One World Religion?

(I am growing weary of all those – Catholics and non-Catholics – who are so eager to proclaim Pope Francis as an anti-pope or false prophet that they jump on every statement he makes that they can twist to support their thesis while ignoring his clear statements of orthodoxy on faith and morals. I understand that the religiously illiterate media helps this process along, but we have a DUTY to examine his statements, not just what others say about them. I see many people – and sometimes shocked at good people – who mutilate his words to fit their determination that he be some Mephistophelian figure. Do you truly believe in God? If you do, do you not know that you will be held to account for restlessly defaming anyone with malicious vanity? And to do so with the Pope, the Lord’s anointed? The sheep are, indeed, being separated from the goats – and the Pope is not a goat. Criticize him, disagree with him respectfully, that is all fine. But those who persist in calling him an anti-pope or a false prophet are calling judgment upon themselves. I reprint here Mark Mallett’s response to the latest kerfuffle.-CJ)

Did Pope Francis Promote a One World Religion?

FUNDAMENTALIST websites were quick to declare:

“POPE FRANCIS RELEASES A ONE WORLD RELIGION PRAYER VIDEO SAYING ALL FAITHS THE SAME”

An “end times” news website claims:

“POPE FRANCIS MAKES PROCLAMATION FOR A ONE WORLD RELIGION”

And ultra-conservative Catholic websites declared that Pope Francis is preaching “HERESY!”

They are responding to a recent video initiative by the Jesuit-run global prayer network, Apostleship of Prayer, in co-operation with the Vatican Television Center (CTV). The minute and a half-long video can be watched below.

So, did the Pope say that “all faiths are the same”? No, what he said is that “most of the planet’s inhabitants consider themselves believers” in God. Did the Pope suggest that all religions are equal? No, in fact, he said the only certainty between us is that we are “all children of God.”  Was the Pope calling for a “one world religion”? No, he asked that “sincere dialogue among men and women of different faiths may produce the fruits of peace of justice.” He was not asking Catholics to open our altars to other religions, but asked for our “prayers” for the intention of “peace and justice.”

Now, the simple answer to what this video is about is two words: interreligious dialogue. However, for those who confuse this with syncretism—the amalgamation or attempted amalgamation of religions—read on.

HERESY OR HOPE?

Let’s look at the three points above in light of Scripture and Sacred Tradition to determine if Pope Francis is a false prophet… or a faithful one.

I. Most are believers?

Do most people believe in God? Most people do believe in a divine being, though they may not yet know the One true God—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. The reason is that:

Man is by nature and vocation a religious being. Catechism of the Catholic Church, n. 44

As such, the drama of human history is one intertwined with a constant sense of the One Beyond, an awareness that has searchforgodgiven way to various flawed and misguided religious expressions throughout the centuries.

In many ways, throughout history down to the present day, men have given expression to their quest for God in their religious beliefs and behavior: in their prayers, sacrifices, rituals, meditations, and so forth. These forms of religious expression, despite the ambiguities they often bring with them, are so universal that one may well call man a religious being.Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC), n. 28

Even Christians often hold a distorted view of God: they see Him as either a distant, wrathful being… or an all-merciful benevolent teddy-bear… or some other image upon which they project their own preconceptions based on our human experiences, especially those drawn from our parents. Nonetheless, whether one’s view of God is distorted slightly, or grossly, does not discount the fact that every person is made for God, and thus, inherently desires to know Him.

II. Are we all children of God?

A Christian might conclude that only those who are baptized are “sons and daughters of God”. For as St. John wrote in his Gospel,

…to those who did accept him he gave power to become children of God, to those who believe in his name. (John 1:12)

This is but one way that the Scriptures describe our relationship to the Holy Trinity through Baptism. Scripture also speaks of us as being “branches” to the Vine; a “bride” to the Bridegroom; and “priests”, “judges”, and “co-heirs.” These are all ways to describe the new spiritual relationship of believers in Jesus Christ.

But the parable of the prodigal son also provides another analogy. That the entire human race is like the prodigal; we have all, through original sin, been separated from the Father. But He is still our Father. We are all generated from the “thought” of God. We all share in the same ancestral parents.

From one ancestor [God] made all nations to inhabit the whole earth, and he allotted the times of their existence and the boundaries of the places where they would live, so that they would search for God and perhaps grope for him and find him – though indeed he is not far from each one of us. For “in him we live and move and have our being.” —CCC, 28

And so, by nature, we are His children; by spirit, however, we are not. Hence, the process of leading the “prodigal” back to Himself, to make us truly sons and daughters in full communion, began with the “chosen people.”

The people descended from Abraham would be the trustee of the promise made to the patriarchs, the chosen people, called to prepare for that day when God would gather all his children into the unity of the Church. They would be the root on to which the Gentiles would be grafted, once they came to believe.CCC, 60

III. Is dialogue with other religions the same as creating a “one world religion”?

Pope Francis states that the goal of this dialogue is not to create a one world religion, but to “produce the fruits of peace of justice.” The backdrop of these words is both the outbreak of violence today “in the name of God” and the popeinterr_Fotor
interreligious dialogue that took place in January of 2015 in Sri Lanka. There, Pope Francis stated that the Catholic Church “rejects nothing of what is true and holy in these religions” [1]Catholic Herald, January 13th, 2015; cf. Nostra Aetate, 2  and that “It is in this spirit of respect that the Catholic Church desires to cooperate with you, and with all people of good will, in seeking the welfare of all….” One could say that Francis’ intention in interreligious dialogue, at this time, is to help ensure the welfare of peoples according to Matthew 25:

‘Amen, I say to you, whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me.’ (Matt 25:40)

In fact, St. Paul was among the first to engage in “interreligious dialogue” with the purpose of spreading the other, primary aspect of the Gospel: the conversion of souls. While the proper term for this is simply “evangelization,” it is clear that St. Paul uses the same tools we do today to initially engage the listener of non Judaeo-Christian religions. In the book of Acts, Paul enters the Areopagus, the cultural center of Athens.

…he debated in the synagogue with the Jews and with the worshipers, and daily in the public square with whoever happened to be there. Even some of the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers engaged him in discussion. (Acts 17:17-18)

The Epicurean’s were concerned with the pursuit of happiness through sober reasoning while the Stoics were more akin to today’s pantheists, those who worship nature. In fact, just as Pope Francis affirmed that the Church acknowledges what is “true” in other religions, so too, St. Paul acknowledges the truths of their Greek philosophers and poets:

He made from one the whole human race to dwell on the entire surface of the earth, and he fixed the ordered seasons and the boundaries of their regions, so that people might seek God, even perhaps grope for him and find him, though indeed he is not far from any one of us. For ‘In him we live and move and have our being,’ as even some of your poets have said, ‘For we too are his offspring.’ (Acts 17:26-28)

COMMON GROUND… EVANGELICAL PREPARATION

It is in this acknowledgment of the truth, of the good in the other, of “what we hold in common” that Pope Francis finds hope that “New avenues will be opened for mutual esteem, cooperation and indeed friendship.” [2]Interreligious Dialogue in Sri Lanka, Catholic Herald, January 13th, 2015  In a word, “relationship” forms the best basis and opportunity, ultimately, for the Gospel.

…the [Second Vatican] Council spoke of “evangelical preparations” in relation to “something good and authentic” that can be found in persons, and at times in religious initiatives. In no page is explicit mention made of religions as ways of salvation. —Ilaria Morali, Theologian; “Misunderstandings About Interreligious Dialogue”; ewtn.com

There is only one mediator to the Father, and that is Jesus Christ. All religions are not equal, nor do all religions lead to the One true God. As the Catechism francisdoors_Fotorstates:

…the Council teaches that the Church, a pilgrim now on earth, is necessary for salvation: the one Christ is the mediator and the way of salvation; he is present to us in his body which is the Church. He himself explicitly asserted the necessity of faith and Baptism, and thereby affirmed at the same time the necessity of the Church which men enter through Baptism as through a door. Hence they could not be saved who, knowing that the Catholic Church was founded as necessary by God through Christ, would refuse either to enter it or to remain in it.CCC, n. 848

But how grace works in souls is another matter. St. Paul says:

Those who are led by the Spirit of God are children of God. (Rom 8:14)

The Church teaches that it is possible that some are following the Truth without knowing Him by name:

Those who, through no fault of their own, do not know the Gospel of Christ or his Church, but who nevertheless seek God with a sincere heart, and, moved by grace, try in their actions to do his will as they know it through the dictates of their conscience — those too may achieve eternal salvation… the Church still has the obligation and also the sacred right to evangelize all men. —CCC, n. 847-848

We cannot stop at only “friendship” with others. As Christians, we are obligated to communicate the Gospel, even at the cost of our lives. So when Pope Francis met with Buddhist leaders last summer, he clearly enunciated the proper context of the meeting—not an attempt to merge Catholicism with Buddhism—but in his own words:

It is a visit of fraternity, of dialogue, and of friendship. And this is good. This is healthy. And in these moments, which are wounded by war and hatred, these small gestures are seeds of peace and fraternity. —POPE FRANCIS, Rome Reports, June 26th, 2015; romereports.com

In the Apostolic Exhortation, Evangelii Gaudium, Pope Francis speaks about the “art of accompaniment”[3]cf. Evangelii Gaudiumn. 169  with others that extends to non-Christians, and in fact, prepares the way for evangelization. Those who are suspicious of Pope Francis need, again, to read his own words:

Interreligious dialogue is a necessary condition for peace in the world, and so it is a duty for Christians as well as other religious communities. This dialogue is in first place a conversation about human existence or simply, as popewash_Fotorthe bishops of India have put it, a matter of “being open to them, sharing their joys and sorrows”. In this way we learn to accept others and their different ways of living, thinking and speaking… True openness involves remaining steadfast in one’s deepest convictions, clear and joyful in one’s own identity, while at the same time being “open to understanding those of the other party” and “knowing that dialogue can enrich each side”. What is not helpful is a diplomatic openness which says “yes” to everything in order to avoid problems, for this would be a way of deceiving others and denying them the good which we have been given to share generously with others. Evangelization and interreligious dialogue, far from being opposed, mutually support and nourish one another.Evangelii Gaudium, n. 251, vatican.va

PAUSE BEFORE YOU SHOOT

There are some in the Church today who are very much alive to the “signs of the times”… but not so alert to proper hermeneutics and theology. Today, like most of the culture itself, there is a tendency to quickly jump to conclusions, to take shallow assumptions for truth and sensational claims as gospel. This is manifesting particularly in the subtle attack on the Holy Father—a root judgment based on shoddy journalism, faulty Evangelical claims, and false Catholic prophecy that the Pope is a “false prophet” in kahutz with the Antichrist. That there is corruption, apostasy, and the “smoke of satan” wafting through some of the corridors of the Vatican is self-evident. That the validly elected Vicar of Christ will destroy the Church is nothing short of heresy. For it was Christ—not me—who declared that the office of Peter is “rock” and that “the gates of hell will not prevail”. That does not mean that a pope cannot do some damage by timidity, worldliness, or scandalous behavior. But that is a call to pray for him and all our shepherds—not a license to make false accusations and slanderous statements.

I continue to receive letters telling me that I am “blind”, “beguiled” and “deceived” because I am, apparently, “emotionally attached” to Pope Francis (I guess it’s not only Francis under the wrath of judgment). At the same time, I am sympathetic, to a degree, with those who take exception to this video (and we cannot assume that Pope Francis has approved of it let alone seen how it was edited together.) The way the images are presented carry a whiff of syncretism, even though the Pope’s message is consistent with the Church’s guidelines on interreligious dialogue.

The key here is to discern what the Pope is saying in light of Sacred Tradition and Scripture—and it is most certainly not what a handful of sloppy journalists and bloggers have concluded. For example, none of them reported what the Pope had to say during the Angelus the day after the video was released:

..the Church “desires that all the peoples of the earth be able to meet Jesus, to experience His merciful love… [the Church] wishes to indicate respectfully, to every man and woman of this world, the Child that was born for the salvation of all. —Angelus, January 6th, 2016; Zenit.org

 

RELATED READING

I want to recommend to my readers a new book by Peter Bannister, a brilliant, humble, and faithful theologian. It’s called, “No False Prophet: Pope Francis and his not-so-cultured despisers”. It’s available for free in Kindle format on Amazon.

A Tale of Five Popes and a Great Ship

A Black Pope?

The Prophecy of St. Francis

The Five Corrections

The Testing

The Spirit of Suspicion

The Spirit of Trust

Pray More, Speak Less

Jesus the Wise Builder

Listening to Christ

The Thin Line Between Mercy and HeresyPart IPart II, & Part III

Can the Pope Betray Us?

A Black Pope?

That Pope Francis!… A Short Story

The Return of the Jews

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
This entry was posted in Church Governance, Discernment and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

304 Responses to One World Religion?

  1. Nance says:

    Keep getting your posts just AFTER I read it on Abyssum, or Mark Mallett! However, I like your links to those other posts where you’ve written about it.

    Everybody remember our Day of Prayer and Penance on Friday! i’ll be spending mine, after Mass, on the sidewalk outside of the largest known abortion center in the world – right here in Houston.

    Liked by 6 people

  2. Beckita says:

    Amen, Charlie, to your introductory remarks! Just read this at Mark’s blog early this morning and so happy to see it here. Thank you for all you do!

    Liked by 4 people

  3. Kim sevier says:

    Constant battle against this Charlie. Don’t get tired. We lift you up in prayer.

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Thank you. I worry some that the satan has already convinced who he can and now just uses all the hollering as a distraction. Ah well…endure with fortitude. Mark gets even more grief about it than I do. Hee hee…I always tell him he needs to develop a little of my edgy mean streak to keep the howlers at bay.

      Liked by 16 people

      • Mick says:

        So, you’re saying that Mark needs to get in touch with his inner curmudgeon? Ha!

        Liked by 7 people

        • charliej373 says:

          Works for me! Sometimes it comes in handy to have a reputation for occasionally being surly.

          Liked by 8 people

          • EllenChris says:

            I have always had a sweet spot in my heart for curmudgeons. Must be why I like it around here. Keep on keeping on, Charlie 🙂

            Liked by 4 people

          • jaykay says:

            Heh heh😊 I don’t know him personally, of course, but somehow I think it would take A LOT to get Mark M mean!

            But, wow, another masterful analysis from him: cool, clear, objective, calling those who have been driven to that low level of criticism of the Holy Father to recollect themselves and step back from that dangerous brink. How ugly it is for Catholics to give themselves over to that sort of thing. O.k., one almost expects it from the loonier shores of knee-jerk fundamentalists (in the Protestant sense) but to see Catholics abandoning reason and charity in that manner and becoming knee-jerk fundamentalists of the opposite sort is so depressing.

            Thank you, Mark, and Charlie.

            Liked by 7 people

      • janet333 says:

        I’ve been battling with the anti-papists all day Charlie..some of what they say would make your hair stand on end! Praise the Lord I did manage to get through to to one of them. That makes a very stressful day worth while. 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

        • charliej373 says:

          Yeah, I know…you should see some of the stuff I get, which is not nearly as bad as that Mark Mallett seems to get. On the other hand, I have had more than a few tell me I helped give them reason to hang in there and defend the faith.

          Liked by 4 people

  4. midgepm says:

    In reference to our Holy Father, It seems to me that we read in scripture something very similar. If you can visualize it… Picture Jesus, sitting, speaking to the multitude of people and listening to them. Some people stayed and listened to what he had to say, others left critisizing him and plotting against him! Sound familiar?
    Looks like Pope Francis is “walking the walk!” Pray for our Pope!

    Midge Milne

    Liked by 12 people

  5. Julie of WI says:

    Charlie, it seems to me that liberals and Catholic liberals love Pope Francis. Do you think that it makes us very conservative Catholics leery because of that? I am not trying to start anything, just questioning why he barely addressed abortion or the evil things happening at planned parenthood, the biggest issues to me that reflect our downward spiral, and his speaking about these would have done so much to solidify Catholic’s belief in respecting life (to protect, to feed, to value the unborn all alike).

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      I think his often left-leaning political pronouncements have, indeed, had that effect. But if people would read has actual Magisterial pronouncements, he is completely solid. I disagree with much of his politics – and often wish he would talk less of it – but it scares me to think that some are reducing the faith to mere politics. If that is the case, I am glad of the confusion, for people need to get things straight. If one can declare a Pope an anti-pope just because you disagree with him politically – or even have genuine disagreements on what he emphasizes – and that cause one not to even look seriously at his pronouncements on faith and morals except to caricature them, then the problem is the person doing that. His faith was deficient in the first place.

      I do not think it is the Pope’s plan – but part of me suspects it might well be God’s plan to draw some people in by the left-wing nostrums then keep them here for the substance. I don’t know. What I do know is that on matters of genuine faith and morals, this Pope has been exceptionally solid.

      Liked by 10 people

      • Julie of WI says:

        Thank you, Charlie, for posting this and your response to me. I love that you get a little surly at times. Shows passion and fortitude! Helps to keep my faith strong and on the straight and narrow! Many of God’s Blessings to you!!

        Liked by 5 people

      • Daphne says:

        Jesus said that He would leave the 99 sheep to go after the 1 lost sheep. There seems to be a lot more lost sheep amongst the liberals, so it would make sense that He would choose a Pope that would focus on bringing back the liberals (as well as all of the other lost sheep around the world). We just need to make sure we do not to act like the older brother of the prodigal son when they return.

        Liked by 9 people

      • While the Pope’s words supporting Catholic struggles with Right to Life efforts and with opposing government mandated contraception etc, would be comforting to those on the front line, those same words are heard by our wounded brothers and sisters as rejection.
        Catholics “inside the Church” sometimes don’t realize the pain of those who feel their sin or circumstances make them rejects. They are not rejects, but to overcome their despair, I believe Jesus wants to act in Francis to extend His mercy and hope. So while I don’the hear as much of the affirmation of my struggles as I want from Pope Francis, I rejoice when I hear those dear to me saying they are re-considering the Catholic Church because of him.

        Liked by 6 people

      • Gary says:

        Incremental change, of the Pope’s “solid” faith?
        Pope changes liturgical norms to allow washing of women’s feet on Holy Thursday

        http://www.catholicculture.org/news/headlines/index.cfm?storyid=27256

        Like

        • Mick says:

          Gary, with all due respect, a change in a discipline of the Church is not a change in faith and morals. Pope John Paul the Great changed the discipline of the all-male altar-serving corps; but no one has changed or can change the fact that the priesthood shall forever remain all male. A change in the discipline about when we as Catholics must abstain from meat does not mean that faith and morals are being compromised by those who choose to eat meat on non-Lenten Fridays.

          I’m not crazy about women having their feet washed on Holy Thursday. I am pretty old-fashioned and of quite a traditional bent in most matters (when my husband proposed to me, I refused to say yes until he asked my father’s permission; that’s pretty old-school, no?). Nonetheless, I’m not going to let this disturb my peace, or cause me to question Pope Francis’ faith or his validity or his right to “bind and loose on earth,” which right was given to him by Christ Himself (Matt. 16:18-19). The Holy Father has some really big fish to fry–and reaching out to those who are lost is perhaps the biggest. He, like Christ, is leaving the 99 in search of the 1 lost sheep. This is one way that he has chosen to do so; and who am I to get my britches in a bunch over it?

          I also must say that I’m puzzled by the quotation marks that you put around “solid” in reference to the Holy Father’s faith. I daresay that his faith is way more solid than mine, and of many (or perhaps even most) of us. All of us–and I refer to myself most of all–need to look in the mirror and pull the beam out of our own eyes before we take issue with the splinter in somebody else’s.

          Pax et bonum, frater. 🙂

          Liked by 8 people

          • Gary says:

            Mick, if this Pope’s appointments are a reflection of his sentiments then I would not use the word solid. Cardinal Wuerl would not obey Pope JPII on the issue of giving Communion to unapologetic abortion supporting Catholic politicians yet calls Cardinal Burke a dissenter after the recent synod. He has the ear of the Pope.Cardinal Burke does not.
            It become ever more clear that this Pope does not care about Tradition nor does any liberal
            politically or theologically. The role of the male gender is constantly belittled by a hierarchy raised to “accept” homosexuality and in many cases are homosexuals themselves. So every opportunity they have to reduce a man’s role in the Church they utilize such as the washing of the feet of women which ignores 2000 years of tradition. There is mercy in this pope for any one and everything except those who hold to the Tradition of the Catholic faith.

            The point is not whether the pope has the authority to change practices but whether it is wise to do what he has been doing. Discretion is the better pat of valor, but this pope wants to make a mess. Well I guess he will have his way and so many of you will excuse it.

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            As you know, Gary, the Pope’s appointments have been a mixed bag. He has appointed some notably orthodox Cardinals to top positions, starting with Cardinal Pell. If it was an unrelenting slew of heterodox Bishops, that would be one thing, but it just is not. I appreciate your love of tradition, but where are you going with your sometimes angry invective? I know you don’t think Christ was mistaken when He promised to protect the Church and that Peter was his rock. So I don’t know where you are going when you attack him on matters unrelated to faith and morals and then insult those who don’t.

            Liked by 5 people

          • Mick says:

            Gary, again with all due respect, I believe it unfair and uncharitable of you to be angry with and accuse me and others of excusing the Holy Father for his words and actions of which you do not approve. I have made no excuses; I simply stated that although I don’t particularly like everything that Pope Francis has said or done, I acknowledge, respect, and uphold his authority to change Church discipline when he sees fit. He is Peter, and upon him Christ is today building His Church; and the gates of Hell shall not prevail against it. I choose to build my house upon on the Rock who is Peter, the Rock who is Francis. I pray and trust that you are doing the same.

            If I may, I would like to refer you to a document found in the Contact/FAQs/Help section on this site. You may find the link in the navigation bar at the top of Charlie’s homepage. If you click on the link, you may then scroll down to the link for the article entitled “On the Legitimacy of Pope Francis.” I hope that you will find the article helpful.

            May God bless you and those you love.

            Liked by 5 people

        • Beckita says:

          Gary, it seems my earlier posted comment disappeared as I no longer see it awaiting moderation and it’s no longer here. Please scroll down and read YDs comment concerning your concern. Peace of Christ be with you.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Gary says:

            Charlie I am just as much a curmudgeon as you maybe worse. I have had to live with this hierarchy for a long time and you only recently. It is said the we worship as we believe and we believe what we worship. In subtle ways they changed how we worship at the Mass and therefore how we believe. The hierarchy like Cupich do not have to go into outright schism they just do not have to act on their authority and let linger the doubts they place
            in the hearts of the faithful. You can not doubt the institutional feminization of the Church by her enemies and so we have another “practice” feminized by the Church. They have lead the faithful to the water’s edge of schism and heresy but do not walk in the water themselves, but by their prompting the laity has. Then they tell us we have to accommodate these poor misled people. In small steps they get want they want a denuded Catholic laity whom they have misled in the Catholic school system and the seminaries.

            The pope may well rule that under certain circumstances divorced and remarried Catholics
            can receive Communion, and these certain circumstances will become an avalanche for all divorced and remarried Catholics. That is what the liberals had done to Vatican II, And they will have accomplished what they want without uttering a word of heresy. But they will have created a schism under the guise of mercy. Those then who live in sin will stay in sin.
            All the pope will have caused is a hardening of the hearts of the sinful and alienated those of us who were his good sons.

            It is not that the pope is leaving the 99 to to gather the one sinner, he is abandoning
            the 99 and calls them judgmental pharisees.

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Yes Gary, but the worst criticisms of the Pope are not for what he has done, but what he “may do.” I have listened to that doomsday scenario for a couple of years and it is caustic. The dark pronouncements have not come to pass…and whenever one of them fails, I seldom hear anyone say, “Well, that didn’t happen.” Usually they just move the goalpost and let loose with another dire pronouncement of what the Pope “may do.”

            I have great sympathy for your first two paragraphs here, but the last few are, at best, caustically over-stated. But I chalk it up to your finely-honed curmudgeonly nature.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Gary says:

            Charlie I hope I am wrong but it feels like deja vu all over again.

            Like

          • Yong Duk says:

            Did you contemplate YD’s comments, Gary?

            Why dispute? Be simple. Humble. Joyful. There is so much in your immediate surroundings to touch with Joy, to see with Joy… Blind guides and Fools.

            Be childlike so as to enter the Kingdom of God!

            I will remember you and your family at Mass today as my special intention on this Memorial of Roe v. Wade for healing.

            [Your] sinful servant,
            Young Duck

            Liked by 5 people

          • Beckita says:

            Amen, Charlie! Amen to: “…he worst criticisms of the Pope are not for what he has done, but what he “may do.” I have listened to that doomsday scenario for a couple of years and it is caustic. The dark pronouncements have not come to pass…and whenever one of them fails, I seldom hear anyone say, “Well, that didn’t happen.” Usually they just move the goalpost and let loose with another dire pronouncement of what the Pope “may do.”

            Thanks, YD: Be childlike so as to enter the Kingdom of God!

            Liked by 3 people

          • Yes, YD! Good to see you back out on the trail smiling at the simple things.

            I was a curmudgeon by age six and had to work it backwards like a Benjamin Button of sorts. Of course the world and the enemy will continue to say otherwise, but The Word does indeed tell us that we must become like little children. Is it really so difficult as Catholics/Christians to decide who we are going to listen to?

            Will keep you all in prayer in the wilderness tomorrow.

            God Bless,
            MP

            Liked by 3 people

          • Yong Duk says:

            Gary, my Apologies.

            I meant in no way to imply even remotely obnoxiously offering Mass for you today for healing in any negative way.

            Rather, just that I liked that you have a photo of you and your wife (I assume) with your name and that I just wanted to offer Mass for you in that light on this day and figured why not for any healing that you and your family might need.

            Peace and blessings to you and all here,
            +YD

            Liked by 4 people

    • janet333 says:

      Hi Julie..I’m not a liberal Catholic but I love this Pope. Everyone knows the Churches teachings on abortion so he doesn’t have to constantly be speaking on this great evil. Emeritus Pope Benedict felt the same.

      (Benedict in 2006 to the Swiss bishops, spotted by Wheat & Weeds)
      “I always knew the questions in advance. They concerned the ordination of women, contraception, abortion and other such constantly recurring problems. If we let ourselves be drawn into these discussions, the Church is then identified with certain commandments or prohibitions; we give the impression that we are moralists with a few somewhat antiquated convictions, and not even a hint of the true greatness of the faith appears. I therefore consider it essential always to highlight the greatness of our faith – a commitment from which we must not allow such situations to divert us.”

      Still he has spoken out about the evils of abortion

      Pope Francis ….“……It is horrific even to think that there are children, victims of abortion, who will never see the light of day,” he said in his toughest remarks to date on abortion in his “State of the World” address, Reuters reports.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Julie or WI says:

        Janet, I don’t disagree with you and I respect our Pope. Paraphrasing Charlie, it makes sense that maybe God has a plan to attract many people to him. After reading all the comments here and trying to keep it all simple in my mind, the 10 Commandments have not changed. I know this seems like a random comment but Catholics and many non Catholics know what these are. I guess that is what collectively should make us solid if we live by them. I just would have liked to hear more about living by these than to hear about global warming. Yes we need to take care of our God given planet but there are so many other pressing issues that I feel should have been addressed.

        Like

        • janet333 says:

          Hi Julie,

          Fr. Federico responded when asked about this. He said that “Francis has made clear his and the Church’s opposition to abortion during other remarks on his papal visit, and also at numerous other times during his pontificate.”

          When he addressed the UN. He said there must be a “respect for the sacredness of every human life,” including “the unborn,” and again echoed the need for “absolute respect for life in all its stages and dimensions.” He also said “the right to life” should be the very foundation of any agenda the UN advances.” So yes, they do know that Pope Francis opposes abortion and has addressed this issue explicitly on this trip.

          Pope Francis was actually telling Congress that the Church is good. It feeds the poor. It shelters those in need. It demands that we take care of our neighbors and defends human life at every stage of its development. I’ll just repeat here again what Emeritus Pope Benedict said “I always knew the questions in advance. They concerned the ordination of women, contraception, abortion and other such constantly recurring problems. If we let ourselves be drawn into these discussions, the Church is then identified with certain commandments or prohibitions; we give the impression that we are moralists with a few somewhat antiquated convictions, and not even a hint of the true greatness of the faith appears. I therefore consider it essential always to highlight the greatness of our faith – a commitment from which we must not allow such situations to divert us.”

          God Bless You

          Liked by 4 people

        • Snowflakesdancing says:

          Julie, I keep hearing things like this from people.. what is confusing to me is that the Church has been teaching the Truth for over 2000 years now …and what..people suddenly have forgotten all they have ever learned because Pope Francis said something that doesn’t fit with their own way of thinking? God is not so narrow. Every Pope has his own way of teaching.The way Pope Francis has chosen to teach and reach the lost sheep is by reaching out to people where they are at- meeting them in the trenches so to speak because this is what is needed now. You and most saying things like this already have the Truth, know what the Church teaches…and this will never change and you also know that. God always gives what is needed when it is needed. It’s as though many Catholics today are saying God has abandoned us, the Church is in ruins because the Pope isn’t doing things my way. It is exactly what the Pharisees said when Christ Himself was here. Trust God, He promised us hell would never prevail against His Church.

          Liked by 4 people

          • charliej373 says:

            It is bizarre…people’s sole rule of faith these days seems to be how they would do it. It is a summit of vanity and its way is death. I think back at how many times I have informed the Lord when instructed on something that “that’s not how I would do it.” It has been both a little sullen and a little comical and the response has always been a twinkling and amused, “I know.” I thought this was just an amusing repartee when nI didn’t like something in particular – but I am beginning to see how people have become so intellectually and theologically impoverished, they have lost all hint of humility, to where they cannot imagine there could possibly be a way other than what they prefer – and are eager to condemn as heresy whatever they merely don’t prefer. Thank God for the Storm. More and more I think most of us would be lost without this corrective.

            Liked by 6 people

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            Yes, Charlie, thank God for the Storm! I was struggling in how to word this because I also have to watch that I am not being a hypocrite or allowing my pride in here… but I am so tired of people not understanding that God has chosen Francis as His Vicar! How can people not see what they are implying with this attitude? It is a mystery! It borders on what the devil did but thankfully people don’t have full knowledge and so mercy will prevail with many..I pray.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Yong Duk says:

            Amen… And I keep saying what I say about the Great Apostasy based upon that: the challenging of hierarchies.

            St. Ignatius of Antioch’s letters in the Office of Readings read yearly should remind clergy about the design for unity in the Church. The same regards Bishops and Rome.

            How many publicly went into Schism and Heresy and how many internally?

            And somehow, we all read the Saints, from St. Ignatius to St. Therese and as open or internal Schismatics or Heretics quote them left and right and never see how far from the Truth we have strayed from that Unity all because we want our idol god.

            And yet, God in His Mercy, doesn’t abandon us with our falsehoods, but keeps setting it up so that we would get back on the Right Path.

            And when we stumble upon the Truth, we stay where we are in our error, you (I think) and I say to God, why does He allow that? St. Peter says it for us: God’s Patience is oriented towards the Salvation of Souls.

            He is a Good Father.

            But what if we had stuck to the Original Plan and Hierarchies as St. Ignatius wrote about? We would have had the Kingdom of God on Earth…

            Dare we hope that we shall!?

            Liked by 4 people

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            Dare we hope? I will say with St. Teresa of Avila~
            “You pay God a compliment by asking great things of Him.” !

            Liked by 4 people

          • Julie of WI says:

            ….and in the meantime, more babies are being murdered. Don’t get me wrong! I want to trust this Pope and my heart is in the right place. It seems our Pope is trying to save people that have already made choices which is good. But, what about the little souls that can’t? I am just disappointed. How many Americans listen to UN speeches? How many secular Americans read our Pope’s writings? He had the ear of so many Americans and seems to me he missed the chance to speak up. Maybe even one person would have thought to not abort if they heard him speak against it. Maybe his mere presence changed someone’s mind? If we equate the Pope’s job to that of a parent, then the touchy-feely speak makes for spoiled selfish children. I have to trust that God has a plan and it is okay for me not to understand it, but I am human and have to work through all this and not ignore it. It makes my faith stronger!!

            Like

          • Beckita says:

            SO WELL said, Snowy! Thank you.

            Charlie, you know I have appreciated many of your, what I call, wisdom sayings. Wish there was a way to make a “pop-up” online with this comment you have written here. A person comes to the site and this comment would overlay the page waiting to be read before entering the site. I know it’s unrealistic but humility is the key. Maria Esperanza’s ‘oft repreated exhortation during my times with her: Humility is the Crystal Bridge to Heaven. Thanks, Charlie!

            Liked by 3 people

          • Beckita says:

            WOW, YD! Amen and Alleluia!

            Liked by 2 people

          • Yong Duk says:

            Julie…

            There was a quasi-debate in the public square of sort years ago more or less pitched between Casper and Ratzinger. The question was the Role of the Pope versus the Local Ordinary.

            Who is your Ordinary? Do you listen to him? If not, does he not have a voice? Why not? Who took it from him?

            Read Ignatius’ letters, you might be pleased to learn who your Ordinary is supposed to be and how much of an error it is to overlook him.

            Don’t give to the Pope what is not the Pope’s and what is your Local Ordinary’s!

            Liked by 5 people

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            용인 덕, 이것은 당신이 말하는 언어인가? 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          • Mick says:

            Yes, that’s exactly it, Snowy. Nice!

            Liked by 2 people

          • Yong Duk says:

            Yeah, HNSE, I do like ai jjigae, but I have my heart set on some kitfo and maybe some shero wat on the side.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            I had to look all of these up and they all sound scrumptious. I had
            새우 마히 마히의 가리비 치미 mmm!

            Like

          • YongDuk says:

            Yikes, HNSE, that’s Doug’s brother, Kim for short! You do know cannabalism is a sin, right?

            Liked by 2 people

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            Oh dear! LOL

            Like

        • vkmir3 says:

          I believe part of the problem and reason that people don’t hear our Holy Father give strong statements for life or other such topics such as these is that there is no way the Main Street media is going to share anything close to that to the public in their writings or broadcasts. The MSM is very selective on what they report. The Holy Father makes a statement about women being able to have their feet washed and it makes headlines. Look at the opportunities the press had to report on the thousands of young people who weathered the blizzard to March for Life, even though Washington was at the center of that blizzard and the march went on, not one word was mentioned until the buses of young people that became stranded in Pennsylvania and the young people made an altar of snow and for branches to make a cross and have Mass. And when they reported where the young people had been, they stated at an anti-abortion rally very matter of fairly. Perhaps God saw a way for this effort to be announced even though there was sacrifice involved. Those young people will never forget this experience. More importantly, the way to get the message out there about how precious and sacred life is would take more of a grass roots effort. Get everyone involved at the local level and through networking with those who don’t have the truth, proclaim every life as sacred. Within our local communities is where it needs to happen and it needs to happen more than just the week surrounding the Roe v. Wade decision. To be honest, who am I to judge what our Holy Father is doing or not doing. I don’t want to be judged by those same standards. God will not allow His Church to be destroyed and the Holy Spirit selected this Pope.

          What wonderful discussions we are having on all of these topics and without fear of being subjected to the typical bashing on many comment sections. God bless and keep all here. I lift up mall prayer intentions mentioned here even though I don’t write a comment.

          Liked by 7 people

          • janet333 says:

            Thanks Snowy http://www.miraclehunter.com/marian_apparitions/approved_apparitions/itapiranga/index.html

            “God has given us a sign for our current times, with Emeritus Pope Benedict XVI and Pope Francis: the Emeritus Pope prays in silence, in humility and worship for the Pope who must speak to the world and take action. Thereby, we must come together and pray a lot for the Church. Satan today creates confusion in many countries and he also wants the confusion to invade the Vatican. He wants above all to destroy the Church and thus attack the center of the Church, by removing the Pope and the Vatican. But the Virgin Mary intervenes to protect the Church, and that is why She appears in different places in the entire world. “​

            Liked by 3 people

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            Hi Janet, I’m not sure what your comment is in reference to? My comment above was to show Julie that what Pope Francis is doing is having a very profound effect on the young people today! Hence the link showing the March for Life 🙂 Even though he is not focusing always on abortion, the teachings on love, mercy and the value of all life is having a profound effect.

            Liked by 3 people

          • janet333 says:

            It was in reference to you writing….”Pope Francis must be doing something right!” Our Lady in that approved message agreed with you 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            Janet, yes… forgive me, I realized too late. Lately..I’m about as dense as a stump. I have no idea why the simplest things confuse me.

            Like

          • janet333 says:

            Oh gosh Snowy..there is nothing to forgive. I get confused all the time. 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            Janet…I figured it out, I clicked on your name instead of Julie’s name when I posted this comment a few days ago. Sorry! Anyway, I enjoyed the link you sent me very much! I had not heard of this appearance, thank you! 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

  6. RJW says:

    Shame on those involved in gossiping and judging Pope Frances. The gospel comes alive to me and helps me understand the errors in the world, as I listen to the words of our Pontiff. His dissenters remind me of the proud and haughty Pharisees and Sanhedrin, when his acts of love and compassion are met with the same critical scrutiny that Jesus endured, I wonder how they can not see the parallel. We all have to pray for humility.

    Liked by 14 people

    • charliej373 says:

      It is a gloomy report, for sure, Susan. I have never been a fan of the “ostpolitik” approach, which was adopted by the Church towards communists in the 60’s through the late 70’s, and then brought to an abrupt halt by St. John Paul II. Diplomacy is not a matter of faith and morals – and the institutional Church has stumbled many times throughout its history on such matters. That is not to doubt the intentions behind it – the ostpolitik toward the communists was designed to try to protect Catholics behind the Iron Curtain. I just think it was not as effective as the Vatican hoped and, in fact, served to give a patina of legitimacy to tyrannical regimes. It is a tough business – and sometimes such things turn out to be a matter of setting up the proper response. Without the ostpolitik of the 60’s and 70’s, St. John Paul’s reforming response might not have been so intense and focused. God always plays a long game.

      The hopeful part of the article is that, despite the best efforts of the Chinese Communists (who hoped to eradicate Catholicism in their country), it persists. In the end, it will become a big ace in the hole for the rest of the world, I think.

      Liked by 11 people

      • YongDuk says:

        Glad to hear you have this hope, Charlie!

        +勇德

        Liked by 1 person

      • Mick says:

        Charlie, I have noticed over the past 10 or 12 months that LifeSite News (and also http://www.sign.org) have been carrying more and more articles which portray the Holy Father in a bad light. At first, I tried to shrug it off because both of those sites have done so much good work in the past. But the more time passes, and the more of this type of article that those two sites carry, the more uncomfortable I have become. And sadly, I’m pretty much stopped visiting those two sites over this. What do you think?

        Liked by 8 people

        • charliej373 says:

          Sadly, Mick, that has been my take, as well – and my reaction, as well.

          Liked by 8 people

        • irosemj says:

          I have stopped following LifeSite News for the same reason. Glad to know it’s not just me, that you see it also.

          Liked by 3 people

        • Kati says:

          MIck,

          Thank you for mentioning this because I have had the same reaction to this leaning of LifeSite…wondering about maybe sending an email to courteously point out that they are, in effect, making things worse. It has also caused me to doubt the objectivity of some of their other articles.

          Liked by 3 people

          • janet333 says:

            Hi Mick..I feel the same. I posted my concerns on their site and I was blocked! I do know that one of the journalists was following a false prophet who slanders the Pope so maybe this is where it all started.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            Mick, I stopped going to that site when they repeatedly blocked my comments defending Pope Francis…and that was well over a year ago! What I was reading there – and to be fair here, especially in the comment section- was heart breaking. The articles were always leaving one wondering or hanging and even feeling badly about our Pope Francis. I have not been back since so I don’t know about now, I imagine it’s worse.

            Liked by 2 people

        • jlynnbyrd says:

          Mick, I have noticed that too and have also stopped referencing their site.

          Liked by 4 people

        • Beckita says:

          Distubing yet so true Mick.

          Liked by 3 people

        • LifeSite is in no way deliberately attempting to “portray the Holy Father in a bad light.” The problem is that we have unfortunately, and I stress that word, been obliged to report on a slew of problematic papal developments related to the issues we cover – life, family and related culture issues. If we were the only ones doing this regarding Francis you might have a point (not that that justifies anything on our part), but the news is the news and to ignore these genuinely newsworthy developments, and pretend that all is well and they are of no real importance, would be a disservice to our readers. At the same time, we have also reported many exciting, positive statements from the Holy Father.

          It is important to note that we are not a Catholic apologetics service, with an obligation to always put the most positive spin on what the Holy Father says and does. Very many have been doing that and what is clearly happening is that they are growing weary of it. I recently talked to the head of a major, orthodox Catholic website. This usually prudent person told me that he no longer enjoys his work because of what he has to struggle with every day regarding Francis. That was an astonishing admission from someone who normally writes positively about the popes. What we are seeing now is that he is far from being the only person feeling this way.

          LifeSite is not a Catholic news service and serves people of all faiths and no faiths. We are therefore freer to report Catholic related developments with more objectivity and are less obliged to try to put the best possible spin on everything Francis. We have, however, out of charity, frequently done just that, but, like the others, we too are becoming weary of having to do so far, far more than for anyone else we have every reported on in the past. It is just not right, not professional, and perhaps not charitable, to continue to always do this. Our readers deserve frank reporting so that they can be informed enough to make the best judgments.

          However, if you think that we enjoy any of this, you would be very wrong. Given that most, but not all of our staff are orthodox Catholics, we struggle mightily over every report related to Francis and discuss the more controversial ones at length among ourselves and with outside sources, including even some high level Catholic hierarchy.

          Reporting on Francis has been brutally difficult because of the frequent lack of clarity from Francis and his close association and preference for a large number of the most liberal clerics and notable historical enemies of those who have for years been fighting for life and family.

          The implications of some of the Francis developments have caused considerable alarm. The sound and light show at St. Peters was from my personal past experiences, one of the most alarming developments of all. There was not the slightest doubt, because of my own past, in depth research and battles related to New Age, occult influences, that the show was extremely inappropriate for the Vatican to host. Whether Francis was aware of those implications is another issue altogether and we did not go there except to note that it had his full personal approval and that he personally witnessed it. We did a thorough analysis of the show and its presenters. Should we have not done so? Should we have pretended that we did not know what we know and, again, presented the most positive spin on it as many others did? We could not do that. It would have been dishonest and a cowardly betrayal of our mission.

          We fully realize that a lot of our more recent reporting on Francis has been disturbing and unpleasant – both for us and for our readers. However, that is no reason to not publish those reports. We make every effort to be respectful and objective and to present facts that have been carefully vetted for accuracy. We deliberately avoid polemics and incendiary language, although sometimes professionalism requires that we quote notable persons who may express strong opinions.

          The comments under the stories are regularly reviewed and the more extreme and uncharitable ones frequently removed – every day. However, there is only so much censoring that should be done. We have to allow a percentage of the more critical ones to remain to reflect the true response to the reported developments.

          We have an obligation to the truth as we see it from the evidence accumulated. We have gone through similar experiences many times in the past where readers criticized us for supposedly excess negativity on one issue after another and yet, after some months or years, our reporting was more publicly proven and accepted as having been correct. We have rarely every been wrong in our general assessments of the implications of the news developments we cover. The exceptional difference this time is that we are having to report uncomfortable news about a pope. We are not all used to doing this and would never in the past have dreamed that we would be in such a position in our lifetimes.

          It can be tough to read LifeSite reports. I admit it. But, in addition to the uncomfortable stories, we also include many that inspire and relate heroism and deep faith. There is a balance and we consciously look for as many such inspiring stories as we can find.

          By the way, we start each day with a staff prayer call and every day most, if not all of our staff, pray for Francis. We have also often encouraged our readers to do so.

          Liked by 2 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Steve, thank you so much for taking the time to make this explanation. You have made your case very well. I should note for our readers here that Steve Jalsevac is the managing director and one of the founders of LifeSiteNews. I am glad to know you take these things very seriously. As a former newspaper editor, I understand your discomfort. Pope Francis does sometimes say things in a way that creates misunderstandings – and more than a few things coming out of the Vatican these days are strange. Thank you for this.

            Liked by 6 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Steve, I appreciate your detailed, thoughtful and clarifying post. Bless you.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Yong Duk says:

            Meh.

            But I saw Meh to Wuerl too, so don’t take it too personally, Steve.

            Even hear of Noah? Ham? Take a look at your honest reporting and Ham.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Gary says:

            Thank you for making my point and illustrating my deep seated fears, Steve. Rather than making a mess I wish this pope would clean up the mess. Some of what I have stated in my replies were alluded to from this article:
            https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/pope-francis-raises-the-stakes-for-catholics-unwilling-to-accept-change

            I think that God can not convey mercy to the unrepentant and that seems to me the crux of the problem with modernists.

            Like

          • Petra says:

            Steve, I very much appreciate your response to the comments that appeared here questioning the objectivity of LifeSiteNews’ reporting on the Pope. Your response is very, very helpful to me. I know I have a choice whether to view a website or not, and often if I find something that is continually disturbing to my sense of fair reporting, I just avoid visiting and reading there. Because of your response I once again trust the editorial judgement of LifeSite News. I may not like some of the articles I read there, or may not agree with how an event is portrayed, but I would much rather know I am reading something that the writers and editors believe is a fair report of facts than I would sugar-coated misinformation that spins everything positively.

            Thanks for taking time to write here. I appreciate your frank presentation of your editorial policy and practice. As all of us must, you can only do what you have discerned is right.

            God bless.

            Liked by 4 people

          • janet333 says:

            Hi Steve,

            I am not impressed with your explanation at all. I agree with Mark Mallett

            “So many people write me saying, “But Francis is confusing people!” But who exactly is confused? With respect, I’m not confused, and it’s not because I am a theologian. No, I am a simple singer-songwriter. But I can read. People are confused because they read headlines, not homilies; extracts, not exhortations. What is necessary is to sit at the feet of the Lord, take a deep breath, close one’s mouth, and listen. And that takes a little time, effort, reading, and above all, prayer.”

            God Bless and enlighten you

            Liked by 3 people

          • Yong Duk says:

            Thanks, Janet!

            I got no likes to my comment. 😀

            Reading several languages, I used to compare stories that were covered. Doing that you start to see the particular bent of the journalists and the newspapers — or when the journalist is taking from different sources unknowingly.

            I am all about free-speech, but I am also honest about my biases.

            Liked by 5 people

        • Because of the difficulties many were experiencing with some of our reports, I wrote a blog post that readers have said was helpful. See “How to survive what seems to be lots of bad news and stay sane and reasonably at peace”
          https://www.lifesitenews.com/blogs/how-to-survive-what-seems-to-be-lots-of-bad-news-and-stay-sane-and-reasonab

          Liked by 1 person

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            Steve, I have spoken with you in the past -when I asked why my posts, defending Pope Francis, were being deleted repeatedly from your site…and it seems the problem I was having then is still the same now…and that was quite a long time ago. Those posting negative comments were never deleted and they were allowed to post on and on. So I left and never came back.
            Pope Francis has never confused me except for one remark and that confusion lasted for as long as it took me to go look it up on the Vatican Site.. so about 6 minutes. I will remain LEARY and WARY of any site that chooses to do this…. sorry but that’s where I stand.
            I pray for for all those I see online, on the so many so-called “catholic sites” who have some deep dark need to go against our Vicar in these varying and secretive ways. They are spreading fear and insecurity and so many evils..in my opinion, and are NOT doing God’s will.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Yong Duk says:

            Thanks, Snowy!

            Ham, Steve, Ham!

            +YongDuk

            Liked by 2 people

      • It should be noted that the report was entirely written by Cardinal Zen and was originally published on asianews.it.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. To everyone who thinks they know God and all that he will and won’t do to save a soul, pay attention because you may be on the wrong side of this purification. Legalist and fundamentalist are the greatest deterent to the loving mercy of God. His ways are not our ways his thoughts are not our thoughts. We need to get over our selves and bow down in humility, humility, humility. We should not be complaining about our Priest or Bishops at this point either. God loves his men who gave up there lives to save our souls. Yes there are those who have gone off course but leave it to Jesus to and his Holy Mother to straighten them out.

    Margaret

    Liked by 9 people

  8. Tom from Georgia says:

    Great article, CJ. Before I started reading you I could never believe that the Pope could be the enemy of the Church, but still some of the things I was hearing were really bothering me. I am no longer personally bothered by the false reporting or misunderstandings, and don’t need to understand everything – just trust. Fr. Regis’ article opened my eyes wider. You are doing your work, no doubt. God bless

    Liked by 8 people

  9. Barbara Dore says:

    Pope Francis is not an anti pope. He wants to show the Saint’s body to the world. It may attract many people outside the Catholic church. His incorrupt body is the first class miracle from God. Many people, even Catholics are not aware of this incorrupt body. Pope Francis wants to use Padre Pio as his assistant…

    Padre Pio’s remains will be venerated in St. Peter’s Basilica …
    http://www.romereports.com/…/padre-pio-s-remains-will-be-venerated-in-st-pe...
    Jul 17, 2015 – Pope Francis will visit the Mosque of Rome on January 27. January …. Padre Pio’s remains will be venerated in St. Peter’s Basilica for the first time … His body will be exhibited during Ash Wednesday, which is February 10th.

    Liked by 5 people

  10. Snowflakesdancing says:

    I have said so before…but this, I think this is absolutely one of the best that I have read from you, Charlie. It is filled with truth and power. Your defense of Pope Francis swelled to overflowing in my heart and soul!
    The vision and heart of our Vicar is truly universal. He truly desires the salvation of ALL. I love him with my whole heart and soul and by the grace of God would defend him with my very life. I am not very courageous but I would ask for the Grace and Love to do it if it finally comes to this… and it just may. Sadly, from what I have seen and am now seeing, it may come from the inside. Lord have mercy! Jesus and Mary save souls!

    Liked by 7 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Well thanks, Snow, but all but the introduction to this wonderful piece was written by Mark Mallett.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Snowflakesdancing says:

        Yes, I know Charlie 🙂 but you said this:
        “Do you truly believe in God? If you do, do you not know that you will be held to account for restlessly defaming anyone with malicious vanity? (especially this) And to do so with the Pope, the Lord’s anointed? The sheep are, indeed, being separated from the goats – and the Pope is not a goat…”
        You are the Sherpa, Charlie and you speak the truth. And you are also humble and give credit and voice here to others doing the same!
        The rest, from Mark, is truly wonderful too! 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

  11. Lynn says:

    Charlie
    Thank you so much. We are seeing this issue first hand. An amazing man of God has now talken to a site that is against the Pope and there is no talking to him. He is now publicly bashing the Pope, our Bishop and clergy. It is becoming quite awkward for my dear friend who is in committe with him. Its quite the situation as communication only makes him more vocal and agitated. SoI pray for him and her. Any wisdom here I can pass along is appreciated.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. milliac says:

    I’m beyond thrilled to read this article, and look forward to reading the wisdom in the comments.

    This theme has been in my heart and mind the past week. My first thoughts as I woke this morning were “See what love the Father has bestowed on us that we may be called the children of God. Yet so we are.” It always amazes me how the Holy Spirit leads those in His Church in a collective conscience.

    Liked by 8 people

  13. Daphne says:

    I have also seen a lot of negative hype around the Pope and his latest prayer request. I’m not surprised at evangelical Christians calling the Pope the anti-Christ – they’ve been doing that for awhile. I am surprised at the Catholics, though. The Church has throughout history dialogued with other beliefs and kept what was good and either transformed or dumped what was bad. That is why we have wedding rings and why the dates and traditions of many of our Christian holidays have pagan origins. As Mark Mallett points out, this method was used as early as St. Paul. Why are we surprised if Pope Francis uses the same technique?

    How can we expect them to open their minds to what we know to be true if we don’t open our minds and look for and acknowledge what is true in their religion as a starting point? As the saying goes, “you can attract more flies with honey than vinegar.”

    We may have trouble understanding God’s Ways, but we need to trust in Him and His Word – and if he says that the gates of hell will not prevail against His Church, we need to believe it. In the words of St. Peter, “Master, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life. We have come to believe and are convinced that you are the Holy One of God.” Jn 6:68-69.

    Liked by 10 people

  14. EllenChris says:

    I certainly do NOT think that the Pope is an anti-christ or in league with him; I do NOT think the Pope is trying to create one world religion. Praying for people is good — being at peace with others: great.

    But I have to say honestly. Seeing the Pope’s face and hearing his voice and 2 seconds later being offered a statue of a Buddha by a Tibetan rinpoche: well, it just creeps me out a little. Jesus did say, after all: “NO ONE comes to the Father except through Me.” many blessings all around.

    Liked by 6 people

    • charliej373 says:

      The video was, I think, a terrible idea in the way it was executed. If this were a campaign and I were in charge of it, whoever did it would be fired.

      Liked by 10 people

      • Petra says:

        Charlie: ..”a terrible idea in the way it was executed.”
        I think so too. Things like this video give me the willies! 🙂 This is the sort of heterodox oh-so-subtle misrepresentation of Catholic teaching that we saw so much of in the 1970’s and 1980’s. It’s sly in its editing and implications, and Mark Mallet does a great job of parsing it piece by piece to show it’s not the Pope who said any such thing.

        I think this is just another example of what we saw from the beginning of his Pontificate of how some people are trying to twist the Pope’s words to mean something other than what he actually says, and something other than orthodox Catholic doctrinal thought. Very slick, and I’m afraid this video will deceive at least some *low information* Catholics, and give ammo to Traditionalists who are looking for anything to condemn this Pope.
        God bless.

        Liked by 6 people

      • Thank you for saying that.

        I understood the meaning of the video, but I thought the same thing.

        Liked by 2 people

      • victormusara says:

        Thank you for the wonderful work Charlie.

        I think we should pray more for Church, given the prevailing conditions,
        It is written that God prevent(ed) his anointed, “Saying, Touch not mine anointed, and do no my prophets no harm”. But it seems to me that less listen to this command.

        I have not yet seen the video, but from the comments I have seen that the Holy See was offered some sort of those Buddha statues. I have come to the conclusion that these Interreligious Meetings / Gatherings / whatever they are called, have no specific guidelines at all. Just the fact that the one who offered him the statue somehow thought it as an expression of a good gesture of some sort / maybe that the Pope might need it in some way, makes the meeting queer, strange and scary for me-and laughable too.

        But I think that the blame for the lack of those specific guidelines; which might prevent the Holy See from recieving those unwanted gifts in future, lies not on the Holy See alone; but the Vatican Officials and indirectly / directly on all of us Catholics-I think the atmosphere at the Vatican is not stable as this “Open Letter to Pope Francis” ( http://www.onepeterfive.com/open-letter-to-pope-francis-from-a-former-member-of-the-roman-curia/ ) suggests.

        Given that it [the Letter] has the credibility which it claims, the scenario which occured when St. Paul corrected St. Peter (the 1st. Holy See) concerning the treatment of the Gentiles will never repeat itself.
        So basing on the Letter, lack of cooperation between Vatican officials and the Holy See, as long as it persists, will bring more of those strange gifts from the Buddha, Muslims and the like.

        Like

    • Yong Duk says:

      Perfectly said, “creeps me out”, but the four objects at the end creeped me out a little more 🙂

      Liked by 5 people

      • EllenChris says:

        Yes, YD, I agree — all four objects were offered together as though there were an equality among them, and the figure of the Infant Jesus was just one object among them. If I had been the Jewish guy, I would have refused to participate in this thing.

        Thank you, Charlie, I agree with you on the production values. But who set this up; and why; and why did the Pope go along with it? The woman who was dressed as a Tibetan Rinpoche was obviously Italian. How did she end up making a Buddhist profession of faith: “I take refuge in [or “trust”] the Buddha”? Did she get any catechesis at home — should we care instead of holding her up?

        Wow, this thing was just a train wreck in so many ways.

        Liked by 5 people

    • Tarja says:

      The satue of Buddha was the most difficult point in that video for me, too. Other persons had the hallmark (right word?) of their religion in their hand or Jesus Child (naturally, when pope was talking) BUT THIS WOMAN HAD AN IDOL IN HER HAND!That was too much for me and I was very sad. It was a mistake, I cannot think otherwise.

      Jesus Christ has come to deliver us from idols. Lord, have mercy on us!

      Liked by 2 people

  15. Phillip Frank says:

    – So, because you are lukewarm, and neither hot nor cold, I will spit you out of my mouth. …
    This, in my opinion, is how Pope Francis is so effective on both sides of the equation.
    God is using him as a catalyst for those who are not hot or cold. He is rattling both cages, those who are ineffective, asleep in the worlds glamor or those who know just enough about their faith to be dangerous…but no more.
    In the world of intertainment, negative press is still press. The music star Madonna, amassed great fortune and infamy, using this technique.
    God, in order to shake the scales from our eyes, is using Pope Fransis as sign of contradiction. Those on the left looking more closely at him in an effort to see if he is for them or against them, will see truth, maybe for the first time.
    Those on the right, looking more closely at him will also see truth, maybe for the first time. But BOTH sides will be shaken, and that’s a good thing. Its a good thing because the complacency of error on both sides will give way to a ferver, a ferver to be proactive toward the truth, which in its fruition, intimately leads to God.

    Liked by 11 people

    • zeniazenia says:

      I love the story behind hot, cold and lukewarm. Hierapolis was famous for hot mineral springs which were healing and good for rest, Colossae was famous for cold refreshing water which was healing and good for rest. Laodicea was a rich cosmopolitan city between those two resort cities on the Roman road, but their church was not much of a comfort to the people, so Jesus’ metaphoric meaning in His letter in Rev. 3, telling them they were lukewarm was not lost on them. They has no merit at all on their own, so Jesus tells them, ‘Therefore I counsel you to buy from ME gold refined by fire, that you may be rich, and white garments to clothe you and to keep the shame of your nakedness from being seen, and salve to anoint your eyes, that you may see.” The Church can always help restore us with what we are lacking. Jesus gives us the answer. Praise God :0)- ZJ

      Liked by 5 people

      • zeniazenia says:

        Reading Jesus’ letter again, it may be (I will look for historical commentary) that one would receive a white robe and salve at those health spas, just like we do today! Jesus never fails to bring us back to the comfort, rest and coziness only He can provide. :0)

        Liked by 3 people

      • EllenChris says:

        Great point, Zenia. At Laodicea the hot and cold waters were mixed together and became lukewarm. The church at Laodicea was sternly warned. We need the same warning today.

        Liked by 4 people

    • zeniazenia says:

      I agree with your analysis Phillip that both sides are being rattled and shaken by Holy Father Francis and the Church is a salve for our eyes. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

  16. milliac says:

    I just remembered that Fr. Larry Richards homily addressed this on 1/10/16. It was very good, and worth a listen.

    Basically he was saying: If God’s not the Father of everybody, why would he create anybody? We know God so loved the world he gave his only Son, but only these certain few will be saved? People are saying Muslim, Buddhists, whatever…’God loves me and you are going to hell’. Think about that. What kind of God would do that?

    http://thereasonforourhope.org/homilies/January102016-TheBaptismofOurLord-CycleC/

    Liked by 5 people

    • EllenChris says:

      Dear MIlliac, may I urgently invite you to read my long comment below which addresses the issue you raised. I hope you will do this — many blessings.

      Like

      • milliac says:

        Thank you EllenChris. I appreciate your comments and I’m sure I will find much to meditate on. I should know Fr. Larry Richards words in print come across differently than hearing him speak it. God Bless!

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Linda says:

    Where the pope is there is the barque of Peter.. We are so lucky to know.. BTW Charlie the Lord must need suffering this week.. Pink eye…bladder infection here just to mention a FEW .. Lol. All for you dear Jesus..💟 triumph💟💟💟

    Liked by 7 people

  18. Humility is a good which is often forgotten.

    Liked by 8 people

  19. Robyn says:

    I know this is a little off topic but I just watched this inspiring video interview of Jim Caveizel who played Jesus in the Passion of the Christ. It is so inspiring and got better and better as the interview went on. The interviewer was trying to keep it light but Jim wouldn’t have it. He spoke of Mercy and love and how we are called to live in these times and how not to be afraid of the difficulty coming, it’s a grace. Jim goes in and out of Aramaic (the language spoken during the movie and that Jesus used). It’s 39 minutes well spent. I am so tech illiterate I hope you all can access it
    http://www.faithit.com/this-jesus-actor-is-about-to-blow-up-your-view-on-gods-mercy-with-one-powerful-question/#.VpsuELqBKT0.facebook

    Liked by 5 people

    • Wow. Awesome video. Thanks for the link, Robyn.

      Liked by 2 people

    • diane says:

      Thank you Robyn – that was powerful. Love. I do. Diane

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mary T. says:

      Hi Robyn and all here. Thanks for the video link. I watched it last night. Sadly, it bothered me to hear Jim (among other things he told about) say that he knew that all of the people there in the crowd would be going to Heaven when they died. That really struck me wrong. How does he know that? I also thought, as the video went on, that Jim was kind of full of himself, like as though he really did think that he just might be Jesus himself. I have to remember that he is an actor, and quite possibly being used by the Satan. Perhaps I am way off base here, but I went to bed last night quite disturbed about this video. I initially thought I would forward the video to my kids, but no more. I simply can’t forward something I don’t believe in.

      Like

    • barbara dore says:

      the veiwers should pray for mel gibson and hell attacks him for making a brilliant film about Jesus s last hours on Earth. please pray for his poor soul.

      Liked by 4 people

  20. Anne says:

    Read this first on Mallett’s website. I am not surprised by it…….. We have been warned for awhile about the world turning into ” conglomerate mucky duck soup.”
    Just help us stay the course dear Lord.
    Looking forward to some Charlie articles emanating from Mountain cabin time!
    Some encouragement to all to be signs of hope in the storm/rescue……. Or the stormy rescue….. However you like to put it!

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Joy says:

    Charlie, I was just feeling a little blue about the state of the world (political scene, falling stock market, ISIS) and went poking around in your archives. The Lord sent me to your piece called The Shrine from Aug. 26, 2014. I read the whole thing and the last few sentences left me in tears. You (and I) may not be here when the Shrine is completed and visitors are going there to pray and give thanks, but I have hope that we will have done our part in this story called life. Thank you for being a faithful servant.

    Liked by 4 people

  22. I never leave comments but I think I should this time. I want to say that I was ensnared for about four months by “traditionalists” from the end of 2014 to around early March of 2015 and it was the most tormenting, miserable time in my entire spiritual life. I was terrified that if I didn’t find a traditionalist Church I would be condemned. I prayed and prayed throughout those months to not be deceived. On Christmas of 2014, I was throwing out false claims about the pope to a couple of my cousins when one of my cousins, who was intoxicated at the time, said what I needed to hear. Even while drunk, he was loyal and God made use of him. He told me to go talk to our parish priest. I did the next day and father was able to aim me back toward the right path from there, even though I still suffered from doubts until around March. The thing that kind of clicked eventually was how much hatred the traditionalists I was listening to had for Jews and how completely unmerciful they were to everyone outside of there circle and how contemptible they were towards the Pope.Then of course their obsession over secret societies, which made me incredibly paranoid. It gave me chills when I read Charlie’s piece about the demons that were loosed with the mission of attacking the most pious. Especially since it was right around that time when I was mislead. It was Mass that really set me straight. A specific Mass where the true presence of Christ was so powerful it almost brought me to tears. As long as Pope Francis is doing all he can to Imitate Christ and pointing people to Our Blessed Lord, he doesn’t fit the bill of a false prophet at all. To all the haters out there, does the “false profit” have a mission to point people to Jesus. Makes no sense at all. Charlie. If you read this, please! PLEASE! say something about rapture. Even if just a quick note. I can’t stand hearing about it anymore. The way I remember it, “rapture” is when the righteous in Christ rise from the dead and are taken up by the angels on judgement day to praise Christ at His glorious return. Not a bunch of people disappearing so they can escape suffering while all others get the short end of the stick. Just a strongly desired suggestion. And btw Charlie, you really helped me get the refortified conviction I need to defend the church, ever since my Aunt posted a link to your talk from Birmingham video on my facebook wall back in July. If not for my being deceived before and the lessons learned from it and then finding you, I might be among the accusers right now. Thanks be to God for answering my prayer and thank you.

    Liked by 13 people

    • charliej373 says:

      I am glad you have safely taken shelter in the Barque of Peter. I do have to note that not all traditionalists are caught up in such. Most are loyal to the Pope and the Magisterium. But there is a small, but influential group, that is filled with bile, thinking they are holy and everyone else is doomed. You got caught up with the latter. I pray for them, but I fear some are so far gone they would crucify Christ again if He came in Person and dared contradict them. They are caught up in their own vanity and hatred.

      Liked by 7 people

      • Yong Duk says:

        Yes, beware of wolves in sheep’s clothing in all groups–I have seen rigid “Faithful” Roman Catholic Traditionalists destroy seminarians lives! (Thanks be to God, I have seen God defend them in regards to those same people to bring about their change of heart [but did not see it], but I would not want to be the people who did that either now or on judgment day.]

        Liked by 4 people

        • Love is everything. I learned this from my agnostic brother, not my fellow Catholics.While they were busy noticing all the rules that were being broken by everyone around them, my brother was busy giving away everything he owned and all his money to those in need. He couldn’t stand to see anyone suffer. He was agnostic because he couldn’t understand how a God of any kind could watch people suffer and do nothing about it…so maybe there isn’t one. After He died I prayed to him for a favor and received a very dramatic answer to that prayer. That’s when I got it: the greatest of these is charity.

          Liked by 5 people

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            singingflowers, that’s just beautiful, I love it! 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • Mick says:

            Oh, I love it, Singingflowers! It’s exactly what our Lord said: “Greater love has no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.” And again, “Whatsoever you did to the least of my brethren, you did unto Me.” Your dear brother, even without his knowledge, was serving Christ by loving his neighbor; and the Lord has rewarded him for it.

            When our youngest was in the NICU, one of her doctors was a devout young Muslim lady. She is an amazing doctor and an amazing person. (We sat around joking one day about the comparative hardships of Ramadan versus Lent.) She was the doctor who helped me track down a deacon when we needed to have our daughter emergency-baptized after the priest chaplain had gone home for the day. This doctor is in serious error in her beliefs, but she loves and loves and loves. And I hope, pray, and believe that it is this love that will save her in the end.

            God bless Dr. Sabina.

            Liked by 7 people

    • Joyce Brown says:

      Daniel, I went through something very similar in 2003, at the end of JPII’s pontificate. It was around the time of the Boston Globe publication of their massive investigation of sexual abuse in the Church. A seed of worry was planted and over a period of months it metastisized into a full-blown crisis for me. At the acme of my personal crisis I had an ulcer and was very nearly convinced I had to leave my Novus Ordo parish and find a licit, exclusively Tridentine parish.

      Our bishop (at the time) was the “hit-and-run bishop”, Thomas J. O’Brien. O’Brien had completely refused the indult Mass in our diocese, but there were a pocket or two of priests from SSPX and the Priestly Fraternity of St. Peter who ‘illicitly’ were celebrating the Tridentine around Phoenix. I was in a real panic, having been convinced (through much reading and research) that the Novus Ordo was in actuality the illicit Mass. I found a Church (an hour from my home) administered by the FSSP and I called and spoke to a priest there. I told him of my crisis and asked him if I should take this step. He was really wonderful, and he directed me exactly to where I should go and what I should do: I should go to my knees and pray directly to Our Lady and ask for guidance.

      So I thanked him and hung up the phone and did as he suggested. As a result, peace was restored to my heart. I was going to be okay to stay where I was. But then several amazing things happened over the next few years. First was that Bishop O’Brien, unable to escape his actions resigned and our diocese was assigned the most amazing, holy Bishop: Thomas J. Olmsted, author of the recent exhortation “Into the Breach”. Then the priest of my parish was accused of inappropriate behavior by an ex-employee of the Church and the answers given to the congregation by him and others were highly unsatisfactory, so we left and started attending our neighborhood parish. No more teens crowding the altar at the Consecration, no more liturgical dance or ‘skits’ during the homily. My fear, anxiety and ulcer finally left and I’ve remained at this wonderful parish ever since.

      My takeaway from it all is this: trust in the Lord, not in your own faculties. Trust in the Magisterium. Stay on your knees and do not imagine that you can ever be ‘more Catholic’ than your fellow Catholics who are also struggling to live as Catholic. And pray for our clergy, because The Liar is pursuing their souls with even more fervor than yours.

      Liked by 5 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      Praise be to God. It is so nice to have you here Daniel as a powerful witness. Bless you.

      Liked by 1 person

    • janet333 says:

      “To all the haters out there, does the “false profit” have a mission to point people to Jesus.”

      Well said Daniel! Ah that old rapture myth. Many are going to be shocked when they realise that they are not going to be whisked up into the air…(depending on their misinterpretation of Scripture)…before… during… or after the tribulations.

      Liked by 2 people

  23. Rose says:

    Charlie, I too am one of your loyal readers who don’t post but it was so extremely important to me that you have been so outspoken about defending our Holy Father, that I feel I must thank you for doing so from the bottom of my heart. I have such great affection for him. My thanks to you and Mark Mallett for helping us all in these difficult days to remain faithful to Pope Francis and Our Lord.

    Liked by 9 people

  24. EllenChris says:

    After reading the comments above, may I make some observations:

    As Charlie pointed out, there is a difference between arrogant and cranky “traditionalists” and those who take their stand totally and faithfully in the Gospel received from our Lord Jesus Christ through His Apostles. Those who are truly faithful have been painted as narrow minded by the enemies of the Gospel for quite a while now. We have been made to feel wrong and guilty when we hold to the Truth; Christians are urged to believe that we can only be good guys when we go along with the progressives. **Don’t buy the propaganda!** There is no compromise between the Truth and a Lie. Jesus Christ is THE Way, THE Truth, THE Life. Why? Because HE said so, and He is the only begotten Son of God. That has to be totally clear before we should try to engage in “dialogue” with those of other religions with whom we disagree. And we do *disagree* with them, as the Pope said in the video — don’t miss that bit.

    There is a pernicious heresy that pervades the thinking of people in Western culture, including Christians (Catholic or otherwise) called: SYNCRETISM. Syncretism says that we can just look around and take a little bit of whatever pleases us and patch it all together like a quilt. This is not just “cafeteria Catholics” who pick which parts of church doctrine they want to follow; this is the idea that you can do some Yoga, meditate with Buddhist methods, get a charm from your local Santeria practitioner and dance around with Islamic dervishes, and *It’s all good*! NO. And just BTW — ***NO*** NOT for a faithful Christian. Syncretism is not okay at all — it is deadly to our souls. I speak from experience here.

    Now the Pope did not *say* anything that was actually syncretistic, but that video — Yeeeeech!

    So then, does God send people to hell just because they are not Christians? No. However — this needs to be clearly understood: There is also a heresy called UNIVERSALISM. Universalism says that everyone goes to heaven just for being human. Unless, maybe, you actually murder someone. Somehow, the only sin that people think is serious these days is murder (except for the kind of murder that is abortion — that’s okay according to some). Every other sin just gets passed over, and even murderers will be okay if they somehow had a good enough reason (whatever that may be). This is NOT the Faith that we have received.

    So what does the Church teach? Original Sin is the real condition of the human race since we, as a species, chose to turn away from God’s Grace. All humans are born in a state of separation from God. Heaven is not our “default” position. We need Redemption in order to be restored to a relationship with God and to be admitted to heaven. God sent His only begotten Son so that all who believe in Him shall not perish but have eternal life (this is Holy Scripture, not my opinion). Jesus Christ is THE Savior. The Church teaches that God has a “universal salvific Will,” which means that God has provided salvation for all humans by means of Jesus’ Life, Passion, Death and Resurrection. God wants every human being to receive this Gift of His Love — no one is excluded from the ability to receive the Gift. However, this gift is *not* automatically our possession: We have to accept the Gift of Salvation in order for us to benefit from it. We are baptized INTO the Body of Christ. Or not. Those who hear the Gospel and reject it, do not receive the Gift and are therefore not admitted to heaven. God does not want this to happen, and He will give them every opportunity to repent and accept salvation in Christ. None of us can judge anyone’s eternal destiny because we do not know how God is acting in their lives or what their final choice will be. But Jesus was quite clear: “No one comes to the Father except through Me.”

    The Church of Jesus Christ, wherever it is faithful, does not teach Universalism or Syncretism. That is not what the Pope was trying to say. But both of these heresies have infiltrated the Christian Churches to an astonishing degree, and most people are not even aware of this.

    There is a place of Faithfulness between narrow, arrogant and angry Traditionalism for its own sake, and the false teachings of Universalism and Syncretism. This is the place of authentic Faith in Christ. If we entrust ourselves to Jesus Christ as Savior and Lord, then we must trust that He will take very good care of us. We should pray very much that His Gospel will be received by everyone because everyone needs it.

    Does God love every human being He has created completely? Absolutely! Do we have free will to choose to receive that Love or not? Yes, we do. Does everyone make that choice to receive His Love and love Him in return? Sadly, NO. Hell is real, my brothers and sisters. God did not intend it for us, but people do go there. We need to be clear about this. Peace and Goodness to all.

    Liked by 8 people

  25. singingjuls says:

    Thanks Charlie for defending our pope, and teaching me more about his great role in God’s plan for us. I have to share this as an aside, but I didn’t know or really understand the true role of our popes until Saint Pope John Paul II passed away. The summer of 2010 our junior high camp theme was about John Paul the Great. (He wasn’t a blessed or saint at that point). Our teens were always on fire for him and I didn’t really get it until that summer. I learned so much about him that year, and the true role of our great pontiffs. I learned to love these vicars of Christ in a new unique way. Pope Emeritus Benedict is German and is such a quiet man that I felt a kinship to him as I am mostly of German heritage and generally a quiet person. Then when Pope Francis was elected, it was on my birthday, what a beautiful birthday gift! My husband and my grandfather’s names are Francis, my son’s middle name is Francis, both my husband and my son love St. Francis so much that they chose him as their confirmation names, and my favorite quote long before Pope Francis was elected has always been, “Preach the Gospel, when necessary, use words.” My favorite quote of Pope Francis? “Pray for me.” God does have some unique and quirky ways for us to relate to His chosen ones.

    You, Mark Mallett, our great parish priest and our awesome youth minister, as well as many more wise servants of God in our church, help me to continue to love our faith every day, even on the hard days. Many blessings and thank you. ~Juls

    Liked by 4 people

  26. Phillip Frank says:

    zeniazenia says:
    January 21, 2016 at 7:10 am
    I agree with your analysis Phillip that both sides are being rattled and shaken by Holy Father Francis and the Church is a salve for our eyes. 🙂
    You can see his results right here in this thread alone ZZ. There are two or three people who have been searching because what Pope Francis said has troubled them but they went seeking genuinely for truth and finally, with the help of Charlie, Mark and others, have found it.
    Pope Francis asked us to “make a mess” and he has been true to his word, messing some of us up big time. But in the end he is hoping that as we are unarranged by this mess, we will be rearranged in the light of real truth which he has succinctly written in his magisterial writings, with the glue of grace, the wisdom of the Holy Spirit and on a foundation of Rock.

    Liked by 6 people

  27. That video was definitely not my cup of tea.

    That being said, I will also say the following: it helped me in a very concrete, practical way to evangelize. Shortly after it came out. I was invited to be a panelist on religion at a local college, representing Catholicism. I would be alongside a Jew, Muslim, Unitarian, Protestant, and Atheist. I had to sit there in front of a group of college students, listening to a whole torrent of errors coming from the lips of my fellow panelists (to give you some perspective, the Jew they invited was a female “rabbi” who was “married” to another woman, whom she constantly referred to as her “wife,” and they have four adopted children). Since they all droned on for so incredibly long, I had extremely little time to present for Catholicism, as I was second to last. I chose to simply recite the Apostle’s Creed, take several moments to exalt Our Lady, and then advise them to Google the “Catechism of the Catholic Church” to learn more.

    After the panel discussion was over, while my fellow panelists were huddled together… perhaps congratulating each other on how liberal they were… with no students approaching them, one student came up to me saying he was thinking of becoming a priest, and another came up to me acknowledging that he really needs to get back to Mass.

    Needless to say, I left that event glad I was willing to dialogue and accept that invitation. Pope Francis’ video gave me the courage to accept the invitation and attend.

    As I’ve said before, Truth only needs a small fraction of the speaking time as Error to nevertheless prevail over it. But if we’re too afraid to give it even that chance — because we tremble at the thought of being in a situation where someone will be speaking error and we will have to be silent, or perhaps even ignore the error therein and merely praise what good in it we can find, causing us to instead cling to our small circles of comfort and security — then we neglect our duty. Pope Francis is trying to show us that we need not be afraid. Let us heed his call.

    Liked by 14 people

  28. Mary Ann Parks says:

    Words can be parsed (and one must admit that the non-baptized are children of God metaphorically as his creatures, not truly as those adopted into His divine life). But images speak also. Visually, the video speaks indifferentism and syncretism. Also the use of the word for faith is equivocal among the different speakers. Buddhists don’t have faith in Buddha as Jews have in God.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Carmelite says:

    Charlie and Mark, i hear you, and I am not a Pope Francis hater. By the grace of our God, I will not leave the Church founded by Our Lord.
    But I must agree with this author … http://www.catholicculture.org/commentary/the-city-gates.cfm?id=1221
    God bless all in this family!

    Liked by 2 people

    • janet333 says:

      Hi Carmelite…The washing of the feet was reserved for the poor and the newly baptised in the early years. It wasn’t included in the liturgy of the Mass until 1955. Women were excluded only because at that time they could not enter near the altar.

      Liked by 3 people

  30. theresa323 says:

    Just wanted to mention, today the Holy Father has By decree opened up foot washing for women on Holy Thursday. I realize that most parishes have been using women for years…….but there were always those who would use all men. The bishops would usually use the seminarians.
    Of course now every parish will be obligated to use women…
    I am sure the Holy Father was chosen for this time in history, but He does like to shake lthings up.
    Holy Thursday is when we celebrate, the sacrament of Holy Orders, and the Institution of the Eucharist.
    Men are called to be priest, and Previous Popes have said, Women cannot be priest, even if the Pope ordains them.
    What are your thoughts on this Charlie.

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      I suppose I should be a little red-faced to admit that, until this tempest, I was not aware that women traditionally were not part of the foot-washing ceremony. I have come to appreciate and value the argument that it is better for altar servers to be boys, as it is kind of like a Priestly “Little League.” I would have to ponder on this one, as I never knew it was an issue to begin with.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Mary Ann Parks says:

        To help your pondering: This Mandatum ceremony was allowed to be done in seminaries, monasteries of monks, and cathedrals only, as it was historically seen as a symbolic expression of the nature of the priestly hierarchy. It was optional, but ancient, and done at the end of the Holy Thursday Liturgy. The placement in the Holy Thursday Liturgy at all “venues” was changed in the 50’s, but not the meaning, and it was still optional. But the 70’s brought a different interpretation than what the Church had always taught, which is the interpretation that Archbishop Bergoglio followed. As a result, people began to disobey the law on this so universally that the law began to be something of which most were ignorant. Now the Pope has declared a new practice. His right to do this is unquestioned, but his citing that this would bring out the “real meaning” of Jesus’ action conflicts with several hundred years of Catholic tradition in the understanding of this event. My problem is this: just when we need an example to bishops that they have to be servants, we get it aimed at lay people instead.

        Like

      • janet333 says:

        The practice of washing the feet has great value in that it signifies the act of humility and service. This is exactly what Christ asked for.
        In convents woman washed the feet of guests and children. So yes.. foot washing does have a long tradition..but it didn’t exclude women up until 1955 for the reasons I’ve stated above. Pope Francis is only doing then what was practiced in the early years. Canon lawyer, Edward Peters says what Francis is doing is “absolutely licit” because it doesn’t entail a sacrament.
        “Amen I say to you, whatsoever you shall bind upon earth, shall be bound also in heaven; and whatsoever you shall loose upon earth, shall be loosed also in heaven” 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

    • zeniazenia says:

      Hi Theresa, Just as the Church follows the teachings of Jesus, though God can surely save someone in another way (Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit), I always thought –could be wrong–the Holy Father, as the Vicar of Christ, could make changes in such a minor discipline as foot washing. We in our parishes of course do not have that same authority to change that discipline. 🙂 –ZJ

      Liked by 3 people

    • Joyce Brown says:

      From what I understand, in the Ordinary Form of the Mass, the washing of the feet is completely OPTIONAL. And it is NOT required for the Extraordinary Form.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Yong Duk says:

        Hi, ‘Cepta has me in a mood.

        So…

        If we were talking 1950 or even 1958, when Liturgical Reform was all the Buzz in circles, with a return to the Patristics revitalized and the Tridentine Abuses were felt acutely, then these arguments would be all the more valid.

        John Paul II stated there was an oversight on Altar servers in the common reckoning (yes, Doug and MP, as opposed to Shire Reckoning).

        So with Altar Servers, there is a difference. But how many Altar Serving boys serve less worthily than girls? (I digress…) It is a function of love and respect.

        Ideally, it would be as it was… either or both: foot washing or altar servers.

        But Think about It. Does the Same Symbolism truly truly truly hold in 1996 as 2006 as 2016 as 1956? Especially with regards to Foot Washing? Do the Faithful really see it that way?

        So, while there is the ideal… there is also the frank (and perhaps even stark) reality that there is NO going back. [And for those who think the Storm is a going back, look at St. Tarciscius.] So? What to do?

        Let’s at least be honest and see the Pope as being a realist. Not Realist vs. Idealist in philosophical terms, but a realist in terms of Ministry.

        It isn’t about inclusivity or exclusivity. It is about Ministry.

        Does anyone know who Cardinal Sean Patrick O’Malley is?

        Why he was made Cardinal of Boston after the Scandals?

        Does anyone know why he messed up in cleaning up Boston? (Forward this to him if you desire.)

        He used to go down and minister while in Puerto Rico… And when appointed Archbishop, he made the mistake of not getting rid of the those culpable, even if Auxiliary Bishops.

        The Pope isn’t like O’Malley. O’Malley needed to be hands on and get his fingernails dirty as he had before.

        The Pope stands with and above–not apart. And what he does send shockwaves throughout the Church… He needed to minister and give example to all the Clericalists on how to minister to calling–and I am talking to you Archbishop Sample (forward this to him)–those who sought him out humble and to touching those unable to hope to be touched with dignity as that Muslim woman in jail… Imagine, calling a lowly newspaper man to cancel a subscription. Imagine returning a phone call to someone heartbroken… That’s what Pope Francis did!

        Fools! Learn from Christ!

        I disagree with Ellen Chris on several points and even her quoting Tax Collectors and Sinners in that context she did several days ago, but I will stand by her and her convictions and respectfully (mutually speaking) my own and say: Jesus ate with them there Publicans and Tax Collectors. And I ate with HIV+/AIDS ridden Prostitutes in Africa, dipping my bare hand in their food with theirs, and I am not saying I am better, but I am saying, “Get your heads right with Christ and stop fighting Grace!”

        Does anyone remember Abp. Fulton Sheen when he was in Africa at a leper colony? Does anybody know St. Damian of Molokai? Write to Sample and write to O’Malley and remind them from where they have fallen and rejoice when they remember…

        Gandalf rocks,
        +Young Duck

        Liked by 7 people

    • Beckita says:

      I am grateful the Holy Father officially opened the foot washing on Holy Thursday to women. When we are baptized we are anointed as priest, prophet and king.

      From the baptism rite:
      “Priest: The God of power and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ has freed you from sin and brought you to new life through water and the Holy Spirit. He now anoints you with the chrism of salvation, so that, united with his people, you may remain for ever a member of Christ who is Priest, Prophet and King. All: Amen (The priest anoints the child on the crown of the head with the sacred chrism…)

      We are certainly not ordained priests, but each of us participates in a common priesthood and I am humbled to think of the emphasis placed on loving service by our Master when He gave the example of washing feet. I particualrly think this as I envision clergy and laity united in building up the Mystical Body of Christ as we are rescued.

      Now the Eucharist is an entirely different matter. No priest = no Eucharist confected. Of coruse we know Jesus instituted the Sacrament of Holy Eucharist on Holy Thursday. The ordained priesthood and the Eucharist are inextricably united.

      Liked by 5 people

  31. diane says:

    I need to remember that all I really need to do is recite the Creed – long ago we had a priest who said exactly what you did. He told us when people ask us what we believe, to answer with the Creed, it says it all. Father Wally, he was such a neat old guy. His off the cuff homilies were the best. Ahhh, this is a prayer for him and he knows it. God Bless you Father Wally. Love. I do. Diane

    Liked by 6 people

  32. milliac says:

    In my journey of how to balance the risk of being deceived by heresy, the challenge of raising our son in the Catholic church, and respecting the Hindu faith of my husband and my in-laws that live with us, I have learned a few things. I’m glad I kept notes. 

    I’ve learned that God loves everyone more than I will ever love them. All people belong to Him. They are His idea. He made them. He knows them. I am learning to trust them to God’s power and sovereignty.

    With that said, I am convinced that “Jesus is the fullest and most complete and final revelation of God to the human race and Catholicism is the fullest most ancient and most complete union with that unique revelation of God in Jesus Christ”. http://www.patheos.com/blogs/standingonmyhead/2016/01/ten-tricks-of-the-devil-to-watch-out-for.html

    By his incarnation the Son of God has united himself in some fashion with every human being”.2 This saving event reveals to humanity not only the boundless love of God who “so loved the world that he gave his only Son” (Jn 3:16), but also the incomparable value of every human person. (Evangelium Vitae 2)

    This part from the article stood out for me: “But the parable of the prodigal son also provides another analogy. That the entire human race is like the prodigal; we have all, through original sin, been separated from the Father. But He is still our Father. We are all generated from the “thought” of God. We all share in the same ancestral parents.”

    As I type this, I recall meditating on the prodigal son walking home, but then noticed Jesus was ahead of him on the path…beckoning him and leading the way back to the Father.

    Jesus is The Way, The Truth & The Light. Since Jesus is God, and God is Love, could we also say that Love is the Way, Love is the Truth, Love is the Light? As the video was trying to demonstrate, love is common between us all. As the children of God, we can build on that foundation of love to lead to the “fruits of peace & justice. “Love and truth will meet; justice and peace will kiss. Truth will spring from the earth; justice will look down from heaven. (Psalm 85:11-12)

    I believe Pope Francis, in his own way, is trying to take us back to the basics of Love and Mercy; calling and leading us all back to the Father. He is asking us to do the same…to dialogue with Love and Mercy–not judge others’ salvation. We are only asked to plant seeds along the way; The rest we trust to His mercy.

    Christ is “the light that enlightens every man who comes into the world” (Jn 1:9) by natural revelation, natural wisdom, and the natural law known by conscience. When a Lao Tzo, or a Socrates, or a Buddha arrive at a profound knowledge of some eternal truth, they do so by the light of Christ the eternal Logos, the pre-incarnate Word or revelation of God. He is the same person, but not with his human, incarnate nature. All truth is His truth. (Peter Kreft) http://www.peterkreeft.com/topics/weakness-strength.htm

    For the early generations of Christians, the language of ‘the Word’ helped them understand why the individual history of Jesus, the God-man, had cosmic significance. We get a sense of a visionary, intellectual enlightenment that runs from the Letter to the Colossians through to the writings of the Church Fathers. But it also helped them recognise that life-giving truth could be found in other cultures and traditions. The world is inextricably entangled with the Word of God that shapes it. All human beings are shaped in the Word to respond to the Word. And thus our God speaks to us all and through us all – indeed through all creation.
    http://www.thinkingfaith.org/articles/beginning%E2%80%A6

    Lastly, “Joy, happiness, and love attract people. Anger, frustration, and discontent alienate them. Our joy and gladness in the Lord should be contagious; they should draw people to Jesus and his Church. We should make our acquaintances inquire, ‘Why is he so joyful? What does he have that I don’t have?’ If we grumble and gossip, it will convince the lost one that they have indeed received the better part. http://www.catholic.com/magazine/articles/six-rules-for-dealing-with-non-catholic-family-and-friends

    Liked by 4 people

  33. I’m a newish Catholic, having reverted and finished my sacraments in 2012.

    I have to say that it is imperative that faithful, steady, prudent Catholics be out there to help ..shore up? the faith of those just coming into the church. These are hard waters for new Catholics to navigate.

    God graced me with an exceptional parish that I love, my priests are all so faithful and true that they are a banquet of God’s grace to our parish with their different gifts. However, I know many aren’t as blessed as we are, and coupling questionable parishes with the online barrage questioning Pope Francis, many newer Catholics are confused. I am watching many people that I came into the church with falter, and question their decision.

    Thank you for this post, Charlie. It helps a lot.

    Liked by 5 people

  34. Anne says:

    Thank you to the person who put on a link to father Sam Johnston. Read some of his entries. Go to acceptance on side column. There are 4 entries. In one we are told to do what is in front of us. ……. The next step.

    Liked by 2 people

  35. Ed Allison says:

    Apparently, it’s National Squirrel Appreciation Day. Who knew???
    https://www.daysoftheyear.com/days/squirrel-appreciation-day/

    Liked by 7 people

  36. moomba1 says:

    Hello, Charlie ~ I found the following quite interesting and am wondering what your thoughts on it are: http://insidethevatican.com/ In case the link does not go directly to the “Letter” I am referring to, it is Letter #5 by Dr. Robert Moynihan. Could it be that there is indeed hope?

    Thank you, Charlie.

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      That renewal begins in each heart and will grow, not from Hollywood, Washington, London, Paris or Brussels, but in little enclaves that say enough and live as they should is something I have been saying since I began. I appreciate you offering evidence to support that.

      Liked by 6 people

    • The Catholic homeschoolers I know have been moving in the direction of the Domestic Monastery and looking to St. Benedict as a role model. So that article is very encouraging! Especially knowing how those very monasteries brought us through tumultuous times. Ora et Labora.

      Liked by 5 people

  37. Bob says:

    I have not commented much on this topic. For me the duty is clear, to trust the Pope God has appointed and anointed for this duty, to pray for him and to pray that God will give me greater grace to live well. I suppose I am often too busy to engage in controversies which for me are not issues.

    Liked by 6 people

  38. RA in WV says:

    I suspect that this post will be filtered out as “troll” by the NRS “powers that be,” but my point is not so much to influence readers of NRS as to express frustration with Mr. Johnston’s (to me) culpably naïve support for the antics of our current Supreme Pontiff.

    As far as I can discern, Mr. Johnston and his spiritual acolytes (Mark Mallett et al.) firmly believe that Pope Francis has been delivered of a brilliant insight by the Holy Spirit, to wit: since the world has become completely deaf to the “old” and “stale” formulations of Christian doctrine, ethics, and morality, the way to hit the evangelical “reset” button is to tone down all the exclusionary, triumphalist, Pharisaical claptrap that influenced people of a simpler and less sophisticated age (you know, before Vatican II), in favor of a gospel of unconditional inclusion, mercy, and self-congratulatory celebration, all in the hopes of gaining an eventual hearing for some approximation of the Gospel – sort of a “practical application” of 1 Cor 9:22 – “I have become all things to all people so that by all possible means I might save some.”

    Now the need for an irenic (as opposed to polemic) approach to spreading the Gospel in the post-modern era may, indeed, be a “brilliant insight,” but Pope Francis’ (to me disingenuous) irenicism has, in effect, proclaimed a gospel of universal salvation, religious indifference, and secular humanism with a Christian veneer. His nominal adherence to Catholic orthodoxy is akin to a politician’s nominal adherence to his Party’s platform: it sounds good and it keeps a restive and vigilant Party base (you know, stubborn purists, aka traditionalists) on the defensive. There is more than ample evidence in both his Argentine clerical and Roman pontifical histories to suggest that Francis is a modernist, a materialist (in the philosophical, not economic, sense), a universalist, and a Peronist. (Yes, we hateful, benighted Francophobes just LURVE our labels, don’t we? It lets us put people into convenient little pigeonholes and point fingers at them without having to consider the actual evidence, don’t you know? Yeah, whatever…)

    The argument that, while Pope Francis may be a loose cannon on matters unrelated to faith and morals, his pronouncements on topics that DO touch on those subjects are “100% rock solid” and in total and verifiable agreement with everything the Church has ever taught throughout the ages, is risibly naïve. It would appear that all a pope has to do to be considered a “rock solid” defender of the Catholic faith is not make any ex cathedra pronouncements officially denying, reversing, or abrogating prior dogmatic or doctrinal beliefs of the Catholic Church. Anything else he says or does, while perhaps inadvisable or even injurious to the faith and the faithful, is of no ultimate consequence in the larger scheme of things. This sets a dangerously low bar for orthodoxy for the Vicar of Christ. One should not have to comb and sift and parse through a pontiff’s statements to ferret out a nominally orthodox interpretation of his meaning, especially when he makes his heterodox intentions clear time after time via deliberately ambiguous, meandering, and equivocal language.

    I get it that Francophiles will never stop giving him the benefit of the doubt, no matter what he says or does, because of the office he holds and the deference normally required of a Catholic toward the sovereign pontiff. I also get that many of them, like Fox Mulder of the X-Files, desperately “want to believe” that Bergoglio has been sent by the Holy Spirit exactly for these times, and that whatever he does, no matter how “surprising” (Bergoglio loves the “God of surprises”), is the manifest will of God for our time. If Mr. Johnston and his spiritual confreres have the inside track on that via private revelation, God love ‘em. For the rest of us poor untutored drudges, however, the plain old ordinary data don’t look so good. As Chico Marx said to Mrs. Teasdale in Duck Soup, “Who you gonna believe? Me or your own eyes?”

    And please spare me the facile accusation of sedevacantism. Bergoglio is the pope. The available evidence suggests, however, that he is a dangerously bad one. He needs to be resisted “to the face” vigorously and publicly by all orthodox prelates and laity. THAT is the challenge of our time.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      I’m sure it is more fun to emote hysterically than to take the time to actually study up on what you are talking about. Ironically, I have offered here many of the same criticisms of the Pope you have – only I did it with some respect for him and with the humility that maybe there are things going on that I do not yet understand and that I may be misinterpreting.

      But you go right ahead. Continue to make bombastic accusations with no sense of humility, no respect at all for the Holy Father, and without bothering to read the work of those (like me) who you are eager to attack and bear false witness again because you won’t read all they write before launching your broadside. I’ll take my chances with my approach and you take your chances with yours – and when we stand before God to give an accounting, one of us will have a surprise.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Yong Duk says:

        Need sleep…

        Thank you all for praying for Robert. Today he asked for us to pray for him as he faces death!

        And now for something completely comet…

        Liked by 5 people

        • Beckita says:

          Thanks for the update, YD, about Robert. All Glory to God!

          Liked by 3 people

        • Petra says:

          Oh, YD, praise God! I am glad Robert is still here on this side of the veil. I prayed a Chaplet of Divine Mercy for him this morning, and will pray another tonight at bedtime.

          God’s mercy is unfathomable.

          God bless.

          Liked by 5 people

        • Mick says:

          Praise God, YD!

          Liked by 2 people

        • zeniazenia says:

          Dear Yong, I pray you slept well. So sorry if you missed that comet. (it missed you too).
          I want to thank you for giving Robert to us, in a spiritual way. Now if we could somehow know more concretely, the work that you performed at the hand of Jesus for Robert at his bedside. I’d like to witness what happened there, so we can perform a Lay State model of the same work of mercy someday. I wish I could be there with you. I will continue to pray. — ZJ

          Liked by 3 people

          • Yong Duk says:

            Robert, on Wednesday thanked me for serving him. I honestly told him, that it was rather an honor to have served him.

            So yesterday, when I heard he had asked a friend for our prayers as he faced death, I was happy and thankful and to everyone here.

            I wrote what I wrote weeks ago that some souls you meet and you can’t wait to see them again in Heaven to see their joy at being there… and discovering God.

            A funny, eccentric man… It good for us to be here.

            Liked by 6 people

          • Yong Duk says:

            P.S. The duck goes with the young.

            Dragon-slayer, not dragon.

            😉

            Liked by 5 people

          • Beckita says:

            Dragon-slayer, indeed, YD, garlic breath and all! Why it’s enough to avert any old comet.

            Liked by 4 people

          • zeniazenia says:

            Dear Yong Duk, Thank you for the details, funny, eccentric and blessed is very good. Robert is God’s gift to us. Dragon-slayer YES! (Purgatory release alert)!! –ZJ

            Liked by 3 people

      • RA in WV says:

        I expected a response no different than you provided. My thanks to you for allowing it to be published, even if only as a “bad example.”

        Liked by 1 person

        • jlynnbyrd says:

          RA, I was glad to see the Spiritual Works of Mercy that were poured out on your behalf and am glad you were expecting that that. I expected no less myself.

          Liked by 7 people

        • Petra says:

          RA in WV: I expect if you had lived in the Middle Ages when there were two sitting Popes, your head would have actually exploded!

          I don’t know what is to be proven by citing all the complaints about the current Pope, or your fears about his heterodoxy. I guess I simply shrug about it all because I have lived up close and personal with heterodox clerics in Chicago for most of my life. I refuse to condemn God’s priests. Let Him chastise them if they are in error. But I am responsible for knowing my Faith and the doctrine regardless if a priest (or bishop, or Pope) refuses to teach it. So, I will not leave the Barque of Peter, and I will not condemn the priests God has given us, including the Pope, even if I suffer abuses of the liturgy or sacraments at their hands. Remember, even if they are heterodox, only a priest can change bread into the Body of Christ. Only their hands can confect the Sacrament. If for no other reason they are to be respected and revered.

          I will pray for them, and ask for God’s mercy, for both them and myself: on them, so they will follow Him and do His will, and on me, so I am not deceived. I can’t do anything more. I refuse to be someone who helps destroy the Church from within.

          God bless.

          Liked by 12 people

        • zeniazenia says:

          Dear RA, When people see me and know I am Catholic, it is like wearing a religious habit or clerics. ((I am provided a nametag to wear when I walk in to do a work of mercy, but. I prefer the poor see nameless me, bringing the Holy Spirit, by way of Jesus.) We, who serve the poor, are responsible for presenting Jesus and being His Spouse for anyone who encounters us. No matter what our dismal opinions are of some sinners in the Hierarchy of the Church, we must first be faithful to God by focusing on using the unique personal gifts He has given each of us. When all that has been established and refined in us through the sacraments, we are left with a simple mission to respect for the dignity of every other human life, so we speak Truth and Love. Perhaps we should revisit the concept of Our Lord’s Justice. As much as I know it is my duty to dive into Church documents, it is our one on one love of the poor that makes the heartbeat in the Church, it always has been. Charlie has been asked to announce this again through a prophetic word for us. We sense, the Holy Father feels the need make a drastic course correction, obviously a clumsy, inelegant move for our Barque Skipper. May God fill Holy Father Francis with Grace, and maybe add a tiller extension, so he can look cool-er. Thanks be to God every Catholic prays for our Pope at every Mass. We are one body. We desire all parts to be filled with the Spirit. I pray you will look at your abundant gifts with fresh lenses.. -Love Zenia Jane

          Liked by 7 people

      • janet333 says:

        I can’t wait for God to open His children’s eyes!
        Maranatha!

        Liked by 3 people

    • Beckita says:

      From the blog of Fr. John Zuhlsdorf who is known as a Traditionalist Catholic priest::
      http://wdtprs.com/blog/2015/08/ask-father-is-it-a-mortal-sin-to-criticize-the-pope/

      Catholics are obliged to have filial love for and obedience to our Holy Father. Neither that love nor that obedience are required to be blind or stupid.

      Criticism of the Pope can become a mortal sin if one’s criticism is filled with a hatred and vitriol that shows a lack of respect or filial love for Our Sovereign Pontiff. One must also consider to whom you show that lack of respect. If by your words and actions you harm his reputation with others unjustly, you do him and them a grave wrong. You also may be committing the sin of sacrilege.

      The Pope is Christ’s Vicar, and deserves all the respect of that office.

      The Pope is, however, not Christ. Nor does his charism of infallibility render him perfect in all his words and actions.

      He may do things that are objectionable. When he does, he can be criticized – respectfully.

      But be careful in aiming criticism at the Pope. Be careful to whom you open your mind or reveal your attitude. Examine your conscience with brutal honesty, remembering that His Holiness has a perspective on the Church that we do not.

      Catholics loves their Popes. That doesn’t mean that we always like them or everything they do.

      We should, however, avoid giving scandal. Maintain respect for the Holy Father when speaking about him to others, heed his words on faith and morals, and give him obedience when it is called for.

      Liked by 11 people

    • Well, I don’t need sleep. It’s not even 10:30 here.

      I don’t think that St. Joseph was around to hear the accusatory bombast from the detractors/enemies of Christ, thank God, but I have no doubt that he heard it from his place of expectation… and he continues to hear it today from Heaven.

      I mention St. Joseph because I asked him if he would choose a Scriptural passage for me to meditate on at Eucharistic Adoration on Thursday. This is what I opened to: Jeremiah, Chapter 35. Of course I couldn’t say with certainty whether or not he actually chose that passage, but it provided a deep and fruitful meditation nonetheless. Personally, I think it’s just the sort of passage from Holy Scripture that he would indicate at the time.

      I share that here in the hope that you might meditate on that chapter as well and lay your head against the heart of St. Joseph as you do so.

      Many diverse folks share quite a bit here, and I often find it so easy to overlay their words onto some part of Sacred Scripture and clearly see the symmetry. All the easier, because I’ve worn out many, many Bibles over the years, coupled with the loving simplicity with which so many endeavor to share The Faith here.

      That said, I have to admit that you stumped me with your words. I love a good challenge, but please help me out here and indicate that place in the Bible that aligns well with your thoughts. Somewhere where Our Lord, The Word said something like that.

      Jesus, I trust in You!

      MP

      Liked by 6 people

      • zeniazenia says:

        Hi MP, Yes, I don’t ask what would Jesus do?, but better to ask, ‘What did Jesus do?’ –ZJ

        Liked by 5 people

      • Beckita says:

        Amen, MP. Just read the passage from Jeremiah and will hold it close during todays adoration. God bless your trek in the wilderness, today and always.

        Liked by 5 people

        • B, that prompts a “Level 10 Grin” from me (that’s the grandaddy of all grins). I’m heading to the river in 15 minutes with my boys and some of their friends (yea, bit of a miracle right there). St. Joseph is on it! How much he is ready and willing to help! I can’t mention this enough after Pelianito (Janet) mentioned it to me.

          Taking all here to the river as well in prayer. God Bless,
          MP

          Liked by 7 people

    • Two questions, RA:

      1) Who decides when the deference that you say is “normally required to the Sovereign Pontiff” is no longer required? (You?) All of these venomous titles you give to the Vicar of the Second Person of the Most Holy Trinity have also been given to all the former ones, so long as you ask the right person.

      2) As Our Lord said, “by their fruits you shall know them.” How many souls have accepted the Divine Mercy thanks to your decidedly anti-“Bergoglio” approach? No need to answer that, just ponder it. Remember that the Twelve Doctrinally-Defined (see CCC 1832) Fruits of the Holy Spirit are the infallible proof of where the Holy Spirit dwells, and in whom.

      Liked by 10 people

      • Yong Duk says:

        Young and curmudgeonly, Love it!

        I will take you and your wife for today’s Mass, if you would allow me, for your intentions and ministry. I am getting a slow start. Don’t tell anyone, please. Sitting in the Chapel with my computer and Jesus. (That is written in the Semitic and Slavic way wherein the last is most important, just FYI.)

        To our Lady!

        Liked by 7 people

        • charliej373 says:

          I have met Daniel. It will take decades of simmering yet, but someday he is going to be an absolutely GREAT curmudgeon. And if I do good, I am going to ask the Lord when I pass on if I might become the patron saint of curmudgeons!

          Liked by 8 people

        • Beckita says:

          YD, do you suppose you could compose a piece to eastern chant entitled: “Sitting in the Chapel with My Computer and Jesus”? 🙂

          Liked by 3 people

          • Yong Duk says:

            I am still waiting for my hymn in honour of St. Theodore the Hairshirt-wearer to be published.

            “Theodore the hairshirt-wearer, Theodore wears a hairshirt.” (repeated to the point of exhaustion or as long as the procession lasts.)

            I am a bit despondent that it hasn’t yet been and am quite discouraged as a hymn-writer in the English language.

            Liked by 6 people

          • Beckita says:

            LOL! To the point of exhaustion?

            No need to compose in English; just teach it to us in your whatever-language in which you love to compose. I’m sure Doug and MP would carch on right away.

            Actually, it’s interesting you would name Theodore the Hairshirt Wearer. My late husband was a Theodore No Hairshirt Wearer ‘cuz he was married to it.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            “Theodore the hairshirt-wearer, Theodore wears a hairshirt.” (repeated to the point of exhaustion or as long as the procession lasts.)
            LOL! I can’t stop laughing about this…I’ve gone through several tissues because whenever I laugh this hard my eyes spout tears like a fountain!
            I think I need to give TNRS up for Lent, I’m just always laughing here haha!

            Liked by 2 people

        • Oh, just learned that St. Gertrude is the patron saint of cats…and gardeners…and those who are afraid of mice. That leaves me out. But Charlie doesn’t have to be the patron saint of curmudgeons…the position of patron saint of squirrels is apparently not yet taken. Although, I think he should be the patron saint of foxes…also not yet taken. Yong Duk should be the patron saint of squirrels.

          Liked by 1 person

      • All of your responses are a perfect witness to… Defending the faith, Heartening and Defending the faithful.

        Liked by 6 people

      • RA in WV says:

        Nolo contendere, Mr. O’Connor. The charitable anathema with which Mr. Johnston greeted my original post was most enlightening and instructive. Further comment would serve no purpose. Charlie locuta est; causa finita est.

        Liked by 1 person

        • charliej373 says:

          Deliciously sarcastic, I suppose, but it does a disservice to the brilliant thinkers here. Daniel has corrected me a few times – a burgeoning young theologian of real talent. Yong Duk is the pen name of a Bishop here – though with the vitriol you spew at the Holy Father I doubt Bishop is an office you have much respect for. Why don’t you stick around, RA…lose the attitude and look at the real, respectful discussion and argument that often goes on around here. We are not big on the food-fights that pass for disputation around here…but it is a sharp group. You may learn something – and you may contribute something. But you are right…if all you have to offer are snarls and sarcasm, we will have to part ways. I may be wrong, but I suspect you might be able to do better than that.

          Liked by 5 people

          • RA in WV says:

            My dear fellow, the reason we disagree so fundamentally is because we have different interpretive lenses through which we view and interpret reality. I’m afraid there’s not much that can be done to remedy that. You accuse me of not having taken the trouble to familiarize myself with your oeuvre, but implicit in that accusation is the assumption that anyone who becomes familiar with your point of view will, perforce, agree with you. I might reasonably make the same claim, pointing you to analyses and interpretations of events that support my point of view. But where would we be at the end of it? My guess is that we would end up accusing each other of intransigence born of stubborn pride, and still end up merely agreeing to disagree. You have an advantage over me in that your truth claims are bolstered by the claim of private revelation. For those who accept your claims, that is an insuperable advantage. For those who do not, I would argue that the merits of the Bergoglio papacy remain an open question.

            Bon soire, monsieur.

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Nah, RA, if that were the purpose of discussion and debate, it would merely be a contest of wills and an expression of vanity. I know that pretty much is how it is treated, but it was not always so – and is NOT the purpose of debate in classical western tradition. The purpose is, in fact, to glean more information AND to see from different perspectives – to help each of us to grow.

            My main problem with your critique of the Pope is that it is so bombastically disrespectful and allows for only one possible interpretation of what is happening. I do not need private revelation to know that the Pope is the Vicar of Christ. I know that in the past there have been unworthy Popes – yet none have contradicted Magisterial teaching on faith and morals. Even some of the dodgiest, the Medici Popes, gave us some of the great artistic and musical treasures in the history of the Church. So when I see someone like Pope Francis, who does, indeed, do some things that puzzle me and whose political agenda I largely dismiss, the first thing that comes to my mind is not, “What a rotten guy,” but what is the Lord doing here and how have my expectations been deficient. Then I did look at his comments on faith and morals and compare them to his mere political preferences. It is a puzzle to me that many of his proposed temporal solutions would undermine his spiritual teaching. But again, I have seen enough how God works in unexpected ways and by indirect means that I do not immediately assume that all my expectations are completely correct and any dissent from the magisterium of my will is either completely wrong or evil.

            The purpose of disputation is for all of us to grow together – even while we retain some disagreements.

            Liked by 5 people

          • Yong Duk says:

            RA in WV and Charlie, I was praying yesterday, wondering why do people feel compelled to come to this site to attack it or what is being said here if it is not said in that fraternal arena of debate?

            Self-willfulness? Self-Righteousness? Pride.

            I come here to relax, to garner inklings of what my heart tells me and because it is largely positive (even if one or two like Doug are positively ridiculous in regards to their humour).

            Oh, we debate. But charitably–even when dealing with uncomfortable truths of the Catholic Position–for the most part. (I slip up when dealing with prideful comments that are my kryptonite.)

            I guess I don’t understand the psychology of the necessity to attack. It doesn’t affect the life of those who do, if they go onto another site, does it?

            As an aside, what drew me to Charlie–after my mom kept sending me his articles and I dismissed them as being decidedly Americocentric like another site (the one of the Comet, I believe) and therefore lost on me for their value as I abhor politics being steeped in the politics of the Church, as I more or less am day in and day out–was his obedience and his joy.

            Maybe take a look at that aspect of Charlie’s message.

            When I first saw Pope Francis check out his watch during Liturgy, I rolled my eyes. But habits are habits and if I condemned all my penitents for their habits and if I were to be condemned for mine in this day and age of satanic influence or satanically-influence cultural influence, we would all be damned to Hell.

            So, Charlie: I am sure you are aware that Francis has his habits. They influence his decisions, as you know.

            RA in WV, Charlie has his habits.

            I have mine.

            But you know what?

            Despite me looking at God often and wondering why He chose me with my habits, sometimes He tells me it is precisely because of them that He did and it is through them that He keeps me humble.

            The root of humility is self-knowledge.

            St Catherine of Siena wrote that in The Dialogue.

            The root of humility is self-knowledge.

            And if we are docile, the Holy Spirit will give us self-knowledge.

            Perhaps, you would challenge yourself to ask God in docility to show you the root of your intent and mold you and your habits to His Greater Glory.

            I hope you stick around as you use funny big words that make me laugh like wet wool saturated by mothballs and pipe smoke!

            Liked by 6 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Thanks, YD. I think a lot of it has to do with the whole caustic modern definition of what debate is about, which really has impoverished it to be a mere contest of wills. I often think many otherwise good people have allowed themselves to get caught up in that. I may be wrong – I get trolls here and have to make decisions on which is which. But I got a sense that RA might be sincere. If so, there could be something useful to add to the debate here. If not, then I would ultimately just cut it off. As I have always said, I encourage vigorous debate here, but will not let it degenerate into a food fight.

            I have heard from a few people that they started here to show how stupid we all are, and then stayed when they saw that we had a completely different paradigm…no politically correct nonsense, no gotcha style of argument, but really trying to reason together. Hee hee…even if I can’t persuade all of my positions, I love it when they find it is a safe place to hold varying positions as long as you treat all with the respect you seek. So, the jury is out on RA, but I think he or she may be someone who has a useful contrarian position. As long as they don’t start with the antipope apostasy, I give a little leeway.

            Liked by 4 people

          • RA, thank you for mentioning the theme of interpretation and reality as I’ve been endeavoring to refine my thinking on this for some time.

            Flipping around the channels this weekend, I noticed that the ‘news’ was dominated by the U.S. election cycle (ad nauseam) and the winter storm in the east. I suppose that one will effect me to some degree and the other not at all (while I sit under sunny Arizona skies), but ultimately I don’t have any control over either, and I don’t see much point in sharing my opinions.

            I really haven’t had a challenge with Pope Francis, probably because about the same time he was setting the pace and hitting stride, Charlie and others were helping me change up my pace and reach a personal stride that felt terribly uncomfortable at first (namely, I was taking a hard look at the themes of humility, docility and judging in my own life).

            In a nutshell, God was helping me to understand that only the humble can be lead, and only the humble soul can truly advance in the spiritual life. On docility, that God sends the Holy Spirit to guide us every moment of every day, but I can only benefit if I’m docile to His promptings. On judging, that I’m merely pretending to be God when I judge, and that my opinions are nothing more than a highly evolved way of judging (…and, wow, do I have a lot of opinions that make an easy trap for my pride).

            Can we agree that we ALL have a distorted view of reality? That we don’t see things as they really are, or even see ourselves as we really are? Think Saul to Paul from Scripture. I’d share other examples from my life, but The Word already says it all in Holy Scripture, and infinitely better (and I don’t want folks to get the wrong idea that I’m self-absorbed… I’m just a squirrel).

            I’d love to run with you, RA. Just keep in mind that I go running every day with Jesus, Who tirelessly works on liberating me (and all of us) from opinions, blind spots, prejudices, biases, etc. so that we can see things and ourselves as we really are.

            Hard work and tiresome, I know, but at least we’ll be running together with Jesus and there’s real Joy in that! That’s what I hope for.

            God Bless,

            MP

            Liked by 8 people

          • Beckita says:

            Profound responses, YD and Charlie!!!

            RA, as one who is quite little here, yet one, nevertheless, who has read all of Charlie’s posts AND the ensuing comments which accompany them, I invite you to dig deeper into what has actually been occurring at this site. In reading the archives (and I cannot stress enough the inclusion of the comments which accompany Charlie’s posts), one will see evidence of discussion refining and developing understandings together.

            One will also discover that the shared details of Charlie’s private revelation do contain a skeletal overview of where we are and what’s to come. The only clear date-range given is the Final Rescue at the end of next year and this is given to provide Hope because we are going to need it when the current world turmoil escalates. I will add, Charlie’s ways of integrating his own private revelation into the message and mission given him by God keep the focus on Our Lord and Our Lady and on the spiritual development of each one here while… Actually, Charlie says it best and I believe those who remain here can readily vouch with me he has remained true to his purpose: https://charliej373.wordpress.com/archives/

            I’m dominated by right brain activity but I’ve got enough in this noggin to clearly see the vast majority of what has occurred here is developing and anchoring within each one, who would take this journey together, a way of thinking and acting which will serve us and those around us very well when pervasive chaos erupts: Acknowledge God, take the next right step and be a sign of hope to those around us… Whatever you decide to do about staying with us, RA, and I do pray you remain, but more than that I pray you remain in the Barque of Peter. God is sifting us even now and I see how much you love Him and His Church. We here are united with you in this and the only safe refuge in the stormy seas now intensifying is the very Barque of Peter. “And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hades will not prevail against it.” (Matthew 16:18) God bless you.

            Liked by 4 people

        • Robert Cunningham says:

          RA

          Clever use of the Latin. I appreciate that. People who both love the Lord and his Church can disagree sometimes. I’m sure that you know how St Augustine felt about St Jerome and vice versa. Did not our Lord say, “Be hot or cold or I will spew you out of mouth”. I hope that you stay around. Please pray for me. St Pope Damusus I, pray for us

          Robert

          Liked by 5 people

          • Yong Duk says:

            (I wanted to reply in Syriac, but last time I posted something in Arabic, Charlie didn’t clear it.)

            Liked by 2 people

          • charliej373 says:

            It must have gotten lost somehow, YD. I rarely clear things in other languages I can’t understand – but there are several commenters here I so trust that I clear their stuff even when I don’t have a clue what it means. You are among them. So try again!

            (One thing to note is that many foreign language – particularly foreign alphabet stuff – gets in the spam files. I try to check all of them before deleting spam, but I get as much spam each now as I did comments a year ago…so I know I miss some or accidentally hit the “delete all” button before I remember to check it all.)

            Liked by 2 people

          • CrewDog says:

            If I had to guess I’d guess that RA 0f WV is in fact a Troll!! I have not spent much time on this Thread ’cause it is of little interest to me … so I could be wrong … but Trolls like to make long dissertations filled with big words and lofty ……………. It’s what we used to call in the Old AF Staff: The “Baffle Them With BullS***” Tactic!
            My biggest problem with Pope Francis from where I stand in the middle of The Bible Belt is that his “Off de Cuff” comments have “riled-up” and given “ammo” to the cradle to grave Catholic Haters “Out-Here” and may be a factor in my tactics to survive The Storm!?l
            Soooo …. Perhaps!!?? …. Time here may be better spent on “Thinking about Storm Survival”!???

            GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

            Liked by 4 people

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            Oh shoot, Charlie, I just sent YD a comment in Korean- asking if this was his language with a 🙂 and I think it got trashed because it never showed up on the post as pending. I didn’t know you deleted them.

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            I did pull something with Oriental characters out of the spam folder. Hopefully that is it.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Snowflakesdancing says:

            Thank you, Charlie 🙂

            Like

        • Yong Duk says:

          MP, that’s why I can’t wait for a 30-day Ignatian retreat led by you! 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

          • That’s YDiculous, YD. I’ve got a “Do It Yourself Ignatian Retreat At Home” book on the shelf collecting dust because I could never get further than page 8. Please don’t let me squander the scanty progress I’ve made on letting others lead.

            Speaking of that, where’s Doug? Is that him way back in the “Mountain Retreat” and “Let Us Proceed” comments sections? Hard to tell because there’s so many comments to keep up with and it’s hard to pick out the squirrel-through-the-patio-window gravatar when I’m not wearing my glasses.

            Liked by 2 people

    • SteveBC says:

      RA in WV, from a different perspective:
      * You have a goal of Discrimination. That can be a truly excellent way to move through life, provided that you are discriminating in your pursuit, meaning that you use your talents with surgical finesse and not as a sledgehammer to crush people who do not see your version of the light. There is a fun Country and Western song that has the line, “… had a heart like a nine-pound hammer.” Something to consider.
      • You have a chief negative feature of arrogance. This means that you create a public persona that is designed to impress and indeed overwhelm others because deep inside you lack confidence in yourself and fear that others will figure out that you aren’t nearly as impressive on the inside (by the way, you’re not). Negative features are to be extinguished in living one’s life. It will be hard for you to learn humility, but if you are appropriately discriminating in pursuing humility and leaving your arrogance behind, you will be quite a valuable member of our world. Someday.
      * My family has roots in WV. I suspect you are a very big fish in a very small pond and find that quite appealing. You might want to wash the feet of some of the hoi polloi who live near you and on whom you currently look down. If performed in genuine contemplation, it will do you a world of good.

      You have a lot of work to do, my friend. Until it’s done, you should be a little cautious in your treatment of others.

      Liked by 3 people

      • victura98 says:

        Steve…I am going to use this comment as a personal examen, from time to time. These qualities you state, all tangents off the putrid circle of pride, are of themselves fantastic tools of self-accusation. I say all of this, trusting that my accolade will not make you proud. 🙂

        Now, I need to ask people to “like” my comment here, so that I can find Steve’s original comment again! 🙂

        Liked by 7 people

      • Rara Avis says:

        SteveBC,

        This is Rara Avis and RA in West Virginia is my husband. I am a regular reader of this site and have encouraged my husband to read the posts and comments because of the many helpful and instructional views expressed by regulars such as yourself. I am astonished at this response, however! Although I do not hold with his assessment of Pope Francis, I do respect his struggle, maybe anguish would be appropriate also. (I had sincerely hoped that YongDuk, who I not only highly respect but enjoy as well, would chime in to refute my husband’s points and direct him in his gentle, pastoral way) Your psychological evaluation of him is 100% INCORRECT. I will not go into details of how wrong you are because that would be self serving and unhelpful. We are recent transplants to WV and live a very humble and quiet life with our three children with disabilities. Our life is one of voluntary house arrest.

        I was very uncomfortable with his posting anything on this site because he would absolutely come off poorly as he did. I had to leave it in God’s hands hoping that there would be some give and take that would be helpful to his struggle. I certainly understand a strong defense of our Holy Father but not a trashing of his person. Anger can certainly masquerade as fear and I see that in my husband. He has a profound love of his faith and has many fears regarding this Pontificate. I am NOT defending anything he said regarding our Holy Father, I am simply telling you, SteveBC, that you are wrong about him as a person. Absolutely, positively wrong and you have done harm. Badly done.

        Brenda in West Virginia

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          Thank you for this, Brenda. I am so glad you confirmed my original instinct that your husband is a sincere man, sincerely baffled by some of the things the Pope says. I figured out when I was a young man that fear and confusion often presents as anger…so you have to listen to what is meant as well as what is actually being said. At the core of what your husband said I felt a sense of hurt rather than malice. Please encourage him to stick around. I think it would be good for him and for us.

          And, I must admit, he had me laughing out loud at his sarcastic little Latin joke. When I was in radio, a lady called one day to criticize me and said she did not understand people around there – that they treated everything I said as if it was holy writ. I bombastically told her that the reason most people thought I was right was that most of the time…I am right. An intern at the station cut up that conversation and made it into the most hilarious promo for my show ever. Your husband’s comment reminded me of that.

          Liked by 4 people

        • SteveBC says:

          Rara Avis and RA in WV, I most humbly apologize and withdraw my criticisms.

          RA in WV, I have misread you utterly. I hope you will accept my apology. I have learned something myself today.

          Liked by 4 people

          • Rara Avis says:

            Oh Steve,

            Thank you SO much. Of course your apology is accepted, we are family after all !! Paul is outside fighting the snow drifts in an attempt to free the chickens from their coop. I will tell him as soon as he comes in. Regarding his use of unusual words, is it any wonder I have Webster’s Dictionary on speed dial?

            I’ll pray for you and your Mom, you pray for us and we will call it even, What do you say? Seriously though, I am grateful to you for your participation in bringing us this website. This site has led me to a relationship with our Blessed Mother that I never had before.

            Joyously awaiting the Triumph of her Immaculate Heart,
            Brenda

            Liked by 6 people

          • LukeMichael says:

            I have not had much to say the last few days because I was flabbergasted by RA’s original post. I deliberated responding 2 or 3 times but knew that my emotions had the best of me, so silence and prayer.

            I learned a long time ago that all anger comes from fear and if I paused before reacting no matter if I was angry or another, a better exchange ensued. I was amazed at what my fears might be, sometimes serious but often not so much. It made me much more sympathetic to others.

            Now, I am not pleased with everything Pope Francis has to say and I think “antical” is at times appropriate to describe his behavior. But I have yet to find him contradicting dogma and I read original sources (not the Wanderer or Lifesite News) and if the Lord allows him to draw more people into or back to the Church, I can only pray for him. At times we are all fools for Christ. Occasionally, I pick shoe leather from my teeth as well.

            My good old dad, a jurist, loved to say “better to keep your mouth shut and have people believe you a fool than to open it and prove the case.” He was usually talking to me though occasionally to one of my 8 siblings. And ,no kidding, he said (“nolo contendere “)
            to my Mom almost daily, in self defense, regarding domestic transgressions great and small. We kids knew who the boss was!

            I agree with Charlie that you would be an interesting addition to our eclectic group here but I would urge you to emphasize your love of Christ and his Church. We, are a motley crew, but , He,will get the job done!

            Charlie may have spoken but he is not the Alpha and Omega. Heck, he is not even the great Oz!

            Liked by 3 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Ha! But I can blow smoke!

            Liked by 4 people

          • LukeMichael says:

            Really “Like” and admire this Steve.

            Liked by 4 people

          • LukeMichael says:

            Brenda
            Somewhere in WV got 40 inches of snow this weekend. I hope that wasn’t you!

            Liked by 1 person

          • SteveBC says:

            Rara Avis, I think that an exchange of prayers is considerably better than an exchange of fire. I will add you and your husband to my prayers later tonight – it’s a deal. 🙂

            I’m happy to find that you’ve gotten so much from Charlie’s website. It’s been a privilege for me to participate and help out. Like you, I have received much in return.

            Liked by 3 people

        • Yong Duk says:

          Brenda and RA in WV:

          A man is truly great when he humbles himself.

          While I see Steve’s Apology, that you say that he has done “great harm” shows–and I say this pastorally–the pride of ego that takes offense. Please, consider this for the sake of peace and joy that endures!

          Look at Christ and see how He took offense.

          If one truly knows who one is, then one is stable in who one is, one is confident in who one is, you are saturated with peace and joy–even if at times weakness and passions overcome: one is humble as one sees one’s magnanimity and right-relationship. Then one allows God to defend oneself and allows oneself to take critiques positively, taking the good and leaving the bad.

          While I am sorry that “harm” was done here: A man is truly great when he humbles himself even when both sides come back to the table and both say: I have been headstrong.

          I happily and encouragingly say that the challenge is yours to accept.

          “Wives sanctify your husbands.”

          pax vobis,
          +YD

          P.S. Brenda, I did not speak to the critiques against the Pope as I have done so elsewhere with regards to foot washing and altar servers regarding pastoral approaches. Ctrl+f “yong” should pull up what I said. Furthermore, Charlie has done a fine job on several occasions.

          Liked by 6 people

          • Rara Avis says:

            Thank you for your words of instruction, YD. I view you as the Shepherd of the souls who read and participate on this site. That may not be technically correct but you seem to have adopted us and I am thankful to be among this group. I accept your correction, thank you.

            There is a bit of irony in this situation. Twenty years ago this month I was brought into the Church. It was a rocky road for me because of the misconceptions about Catholicism I held. My biggest hurdle was the Papacy. My husband and I had more than a few heated discussions (read as knock down, drag out fights) over the role of a Holy Father as well as the concept of the universal Church. I would not comprehend or accept my husband telling me “the Church says . . .” with the critical word being ‘the’. Coming from a Protestant background, I could not accept the authority of the Pope nor the Church. It has now become, to me, the most important and comforting part of being Catholic. Jesus has given to us the help and guidance we need in the hierarchy. So, now the tables have turned, I am the one in the position of defending, not the Papacy, but this Papacy. I pray for a softening of the heart.

            Thank you YD for walking with us.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Yong Duk says:

            pace bene

            Liked by 2 people

  39. Robert Cunningham says:

    MP

    Just curious, what was your mediation on Jeremiah 35? He is my favorite prophet. I even have an icon of him in my chapel.

    In IC XC

    Robert

    Liked by 4 people

    • Mick says:

      Robert, are you a priest?

      Liked by 2 people

      • Robert Cunningham says:

        No Mick. When the Lord visited me in April 1994 I was not Catholic but offered him to be priest. I was engaged at the time and even called off the wedding. His response was that I was to be a husband and a father. I explained all to my wife and we have been happily married since that same year and I was confirmed into the Church before we got married. We have two beautiful girls and I love the Lord as a layman. I do have a chapel in my house but there is no alter. It is a room where I have many statues and icons (East and West) and one chair. I love it. To be a priest is a great honor and a life of sacrifice

        Liked by 8 people

      • LukeMichael says:

        Mick
        If you did not see this in another thread, Robert has written a very nice book on prayer which I found quite thorough and uplifting. I found it as an iBook through ITunes

        Liked by 2 people

    • RC

      In a nutshell, how much God loves and never fails to reward obedience. From the opening of Jeremiah 35, I first marveled at The Lord’s hospitality, but quickly realized He was preparing to make an example of the Rekabites’ obedience with regard to wine and hold it up as a teaching lesson for the people of Judah (and everyone living in Jerusalem). I also recognized the figure of St. Joseph there. Beyond that, I had a deep meditation on the role of fathers and children which I don’t dare articulate for fear of rambling.

      Like you, Jeremiah resonates with me deeply.

      God Bless,

      MP

      Liked by 5 people

  40. Linda says:

    Michael Patrick I do my holy hour of adoration Thurs as well.. Lol 3-4… I’ll look that passed up next Thurs.. Thank you and God bless you😇

    Liked by 3 people

    • Wonderful, Linda. Based on your time zone, I follow right on your heels. It’s so comforting to imagine the many NRS’ers at Adoration or at prayer anywhere. Jesus is so good. God Bless.

      Liked by 6 people

      • Linda says:

        When I’m there with Our Lord Michael Patrick I never want to leave… I imagine we all feel the same way.. Kinda neat to think for a moment we are both in the presence of Jesus.. What a marvel.. We have so much to look forward to all of us…(no presumption there on my part.. great and trembling..lol)

        Liked by 5 people

  41. theresa323 says:

    I can see posting the article on the footwashing caused a firestorm. We are divided in many ways and that is why Mary our Mother is coming to the rescue. My only comment is Jesus Christ did set up a hierarchy in his church, and for the family, and also in Heaven.
    Mary our Mother always tells the seers in Medjugorge, that the Blessing from a priest is much greater than her blessing….. Imagine that . The priest is taking the place of Jesus Christ on this earth. I do recall, as a young child, whenever a priest entered the classroom, we always asked for his Blessing. It seems this practice has gone by the wayside.
    As far as the foot washing, Women have been involved with the foot washing since the very beginning, and the altar girls, were on the altar, long before JPll granted the OK.
    Girls seem to do a much better job on the altar, but it seems, now we have more girls than boys.
    We have women altar servers at daily mass, and I must admit when I see one little altar boy, who is homeschooled, and he serves during a weekday mass. it just elevates my heart.
    I think Charlie is right. the old Dragon loves division… It will all work out in the end and we know who wins….

    Peace

    Liked by 6 people

    • jaykay says:

      Theresa323: I fully agree. That creature is at it again with this latest foot-washing non-controversy. Now, I am “liturgically traditional” , to put it that way, and I love the Extraordinary Form (I actually have Latin as a degree subject, but I don’t make it a fetish, nor the particularities of ritual) and I love the Ordinary Form as well. But I am not going to get into a lather if my sisters, as well as my brothers, have their feet washed on one of the holiest evenings of our liturgical year. It’s purely a matter of discipline, as others have pointed out, and anyway optional. And as a matter of discipline, for me: Papa noster locutus est; mihi satis est. Finis.

      We have soooo much more coming down the line at us that it truly doth boggle my mind people can get fixated on such a minor thing. But then, the dirty hoofprints of that creature have already done their work of division… yet again. Why should we be surprised? Well, we shouldn’t be. Shrug and move on to the really important elements of the fight. Keep your powder dry for the real battle. And pass the whiskey… in moderation, of course😊 Hey, I’m Irish!

      Liked by 7 people

      • theresa323 says:

        This really is not about altar girls or women having their feet washed, it is about being obedient or disobedient.
        There are those in the church who want the ordination of women as priest. Do some have an ulterior motive.
        I have been a pro-lifer for years, going back to Fr. Marx. He preached following Humane Vitae, the encyclical Of Pope Paul Vl. We are now coming home from the 43rd year of the March for LIfe. Who would have believed back in 1973, that we would still be marching.
        My Point many priest, Bishops, Cardinals. were dissenters and would not preach on contraception and were telling women there was no problem in it… and it still goes on to this very day. Disobedience is the biggie here…. What Pope Paul VI prophesied has happened and we are living through it.
        This is what the rescue is all about… God is so merciful, and all this can be forgiven, if we repent of our sins..
        So what I am getting at is, If the Pope allowed altar girls, and the washing of women’s feet, then fine the Pope decreed it…..In reality the Priest were disobedient and did it, without the consent of Rome. The practices became so widespread, so the Pope then relented and gave consent. Not all priest were disobedient, but because the practice was instituted in so many churches, the laity rose up and demanded it….
        I remember how upset Mother Anglica was when JPll came to Colorado, and they did the stations of the Cross, and a women was depicting Jesus.. that was when she went back to wearing the Old Habits, she was really upset. God Love her.

        Liked by 4 people

        • jaykay says:

          Theresa323: Yes, I agree totally with you about the disobedience. It had been around for a long time before V2, of course, in the form of modernism but really seemed to take flight after that, given the general spirit of the times – with, more than likely, the involvement of other types of spirit also! And please believe that I’m not just shrugging that off, apologies if I gave that impression; in fact I deprecate it and wish deeply that it hadn’t happened/isn’t continuing to happen, but I do feel much as Yong Duk has expressed it in his post of 21st January away above this.

          God bless you and comrades in the pro-life fight. We here in Ireland really do take a lot of heart from you, because you’ve been there long before us and have been well and truly blooded (and bloodied!) over the years when we in our complacency thought we were still “safe”. Well, in just the last 2 years what an awakening we have had! We have a general election coming up within the next month, and they are seeking to ramp-up their assault on life, buoyed up by their foul “victory” in 2013. We’re truly up against it. I’m going to a presentation on Thursday evening by Life Ireland, focusing on how to counter the disinformation tactics. It’s in our local Dominican Rosary Centre, so plenty of good spiritual “vibes” stored-up there 🙂 We’re not despairing, of course, but the spirit is rather like that of the US just post Pearl Harbour, or Britain just post Dunkirk. Blood, sweat and tears. Yet, those will turn to tears of joy in the end.

          And how wonderful to read all the posts concerning those who made it to Washington to witness, despite the blizzard. Loved the one where they set up the “snow altar”!

          Blessings to all. Please keep us in your prayers over these coming weeks, in what will be a crucial time for the pro-Life movement in Ireland. J.

          Liked by 4 people

  42. Snowflakesdancing says:

    Yong Duk, I had to look this word up…as always (is anyone wondering if…nevermind)
    Heteroprax: Of or pertaining to persons who consistently fail to follow the teachings of an avowed belief system. The praxis of hypocrites. ( I like the sound of that…the praxis of hypocrites- but now I have to look praxis up) the process of hypocrites.
    Funny… spell-check thinks every other word in a definition from a dictionary is misspelled.Red lines all over this! A very interesting word. ( Migraine)

    Liked by 6 people

  43. Mick says:

    Thanks, Snowy; I was too lazy to look it up.

    Liked by 5 people

  44. Beckita says:

    Ah, Pope Francis! True to Peter, in the words of Edward Condon, in his piece: “While some still insist, despite their rapidly vanishing grounds to do so, that the post synodal exhortation could contain some pastoral mechanism for regularising those in invalid second marriages, Francis ended his allocution with a clear indication of his pastoral priority. He called for a new catechumenate, especially for couples preparing for marriage, with an emphasis on better formation for all the laity and a path towards a deeper appreciation of the faith, which is a marriage of truth and mercy, rather than the construction of some kind of accommodation for situations of failure, be they personal or structural.”

    http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/commentandblogs/2016/01/25/the-popes-address-on-marriage-was-strikingly-conservative/

    Liked by 2 people

  45. jlynnbyrd says:

    Beckita, I just love that! Thank you for the encouraging and affirming news!!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s