love for those on their path overflows, making that Joy & Love contagious! I know that your family has been blessed by the Lord with the gift of your baby!

        Also, I was raised as the oldest of a family of 6, although not on a farm or ranch. No matter where one lives in a large family, working together as a team & giving of self to the other is so important and those lessons are learned “hands on” ! Homeschooling was unheard of back then, as far as I know, but Thankfully my parents had the help of Catholic schools because with my Dad in construction & the family moving around the country once a year, my mother would’ve had a meltdown. She had 6 living children in the span of 10 years & lost 3 babies too. I can really relate to the fighting like cats & dogs, but loving like teddy bears too! Your blog reminded me of some Precious memories for sure!

        A friend from our parish back home in Montana has just announced that she is pregnant with #13….they have a BEAUTIFUL Big family. Some of the children are now old enough to work in the family plumbing business & the older girls help mom to raise the younger siblings. And Charlie some good news, there are many other large families in our parish that exemplify that large families are NOT vanishing, I am HAPPY to report….Alleluia!

        Liked by 5 people

  8. zeniazenia says:

    Thanks Charlei– Yes, I see that clearly. You write, ‘…formed from indestructible, perfect and eternal materials – and beyond the reach of the satan.’. This is how I envision all evil– little arrows, by comparison, shooting at a massive engine of Truth. The historical arrows (isms, selfishness and heresies) are painful for life on earth and they might leave scars on you, me and the generations, but all this is eventually paid for by the Bridegroom and the Bride. The Truth moves on undeterred and remains whole and unmoved, because it is Him. –ZJ

    Liked by 3 people

  9. kent4jmj says:

    The earthly pattern as revealing, in an imperfect way, a heavenly reality is well known to lovers of scripture. The account of the instructions given to Moses for the building of the Tabernacle is probably the most well known.

    A pattern created reveals to some extent a Divine reality. Pretty much defines what a Mystery is. Something both known and unknown. We are a beautiful glorious Mystery created by God.

    Liked by 6 people

  10. SteveBC says:

    Charlie, something that has always made no particular sense to me is the belief in a physical resurrection in a perfected body. I think that’s what you’re discussing here.

    Why bother? I’m not interested in coming back to this body, even if it’s perfected. Why not stay a soul that has been perfected? Or am I just totally misunderstanding the concept of resurrection using this DNA pattern? What am I missing here? All I get is a science fiction image of a perfect body that never gets sick or injured, so I have the opportunity to spend a billion years wandering around this beautiful universe in my space yacht with my friends. After a while, my reaction to another day will get to be, “Meh.” And then what do I do?

    Liked by 3 people

    • jayman92 says:

      I’ve always said, if in Heaven I’ll have a perfected body, I’ll have to wear a name tag so people recognize me.

      Liked by 9 people

      • charliej373 says:

        Hey, the apostles did not recognize the risen Christ at first. I will laugh hysterically if, at the pearly gates, St. Peter is handing out those little tags that say, “Hello, my name is….”

        Liked by 14 people

        • LukeMichael says:

          I heard a story today about a few souls in heaven that looked out of place to Jesus when he saw them. He went to St Peter and said “how did they get in?”
          Peter said, “Jesus, I did not let them in!”

          Jesus said, “well, how did this happen?”
          “Lord, I cannot tell you.”
          Jesus said, “Peter you must!

          Well Lord, I met them at the heavenly gate and told them no. But your Mother told them to come around to the back door and she let them in!

          Precious, like my grandchildren! #3 arrived on Wednesday and I met him today!
          So blessed beyond belief!

          Liked by 6 people

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            LukeMichael, I love that! Here’s the version I read from one of his books- and it made me laugh until I had tears in my eyes:
            Padre Pio had an astonishingly unconditional, total, perennial, unwavering love for the Virgin Mary. He used to tell a story: “One day Our Lord making the rounds of Paradise saw some strange faces. He asked Peter: ‘Who let these people in?’ Peter replied: ‘There is nothing I can do.’ The Lord said, ‘But you have the key.’ Peter said: ‘There is nothing I can do, and you can’t do either.’ The Lord said: ‘What do you mean?’ ‘It’s your mother. She has another key. She lets them in.”
            So happy about your little grandchild! 🙂

            Liked by 4 people

          • Beckita says:

            Congratulations on the birth of your new grandson, LukeMichael!

            Liked by 2 people

          • Mick, I tend to agree with LM in that these special children who have a “chromasomal abnormality”, and I am thinking not just of DS kids only, that they may have unique
            capacities for love and other graces maybe even BECAUSE of these “unique chromasomal configurations” (which in heaven will not be “abnormalities” as we on earth considered them). Just how I envision it.

            OH, LM Congratulations! Blessed indeed!

            Liked by 4 people

          • Mick says:

            Congratulations, LukeMichael! 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • Mick says:

            Bread, I couldn’t agree with you more. My daughter has the most amazing capacity to give and receive love and I believe that her chromosomal difference is the reason.

            Liked by 3 people

          • janet333 says:

            Congratulations on the birth of your Grandson…God Bless you all.

            Liked by 1 person

    • Fran says:

      Steve, I think we all have a hard time understanding these things. They are mysteries to us, but what we do have to hang on to is that we are promised “no eye has seen, nor ear has heard, nor the heart of man imagines what God has prepared for those who love him.” Because God has so willed it that we will have glorified bodies, what we don’t understand now we will be glad of later!
      I remind myself every single time I don’t understand what God is doing that I don’t NEED to understand. I don’t HAVE to understand. The only thing He asks is for me to TRUST Him that it will all be far better than I can imagine!

      Liked by 7 people

    • Several years ago, Ben Stein released a movie called “Expelled”. It was about those in the world of higher academics who were banned in America from their profession because they agreed with man’s origin coming from a Creator. He was interviewing American professor in France, I think, anyway, this professor showed him that when you get to the smallest particle in DNA, it’s held together by a thread in the form of a cross. Thanks for all the deep, pensive writings. Shiela, Lake Charles, LA

      Liked by 12 people

      • Sandy says:

        Yes – the molecule that is in the form of a cross is called laminin. Our high school youth mentors played a you tube video to the kids a few years back about this “cell adhesion molecule” – it is awesome!. I don’t know if this link will work – I have never tried to put one in a comment here. But if it doesn’t, go to YouTube and enter “laminin louie giglio short” – it is awesome!!! In Him all things are held together – Colossians 1:17

        Liked by 10 people

      • EllenChris says:

        Anybody who has not seen this movie — locate a version and watch it — don’t miss it. It is excellent. The The Professor you mentioned, David Berlinski, wrote a really good book called, *The Devil’s Delusion* demonstrating that science is not at all equipped to have a negative opinion about the existence of God. A really entertaining and enlightening read.

        Liked by 2 people

      • El ingeniero de Tepeyac says:

        To expand on the thesis of “Expelled”, my question for the atheists is how is the Second Law of Thermodynamics not violated if there is not a Creator?

        The Second Law of Thermodynamics in a nutshell states that a closed system will always become more disordered (Entropy increases). The universe is a closed system so in other words the universe is running down. A simple example of this is a hot pot of water. The closed system is the room in which the hot pot of water is along with the air and the hot pot of water. If one has numerous thermal probes measuring the air temperature and the water temperature and the temperature of the pot itself and no heat is lost to the outside environment then the air, the water and the pot all come to the same temperature. The water and pot drop in temperature and the air rises slightly in temperature and the entropy of the system increases.

        From a biological standpoint then it would seem antithetical that biologic systems would become more ordered and more complex taking into account the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics. There is no theory backed by rigorous scientific evidence that clearly demonstrates that single celled animals developed into multi-celled animals of increasing complexity. Evolution theory in conjunction with empirical evidence shows that an organism type of a certain level of complexity can evolve into another organism type at the same level of complexity. Darwin saw this with Galapagos tortoises and with the marine iguanas. The tortoises became specialized but stayed tortoises. In other words the tortoises did not change into fish or birds or mammals or any other animal. Furthermore, there is no evidence that lungfishes evolved into amphibians.

        http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/lonesome-george/galapagos-tortoises-and-evolution

        To go back to the theory of the universe then, Irrespective of one’s theory of the start of the universe, all the theories for the start of the universe require an outside intervention in my opinion. For instance in the ‘big bang’ theory what was the cause of the ‘big bang’? And with an ever expanding universe as the cosmologists and astro-physicists have postulated how is new matter created whether it be “dark” matter or regular matter? Because even as the universe increases in size the galaxies and star systems seem to be created. If the universe is considered a closed system then no new matter can be created.

        Here is a lecture from Steven Hawking, a brilliant cosmologist about the beginning of the universe.

        http://www.hawking.org.uk/the-origin-of-the-universe.html

        Although he refutes the idea that there is a creator of the universe the mathematics and physics do not demonstrate that there is NOT a creator.

        One other point, Charlie’s post mentions about DNA. A question was brought up about twins. It is true twins have the same DNA. But DNA is not the entire picture in terms of how a person is formed. Environmental influences can cause the expression of certain characteristics of an individual. The following URL from Nature can help illustrate it.

        http://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/environmental-influences-on-gene-expression-536

        In the womb, a zygote that splits into two separate bodies creates identical twins. The two new bodies then implant into the uterine wall. From the beginning the two new bodies have a slightly different environment in which to grow due to the different implantation. The differences can cause genes to be triggered more strongly or more weakly creating two distinct individuals.

        Liked by 5 people

    • kent4jmj says:

      The incarnation and ascension are two realities which show how much God thinks of human flesh.

      He lowered himself to assume it. And He glorified it by raising it up.

      As for being bored I think you may have missed the significance of The. Fathers infinite being. There will always be something new. A billion years doesn’t even scratch the surface.

      Liked by 10 people

      • charliej373 says:

        Steve, pay close attention to this man. He expresses in few words important truths. There was a long-standing heresy in the early Church that after we die we are solely spirit. St. Paul devotes the entire 15th Chapter of I Corinthians to the importance of a true, physical resurrection. This is a failure of your ability to imagine what it means. Dig deeper. When you do that, you frequently come up with profound insights. I tell you this one is worthy of some serious contemplation.

        Liked by 5 people

        • luvmercy5775 says:

          Charlie, Thank you for referencing 1 Corinthians 15. These are the verses that came to mind for me when I first heard the Song of Thanksgiving.

          If original sin corrupted the DNA of all born from the seed of Adam and Eve, seems to me the task of redemption was to create a new model bearing the genetic blueprint as originally designed. Jesus qualified for this role due to the virgin birth. The life of the flesh is in the blood and blood comes from the father. No blood forms in the female ovum until it’s fertilized by male sperm. Jesus’ blood was untarnished because His Father was God the Holy Spirit.

          As I see it, when we receive Him as Lord and partake of His flesh and blood in the Eucharist, His DNA is implanted in us. “Unless you eat my flesh and drink my blood you have no “LIFE” in you.”

          Consider the words of the Song of Thanksgiving with the following verses. In my opinion, it sounds as though we may receive glorified bodies before entering the era of peace. How else can we rebuild a world where people live together in peace, unless our very nature has been changed?

          Consider the following:

          50 Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God; nor does corruption inherit incorruption. 51 Behold, I tell you a mystery: We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed— 52 in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed. 53 For this corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put on immortality. 54 So when this corruptible has put on incorruption, and this mortal has put on immortality, then shall be brought to pass the saying that is written: “Death is swallowed up in victory.” I Corinthians 15: 50-54

          Other verses alluding to this are:

          13 But I do not want you to be ignorant, brethren, concerning those who have fallen asleep, lest you sorrow as others who have no hope. 14 For if we believe that Jesus died and rose again, even so God will bring with Him those who sleep in Jesus.[b]

          15 For this we say to you by the word of the Lord, that we who are alive and remain until the coming of the Lord will by no means precede those who are asleep. 16 For the Lord Himself will descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of an archangel, and with the trumpet of God. And the dead in Christ will rise first. 17 Then we who are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air. And thus we shall always be with the Lord. 18 Therefore comfort one another with these words.” 1 Thesselonians 4: 13-18

          And lastly, “Behold, the Lord God shall come with a strong hand,
          And His arm shall rule for Him; Behold, His reward is with Him,
          And His work before Him. ” Isaiah 40: 10

          “And the people of the kingdom and the people of heaven shall rise together, shall rise forever and God shall rule. “

          Like

          • charliej373 says:

            I appreciate the contemplation, mercy, but I want to reiterate that we don’t get heaven until we actually get heaven. It will be a normal world where we get a chance to get it right. The dark side of it is that, in time, there WILL be another apostasy – the final apostasy. Could there be a few exceptions? I don’t know, but I would be surprised. We get an ordinary world where, because of the Storm we have just been through and the miraculous Rescue we have seen, most hearts are changed. I really don’t think we will get glorified bodies until we are glorified. (Though I would be delighted with just a small dose 🙂

            Liked by 5 people

      • SteveBC says:

        Kent4JMJ and Charlie: Thank you for the comments. I will begin looking into it by reading Charlie’s cite in 1 Corinthians. You’ve given me a place to start.

        Liked by 2 people

        • EllenChris says:

          Hi, Steve: Gnostic dualism said that matter was essentially bad while only pure spirit is good. Dualism of this sort was entirely rejected by the Church because it denigrates God as Creator in all sorts of ways. C. S. Lewis fictional character, Screwtape, called humans, “miserable amphibians” because we live at once in the physical and material. This is our nature as God gave it to us so that we give conscious voice to all material creation in praising our Creator.

          It is kind of interesting how this topic about the nature of our resurrection came up because I was thinking about it while walking the dog this morning. I think part of your problem is in underestimating the glory of our resurrected bodies. Imagine having full total and complete access to the spiritual realm while also having full and total access to the material realm without any of its limits. St. Paul uses the analogy of a single little seed as compared to a large stalk of wheat with leaves and many grains. Take a look at I Corinthians 15 beginning at verse 12, but especially verses 35 — 38 and 42 — 49 which describe this analogy. Wow! It will be so much better than we think.

          As Kent pointed out, the Son of God did not just appear as a pure spirit, but chose to become incarnate. He did not leave His exalted, resurrected yet still human Body behind but took it into heaven with Him. We will do the same. God keeps the material and spiritual together because we are always to be “amphibians” It will be amazing!

          Liked by 4 people

          • SteveBC says:

            Ellen, thank you for these thoughts. Yes, having both would be terrific. I will look into this more as I do other things, holding this question in mind.

            One thing I have never “gotten,” either in my Christian considerations or my New Age peregrinations, was the usefulness or accuracy of the idea that matter was bad. How could it be, when it is the avenue through which I so often learn wonderful or useful lessons and become a better person?

            What did take me a while to understand, though, is how matter can also be the avenue by which a person can get corrupted, not due to matter per se but to attachments to some of the forms of matter we deal with every day. It was helpful to realize that it was the attachment to matter rather than matter itself that should be viewed with care and released if possible.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Beckita says:

            Steve, it’s one of your many gifts: you open a topic and we *all* become rich in pondering the reflections and resources shared. Thank you seems too little for the treasures you have facilitated us to cull.

            Liked by 3 people

          • SteveBC says:

            Honestly, Beckita, I don’t do it deliberately. 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

        • Sr Lorraine says:

          Hi Steve,
          There is also the whole theology of the body as presented by Pope John Paul. The human body is an integral part of who we are. In fact, Church teaching is that after death until the resurrections we are not fully perfected human beings, even the saints in heaven. They are disembodied spirits awaiting the final resurrection and union with their bodies, when all will then be completed.
          This is a profound topic, because the human being as a union of body and soul is at the heart of Catholic teaching in so many ways. As the pope said, “With the Incarnation, the body entered theology, as it were, through the main door.”
          God bless you!

          Liked by 4 people

          • SteveBC says:

            Honestly, Sr Lorraine, when I opened the topic, I had no idea it was such an important one. I have much to consider. Thank you for your comment. 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

    • zeniazenia says:

      You, Steve, will probably be the most delighted of all with the beatific vision!

      Liked by 2 people

      • SteveBC says:

        ZJ, you mean more delighted than you? I doubt it. 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

        • Mick says:

          Seriously, Steve… with your awesome, engineery, geeky brain and your propensity to ponder ponderously, I can’t imagine how you would find heaven boring. As Kent4jmj said, God is infinite; and he is infinitely creative. Just because heaven is eternal doesn’t mean that it is static. God isn’t going to cease to create simply because the earth, our temporal sphere, doesn’t exist anymore. The way I see it, God will spend eternity giving of Himself; and part of this Self-giving entails creating new and more incredible delights in order to show forth His goodness and glory, and in order to please His beloved children. And the more we clap and ooh and aah over the new wonders, and the more we explore them, the more new wonders He creates. Forever. Wow! It almost makes me dizzy just thinking about it. You, however, are both smarter and better grounded (ha… more stable?) than I, so I’m sure that you’ll find pleasure in the contemplation, both here and in the hereafter. 🙂

          Liked by 8 people

          • SteveBC says:

            Oh, Mick, I do. Although I’m not eager to go through the dying process, I expect to be totally pumped when I get to heaven. My comment of “Meh” was more a rhetorical device. Perhaps I shouldn’t have used it. No way am I going to be bored.

            My real issue is that I don’t see any particular reason to stay human (as we know it) after I’m dead. Now I don’t mean I’m going to turn into Ed Allison’s Quisp and become a space alien *instead* of being a human. We may be made in the image of God, but that doesn’t say to me that God *is* human as we think of it. I’ve always assumed that my “self” after death would be *built on* my current humanness but be vastly expanded. Since the human brain does create our experience (principally by filtering out everything else), I’m not all that intrigued about being even in an uncorrupted human body if I remain limited to being “human” as we know it now to be or can speculate. Our imaginations are pretty limited.

            I’ve simply never considered until now that a human body after death would be an advantage, incorruptible or not. I can see what it *does* but can’t see that as either necessary or useful after death.

            Fortunately, I have a number of friends here who have given me much food for thought. 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            Mick, that was beautifully said, wow! 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • EllenChris says:

            Glorious, Mick!

            Liked by 1 person

          • Julee says:

            This discussion brings to mind the descriptions in the book “The Four Last Things-Death, Judgment, Hell, and Heaven” by Fr. Martin von Cochem. Heaven, after the final judgment, is described as a visible and physical kingdom so glorious that the blessed will never tire of contemplating it and will enjoy it both in body and soul. He describes the glorified bodies of all who will dwell there as being endowed with four qualities: beauty (brilliant with light), impassibility (perfect and unfailing health and strength), agility (able to travel with the speed of thought), and subtlety (able to penetrate all matter). He also speaks of having superior senses used to enjoy the splendors of heaven. Just more food for thought and contemplation…

            Liked by 6 people

    • Bonnie C says:

      Hi Charlie, I asked you about Jesus’ DNA that should be traceable from the Eucharistic miracles a long time ago now, and your article reminded me. Your answer was also about resurrection and I’m pretty sure my face looked like “hunh”?! I think it would be SO COOL to see the Divine pattern of Jesus’ DNA. Perhaps I should switch my ponderings but this is quite interesting to me and I find it difficult to believe that this hasn’t been researched.

      Like

    • Ed Allison says:

      Steve, please consider John 11:24 (the raising of Lazarus) – Martha said to him, “I know he will rise, in the resurrection on the last day.” There’s plenty of evidence in scripture of not only the physical resurrection, but of the glorification of our bodies.

      In Matthew 16:24, Jesus says, “Whoever wishes to come after me must deny himself, take up his cross, and follow me.” So, the Church must follow Jesus into His passion and death, but why would it stop there? Why would we follow Him into the grave only? If we are baptized into His death, then we are also baptized into His resurrection as well.

      Philippians 3:21 – He will change our lowly body to conform with his glorified body by the power that enables him also to bring all things into subjection to himself.

      1John 3:2 – Beloved, we are God’s children now; what we shall be has not yet been revealed. We do know that when it is revealed, we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is.

      God bless you.

      Liked by 4 people

      • SteveBC says:

        Thank you, Ed. I’m going to take your quotes here, as well as Charlie’s recommendation to read part of 1 Corinthians, and then get to pondering the idea for a while. I think my concern is that I don’t think a physical body is needed to have a glorified body, so why say that it will happen? But maybe we get both. Something for me to think about.

        Love your gravatar, dude.

        Liked by 3 people

        • YongDuk says:

          Steve, Christ has His Body, resurrected and glorified, nail marks and all.

          Mary was assumed Body and Soul.

          They have Their Same Bodies. Integral and Glorious. That alone shows the dignity of the body. But Jewish tradition in care of the Dead (Tobit 1) and Christian tradition reflect that same dignity.

          Liked by 5 people

          • SteveBC says:

            OK, YD. However, unlike me, they have a specific need for a body, because they must do at least some of their work via physical bodies in order to help us. Jesus with the Apostles after he rose is one such example. Another is at least one story I have heard about Jesus visiting an Iranian village a few years ago in what appears to me to have been his physical body.

            However, both Jesus and Mary appear most of the time as visitations in spirit form, not in their physical bodies. Do they put their bodies on when they need them for their work and otherwise leave them off? Do they move through the world of spirit, heaven, in their physical bodies or do they not?

            As I’ve said elsewhere, I just have not before now considered having a physical human body after I die as fundamental to my identity once I’m dead. Being both imaginative and practical, I think many times it might be in the way. And yes, I can conceive of both states existing at the same time.

            However, at least as of now I am considering that having a physical, incorruptible human body might provide an anchor to my humanity whether I use it or not. I would not likely need it much for daily use in heaven, but simply by it existing and being available, it would help me remember my humanity. That is not an inconsequential idea.

            I’m not trying to be heretical here nor engage in lese majeste. This is an area I have not more than occasionally considered in my life. Now I have more food for thought, and I appreciate that.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Kati says:

            Can I throw another angle to be considered in this discussion? I’d like to consider why Jesus would not allow Himself to be touched by Mary Magdalene after His Resurrection? Did this have anything to do with His physical, human body? …or what exactly does He mean by “touch?” Could it have a deeper meaning? …because later He instructed Thomas to touch His wounds.

            Liked by 3 people

          • charliej373 says:

            I never touch my visitors. They are so much more real than we are, a much more intense type of reality. I instinctively feel like it would be too much for me – and might be very painful.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Robert Cunningham says:

            Kati

            Did our Lord say do not touch me or “do not cling to me”? (Jn 20:17). I believe there’s something else for you

            Liked by 2 people

        • Ed Allison says:

          I don’t know if you remember, but when I first came to Charlie’s blog, my screen name was Quisp. Once I changed my screen name to my real name, I kept Quisp as my gravatar. Growing old is mandatory. Growing up is optional.

          Back to the important stuff….. I don’t see it as an either or. I think by definition, for something to be glorified, then it has to start out in a not-so-glorified (physical) state. If we are to rise with Him on the last day, then the raw material to be glorified is already there awaiting the Masters hand. When Jesus raised the young girl, He instructed her parents to give her something to eat. Jesus Himself, post resurrection, ate with the Apostles on the beach in the last chapter of John’s gospel. I think that to eat, you certainly would need a physical body. I often wondered about Lazarus and the little girl, and what happened to them for the rest of their time on earth. Hebrews 9:27 says that it is appointed for man to die only once. Did they die twice? Or were they eventually taken up into heaven body and soul? I guess I’ll ask them when I see them! (I hope)
          Anyway, if we are to only die once, then the only thing that makes any sense to me at all, is that after the resurrection of the daed, it is our physical bodies which are glorified and made incorruptible.
          God bless you.

          Liked by 4 people

          • Sean Sullivan says:

            Ed, I think you are onto to something…. here are my thoughts on incorruptibility.
            ******
            Dna. Hymm… where and when do we receive Christ’s DNA? Whom did Jesus receive His dna from? Mother Mary. Whom is always leading us to Jesus? Mother Mary. Whose dna was incorruptible from the beginning? Jesus through Mother Mary through the Creator via The Immaculate Conception (The Holy Spirit) wow, this is going to be a doosy:)

            How do we receive His Dna? Our reception of Him, within the Eucharist. He is present in every Eucharist and therefore is eternal, incorruptible. He states no one is saved unless they receive His Body and Blood. When we die, our mortal bodies disintegrate and go back to the earth. Only through Christ are we brought back to life.

            From the beginning, He was present. He made us in His image. Blew (rather forcefully) His Spirit into us bringing us to life. He is within all of us. So again, how do we receive immortal life with Him. By obeying His commandments and living life in His footsteps. I believe this also is the reason to cling to the baroque of Peter. Who is eligible to enact the consecration? Who is eligible via the laying of hands, passed down from Jesus?

            This reminds me of a Saint asking Jesus how she could thank him for He has done. Jesus answered: “attend one mass”.

            Just my thoughts in the wee hours of the am.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Mick says:

            “Growing old is mandatory. Growing up is optional.” This… is… perfect! It is going to join another one of your statements, which I wrote on a 3×5 and keep someplace where I won’t lose it. That statement, which you made in July of last year, was, “Before you go to bed, give all your troubles to God. He’ll be up all night anyway.”

            Liked by 4 people

          • SteveBC says:

            Very interesting thoughts, Ed. Thank you!

            Liked by 2 people

          • Bonnie C says:

            Sean Sullivan, Thank you. That is where my thoughts go! So awesome!

            Liked by 1 person

    • Laura says:

      I was given this understanding: there is no time in heaven. After being there for 1000 years it will feel as if you just got there, JUST ARRIVED. After 100,000 years, it will feel as if you JUST GOT THERE. And so on. There. Is. No. Time.

      Liked by 2 people

      • SteveBC says:

        Laura, I’m not sure I agree with that, since a sense of where we are depends less on time itself passing and more on how many events have occurred. Since I expect to be very active in heaven, no matter what it looks like, I expect that the passing of experience will provide me with a similar sensation, although clearly it will not be the same sensation.

        You are totally correct that there will be no Time there. Have you considered that that will also mean there will be no Space there? Physics has proven that time and space are intricately connected and irretrievably interwoven one within the other and back again. That’s why our reality is known as the TimeSpace Continuum.

        Without Time, there will be no Space as we know it, yet the New Jerusalem and any other aspect of heaven will still exist and be apparent to us.

        How will that feel? How will that work? I leave that as an exercise for the reader! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Becky-TN says:

    Wow, Charlie! You really make me think…really think – thank you!

    Liked by 3 people

  12. Charlie:

    These are excellent thoughts, and for once sort of bite sized. The noble souls one particularly hit home for me, which is in no way meant to diminish the import of the others.

    My dear wife and I have faced one of these noble moments as your situation from last year with your friend. My wife and I have prayed fervently for several years for one of our adult daughters in particular, who was in a difficult personal situation. It came to a head this past Summer, and we viewed it as an answer to prayer, but were shocked at how what we had seen as the problem turned out to be the tip of a very large iceberg.

    Going on their limited experience and knowledge of their own niece, sister and friend many folks distanced themselves from our daughter, and in doing so caused her far more heartache than most folks could handle. They were critical of the steps my wife especially, and I were taking to aid her.

    But, my darling wife has the noble gene in her personal DNA, and together we have worked to lift our daughter up both in prayer and in life, and to do our best to make her load bearable while she heals. Mothers are the heart of a family and it is so in ours. My role has been mostly that of a spear carrier for my love, and an encourager for our daughter. Our daughter is making great strides. Though just out of the woods, she can see the sun for the first time in almost a decade, and I attribute it largely to the nobility and heroism of her mother, and above all, the grace of a loving God, who inspired this nobility.

    On a lighter note, the recent comments about squirrels, and my own thoughts came full circle for me yesterday. I got to remembering a song that Ray Stevens sang many years ago, about a squirrel in Pascagoula Mississippi who brought about a revival, just by being a squirrel. The link below is to the YouTube video of the song.

    God Bless You

    Michael Brandon

    Liked by 8 people

  13. victura98 says:

    Steve, one tenet of our faith that has received nearly universal opposition and incomprehension, down through the centuries, is our belief in the resurrection of the body. We believe that death (whose very definition is the separation of soul from body) is a consequence of sin. The disembodied soul, therefore, is not the final state of a human person. The human person is unique in God’s creation as an “incarnate spirit”…not created to be a spirit trapped in a body, but a true unity of body and soul. The disembodied souls we become at the hour of death is therefore an unnatural state, and a temporary one.
    Our pattern for understanding the resurrection of the body is to look at Christ himself in the days between Easter and the Ascension. That’s the pattern we will follow. As resurrected bodies, we will be our true selves…either male or female…and perfected as God always intended. The first “resurrected” female of course was the Blessed Mother, and this is central to the doctrine of the Assumption…she was taken to heaven both body and soul, as a unity.
    Perhaps DNA could be described as the physical manifestation of a spiritual reality, namely, our uniqueness according to an intricate plan.
    This resurrected body will participate in the Beatific Vision, and the very last thing we will ever do is be bored. 🙂
    I hope this helps, somewhat.

    Liked by 14 people

  14. Centurion_Cornelius says:

    Very profound and sublime, Charlie. Shows your creativity and inquiry. Faith AND reason.You must have some “engineering” and/or genius in your background somewhere. Most of us can’t get past the pretty imagery of the double-helix.

    But, you have!

    Thanks.

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Ha Centurion! Ten years ago I was very flattered when a prominent microbiologist I had asked to vet a paper I had prepared for some Congressional clients asked me after she was finished where I taught. When I told her I had no background in microbiology she thought I was having her on. I insisted I am just a very thorough researcher. She finally believed me, I think, but told me I ought to consider it.

      Liked by 4 people

  15. Donette says:

    Would the word “transmutation” come into play when we connect the question of Steve and the mysterious decision of Charlie to discuss DNA in this latest post? Charlie has often said that we do not get heaven until we get into heaven. But if the storm brings what looks to be the end and is not then we must be getting a new heaven and a new earth however that is to come about. Maybe, Steve, it takes a new kind of man to live in an era of a new heaven and a new earth; one whose DNA is no longer affected or is it effected (never did get those two words together with their proper meaning) by the vagaries of this fallen world we now live in. Man must become like our resurrected Lord.

    I don’t know. With Charlie, one can find themselves in the cloud of unknowing but still try to fly.

    Liked by 3 people

  16. deereverywhere says:

    Wow, we get a yacht? My husband thinks we get back everything we lost, while that maybe philosophical, I think he is just talking about keys and his one good pocket knife that he can’t find. I believe Charlie is referring to individually. No two alike though I don’t know about twins. Regarding space boating, heaven is ever changing, ever renewing. Tolkien wrote a short story about a farmer who really enjoyed farming but then another place caught his eye and he moved on. Then there is the fifth glorious decade of the rosary. Everyday, new people get to heaven. Everyday they must have a new party, banquet, feast where the Queen of Heaven is crowned. She gets to wear different outfits and so do the attendees. New music is sung. New food delighted over, New relatives to meet. You see the only people who are in heaven are the adopted son’s and daughters of the Father. We are related. There is work in heaven but it doesn’t feel like work. It feels like pleasure and the delight f everyone who looks out of the Windows that I just cleaned and see no streaks. That’s when I know I will be in heaven. I will like cleaning Windows and they will not streak. More importantly, my grandmother will be able to teach me to knit. My mother hated knitting and made me promise never to learn, in this life a t least. Eye has not seen, ear has not heard.

    Liked by 6 people

  17. Guest says:

    Charlie, why do you often write ‘the satan’?

    Liked by 1 person

  18. JeffB says:

    I came from a family with 8 kids and have 5 kids myself. People accuse me of being incredibly selfish and asky why I would have so many children. I tell them that I am incredibly uncomfortable telling Jesus “no thanks” when he offers us a gift and the chance to participate in His work of creation. I point out that love always creates, while evil always destroys or remains indifferent. I’m sure I have lost friends, but feel that this is the most important witness for married people in our time. God be praised for the gift of children and the opportunity to build up His kingdom!

    Liked by 15 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Good for you, Jeff. Strange anyone would accuse you of being selfish – to raise a large family is incredibly generous.

      Liked by 6 people

    • Monica Joseph of the Blessed Sacrament, OCDS says:

      I echo what Charlie said to you, JeffB. I think having a large family is VERY generous. Your critics are probably too influenced by discredited Malthusian ideas of “taking up too many of Mother Earth’s — Gaia– resources.” Ridiculous.

      I always hoped to have a few more than the three children I did. I remember the poignant comment of a relative of my husband at the baby shower when I was pregnant with our oldest child. She said if she could do it all over, she would have had more than 2 children. I hoped to take her advice to heart, but the 80s were a confusing time, and health problems eventually stopped us a three, much to my sorrow.

      So, God bless you and your lovely “large” family, and hold your head up here! I think there will be more who envy your generosity that you would think.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Snowflakesdancing says:

      JeffB, God bless you and your wife! What a perfect response. My daughter gets persecuted and accused of the most bizarre things because she has six kids and wants at least 3 more (her husband just chuckles.) She calls me so upset sometimes by what she is being accused of doing to the planet etc, but by the time we hang up she is determined to reach a baseball team sized family 🙂 Nothing beats a huge family- nothing! (well, maybe Heaven but that’s it!)

      Liked by 5 people

      • canada1nw says:

        While we were having our nine children over 22 years, we heard it all! I had so-o many answers to the questions thrown at us about having so many. My favourite answer to the professed Christians was that ‘I had a hard time saying no to my God or to my handsome husband.’ Some agreed that it was a biblically based reason to have children.

        I agree with what Charlie said: “You also learn that just because you argue a lot doesn’t mean your brother doesn’t have your back.” I remember when one of our younger sons’ friend came to our home. He looked at all the big brothers, we had seven sons, from 6 feet to 6 ‘5, and said he wouldn’t want to mess with our youngest son because he would have all those brothers to contend with. I never thought of that brotherly protection, but that young man did….and it would have been true. I’d do it all over again, because when all is said and done we will all be fine…in Heaven…Jesus I trust in You!

        Liked by 7 people

    • Joe says:

      I work for a company that deals with senior care, i only have 4, but have siblings who have 9, 8 and 4. Most people ask if I’m going to have that many and my usual response is “i don’t know, it’s not really up to me.”
      I usually get the facial expression of “oh, you’re one of THOSE people”, but then i explain to them that my wife and I aren’t naive and really, biology isn’t all that hard to figure out. Additionally, i tell them of my grandma who has 7 kids and VERY bad dimensia/alzheimers. Each child visits grandma 1 day a week, so it isnt a huge strain on the family to take care of/visit her. I tell them that if we do have more, it will be less stressful for them monetarily and physically once my wife and I have lost it in our 80’s (current stats show that at the age of 85, 1 in 2 have dimensia/alzheimers). The conversations almost always end with them understanding benefits of a large family and really appreciating a new perspective on that issue.
      Charlie, thank you for bringing this up!

      Liked by 3 people

    • Mick says:

      Good for you, Jeff! Thanks for being willing to say “yes” to the gift. Fortunately, I’ve never had anybody call me selfish for having a large family. Good thing, because I have a bit of a temper; and I’d probably end up having to go to Confession for my word choice during my answer.

      Liked by 6 people

      • guest says:

        I am in the same boat as Mick. I do have people show shock at my 6 kids. But I have NEVER, NEVER had anyone say anything negative to me about it. They are mostly curious or just happy to see children. I get the sense that most people are now starting to feel a tug on their hearts. I do my best to tell them that, yes, they are not imagining the hard work, but that I am so very joyful for each one of them.

        Liked by 5 people

  19. Julia says:

    I for one don’t think about how God will complete the work He has started in my ‘being’ even if at the moment it seems to be aging with the inevitable outcome of death for the physical part of me.

    You know, some years ago I was talking to a very seriously injured person who was very scared of dying. He was a strong man, full of courage and initiative and very intelligent. When he told me he was scared of dying. I asked him if he was scared of being born. And of course he wasn’t. I told him that is how death works. You are not going to be aware of it in a real sense when the time comes. It is a natural process in the final analysis. Of course there are illnesses and injuries that seem to put the prospect of death straight in front of us for consideration. And the pain and discomfort can be a fearful thing to endure without much medical assistance at times. With the thought that the pain must get more intense as the end comes. And this is not so in most cases. A peace and a calm seems to descend eventually, and a tiredness that seems to need that final sleep brings most lives to an end naturally.

    So you see I feel the resurrection process is already organised and ready in God’s plan. The DNA idea put forward by Charlie is an interesting thought; but I wonder if a furnace leaves any trace of DNA for those who are cremated.

    Jesus and Blessed Mother are in Heaven with their earthly bodies glorified. I think this is amazing. That is what made me realise we are still in a development stage here on earth. Jesus is truly the first born. He is the first to complete the process from conception to tomb to Resurrection, and finally ascending to Heaven. We all hope to follow Him one day. And we will go to our Heavenly Father who organised an Angelic team to carry the body of Jesus mother straight home where her soul and body were reunited and her glorification process was instant. What a wonderful God and Heavenly Father we have.

    Liked by 2 people

    • charliej373 says:

      I think you misunderstood one point, Julia. The DNA is not the pattern, but merely a physical expression that reveals the existence of the pattern. The pattern is created – and held – by God, Himself. I know you don’t think that God needs a physical remnant of the pattern He created to call it forth anew, glorified and perfected with imperishable materials.

      Liked by 9 people

      • Patrick of South Dakota says:

        Thanks for the hint. Wasn’t sure where you wanted us to go with that contemplation.

        What we’ve always known as our bodies is only a shadow of what our bodies really are in God’s eye. Our DNA, which is limited by physical rules and can be manipulated by Satan, is just a glimpse of God’s true design of us. Like Plato’s allegory of the caveman perceiving his world as shadows on the wall, I’ll need to think on this more.

        One thing I can say: We are infinitely unique. The probability that our DNA is configured exactly so it results in each of us, is: 1 divided by a number greater than all atoms in the Universe. We are, by our own standards…IMPOSSIBLE. (We’d have won this billion-dollar lottery trillions of times before our DNA would result in “us.”). We are special and precious. We can say: no other person can fill my DNA but me.

        And even more incredible is that we exist at this same, historic point in TIME. Wow.

        Then follows that unanswerable questions for hours of contemplation: HOW? WHY? Does CHANCE really exist?

        Liked by 3 people

  20. Phillip Frank says:

    I’ve always thought that the universe is so vast because, like Adam and Eve, we are created to eventually live forever and an immortal being needs a infinite playground. But if we are to fly around ” like sparks” I don’t see a need for space ships steve!

    As far as trying to be a noble soul, I was once asked to cut ties with a particularly close friend who was put in jail for attempted first degree murder. My spiritual director, who was in prison ministry, told me after all I had done for him that I was to hand him over with trust to God and cut ties with him completely. My friend who was an alcoholic athiest, had been a close friend for decades. I had been ministering to him through these years, to no avail and his downward spiral finally landed him in jail for 11 years. It was very hard to ” abandon” my friend to such a wretched fate, but I obeyed my spiritual director and cut all ties with him. For years, I begged Our Lord in front of the tabernacle to keep him safe and mentioned his name during the elevation of the host during mass not knowing anything about how he wa doing or if he were even still alive. 11+ years passed, then one day I got a phone call from him free and a christian! After 11 years, which they call the short forever in prison, he had returned a new man!
    He made one brief comment to me about my not keeping in contact with him and said he didn’t blame me because he was a jerk, etc, etc. He has not mentioned it since. Now, 6 years later, I still have not told him he was wrong about why I stopped contact with him and that despite it being like a knife in my heart, I had actually stopped my contact with him out of obediance and to surrender all my trust coscerning him to God.

    Liked by 8 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Now that is serious stuff, Phillip. God bless you – and your friend. Your obedience probably played a role in calling down grace for him.

      Liked by 5 people

    • canada1nw says:

      Just saying’: If I were that prison friend I would like to know that you prayed for me all those years and out of obedience you surrendered him to God. It is the truth and the Truth can set people free 🙂 and make them closer to God and renew their trust in humans.

      Liked by 2 people

  21. Robert Cunningham says:

    Steve

    Maybe YD can speak to how we relate to Jesus Christ and in him and through him to God:

    Metanoia, Kenosis, Dispassion, Adoption, Indwelling, Essence, Divinization, Immutability, Impassibility, Immortality, Theandric Love, Covenant, Unity

    I await with joy. St Irenaeus, pray for us.

    Robert

    Like

    • YongDuk says:

      Ha! The audience would stop reading after the first sentence or two, I am afraid. 🙂

      As for DNA, maybe someone else stated this here and I have stated it elsewhere with regards to Mary and Jesus and their Spiritual Motherhood and Fatherhood, respectively.

      DNA and the haploid shows forth the Dignity and Integrity of Man formed equally by both a mother and father. It then shows forth the dignity and integrity and the cooperation of both in the Father’s Divine Plan.

      St. Irenaeus indeed: Recapitulation!

      Liked by 4 people

    • YongDuk says:

      Oh, Robert, that really is the answer or start to your questions, meaning recapitulation in St. Irenaeus, but I suspect you knew that throwing him out there as you did.

      Like

      • Robert Cunningham says:

        YD

        Thank you for your response. You say in one word what I was dancing around – Recapitulation. I have read some of St. Ireneaus, but mainly just what is quoted in the Catechism. I did not know what the word recapitulation meant from a theological perspective and so had to look it up.

        “He has therefore, in His work of recapitulation, summed up all things, both waging war against our enemy, and crushing him who had at the beginning led us away captives in Adam” (St. Irenaeus)

        Jesus is the new Adam, as the Apostle teaches in Romans, who atones for and undoes the effects of the sin and death. I was chewing on that this morning while contemplating the gospel for today about the Wedding Feast of Cana.

        There were six earthen vessels, man was created on the 6th day from the clay of the earth. The vessels were filled with water used for ceremonial washing so the water could not have been very clean. Our Lord does not discard the old water, rather he directs that the jars be filled up (super abundance) and transforms the water into wine. The waters of Baptism cleanse us from original sin but the wine of the Eucharist now makes us “partakers of the divine nature” (II Peter 1:4).

        Our Lady is the Woman with the redeemer who cooperates with God in this restoration. As the Catechism quotes St. Irenaeus:

        “Being obedient she became the cause of salvation for herself and for the whole human race.” Hence not a few of the early Fathers gladly assert. . .: “The knot of Eve’s disobedience was untied by Mary’s obedience: what the virgin Eve bound through her disbelief, Mary loosened by her faith.” Comparing her with Eve, they call Mary “the Mother of the living” and frequently claim: “Death through Eve, life through Mary.”

        Funny how one word can open up a meditation . . . .

        Robert

        Liked by 2 people

        • YongDuk says:

          Funny, how one glance opens up a conversion!

          Blessings to you, Robert, I was exhausted last night and didn’t have the strength to write and “recapitulation” just jumped out of these fingers.

          And I wrote to Mick above or below or somewhere:

          Why wouldn’t an individual, yet alone God, not celebrate this body?

          God bless God and everyone one of us, prayers for everybody on the prayer pages!
          +YD

          Liked by 2 people

  22. Monica Joseph of the Blessed Sacrament, OCDS says:

    SteveBC,
    A great, honest question. I know there will be more intelligent people than me answering, but isn’t the basic answer to the question is that we are human beings, not pure spirits, and therefore require a body and soul to be truly human. A disembodied soul as a permanent state is not perfectly human.

    But wait! There’s more! (Just like on the infomercials 😉 ) We don’t just stay in this universe, jetting around to all the achingly beautiful galaxies; we are admitted to the beatific vision, which should be anything but boring. That is a great deceit of the satan — that “billion of years wandering around…(lead to) ‘Meh.’ ” St. Paul tells us it hasn’t even entered our minds what heaven will be like, but I like to ponder that, looking at some of what God has created for us to enjoy even in this fallen world, seeing Him should not be “boring.”

    But I understand where you are coming from; it is such an easy mindset to fall into — the “Meh.” I have to fight it, myself.

    Liked by 5 people

    • SteveBC says:

      Monica Joseph, I love your infomercial! 😀

      Seriously, this is a question that I’ve often wondered about, not because I actually think all I’d do is wander this universe until I got so bored I would beg for death. That was more of a rhetorical device than what I truly believe. No, I expect that life after death will be absolutely fascinating in ways I can’t imagine.

      I believe that our spirit or soul comes into this “reality” with a pattern that manifests in our bodies. How could it be otherwise when we are made in God’s image? Further, as I’ve gotten to know more about how bodies work, I am continually awed. I’d love to have now a physical body that actually works perfectly. Mine is somewhat distanced from that, I’m afraid!

      However, I’ve never felt that a glorified physical body is needed after I have shuffled off this mortal coil. To me it seems that this idea is more a case of wanting things to be as they were than that there is any particular necessity to it. Yet I am sympathetic to your statement that “we are human beings, not pure spirits, and therefore require a body and soul to be truly human. A disembodied soul as a permanent state is not perfectly human.” This has some real truth in it.

      I now have people I consider credible on these matters (including you) saying that it *is* important. For that reason, I’m adding it to the list of such questions I carry around with me, and I will see what comes to me over time to help me answer it. It always amazes me how holding a question in my mind will attract useful information.

      Thank you for your comment. It’s given me more to think about. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

      • Monica Joseph of the Blessed Sacrament, OCDS says:

        Thanks, SteveBC.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Tom Harrington says:

        What wonderful contemplative depth our dear brother Charlie has opened to us. On the matter of body and spirit I have a theory developed over many years of thought that might help. Much of this theory comes from observations of babies whose minds have not yet suppressed their spirits, thus the human spirit is (a little bit) observable in them. I could explain more but not here. Tom’s theory, in very abbreviated form:

        Our bodies are not mere containers for our spirits, but are very integral to who we are. The human brain maintains our conscious adult thought. Our spirit thought works differently. For most of us, while alive, our conscious thought heavily dominates over the spirit (not the balance in our original design). For some, the spirit is totally subdued (some people do not believe in Jesus, every human spirit knows Him. Babies know Jesus!!). At death, we immediately lose the power of that brain-conciousness, so our spirits totally dominate (still out of balance), we will not be able to think in the same way as we do now. We will know that we are incomplete and our intellect is missing a very important part of ourselves until the brain-conciousness is restored in the resurrection.

        I hope I explained this well, and hope it inspires even greater depth.

        God bless our understanding!

        Liked by 3 people

        • SteveBC says:

          Tom, this is quite intriguing. Thank you for the ideas. I had never considered before that in my spirit after death I would not be able to think as I do now and that that was a bed thing. I’ve always considered it either neutral or fine. I find it hard to believe our spirits will be out of balance, but if your comments here are a correct picture, they would be. I will add this “out-of-balance” idea to my pondering.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Tom from Georgia says:

            Thank you, and you’re welcome, Steve. My ideas are just a theory borne out of contemplation, you might even call them fictional but holding within them some (hopefully) truth. I am quite convinced that all babies experience Jesus before birth, and have observed signs that show this to be so. Our Lord may even ask a specially chosen baby’s spirit-intellect if he or she is willing to participate in some great work – such as a disability or handicap or other great challenge in life. Anyone agree? I would further propose that the spirit-intellect is not inferior but likely superior to the physical intellect. I didn’t propose that we are unintelligent in death, just lacking the physical-intellect’s perspective – the one that depends upon the senses of the body. We will desire to have that back one happy day when we have arrived in Heaven but are yet awaiting our bodies. When we get our bodies back, we will be able to take in the fullness of Heaven as we were designed to do.

            I find my mind wanting to wander into some very deep water when I start contemplating this.

            Liked by 3 people

      • zeniazenia says:

        If we get to heaven it will be because of our bodies, so they will be rewarded.. We are not like angels. We need to battle our body to make it do loving and unselfish moves. –ZJ

        Liked by 2 people

  23. anne ovari says:

    Charlie, thank you for your thoughts. As a Mum of a large family (10 and one in heaven) I agree with you about tolerance being nurtured in the bigger families. There has been many an argument and disagreement in our house but at the end of the day the love that we have is what binds us together and there is nothing that can take that away from us. Large families are the nurturing grounds of all that is good, even when things get ‘stormy’. God bless

    Liked by 5 people

  24. LukeMichael says:

    This is a tremendous topic Charlie: how human physical being relates to God in the divine pattern.
    The glorified body is not just a perfect physical body but is also a perfect spiritual body. It is recognizable or not according to God’s purpose (the gardener and on the Emmaus road).
    It goes through walls and doors, it eats and drinks with ordinary men, it becomes bread and word and life for the sinner. It is arm and leg and hands and eyes and word and deed for Christ. Jesus is the head and we are its members. In it we will not suffer nor feel the wounds of our sins or those who sin against us. There is mother and father and children according to the nature of the Holy Trinity.

    God gave us a body that we may incarnate love for him, both physical and spiritual.

    Mary is the Mother of Jesus. His body came from her. His body which is glorified came from her. Therefore as members of his glorified body she is our Mother as well. It is a new creation, a new Adam and a new Eve. Please give me a glorified body in Christ!

    Also, squirrels play error free in the glorified body of God become man! Just saying.

    Liked by 5 people

  25. Phil says:

    I am a big fan of your blog and believe in your message. However, I find your point regarding the loss of large families a bit sharp. As an only child myself, I had a troubling upbringing at times, but, I would not trade my experiences for anything. Don’t get me wrong, I am very pro-life and pro-family but I think the unique experiences that each of us have are all very beautiful and involve diversity that has the potential to strengthen our earthly pilgrimages.

    Liked by 7 people

    • charliej373 says:

      My apologies, Phil. I try to be careful not to denigrate anyone in advocating something positive. I, myself, only had two kids, though I was the oldest of six children. My real issue is that big families are so denigrated and treated badly today. I like to encourage them. Everybody’s situation is unique – and I would not have a problem if the parents of large families were treated with respect instead of with contempt.

      Liked by 6 people

    • A Quiet Person says:

      Phil, I am glad you made this comment and want to elaborate on what you said about the beauty and value of our unique experiences. I too was quite taken aback by Charlie’s point about large families versus having an only child. I am glad too that Charlie qualified his thoughts by saying it was the lack of respect for large families that was behind his writing. However, I wish he had said it was the strength of a family, not necessarily the size that is vital to everything. Infertility is a huge, painful cross to bear. Even secondary infertility (having one child but unable to conceive another) is a very, very heavy load and one that few even acknowledge.

      I would love to have had a large family. Both of my kids would like to have had more siblings too but that was not the Lord’s plan for us. Every family has a unique mission and I think most of us will not know the entire agenda the Lord set out for us, as families, until we get to Heaven. My 15-year old daughter and I though have a bit of a glimpse into our situation.

      I adopted her as an infant. (Charlie let me share my pre-adoption story on this site under the title of “Adopting Hope” several months ago.) The actual adoption was profound. In the country of her birth, the adoption process is called the “Giving and Receiving Ceremony.” Normally it involves the adoptive parents and government officials, social workers, and interpreters. In my case, my daughter’s birth mother was there. This is unusual. And she literally, GAVE me her daughter. Oh, Lord, the tears! We passed her back and forth several times, for one last hug, one last kiss. My life changed at that moment. She wanted to make sure (through the interpreter) that I would raise her as my own daughter. I knew once again that this was not going to be an ordinary adoption and this was going to be a special child. And with this precious gift is the constant prayer, “Lord, let me not mess this up.”

      And she is special. Her first words were “thank you.” No kidding. And this was in response to me changing a poopy diaper. It was very telling as to the person she would grow into. I have often wondered how come I got so lucky at the expense of her birth mother. One reason why my daughter is so together is that she was loved intensely by her birth mother from the very beginning and it never stopped. And, the reality is that if somehow I would have been able to give to her birth mother the money it cost for the adoption she would not have had to give her child up. But that is not the way the world is set up and that is not the plan the Lord has for us.

      So, I brought this unbelievable gift home into a situation that because very messed up, very quickly. But, we are a family and the Lord has a mission for us and for some reason He wants her here. I don’t know the future for any of us but I do know that for a few years now she has felt like her mission is to pray and to offer up her sufferings for the sake of her father’s soul. It might not sound like much but, to be succinct, it is a formidable undertaking. I pray for him too but in a non-emotional, disinterested way. She figures (and correctly so I think) that she is the only one sincerely praying for him who also loves him personally, and this in spite of everything.

      It is funny because just today she asked me if I ever thought about the baby I miscarried and I said, no, not often. The reality is that if I had given birth to the one I miscarried, then I most certainly would not have adopted her and I would not have had it any other way. She said that she likes to think that she (we figure it was a girl) is looking down on us from Heaven, happy that the mission of her very short little life was completed insofar as it made room for her.

      All families need to be treated with respect – big, little, in between. With my own story, I just wanted to validate for anyone else out there with a small, unconventional, or otherwise unexpected family situation that though we are small, maybe even hidden, we can be just as strong as a big family. The Lord has a plan for us too, even if it is not the one we would have chosen for ourselves.. And I also wanted to acknowledge how brutally painful infertility is, especially when surrounded by the expectation that in order to be pleasing in the sight of God and the Church you should have a large family and if not, then something is wrong.

      Liked by 7 people

      • jlynnbyrd says:

        Quiet, I love your adoption/love story!

        Liked by 2 people

      • Snowflakesdancing says:

        Quiet, I don’t believe that what Charlie was saying has anything to do with a person in your situation. He is simply encouraging people who do have large families because today they are so persecuted. You are not one who needs to worry at all about this because you did not say NO to God, you remained open and that you bear this cross of infertility is in no way your fault. You were so open to God and love, you adopted a child and this is beautiful.
        So many people today say no to God’s will and refuse children…or limit God. So many today seek their own will by seeking importance in a worldly sense and don’t find fulfillment in God’s will. I think this is the crux of it.

        Liked by 5 people

  26. I could be off base here totally so…..if I am Charlie….just dont post this. Ill understand completely.
    I experienced a situation this last September when our daughter was married outside the church.
    My daughter and son came into the faith at the age of 22 and 15.
    They didnt have strong roots in the faith and soon after they began to not practice the faith at all. My husband too is the same way. He grew up catholic so to speak and was not taught to practice his faith by his parents.
    I am the only one in my family who attends Mass regularly etc etc.
    Our daughter married a non catholic and they were married in Las Vegas in a hotel Chapel.
    One day when I was speaking with my priest about some things, the subject of my daughters wedding popped up and he told me I COULD NOT ATTEND. He told me that since she was a baptized and confirmed Catholic….no Catholic could attend her wedding if it was not in the church. I about fell over and had a heart attack. I didnt know that. I knew that a catholic needed to be married in the church but I didnt know that if they werent ….I couldnt go. I was really sad.
    my priest gave me bible scripture and quoted canon law. He was wanting me to hurt my daughter and create a huge division in my family. I even told him that if I did as he was saying…..everyone in my family would hate me and the worst….would be that my daughter would be hurt to pieces.
    WOW! I had some soul searching to do. I soon entered a very brief depression. Soon after I called my spiritual father….who is a bishop and he told me to GO TO MY DAUGHTERS WEDDING! He then told me of how merciful God was and that the love I have for my daughter and wanting to celebrate one the most important days of her life was the Catholic and Christian thing to do. After I spoke with him. I prayed very hard to Jesus to help me understand things. I then opened scripture to Jesus speaking….I DESIRE MERCY NOT SACRIFICE.
    I cried a bucket and then took a deep breath and realized it to be true. Jesus IS MERCY itself and I was not wrong in going to the wedding. I later confessed to a priest that I would be going even though I was told I couldnt. He gave me absolution and understood .
    I told the priest that if I was to NOT attend it would cause a divide in my family and alienate me from my daughter and that I was the only one in the family who could be a living example of what is to be a practicing Catholic and to show the light of Jesus living inside of me. I wanted to be in my daughters life and to show her how wonderful it is to Love Jesus and serve him.
    The wedding was beautiful! The man who married our daughter incorporated prayer and scripture reading into the ceremony and it was so beautiful! It was one of the happiest days of my life. God was merciful and HE blessed us all that day with a new son…..our daughters husband.
    I was going against the grain according to church teaching and canon law.
    I was given a bit of gruff over it. But my motherly DNA ….if there is such a thing….told me otherwise and I stuck to what my heart was telling me and what I felt Jesus was telling me too.
    Was that nobel of me? I dont know. Maybe not. But Jesus lives in my heart and my heart could not hurt my daughter on her very special day. SOmeday…..Jesus will tell me. Until then….I will continue to be a light of love to my family and to make them jealous of the Joy that is Jesus living in me….until they want HIM too.

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Oh dear, Charlanne. I have to confess I agree with the Bishop.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Hopenjoy says:

        Charlanne, another Catholic mom here who went through a similar experience with my son’s wedding in 2014. His fiancé and her family are extremely intelligent, successful, liberal, progressive, and have what I discerned as a “false spirituality of family”…you know, the beautifully framed family photos in the home, everything centers around the immediate family and their activities and exotic vacations, on the outside looking in they are amazing and beautiful but the Lord is nowhere to be found in their lives. So of course, after several years of cohabitating, a secular “destination” wedding at a resort was planned, with a lesbian officiant (friend of the family) and all types of wonderful, fun activities throughout the weekend, and an inclusive, liberal ceremony designed.

        Prior to the wedding, I had asked the Lord about the wedding, and in my prayer notes I had written: “My child, I know your motherly heart is broken over their rejection of My word, My truths, My friendship. As I have said, your prayers will bear much fruit, but you will need to presevere as you have been. Be kind, be strong, be gentle. I know the wedding will be hard for you, I see your tears and broken heart on behalf of your son and his future wife, and their marriage starting out on a rocky path without Me. Let My mother comfort you as she cries always for her own lost children in the world.” So I understood that although Jesus wasn’t invited to my son’s wedding, Mama Mary was going with me and would be at my side.

        The wedding weekend was spiritually challenging, as I dealt with many small humiliations and insults, being set aside, seeing my son under so much stress and lashing out at me or his father. It was so obviously noticable that my sisters-in-law and some friends organized a little party just for me, while the bride, her mom and the bridesmaids had a “getting ready” session prior to the ceremony. During the ceremony itself, my son and daughter-in-law rolled their eyes with an “I told you she’d do that” look, when my little piece of Scripture was read. My husband was furious with me when I attended Mass Sunday morning, missing the family brunch.

        A few days after the wedding, I was reading about manifesting Jesus, about being a sign of hope, to die to self and the world, to put the Kingdom first…and a series of visions came to me. The Lord showed me scenes from the wedding weekend…my husband mad that I was going to Mass, then Jesus clearly said “See, you put Me first”…me during my morning prayer time and saying grace before each meal, Jesus said “See, you put Me first”…me staying out of the way of the bride, her mother and all those women, accepting their humiliations and rejections and Jesus said “See, you put Me first”…and the awkwardness of the ceremony and my Scripture being read, and Jesus is right there watching me and He said “See, you put Me first.”

        And He was so proud of me, so pleased with me, even as I stood on the sidelines and stayed out of the way, even as I was invisible and ignored by the other women in the wedding party, He was pleased that I asked for His and His mom’s help to make it through the weekend, to accept the humiliations and offer it up for God, to NOT take offense…and to realize, someday, my son and daughter-in-law will fall to their knees in gratitude that they has a Catholic praying mom.

        Liked by 12 people

        • MarieUrsula says:

          God is good, Hopenjoy. ❤

          Your experience reminds me of something one of my previous bishops said, when asked in an interview about Catholics publicly doing or saying this or that contrary to Church teaching. The good bishop's response: "The Church will wait them out."

          Liked by 7 people

        • Snowflakesdancing says:

          Hopenjoy, how truly beautiful this is.

          Liked by 3 people

        • Thank you for sharing this. Hope. It was very touching.
          I appreciate that very much.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Meriadoc says:

          An agonizing, albeit beautiful story. Taking up the the cross and following Him is not an easy business. God bless you, hopenjoy.

          Liked by 3 people

        • Meriadoc says:

          That’s a beautiful, albeit painful, tale Hopenjoy. This business of taking up the cross and following Him is not easy! Thanks for your testimony.

          Liked by 2 people

        • janet333 says:

          You did good Hopenjoy! 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

        • Whitney says:

          Hope joy, what a suffering for you in the midst of all that joy. God’s plan is so great for what’s to come I know your faith and trust in God will be so beneficial to the entire family. Don’t lose hope- I married a man with a similar family and 13 years later his dying father was praying the rosary the hour before his death and my sister in law has walked a long spiritual pass and is ever closer to our Lady. I still pray for my mother in law. Rest assured your prayers will save your family and extended family. I was told by my parish priest and spiritual director as well of this. God bless, you’re a wonderful mom and mother in law.

          Liked by 5 people

        • Petra says:

          Hopenjoy: It’s in the events of our daily lives where we are tested in our belief in Christ. Your experience demonstrates this so clearly. What a challenge to refuse to deny Christ in the face of rejection, scorn, and humiliation at what should have been one of the happiest events of your life, the marriage of your son. How many people cannot bear the thought of this, and reject Christ rather than be rejected by society? This is where the rubber meets the road. I’m so happy you had the courage and fortitude to meet the challenge and act with Christian kindness and docility in the face of public humiliation.

          Jesus said, “Therefore everyone who confesses Me before men, I will also confess him before My Father who is in heaven. But whoever denies Me before men, I will also deny him before My Father who is in heaven…He who loves father or mother more than Me is not worthy of Me; and he who loves son or daughter more than Me is not worthy of Me.” Matt. 10:32-33, 37-39

          God bless you. God bless you a million times!

          Liked by 6 people

        • lauralee77 says:

          Dear Hopenjoy, wow, you have me completely moved to tears!! What a blessed woman and obedient servant of God you really are. Just reading your words about all that you endured for the sake of Christ, and how you offered up every struggle and humiliation to our Almighty God, (when you could have easily given in to feelings of hurt, rejection, self-pity, etc.) makes me realize how far I have yet to go on my own journey and relationship with God.
          I am also both inspired and, admittedly, somewhat jealous, that Jesus speaks to you so clearly in your prayer journal! I have tried numerous times to start my own prayer journal, but I end up getting too discouraged, and more depressed, when all my writing becomes is just a jumbled mass of worried thoughts and concerns. With no seeming end or answer. I know God doesn’t “speak” to everyone in the same way, but I sure wish He would make His voice VERY clear to me. I pray often for that, for Mother Mary’s help and intercession, and praying through Novena’s.. But, too often I get mixed-up with my own thoughts/words and/or what could possibly be His. Does that make sense? It’s like owning a GPS for your vehicle, but not knowing how to turn it on! 😉
          Anyway, now that I’m done bauling my eyes out 🙂 I just wanted you to know what an incredibly beautiful and valuable soul you are to God! I am so thankful for Charlie’s blog, these posts, and especially “happening upon” comments like yours that stir And move the soul. God bless you!

          Liked by 4 people

    • BlessedToLiveNow says:

      Charlanne, a beautiful account to contemplate in this Year of Mercy! Thank you for sharing it!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Josh P. says:

      I could not find any canon law that says a Catholic cannot attend an invalid wedding, and found a few websites stating there is no canon law forbidding it. Can you remember what canon law your priest quoted?

      Liked by 2 people

      • A Catholic MAY NOT attend another Baptized and Confirmed Catholics wedding if it is not in the church and its the first ceremony of the sort.
        That is what I was told.
        My daughter is a baptized and confirmed Catholic but her husband is not.
        We are all catholic. ( my husband and I and our daughter and son)
        I asked my parish priest for a dispensation to attend but he said it would be causing a scandal and he did not give me one or recommend to the bishop for one.
        This was very sad to me because my daughter is not strong in the faith and never really was. Its complicated because both my children were not brought up strongly in the faith since I converted when they were older. My husband does not practice so my children did not see both of us as their parents on the same page in practicing the faith…..so they had no real strong roots. I do not blame my husband for his lack of practicing his faith because he has not yet come to know the love of Jesus yet. He himself is a baptized and confirmed Catholic since he was 9 but his parents never instilled the importance of practicing and living a life dedicated to Jesus. His parents divorced when he a young teenager and it was not easy on him to say the least. But I do know that God has a plan for all of my family. The fact that my children were baptized and confirmed is a miracle in itself. I wont go into that now but trust me…..It was a miracle and an answer to prayer.
        I pray and live my life and witness to them with my love for Jesus. I do not push them nor do I lecture but I feel that in time ….with prayer and sacrifice …they will come to know Jesus in a personal and committed way.
        In the issue of marriages I think there is much that needs to weighed and pondered.
        Its not always a cut and dry case. It can be complicated to say the least especially when dealing with converts and the dynamics of each family.

        Liked by 2 people

        • charliej373 says:

          It would be helpful to cite a specific canon, Charlanne. Sadly, I know of more than a few Priests who know little about canon law – but just say whatever their opinion is is actually canon law. I don’t know for certain on this particular matter, but I routinely want to know the canon when someone, including a Priest, tells me something like that. If he actually does know canon law, it is no problem. If he doesn’t, it helps him to make sure he knows what he’s talking about before just saying whatever he feels. I do not assume something is accurate because it is stated in all caps, but when a proper citation I can check is given. 😉

          Liked by 2 people

          • I found this.
            “Although Canon Law makes no stipulation regarding whether a Catholic may attend an invalid wedding ceremony, moral law most certainly prohibits Catholics (and, sometimes, also non-Catholics) from attending.”

            This makes me mad! I was told by 2 priests that I could not go to my daughters wedding. Priests from my church. I never really looked up whether or not it was true because I didnt think 2 priests from my church were wrong.
            This caused me GREAT GRIEF! I sent me into a depression until I could talk to my spiritual father and director …who is a Bishop and he told me I could go.
            Well……I GUESS THATS WHY HE IS A BISHOP AND THEY ARE NOT.
            My bishop didnt say really that they were wrong…..He just simply told me in a very stern and loving way….GO TO THE WEDDING.

            On a side note:
            I have been seeing a trend in my church that is sad and disturbing. Maybe Ill talk about that ….maybe I wont and just take it to Jesus in prayer.
            But GEEPERS…..i am a bit upset over this. But God is so very good and HE sent me the best spiritual father/director ever and I am thankful.
            Thank You ALL for taking the time to ask about this little problem I had. You ALL are so very kind. Thank You so very much. Thank You Charlie.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Beckita says:

          Charlanne and All, I just checked with the canon lawyer in this house and he affirmed there is nothing in the Roman Catholic Code of Canon Law which says what you were told, Charlanne, no canon whatsoever for this: “A Catholic MAY NOT attend another Baptized and Confirmed Catholics wedding if it is not in the church and its the first ceremony of the sort.” For what it’s worth, this canon lawyer is a priest who received his JUD degree (both civil and canon law), magna cum laude, from the prestigious Pontifical Lateran University in Rome.

          I, too, was faced with this decision when my son married. I clearly remember the weekend he came home to deliver the news. The look of sincere pain and heartache on his face, to tell me what he conveyed, the hesitancy and gentleness in his voice, were as heartbreaking as the news. He knew I would be crushed and that was not his goal. I simply rose from my chair, wrapped my arms around this wonderful human being and said: “I love you. I have always loved you. I always will love you. Life is a journey and I remain by your side.” Ultimately, I knew that my refusal to go to the wedding would created a chasm in our relationship, so wide and so deep and so unnecessary, therefore, I went to the wedding to love. It was emotionally packed from many angles, including being the first trip I had to take without my newly deceased husband. I’m still praying for reversion for my son. God has been so merciful to me. I often wonder whose prayers straightened out all the wrinkles in me and some of my foolish choices.

          Liked by 6 people

  27. Justin says:

    Okay, I can see where you’re going with this. But what about identical twins, who have the same DNA pattern?

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Excellent question, Justin. But since we are a combination of soul and body – and the DNA pattern refers to the body – there is no reason why the two different people who are identical twins on earth won’t be identical twins in their glorified bodies. Yet since they have distinctive, unique souls, they will remain distinct people in eternity. This certainly bears more contemplation.

      Liked by 4 people

      • YongDuk says:

        This is also the answer why cloning is morally wrong:

        God honors the biological laws that He set in place.

        That should serve as our example to honor them as well!

        Liked by 4 people

        • Whitney, i have a family member with Trisomy Eight who also struggles with health issues, learning, etc. I have often thought what courage and love is in a soul, if it is true what I have heard before that a soul says yes to God before being born, to take on certain lifelong disabilities. What graces comes through that soul to those parents that accept him/her. They do teach us so much about love, if we but say yes!

          Liked by 3 people

          • Whitney says:

            Breadoflife55- Amazingly said! I love that and will ponder it for my nephew as well as my own son with ASD and epilepsy! Thank you!!! Such a gift.

            Liked by 2 people

          • LukeMichael says:

            Profound! It will remain in my heart forever!

            Liked by 3 people

          • YongDuk says:

            Whitney, I have heard the same thing. Do you remember where?

            It is very beautiful and shows the intelligence of the soul and the gaps in intelligence of original sins and that God allows for that soul’s joy and glory!

            Liked by 3 people

          • breadoflife55 says:

            YD, I am sorry, got totally
            discombumerated trying to reply to you and Whitney both yest morn and my reply to Whitney came as a reply to you instead.

            I do not know where I have heard of little souls assenting to take on certain disabilities, but as I said to acseibert, it just makes sense on many levels. Could you elaborate on your thoughts about “the gaps in intelligence of original sins”?

            Also, I tried to get this out twice yesterday- will try one more time: “To whom much is given, much is required.” There are many mysteries yet on this earth, in the human body(DNA, for example), and throughout the universe. God has given mankind a great grace in participating in creation. What wonders are still to come for the good of science, mankind, our universe, our own earth if we would but make God sovereign over our minds and hearts, over our own laws instead of forgetting that God has His law built into EVERYTHING. He will NOT let us irreparably alter what He has knit into the very fiber of His creation. We have been tested and found wanting. We must be trustworthy of being good stewards over what He has allowed us to discover before He will allow us to crack open any more mysteries. That should blow our minds. “Eye has not seen, nor ear heard, neither has entered into the heart of man the things which God has prepared for those who love Him”. I have always thought that this scripture was for heaven, but maybe God means this for our temporal world as well. Charlie has gotten me thinking out of the box :]

            Liked by 1 person

          • acseibert says:

            I am deeply moved by the thought that a soul can say yes to God to accept a life long disability. This is something I need to ponder more. I am a Catholic, divorced mother of two boys with autism. My oldest struggles to communicate. He is also diagnosed with moderate mental retardation, and epilepsy. In order to try and medically control the seizures, we had to place him on medication that made him lose his appetite. He has been continuing to lose weight. He is now 16, 6′ and 105 lbs. I wonder sometimes how much one boy can suffer. I find the thought that he said yes to God comforting.

            Liked by 4 people

          • breadoflife55 says:

            acseibert, I believe there are victim souls. Souls who take up a cross in reparation for the gross negligence and insults against Our Lord, the disrespect and dishonor shown to His mother, and to help save souls; perhaps to help save souls in their own lineage.

            John the Baptist was given a special mission before he was born and he leapt in his mother’s womb when he encountered Jesus in Mary’s womb. Mary was given a special mission, of course. It just makes sense to me that our Father in Heaven, who has given us free will, would ask certain little souls if they would participate in a special way in redemption and reparation. And if this is true, then He would also give them special graces for their mission. Is it not true that we each have different gifts from the Holy Spirit for
            our own missions?

            acseibert, I ask St John the Baptist to intercede for you and your boys in your needs. I will pray the Miraculous Prayer of Trust today for you and most esp. for your son to gain weight soon, and to be healed of epilepsy, God willing. I very much admire you,acseibert, I cant imagine your struggles and your pain. I pray you have a good support system closeby and I am very glad you are with us here. You are among friends. Thank You for sharing with us, as there are probably others in a situation like yours who may take comfort in just knowing others share their struggles.

            Liked by 4 people

          • acseibert says:

            Thank you Bread for your prayers for my son and your comforting words.

            Liked by 1 person

    • MarieUrsula says:

      I’m an identical twin, and identical twins run in our family. While my twin and I share many DNA-determined likenesses, I believe through experience that some of our differences come from our distinct souls. It’s not a confusion we struggle with. 🙂 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

  28. Phillip Frank says:

    It takes a village to raise a child.
    This, my friends, is the way it is supposed to be.
    I grew up in a large family by my mom helped raise the kids of the neighborhood who’s mom’s worked and only had one or two kids themselves.
    So there was plenty of brothers and sisters added to our clan during summer and after school and we had a blast!
    Never a dull moment with food and fun, fights and games. The kids in “smaller” families never knew such a thing because the neighborhood WAS their family.
    May it again be so in the near future, my friends.

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      I actually liked that slogan until Hillary Clinton changed it to mean “it takes a government to direct how you raise your child.” If you get rid of that business attached to it, strong neighborhoods made for safe, healthy, happy kids.

      Liked by 6 people

  29. Tom from Georgia says:

    DNA? Eternal? I had always considered DNA as temporal, irrelevant to our ressurected bodies. I will have to reconsider.

    Epiphanies are common to the elect, I suppose. But uncommon to the common (me!). But I might have had one recently. Sometimes in prayer a thought arrives that I know came from without, not from my own mind, a mysterious gift. This is very rare, perhaps every 5 years. Abraham, when pleading with God for Mercy on Sodom was refused. God did not find 10 righteous. This plea was not unheard but applied to our own cities. By the presence of the Church our cities have been spared Sodom’s fate. Abraham performed, as God willed it, a magnificent act of salvation in his plea – he did not fail to obtain Mercy for us (me).

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Well, to reiterate, the DNA is the physical evidence of an eternal pattern, not the eternal pattern, itself. I like your insight on Abraham. That is my confirmation name, so I perk up every time I hear it.

      Liked by 2 people

      • YongDuk says:

        I have been relatively racking my relative brain for months since hearing the Birmingham Video trying to figure out the relationship between “Charlie” and “Abraham”… That now explains it…

        (So, your “Restorer of Nations” wasn’t too far off, Doug.)

        Liked by 2 people

  30. Whitney says:

    I can’t wait to see my nephew in his glorified body someday. It will be the greatest gift as he was born with a chromosome mutation, is now 12, and struggles with health issues, learning and speaking. Praise God for him because he has taught me what love is and
    There has been much struggle for my brother and his wife but God and His love wins!

    Liked by 2 people

  31. El ingeniero de Tepeyac says:

    Hi Charlie,
    Perhaps this may help SteveBC understand in a different way about Heaven and the need for a resurrected perfect body.

    Many of us have been invited to a formal or semi-formal party or celebration. I doubt that any us who went wore our shabby, old clothes. We would have been ashamed to present ourselves so poorly at such a function. Rather we wore tuxes or suits and ties.

    In a similar manner we would not wish to be in the presence of God, where we see Him as He really is, in our shabby, sin-stained bodies. We would want to be in our perfect bodies with our Perfect Lord. There is a parable in the Gospel about this.

    As far as being bored, if one has experienced perfect love even for an instant, then there is no way one could possibly be bored being in the presence of pure, perfect love for all time. To be subsumed in this love, to try to reciprocate it back, to adore the Perfect, Pure Love, to experience the intensity and the ecstasy of the Perfect, Pure Love, a millennium would not be enough time. Even a billion years would only be like a second. Remember God is Love (1Jn:4)

    I have mentioned before about the dream I had. Whether it was true revelation or not, it gave me an idea of what it might be like in Heaven. I am a practical, scientific man. Heaven is different. It is not defined by scientific formulas. You’ll not worry about space yachts when you are in the presence of God.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Bob in Minnesota says:

      Hey, you met the Holy Sprit too, I am going to try to search the site for were you mentioned your experience, to read about it.
      it sounds like your experience was not one of those near death out of body experiences also.
      Thank you for sharing.

      Liked by 2 people

    • SteveBC says:

      No, Ingeniero, you are completely correct. I will not be worrying about needing a space yacht in heaven, and I will not be bored. I will consider your idea that having an incorruptible physical body will add to my presence there, but I would have thought my spirit body would be all I would need. This is something I obviously need to think further about. Thank you!

      Liked by 3 people

      • Steve B C, no one has answered your question about why the body is necessary. I think the real question is why did God find it necessary to create matter at all. After all, the angels are perfectly happy as pure spirits. God Himself, the Trinity ( before the incarnation) is pure spirit. Why a physical world at all? I don’t know but here is more stuff to ponder. I remember asking a priest about the line in the Creed that says “through him all things are made” I asked “Does that mean that there is something about the nature of the second person of the Trinity that makes the existence of matter possible?” His eyes lit up and he said “Yes, exactly! The material creation is an expression of something about God that is particularly related to the second Person, the Logos. In Greek philosophy Logos meant a kind of intellect. Christ, the Logos, is the Divine Intellect personified. Through the Divine Intellect all things are made. It was the second Person who took on material flesh because it was through the second Person material flesh was made because there is something about the second Person that made the material world possible.” We are truly looking through a glass darkly here trying to see something very big and mysterious.

        Liked by 3 people

        • SteveBC says:

          Thank you, SF. You’re right, this is a tough one for me to understand. I’ll add this to my ever-growing list!

          Liked by 1 person

          • YongDuk says:

            Oh, I jumped into the conversation in the middle.

            The easy answer and more concrete one is that it was completely necessary for Creation to reflect God.

            The Angels in their spiritual or intellectual essence reflect the Unity of God. With each one being its own species, they reflect the infinitude of the aspects of God.

            We reflect the Trinity.

            Liked by 5 people

          • YongDuk says:

            Hit send too quickly and thought that it wasn’t clear:

            And matter in all of its aspects reflects the parallel of the Angels reflecting the Infinitude of God, this time in relations.

            Even and especially that there will be a New Earth reflects that and creates a deeper sense of St Paul saying that the Angels learn observing God’s Mercy on His Process of perfecting or bringing about the New Heavens and the New Earth.

            Liked by 4 people

          • SteveBC says:

            Thank you, YD. As I’ve read everyone’s replies on my original question, what was originally a question not very important to me has become instead a rather interesting contemplation of symmetry. Your comments here fit right into that idea, I think.

            And jumping into the middle of the pool is an acceptable way to enter it, hair extensions et al. 😀

            Liked by 3 people

          • Ahhhhh, Yong Duk, sublime!

            Liked by 3 people

        • Beckita says:

          Amen, SF!!!!: “We are truly looking through a glass darkly here trying to see something very big and mysterious.”

          It is so good and worthy to contemplate these things, “Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things.” (Philippians 4:8)

          Even as we go deeper and deeper into the mysteries and as we gain greater depth in doing so beyond the veil, it will be interesting to discover how far God allows us to go with each spiritual mystery, both unique and, at the same, time very connected to every spiritual mystery. We are, after all, contemplating mysteries in the Mind of God and, forever, He will be our Infinite God while, forever, we will be His children. I’m not at all saying don’t go there. I ponder the Philippians exhortation and intuitively sense that Abba loves all this pondering shared here which prompts us to know, love and serve Him with greater capacity. (Charlie, you are a teacher extraordinaire as you lead us to probe spiritual truths via your “short thoughts.” How beautifully you are teaching us to live what you have so frequently encouraged: contemplation.)

          Steve, all of this and so much more, beyond your capacity to imagine now, awaits you in Eternity. “But as it is written, Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither have entered into the heart of man, the things which God hath prepared for them that love him.” (I Cor. 12:9) I have come to appreciate your noodling and the glorious results which come from this activity, given the gifts of intelligence imbued in you by the Gift-giver and developed by your training and life experiences. (As part of my educational training, I often pondered the theory of multiple intelligences. During each school year, I would become intimately connected, albeit in my limited way, with the various ways God had wired each student’s mind. Always striving to unlock and encourage potential, I could readily see tremendous gifts in each and every person. Sadly, that is not the message of this society, so perverted in too many ways.) I’m just trying to say, Steve, I’d like to take a break from the endless opportunities which will be available to me in Heaven, and with your permission, hitch a ride on your coattails to experience the exciting places some of your noodling will take you there.

          With Love, to the best of my ability, I will, not just in the Storm, but forever continue to, “Acknowledge God, take the next right step and be a sign of Hope to those around me.” At the same time, I yearn for our True Home. So while I look forward to the reunion at Mt Meeker, I know that for those in our family here who cannot make it for whatever reason, we will surely meet up in Heaven to recount the plentitude of stories now unfolding in our lives at this juncture in salvation history. God’s Peace and Blessings to All!

          Liked by 5 people

          • SteveBC says:

            Beckita, these are wonderful thoughts. I’m definitely aware my thoughts are quite limited while in a physical body. However, if you want to come along when I spin off into some wild and crazy ponderification, I will welcome the company. 🙂

            Liked by 3 people

  32. Donette says:

    I don’t know how to express in an un-hurtful way that the Traditional Church did frown upon Mixed Marriages. The teaching, in fact, was that there was no marriage if done by anyone but a priest in a church where the Triune God resided; body, blood, soul and divinity. It was a Sacramental Marriage. In fact, I’m not sure priests even tell individuals what is a Sacramental Marriage today and when it is not. In fact many annulments are judged upon whether or not the marriage was or was not a sacramental marriage. Maybe that is why they are now calling annulments, Catholic Divorces. It is not scene as a Sacramental marriage in the first place.

    And they claimed that what happens to one or both persons in a mixed marriage is each will tend to stop going to church whether they are Catholic or other just to prevent a division or fight between them. And it is not uncommon for the children of such a marriage to never learn of God and grow up having no knowledge, love or relationship to Christ nor go to Church.

    Also it was explained that the attendance of the parents at such a marriage, by their very presence was giving approval to the marriage of children who were considered disobedient to the Church of Christ.

    I make no judgment on the decisions of those who do or do not attend Mixed Marriages and I never make judgment on the priest or bishop who gives the direction. It will be God Who decides such matters in the end.

    The wedding at Cana is the example of a Jewish marriage where Jesus was present and also His Mother and performed the miracle of changing the water into wine. This can be a deep theological study of which I am not capable of rendering.

    This concept of marriage is in the Jewish Tradition and they too speak out against mixed marriages. Parents and family will not attend a mixed marriage and in some cases perform a funeral as if the child who enters a mixed marriage is now dead. I have experienced this in our extended family when a Catholic girl married a Jewish boy. The priest did not attend nor did the Rabbi. The result is that the family ended up seeing a Protestant minister perform the ceremony.

    I must also say that in the Traditional Church no marriage was considered valid unless the marriage was by a Catholic priest. This is what I was taught as a child who attended Catholic school and Catechism classes. I know something else is taught now.

    What I do know in today’s upside down world you will find a priest or a Bishop who will say something completely opposite from one another. I have often wondered if the state of families would be in such flux as we see in the western world if they had continued the old traditions. Perhaps you would see the bigger families that Charlie was talking about. What we have now is a spouse with child or children being raised by only one parent and because of the strain on one parent holding down the job of two parents no one goes to Church. The multiple year marriage of many couples are dwindling down to almost as few as the priests we find in fewer numbers saying Mass.

    We live in sad times. I look forward to God’s coming Storm. Our God will set all things right again.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      It is not particular hurtful to discuss old practices that some engaged in or taught pastorally, though it is important to note that is NOT the Church’s formal position on the matter. A quick summary of what the Church actually teaches can be found from the EWTN library.

      Liked by 2 people

    • YongDuk says:

      Donette, I apologise, but I do not completely follow your point or your intention; however, it does sound like you are speaking to the unfortunate situation of many couples in this day and age not entering the Marriage Covenant fully.

      It is very important to know in terms of your argument that the Ancient and Traditional, fully Catholic and Apostolic Churches of the East in Union with the Pope, that the Priest does not marry — effect the Sacrament — the couples themselves do. The Eastern Rite Priest blesses the Marriage.

      In the West, Canon Law rightly echoes this in the situation were a Priest is not available…

      I will trust that the EWTN link provided by Charlie Abraham will cover these nuances and I will leave it to their excellence.

      Pax tecum,
      +Yong Duk

      Liked by 2 people

      • acseibert says:

        Yong Duk, I have a cannon law question for you. I have been in a long term, long distance relationship. A few years ago we were seriously talking about getting married. This is around the time I had a conversion and returned to practicing my Catholic faith. I insisted the relationship has to be chaste and that he apply for declaration of nullity. I wanted to be married in the Church and continue to receive the sacraments. He was a baptized Lutheran, and married 35+ years ago to another Christian while living in PA, divorced for 15 years. Scott agreed to both and applied for the annulment. Since he wasn’t Catholic and didn’t understand the process I ask him to talk at the time with local priest near when he as working in NM. He left this meeting with the idea that he was going to be judged on his worthiness to marry a Catholic. This hurt him deeply. That being said, he still applied for the annulment in that NM diocese without anyone guiding him. The PA diocese recommend he use the local diocese where he was living. I don’t know much detail about his annulment process, but it has be at least two years without a declaration. At one point more than a year ago, he shared with me that the tribunal requested additional witnesses. He was frustrated, for most of his family and friends from that era of his life have died. I don’t believe his ex-wife chose to participate. His entire living family are Protestants what do not see any need to oblige. At my insistence at the beginning of this new year, I asked him to call the tribunal secretary and ask his status and update his address since he moved to ID for work. He did. His exact words for me were “The diocese and I are at a stalemate. Do not ask any more questions, we aren’t discussing this anymore.” He tone was emphatic. I can only assume that more witnesses are being requested, but can’t be furnished. If there aren’t enough witnesses, can a declaration be granted? Is there another process available to him? Will the recent reforms in the annulment process help our situation? Patiently I wait for the tribunal decision. When I asked God the Father about why this process wasn’t moving forward I was given one word in prayer – purification. Each day I surrender my will to God and ask the Blessed Virgin to bring me a sip of the Divine Will. I will accept whatever outcome of the tribunal.

        Liked by 1 person

        • YongDuk says:

          AC, I am not a canon lawyer and only know enough canon law to stir the barque, not win the America’s Cup. In that sense, I can only comfortably say the following:

          Yes, a declaration can be made without enough witnesses, just as one can be made if the spouse will not cooperate.

          There are online resources and you can contact the Diocese of where you have your domicile for help.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Beckita says:

          Praying for you, Acseibert, in these difficulties as they are.

          Liked by 2 people

        • El ingeniero de Tepeyac says:

          @acseibert, contact Rose Sweet. she knows a lot about annulments. https://rosesweet.com/about/annulment-advocate/

          Liked by 5 people

        • Mick says:

          God bless you and your dear boys, Acseibert; and God bless the good gentleman that you wrote about. I will keep all of you in my prayers.

          Liked by 3 people

        • breadoflife55 says:

          Hi again, asceibert. It seems the Lord is trusting you with much suffering. Iam very sorrry that you and your husband to be are experiencing such difficulties with the annulment process. I will say that from my experience with the annulment process 15 or so years ago, i can only say it was an opportunity for some healing when I told my story. I understood that when there are no willing witnesses or ex-spouse, or not enough witnesses, that the tribunal took all that into consideration (I mean, 35+ years!) in determining if there was actually a sacramental marriage that took place. For instance, if the spouse is uncooperative, that could be a telling sign that the spouse was unable or unwilling to fully participate in and understand just what makes up a sacremental marriage. In my experience, since I was married by the Church, my past marriage was much more scrutinized, and my now husband’s past marriage , it seemed that only the particulars of time, place, persons, etc. was enough to satisfy the tribunal. And for me, given our ages, the fact that I admitted to ageeing to marriage only because I was pregnant, etc. if memory serves me, was enough for this particular diocese (Galveston/Houston). So I hope I’m not muddying up the waters here, it’s just my thought that each diocese would have a certain leeway or maybe interpretation. If that is the case, then it’s kind of like choosing a doctor for a certain treatment- one patient might have a very positive experience with this doctor, while one may not with a different doctor. And that sucks. So maybe their needs to be some more uniform perhaps “purified” methods for determining a valid Catholic marriage. I am sorry that in the meantime, many people are suffering. I hate that anyone may become embittered with the Church because of their bad experience with the annulment process. Again, you are in my prayers, and I ask Our Lady herself to intervene for you as she did at the Wedding in Cana.

          Liked by 4 people

        • acseibert says:

          Beckita, Mick and Bread …thank you for your kind words and prayers. They mean a lot to me.

          Liked by 1 person

  33. Susan says:

    I have not commented in a very long time, but I am always here reading. 1 year ago I asked for prayers for our grandson born at 23 wks. 1 lb 9 oz. He just celebrated his 1st birthday and after a 2 hr assessment the doctors said that Francis far exceeded all their expectations! Praise God and thank you all for your prayers!!!

    Our youngest (15 yrs) is now suffering from Crohn’s, weighing in at 96 lb. At 4 John was diagnosed with Chiari malformation, had brain surgery at just 5yrs old to relieve some of his pain, going farther back, his birth was traumatic and the doctor said, “I can tell you, that from a medical stand point, this baby is a miracle.” The doctor is now looking to put John on Remacade. There is a high incident of cancer in teens with this infusion. I lost my Dad to cancer 6 months ago and my father in-law to cancer 6 days ago. This frightens me, John is a great kid! Pure joy! I can’t believe that after a “miracle” birth, brain surgery, and Crohn’s, that God would allow him to get cancer from a drug that is suppose to help – but I am human, a Mom, and weary. Could use some prayers. (And this is nothing compared to what lots of folks deal with)

    John is our second son with Crohn’s. DNA regulating nearby genes ???? No one knows…

    I for one am very excited about a Glorified Body! Heaven is going to be breathtaking! especially for all who have been “trapped”. 🎶”When we’ve been there 10,000 years bright shining as the sun, we’ve no less days to sing God’s praise then when we’ve first begun.” 🎶

    Thank you Charlie for all you do. You have brought together quite a community!

    Peace,
    Susan

    P.S. And on a lighter note so I don’t start my day bawling…..we have a white squirrel living in the woods on our farm. It was my nieces “A day off from school” card every time she saw him!

    Liked by 6 people

  34. Christine says:

    Dear Charlie, while I applaud large families and have friends and relatives who have them I whole heartedly disagree whith your analysis . First I would ask ; what do you consider a “large family”? Second as an only child I will tell you that the lack of siblings has had not detriment to my ability to live with valuss of duty and honour , selflessness and integrity. My husband is one of 6 as is my mother and I do not observe those qualities in all of those siblings. Nor can one say that ‘ large family’ can also mean the wider circle of the family all living and working together as in the ” it takes a village to raise a child” . I grew up a whole country appart from any family that we were at all conected with and that was before instant social media contact, skype etc. I was a single child raised by a single parent who had very few friends. Yet I ended up in a selfless service environment . I currently am surrounded by over 4000 of ‘ America’s finest’ young men and women who are here to learn the core values of ; Duty, Honour , Country, and integrity. The stories that brought them here run the gamit from ” my neighbour went here and I thought it sounded interesting” , to ” when I was a little boy in Haiti I asked my father who that man was in those funny green uniform and he told me that was an American soldier, I told him that I wanted to be one one day” . Stories of a privedged life leading to the desire for the prestige of the getting into one of the top learning institutions in the country to a mentor teacher in the inner city seeing something in a young man and introducing him to the greater vision of possibilities in life and hope. Most heartening of all if you came here and asked these young men and women some pointed questions you would find young adults with faith . Just like the 23 yo that I sat next to at dinner last night and had a wonderful conversation with about his torn meniscus and how that caused him to have to remain behind his peers for a year for re habilitation . He told me that he was ” thankful for the injury” because of the lessons God has taught him through the experience. This brings me back to the point I wrote to you about in a recent letter. I strongly believe it is going through adversity and how one handles it that makes one great. I recently had a discussion with a college student on this very topic . We discussed that it is interesting how the ‘ Great Generation’ raised Baby Boomers who are the ones that raised the selfish generation ,as many would like to see them. What was it that made the GG great ? Overcoming adversity but sadly they failed to recognise this and instead instilled in their children the idea that parents should make life better for their children so that their children do not have to suffer , the Baby Boomers in turn got this idea that they should have more $ than their parents and more ‘fun’ time. That college student intends to write a paper entitled something like ” How the Great Generation destroyed the First 21st Century Generation” . Whether or not you allow this comment ,that has turned more into a short opinion piece, to go through , I thank you . In short ;I believe it is how one deals with and is willing to learn from ,adversity, that builds character and selflessness . Ofcourse living in a large family can be the source of that adversity. It is not however , the Shrinking of family size that is the cause of society selfishness
    which is in desperate need of a storm. This is possibly why the storm delays when people , of their own volition , turn back to God and start doing the NRS. The question is how many good men and women of prayer does it take ? Interesting how we just had the largest jackpot ever causing great excitement and yet what was also apparently the largest drop of the Dow ” ever” ,according to the news caster , causing barely a ripple – yet.

    Liked by 2 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      Christine, bless you and your mom! You are exceptional exceptions to the rule. 😉

      My ex is one of 16 (8 surviving) children. My experience was that the siblings had each other’s backs, but also turned a blind eye to their worst traits and went as far as to enable each other in illicit behaviors.

      As you say, character counts!

      Liked by 3 people

  35. the phoenix says:

    As for our physical bodies after death, here are my musings just based on several dreams I’ve had (and also based on bird watching).

    At the time of the first dream, Pope John Paul II and my father were both alive, and both of them had physical difficulties with walking and talking in waking life. My father had had a stroke, and the Pope had had Parkinson’s disease. The dream reflected theses physical hardships … In the dream, the Pope was carried in sitting down in a special seat in Vatican colors of white and yellow so he wouldn’t have to attempt walking, and he didn’t speak, he only chuckled once at something I said, and his breathing seemed somewhat labored when he did. And we were waiting for my father to come in, giving him some extra time to get through the door because of his trouble walking, and the pope was considerate of my father’s condition … (when dad wasn’t in a wheelchair, he used a walker).

    Second dream: After my father died, I dreamed about him, and he was talking normally and standing up with no sign of a walker. He was wearing his old blue winter jacket … he always preferred being comfortable to being fancy.

    Third dream: And then there was my best friend. Towards the end of her life, she was bed-bound, needed a wheelchair, and had started losing her hair. Then, after she died, I dreamed about her. In the dream, she was standing up just fine and had plenty of long hair. She was wearing a dress, most likely according to her personality. The dress was memorable. I could describe it but that might be too personal to share.

    As for Heaven, I want to visit with my family and my best friend and my guardian angel and saints. And I want to meet my best friend’s guardian angel. Am not sure if I’ll have a mansion or whether instead I’ll have a small portable tent that I take with me to live at the edge of a forest in the winter or autumn to do artwork. Or maybe I’ll make a lean-to. And I would like the birds of North America to be my friends or pets, and also some Australian birds like parakeets, lorikeets, and cockatoos. Cats and horses would be nice too. And I would like to see outer space up close without a space ship … comets and planets and moons and stars and asteroids and quasars, etc. And of course the Beatific Vision … perpetual adoration.

    I don’t think I would be bored in Heaven.

    Liked by 6 people

    • zeniazenia says:

      Dear phoenix, Now that you mention it, I would also prefer to start out camping rather than any other set up, because I know I wouldn’t have problems. 🙂 Then I could get creative from there. Great thought!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Snowflakesdancing says:

      Phoenix, I will look for you so that we can sit together on the edge of that heavenly forest and in the beautiful meadow I once saw, and paint God’s beautiful birds together. We can laugh and play and worship Him together with all He created! I can’t wait, see you there! 🙂
      What a joy your comment is!

      Liked by 4 people

      • breadoflife55 says:

        And I would love to see both of you! And with you, Snowy, a big beautiful white owl, and of course with you, Phoenix, a big fiery red phoenix. I am no artist so I will ask the two of you to sketch me atop a big grey elephant!!!!

        Liked by 3 people

  36. Phillip Frank says:

    We must not forget but there are those who have glorified bodies and they are still with us….the incorruptible saints! Bernadette Soubirous from Lourdes is one of them.
    It is believed that they lived such a holy life that they brought part of their nature into the New Jerusalem which is why it remains incorrupt. The church teaches us that the Eucharist is Jesus’ glorified or “post” resurrected body and many Eucharistic miracles have followed with the host remaining incorrupt.

    Liked by 5 people

  37. Linda says:

    Charlie this was a wonderful interview! Michael and I watched it together and we felt very “comforted” by your message. We felt a real peace. Thank you very much! 😉 Michael loves your laugh! Also.. I don’t know if there will be any tv shows in the new era.. but if there is.. Nick Nolte would be your “go to” guy to play you if this were ever made into a program! You remind me of him.. lol

    Liked by 5 people

  38. Katherine says:

    I like that, DNA is the information, the pattern which informs matter. It’s probably the closest thing to touching the immaterial as the material world will allow. It’s not my substance, it’s not my form, it’s my information, from which I can be made new and yet the same. After all, even on this earth the matter in our bodies changes, sort of. “You are what you eat” is actually a scientific truth. I forgot how long it takes . . . this is something I probably learned from one of those fun factoid bathroom readers. After His Resurrection, Jesus showed us some of the properties out bodies would have, they would be impassable (not able to be ill), the glory of the soul will be seen through the body, our bodies will be completely responsive to our spiritual faculties, (this one will be my favorite, I think, my body will be wherever my soul desires it to be) and we won’t be bothered by any obstacles. This isn’t just a revival, it’s a New Life.

    Liked by 7 people

  39. Jessica says:

    I’d like to offer a few interesting points about DNA. I’m not a chemist, biologist or medical/scientific person by training … I just like health related information, so I’ve learned a few things over time.

    First, many of the oils of the bible (and plenty of others as well) have fun molecules in them called mono- and sesquiterpenes. They basically delete poorly copied DNA, re-write DNA to add in the parts that were/are missing or are able to transform the copying process to make it copy correctly. That’s all a really simplified version of that process, but fun none the less.

    Second, there are mineral combinations that provide the body the ability to express genes only in a healthy fashion. For example, if you have a hereditary predisposition toward cancer (of some kind) eating certain foods will help your body to replicate genes correctly and avoid that predisposition toward cancer. Unfortunately, we’ve really poisoned out soils in recent years and the minerals in them are almost non-existent or are so depleted the food is somewhat toxic to the body …. but hey, isn’t God really smart putting all of those things together for us?

    Liked by 7 people

    • breadoflife55 says:

      Man, this has been the most interesting post, I cant stop saying WOW! and I must stop typing or I will be shirking my duties for sure. Jessica that info is so cool. I have often thought that when we Do get our act together, God will show us and give us the means to grow these amazing foods that you are talking about. Well, maybe I won’t be around for this but I am really hoping that this happens so that God can be praised and glorified for healing and regeneration from these earthly foods.

      Liked by 3 people

  40. LukeMichael says:

    Charlie you have many great meditations but there is nothing like this. Here the hearts of many have been revealed! I am so grateful to see how my many brothers and sisters see the Lord in his majesty. We are just beginning to understand!

    Liked by 5 people

  41. Sue says:

    Charlie, thank you so much for your posts. I wake each day to check what you offer, and it is pure gold. I have a question now: can you give a concrete example is how to do this: “Are you willing to do the right thing even when, publicly, it looks like the wrong thing – and knowing it will bring out the criticism of good and honest people? ” I am not sure of scenarios where we might have to do this.

    Liked by 2 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Think of the Gospels – and how often Jesus was attacked for hanging around prostitutes, tax collectors and other “lowlifes.” Of course, He knew, if He stopped, His critics would just find other reasons to attack Him – and that then His friends would be unevangelized without any pause in the criticism aimed His way. Some honorable Jews were disturbed by His friendship with Samaritans and Pagans, and others who were not part of God’s chosen people. It did not stop Him. There are many such things in everyday life when you contemplate it.

      Liked by 6 people

  42. MarieUrsula says:

    Here’s a telling little line, the third sentence especially:

    “But Jesus cried out again in a loud voice, and gave up his spirit. And behold, the veil of the sanctuary was torn in two from top to bottom. The earth quaked, rocks were split, tombs were opened, and the bodies of many saints who had fallen asleep were raised.” (Matthew 27:50-52)

    The Apostles took note and included this tenet of the Christian faith in the relatively short Apostles Creed: “I believe in the . . . resurrection of the body . . . .”

    Similarly, in the Nicene Creed: ” . . . I look forward to the resurrection of the dead . . . .”

    One reason I’ve found these statements helpful is in dealing with people ~ even Catholics or other Christians ~ who think reincarnation is compatible with Christianity. I’ve lived in a number of places where that’s the socially cool thing to think. It can also be a dangerous way to think; for example, while living in a college town, I remember reading a woman’s account of her abortion in an alternative newspaper. She justified it as a loving act, sending her child to the “other side” until a better time (i.e., a type of reincarnation). The same rationalization could apply to the increasingly trendy euthanasia / assisted suicide movement.

    If reincarnation is true, and the resurrection of the body is also true, then which body will be resurrected? That’s a serious conundrum. In my mind, only one can be true. For me, of course, it makes more sense for the theory of reincarnation to be false and the lines in the Christian creeds to be true. The Christian belief, moreover, gives greater value to our physical bodies.

    For Christians, our one body matters for all eternity.

    Liked by 4 people

    • MarieUrsula says:

      BTW, the Apostles Creed wasn’t necessarily written by THE Apostles. But the concept is part of the Sacred Tradition of the Church. That’s a whole ‘nother subject.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Reincarnation is impossible because the union of the soul and body is a “substantial union” , not an “accidental union”. My glasses are accidentally united to my face, meaning I can take them off without damaging or changing the condition of either my face or my glasses. My nose, however, is substantially united to my face, meaning that separating them will cause something catastrophic to happen to both. They form together, one entity, not meant to be separated. The separation of soul and body is catastrophic to the body. This is evidence that the union is substantial, not accidental. Water can be poured from glass to glass, a hat can go from head to head, and nothing happens to water, glasses, hat, or heads. Those are accidental unions. But you can’t pour a soul from body to body like water from glass to glass. As soon as the soul leaves the body, the body dies, as my nose would die if taken from my face. The union of this soul and this body is substantial, one to one, never meant to be separated. God never intended that separation. In order for God to triumph over Satan he must restore that original union by resurrecting the body and reuniting it with the soul…otherwise Satan wins.

      Liked by 8 people

  43. theresa323 says:

    We are creatures, just as the Squirrels are creatures…. But as is said, God created us with Souls that live forever. We are like Little God’s in a sense…. We have domination over every other creature on this earth. We will always have bodies. Will our resurrected bodies have the same DNA, that we have now, truly only God knows that.
    When we pass into eternity, our spirit leaves the body. The Spirit is what keeps the body alive…The Angels are Spirits, they do not have bodies. They may take on the appearance of a human being, but they were not created with bodies….. Isn’t this what angers the Old Dragon, that we can reproduce, and He the fallen angel cannot… Is this what this culture of Death is all about.

    The old Baltimore Catechism
    Why did God make me.?

    God made me to know Him. to Love Him and to serve Him, so that we may be happy in this life, and with Him forever in Heaven.

    My prayer is that we are all safe in the Arms of Mary our Mother, and we all survive the storm and get to experience the Rescue..

    Liked by 5 people

  44. Karen says:

    Thank you to Charlie and all commenters here on his particular topic .- there is so much to ruminate on that I pray the Holy Spirit help us to cut to the heart of the matter, to show us where He needs us to go.
    I see Charlie has placed the long-awaited writing from Fr Regis which I very much look forward to reading – the Lord seems to be drawing us in an exponential way along the path of Understanding. I trust Our Blessed Mother to take us each by the hand so that we will not become ‘stragglers’ for to be left to my own devices this would surely be the outcome and I would lose my way. Who could have ever imagined just what power is contained within the Rosary – I think this in itself will be an amazing revelation – by that I mean the extent of the power of dutifully and lovingly praying that simple prayer!
    There is one ‘side’ comment, if the editors allow, to add to the above topic. I have three beautiful granddaughters – all IVF children – aged 5 and twins 4, although ‘conceived’ together in a dish. For a year or so they have been captivated by the movie and characters of ‘Frozen’. I squirm when I think of it but maybe it is just my suspicious mind!
    We can often see the way the enemy works to deceive us by aping or mocking the Work of God and the following is a link to a program called CRISPR (always the proud naming!), yet another method that manipulates DNA . The opening comment of the linked article states:
    ‘CRISPR, the disruptor. A powerful gene-editing technology is the biggest game changer to hit biology since PCR. But with its huge potential come pressing concerns.’
    http://www.nature.com/news/crispr-the-disruptor-1.17673
    One scientists says:
    “This power is so easily accessible by labs — you don’t need a very expensive piece of equipment and people don’t need to get many years of training to do this,” says Stanley Qi, a systems biologist at Stanford University in California. “We should think carefully about how we are going to use that power.”
    And so the battle of the two simultaneous revelations grows before our eyes (the wheat and the darnel? – indeed there is an image in the article of golden strands of DNA together with other black strands and a stick of dynamite in their midst!) and our youngsters are as pawns! Faith, Trust, Hope, Love – praise You Lord for the many Gifts You place in our hands, hearts and minds and for teaching us how to move forward using them through people like Charlie and the growing number of witnesses! We would be left behind, completely disillusioned, without them.

    Liked by 2 people

  45. Beckita says:

    Thanks for this alert, Karen. Oh how we *need* the Storm! Thanks be to God we’re in it.

    Like

  46. Charlie, I couldn’t agree more with your assessment on how the near absence of large families has impacted many, many things.

    Another area that I think has suffered is the call to the priesthood. I have 6 boys. I’d be thrilled to see one or two become priests. But for those who have only one or two sons, I can see there is very seldom strong encouragement to consider the priesthood as a vocation.

    When you have a large family – I have 9 kids – you seem to find other large families and you can forget how few people out there are living this life. I work at a fairly large company, and I am singularly known as the guy with all the kids. I find it sad. though, admittedly there are those days…

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      A friend of mine many years ago told me at a Christmas party that she was pregnant with her eighth child – and wanted me to be the first to know. I chuckled and said that didn’t sound quite right. Completely seriously, she told me how hard it is and that, even in a pro-life family. some of your siblings look at you with muted disdain…and she wanted me to be the first to know because I was the one person she knew who would be completely joyful for her without even a hint of disdain. Though an odd one, it was one of the compliments I have most cherished.

      Liked by 2 people

      • YongDuk says:

        To be a Saint is to be misunderstood.

        And when one finds a holy friend… a Simeon, perhaps…

        Biscuitsnita, I trust you will find me a prayer friend. It would only be perfalogical.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Beckita says:

          It has already been accomplished, YD. Let me just say when you reach the kids’ section Above, you will beam from ear to shining ear at what you discover has emerged from this little effort with the outpouring of love and gratitude for who you are and what you are called to do. Spiritual Support is yours, YD.

          Like

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