The Way of the Cross is the Path to Victory

christ-carrying-the-cross-eustache-le-sueur

(by Eustache le Sueur)

By Charlie Johnston

I had a profound sense a few weeks ago that this would be a very consequential, perhaps even transformative, Lenten Season. I felt a real urgency to get up to the mountains, to the cabin, to prepare in my peculiar way in deep solitude. I was surprised when I got here that I am even more isolated than usual – that the land telephone line is down and won’t be up again for a while. God knows what He is doing. When I want to catch up on calls, I have to wend my way down to a small town some 20 miles away. I have to be deliberate. That is as it should be this Lent.

So far, Lent has not disappointed my expectations. Russia is warning that the escalating events around Syria are liable to trigger World War III. Get in line: Pope Francis spoke of the danger of entering World War III last year.

An insightful Priest from St. Louis wrote to tell me he thinks that sometimes there is a disconnect between me and readers because I watch for causes and others are waiting for effects. I thought that brilliantly hit at the heart of the matter. Certainly, causes and effects are coming much closer to each other right now, gathering speed and force.

I kind of chuckle at policy makers, economists and banks these days. The Royal Bank of Scotland, a major European Bank, began the year by telling its clients not to panic, but to sell off their investments and do it with some dispatch. Others, like Citibank, are warning of a major financial disruption of massive proportions.

In this piece, five major former U.S. national security officials write an almost panicked warning about the imminent danger from North Korea and Iran. They end by noting that North Korea is working with Iran to coordinate nuclear capability. Hey, you heard it here first.

The reason I chuckle is because, all of a sudden, so many normally sober, restrained security officials, banks and economists are making me sound like the restrained and calming voice of sweet reason.

In America, the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia makes explicit the relentless drift to a post-Constitutional country where the rule of law has been replaced with a raw grasp for power by ideologues. The four overtly progressive justices are utterly unconcerned with the Constitution except to mount some rhetorical flourishes in their rulings that pervert the plain language of the Constitution to mean whatever supports socialist power-grabs. This will trigger an intensive battle, with only Senate Republicans as the firewall to prevent an explicitly Post-Constitutional Regime of rulers. I am not encouraged by that.

But the Orwellian advance of government supremacy is well advanced. The EPA does not even dock the pay of the people who created the Gold King Mine disaster, the sort of situation they send others to jail for. IRS agents who targeted Christians and conservatives for their views don’t get fired; they get bonuses. Now the president, through a new joint policy draft of the Dept. of Education and that of Health and Human Services wants to take coercive authority over all parents in the country.

Things that the progressive left furiously denied 10, even five years ago as smears against them whenever they were exposed, that same progressive left now openly pushes for. As I have said, these things must come, for before things can be set to right, all things must be revealed for what they are. And come they are, fast and furious. With every new failed disaster given us by self-proclaimed “experts” the progressive left tells us we must docilely submit to even more of their “expertise.”

I have said that my walking pilgrimage was mounted because I was told that the time appointed was upon us and this was my proper preparation. I have joked that when I was directed that way, I asked in no little wonder what the rest of God’s plan was. That WAS the plan. While I joke about it, that really was my reaction for some time. I thought I should go and run an activist foundation, take a more direct role in certain events…something. Taking a long walk just really baffled me and I could not imagine how it could help. I had long foreseen that a time would come when I would have to go a long way on foot, but I thought it would be some sort of flight. I never imagined that it would be a voluntary and affirmative act of religious faith and a radical reliance on God’s providence. But that was the plan. In retrospect, it was perfectly devised as preparation. Yet I could not have come up with it thinking on my own in a thousand years. God’s ways are not man’s ways.

It is largely why I said last month that the key for this year is Eucharistic and Marian Processions. In the face of a growing darkness, it is a forceful, yet gentle, affirmation of unwavering faith. Foolishness to those around us, it is the wisdom and strength to know that the battle belongs to Christ and that we are His. As the frothy waves of dissension and oppression rage around us, it is to join ourselves to the stately, unstoppable, yet  nearly unseen elemental power of the tide of rising faith in Our Lord. This is the plan.

I have often emphasized how important it is that we play our positions well and stay close to what we are called. It is very important that these public processions be led by Priests, Deacons or Bishops – those who have been consecrated to the orders of Priest, Deacon and Bishop are our proper spiritual leaders. It is they who must lead us and we must rise in support of that leadership. Then all things will be well. Oh, it will get stormier and stormier, but the tide of faith will not be stopped or blocked. It ultimately sweeps all before it.

I have thought, with some amusement these last few days, that what a pilgrimage really is is an extended procession of one. Let us all begin our pilgrimage even as the days around us darken. That is God’s plan – and He will lead us safely to Rescue and victory, even as we don’t understand.

There was a political official I once worked for who was a dear friend. One night at dinner, he told me I was unique: the only guy he knew who, when completely surrounded in a seemingly hopeless situation, came fully alive and fiery, convinced that now I had my opponents right where I wanted them. With a little grin, he added that the unique thing was that I was usually right.

The anti-Christian bigots and oppressors are not quite where we want them just yet, but they are close now. Let them froth up the waves of controversy and hatred. These pass away quickly. Connect with the tide that is faith in Christ and ride it on to victory. Let every Diocese in the world publicly proclaim their faith in their own streets, uniting the faithful to our two strong pillars, the Eucharist and Mary, led by our Bishops and Priests.  

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
This entry was posted in Christian Persecution, Church Governance, Conversion, Mary Immaculate, Solidarity, The Rescue, The Storm and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

564 Responses to The Way of the Cross is the Path to Victory

  1. Lily says:

    Does anyone know of resources etc on what a good family does?? I realize that’s a fairly vague question. What sort of faith etc routines/traditions that create strong families? How to live values in a way that kids choose them when they grow up? I feel a little lost because I was raised with very little, other than the standard secular holidays and school, outdoors, and tv. I want to raise my kids a bit differently, and am in that we homeschool. Charlie, I think you said before to live joyfully, but often I don’t even know what that looks like, practically, day to day.

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Lily, please use the search feature to read those posts that have to do with “family” and with “solidarity.” The idea of how to live together authentically as family is a subject that will get much airing here this year. So stay tuned. The main thing is to enjoy each other and to build each other up.

      Liked by 4 people

    • The blog Like Mother, Like Daughter is a treasure trove of how to live the faith in the family.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Doug says:

      Lily, first and foremost, get connected with other folks with the same beliefs and in a good church family. Last thing you want is to be isolated. Do you have a community you can get attached with?

      Liked by 2 people

    • Mick says:

      Lily, two books that I love are The Year and Our Children (written in 1956) and The Saints and Our Children (reprinted in 1995; I don’t know the original publication date), both written by Mary Reed Newland. Each book is available on abebooks.com for under $5, including the shipping. I don’t own a third book that she wrote, but it’s called We and Our Children: Molding the Child in Christian Living. It is available from abebooks.com for under $6, including shipping. It was reprinted in 2013, under the title We and Our Children: How to Make a Catholic Home. You can read reviews of all three books at amazon.com. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Doug says:

      One more thing Lily, what part of the country are you from? There may be some TNRSrs near you that you can link up with. We are all over the country. You can go to the private forum to link up.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Petra says:

      Lily, one of the biggest problems I hear a lot is that even when kids are taught the Faith, the minute they enter their late teens they fall away, even homeschooled kids. I taught CCD for 13 and 14 year old’s a couple of years and found you have to address the real things they face in the real world and give the Catholic answer to the problem. For instance, I wove into lessons (because it was a Confirmation class so I taught out of an appropriate text book) things on peer pressure (I told them it never goes away, even when you’re older), the occult (New Age) and that it’s a doorway to greater evils, drugs (that things are not inherently good or bad, it’s how people use them or abuse them that makes the difference, and that even when taking illegal drugs or drinking is seemingly harmless and fun, it’s also introduces you to loss of control) and so on. I have to tell you, not one of them looked at the clock wondering when the class would be over, and I got 100% attendance almost every week. In no way did I try to become a parent, but I did realize Catholics have answers to these challenges, and they were nothing new, and boy were these kids interested! If I were doing it again, I would make sure each of them had a copy of the Catechism of the Catholic Church (promolgated by John Paul II) and I would show them how to use it, and take topics from there for discussion with teens.

      I honestly believe unless you tell your teens and young adults you know what they are and will face, including scoffing at faith in God and atheism in college, and give them good counter arguments, they are going to switch over in a heartbeat, because the majority of the society is now secular and they are not going to want to be outsiders.

      I will pray for you and your family as you seek to raise children strong in the Faith.

      God bless.

      Liked by 10 people

      • charliej373 says:

        Here is wisdom, Petra. You have to meet people where they live – and let them know it is okay to talk about what really matters to them. When I used to teach RCIA, I would start every year by offering a five-dollar bounty to anyone who could come up with a heresy I had never heard before (and maybe even once believed). That was not my real purpose in saying that; rather, I was giving them permission to talk about whatever really troubled them, knowing that I would not be offended or shocked. It was a great tool, as people would tell me things they would tell no one else, and I could fix the shoe of their faith where it actually pinched them.

        Liked by 8 people

      • So, so true. I taught 8 th garage CCD for two years, and still am in a combined class. They have big, hard questions and they can smell hypocrisy a mile away so you have to tell them the truth. Thankfully we have 2000 years of teaching to look to, and depend on. Middle school is where I think you start to lose them. They don’t want pablum, and they have a much harder world to navigate. Pray a lot and study church teaching so you’re ready to talk about the hard things. They will love and respect you for it, even if they don’t like the answers.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Doug says:

          I taught confirmation and when I came to that the parents are the primary educators of the faith, I said “it’s not me. Nor is it this class you come to every week that is the primary means of learning the faith. It is your parents.” It is true but just was strange to say it in this manner.

          Liked by 3 people

      • Doug says:

        When my son went to college, we subsidized him with a stipulation that if you want the money, you go to Mass every week. If he accepted scholarship money elsewhere, he would be subject to conditions like good grades and behavior. As a parent, I have every right to this. Even if not the parent, I still have the right to this stipulation. He can always say no and figure out how to get money himself. (Loan, state school, etc). He had a full boat scholarship and a job at one school and turned it down for a much more expensive and prestigious school. We did not subside the whole thing, but made him put skin in the game so he would value it more.

        I don’t buy it when kids don’t go to church when living at home. I hear so many parents say you can’t force them to believe. That may be true, but you live in my house, I make the rules. You don’t like them, then there is the door. Live in my house, we all go to Mass together.

        We kicked one of our daughters out at age 21 due to behavior we deemed quite unacceptable. She screamed at us and said we do not love her. She came back to us years later and said that was one of the best things we did for her. She needed a wake up call.

        Being a parent requires some tough decisions doing the right thing in spite of the push back from kids. They will pull on the heart strings, but must stick to our guns many times. At the end of the day, they have to make their own decision to accept and internalize the faith. I have one daughter that has fully embraced it, my son is like warm, but out of respect still goes to Mass when home. The other daughter has much woundedness due to unforseen events and choices she made. I am not mad at her nor do I wish her destruction. It is painful to watch. She is mad at God and has walked away from him. St. Monica and St. Mary Magdaline, pray for her.

        Liked by 8 people

        • jlynnbyrd says:

          Doug, you and yours are in my prayers always. I was the middle child and gave my folks premature gray hairs with my rebel ways. My mother joked that if she could come back, after death, she come as one of my children just to get even! 😀

          Liked by 4 people

        • Beckita says:

          Praying for the conversion of your children, Doug, and for all the sons and daughters of the eath to quickly fall on their knees as the Storm unfolds. The beauty for your children is that they will have a foundation of faith on which to fall which you provided. For those without this foundation, I eagerly await the Infinite Imagination of God to make all things new! Amen.

          Liked by 4 people

        • Petra says:

          Doug, you speak from personal experience, and I don’t think your experience is very different from many other parents’ experience with their kids. The way I see it, what’s happened is that even in the 1960’s we still had a generally Christian culture (I’m speaking of the U.S., I don’t know about the rest of the world) and when kids went out the door they got the same lessons, generally speaking, about right and wrong in school and among their friends. Judeo-Christian standards of right and wrong were reinforced even outside the home, in our laws and expected behavior. That began breaking down, and now kids walk out the door and there are all kinds of people, neighbors, parents of their friends, their high school teachers and college professors, living what we would deem to be sinful lives (for example, no church on Sunday, divorced or just living together, very intelligent and adamantly against God) and they seem to be successful and prosperous and “normal” and having a good life, and so by comparison, restricting yourself by holding yourself away from things deemed sinful seems stupid and simplistic and even impossible. They see pretty quickly they won’t have friends if they reject the culture. (How many even believe someone can remain a virgin until they marry? How many even think they need to bother with marriage anymore?)

          And then, boom, they wander into this stuff, and the really bad stuff starts, and they’ve held this kind of belief that God is Love and what they did is not that bad and God should have prevented whatever disaster happened to them from happening to them. They very rarely make the connection that what happened to them is a very well known consequence of their own sin, because no one taught them apologetics or the Faith that way. They never learned or faced the reality of free will. Maybe they never learned the consequences of their own sin because parents went easy on them as little kids. So then you’ve got a wounded person who is very angry, blames God, digs in their heels, and hardens into bitterness. By this time they reject all talk of God and religion and end up just trying to muck their way through life. Some get trapped into the sin, like addictions, and these are really tragic. I have lots of people I grew up with whose lives are a trash heap because of drugs. There but for the grace of God go I. My parents warned us, their parents warned them, but there it is. Looking at it from the outside, you can’t help but see the truth of our Faith that warns people not to go down that path. The broad road is very attractive, and everyone seems to be on it. Too bad they don’t realize the cliff is just over the ridge.

          We’re in deep water in our culture today and our families. The enemy has the microphone (via T.V., movies, music and (almost) all entertainment, and politics too) and our voice is laughed at and scorned. Even well grounded adults make compromises because the antagonism of the culture is so strong. But our Church also still has Popes announcing the Good News to a world in darkness, many of whom don’t even recognize the Light (because, as St. John says, they preferred the darkness).

          I don’t know if anyone can really save their kids. I do know if you don’t acknowledge what they are facing and tell them clearly in no uncertain terms about reality, and the real consequences of their own actions, and talk about the tragedies of the lives of people they know who engaged in sin, then they are not going to see it. One for instance is the surge in out of wedlock births. If you don’t tell them the economic realities of women without husbands trying to raise kids, not to mention the emotional realities, and show them it via someone they know, then they will assume it’s like a movie star having a kid out of wedlock, and all seems smiles and glitter and what could be wrong or so hard about that?

          Kids today think life’s a cinch, because our culture is in general prosperous, and they have all they need and most of what they want. I remember enlightening my then 10 year old nephew, telling him how much an apartment costs, and utilities, and food, and that’s every month, and then you need clothes, and furniture, toiletries, and miscellaneous, and if you want to have a car, well…. And then you still haven’t factored in what it costs to go out for a good time. 🙂 He was shocked. He really didn’t know. To a young person looking at adults, life appears so easy. Sin is not even a factor. Until they fall into it and are tangled up in it themselves. And by that time they have long left Christianity in the dust. It helps them not at all. They can’t even see it’s the door out of their misery.

          Boy, I wish I had a 5 cent solution to this! But it’s what we face. And it’s why the Holy Father says we need to be a field hospital. Because all of us know the walking wounded, and we have to be gentle with our ministrations, doing the best we can with our words, and then praying for them. But, as they say, God has no grandchildren, only children. You can’t take away your kid’s free will.

          So teach them how to drive their “car” (life). Warn them of the dangers. Show them by example how you drive your life. Show them car wrecks of other people’s lives. Tell them they are responsible for the results – that if their life is a mangled car wreck or not depends on what they choose (I have another nephew who is divorced. You could have never told him he was making a mistake marrying the girl he chose. But it was obvious.) Tell them life isn’t about prosperity and good times here on earth (no one believes this anymore), but it is the testing ground for eternity.

          Lastly (whew, I sure had a lot to say about this!) it was my parents’ strong convictions and Faith, very clear condemnations of sin (in me), deep true love for me (for my soul, not my worldly happiness) that ultimately saved me, because they were like the father in the story of the Prodigal Son, and I knew what I had to do when I saw the reality of the world and what I was doing with my life. They taught me well that my Father in Heaven’s door is always open, and that He’s out on the farthest edge of His fields every moment, watching the road for me. For me. And when He sees me coming, He runs, God runs, to throw His cloak over me, and even though I try to stutter out my rehearsed speech of “Father, I have sinned against You….” He muffles my words as He clasps me to His chest.

          Love your kids that much. Love their souls. Fight their self destruction by loving their souls.

          God bless you all.

          Liked by 5 people

          • Lily says:

            Thank you everyone, I will look into all that you have said.

            Here’s another question: I don’t know how a Catholic mass works, but for a Protestant church, all the kids go to their ‘classes’ after we sing a song or two. I feel strange about this, in that everyone is separated for worship and teaching. Obviously, I understand why, and yet that makes me feel a little sad too. I would like to worship collectively, with our kids, at least some times. Anyway, thoughts? What do Catholics do with their kids for mass?

            Liked by 3 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Hi Lily. In many Catholic Churches, the kids go out for the Liturgy of the Word – that is the Biblical readings of the day – and then come back. Having been a Protestant, one of the things that made me fall in love with the catholic Church at my first Mass was that the kids stay right there with us for most of the Mass. You hear some squawling and bawling, but I loved it. There is a scene in the old movie, “The Ten Commandments,” where the Israelites are leaving Egypt. Children are carrying on, chickens are squawking, goats are bleating – it is a chaotic scene…but every time I see it I think of it as the joyful noise unto the Lord the Bible speaks of and my heart soars. That is what my first Mass of worship felt like…that we, the people of God, are all together, young and old, and we are making a joyful noise unto the Lord.

            Liked by 7 people

          • Doug says:

            Yes Charlie. Sounds like after the rescue too. How glorious it will be. I have been down too. Geting over a bug, just bought a new car and it got smashed after 2 days. Must keep my eyes on the prize. I just want to whine some times, but then I am reminded in the words of Peter “Lord, where else shall we go? You have the words of eternal life”.

            Liked by 5 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Doug, a new car smashed, how tragic. That happened to me with my first car after one hour off of the new car lot. I was 21 years old and saved my own money and qualified on my own for the financing and was so happy. I stopped at a store on the way home and a gentleman smashed the passenger door and rear side panels while it was parked and I was in the store and tried to blame me for parking partially on the painted line.
            I went from being a proud and independent young lady to a sobbing daughter calling her daddy on the phone in an instant. I will pray for your situation, that you seem to have a sound composure about already. Good for you. {{{{HUG}}}} for you all the same.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Ok. Insult to injury. Lambzie is in ER now with heart issues. I could use a few prayers. God be praised!

            Liked by 2 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Oh no, Doug. I have prayed the Lord will send St. Therese to shower you and Lambzie both with roses from heaven, that you may know your Lenten sorrows have been fruitful.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Thank you Charlie. Trials are a grace as you know first hand. Don’t wish them on anyone, but will offer them up including my anger at a particular admitting nurse…… ugh, confession time. I hope we get a few souls out. That will mean more praying for all of us.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Doug says:

            I am humbled Charlie. You are so gracious.

            Liked by 3 people

          • prayingflower says:

            Praying for Lambzie, Doug. pf

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Thank you PF! Home and resting now.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Beckita says:

            So sorry to hear this news, Doug. I have some adoration time this evening and will tuck you and Lambzie into this heart of prayer. Please keep us updated. Your praises of the Lord through it all are inspiring and powerful.

            Like

          • janet333 says:

            So sorry to hear this Doug. I’ll be praying for Lambzie.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Thank you Janet! You must be up late.

            Liked by 1 person

          • janet333 says:

            Yes.. The conversation always gets going in here when I have to go to bed. 😦

            Keep us informed on how Lambzie is doing Doug.. and give her our love.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Janet, she is doing well. We went to our Ignatius study meeting this morning. This week was on the 3 levels of humility. Boy. We feel beat up. But God is working something in both of us. Part of the study was about God’s covenantial love; sticking by in sickness and in health. I initially thought about this in the context of me trying to be faithful, but then I got hit between the eyes. God was showing me that he is being faithful to me in sickness and in health. He did not leave or abandon us. He is with us in sickness and in health; when we are down in the dumps or on a high. It was so comforting. God is so gracious to us. I love him.

            Liked by 2 people

          • janet333 says:

            Ah so glad to hear Lambzie is doing well.

            He is with us in sickness and in health; when we are down in the dumps or on a high. It was so comforting. God is so gracious to us. I love him.”

            What an incredible God we have! 🙂

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Oh yes Janet! So true! Thank you very much for the prayers.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Doug says:

            Hi Beckita. Thank you so much. Lambzie was at the supermarket and had an episode of tachycardia (heart races at 200 beats per minute) at the pharmacy. The pharmacist recognized someting was wrong and called 911. The ambulance came and took her to the ER. The store mgr, a friend, called me at work and a coworker drove me (my crashed car is in the shop) to the supermarket where I got her car and went to the ER for which the admitting nurse made me wait and flared my anger. Now I need confession….. ok. Dr. Converted her heart to normal with a meds. So she is ok. Yes!

            Now, while writing this I accidentally deleted this half way through which really set me angry. I walked into my garage and punched the wall out of frustration. Dumb me! It was with my right arm which may need the shoulder surgery. Ok. More confession….. I don’t know what is with me, but the little things get to me. The big things, no problem. This is where I must learn humility. Ugh!

            Am I mad at God? Heck no. I could sense him there the whole time even when angry, I trust in him and recognized right away I screwed up. I just wanted to stew in it for a while. Ugh! Confession…….

            Alright, we are all human including Charlie and our pope. Lord have mercy on us all! I know I need it. Now I’m mad that I got mad. I probably could have affected more souls in purgatoty. I hope my transparency will help here. You are all wonderful here! I must learn to be grateful for little things and big things. God bless you all.

            Liked by 8 people

          • Beckita says:

            Thank you for the update, Doug. I’m grateful Lambzie received the needed intervention and is home again resting. You two have been through a lot recently. Often times anger can just be a release of pent up feelings or anxiety. Punching the wall was most likely an attempt to release something.

            Years ago, when I was coming to terms with some abuse i had endured, I was advised to get a tennis racket and wallop the heck out of the bed mattress and it was a great! Not a bit of damage done to anything or anyone. Walking with vigor up the mountainside or around a few blocks is another great way to regain equilibrium.

            Feeling anger is not a sin; it’s how we mismanage it that can turn to trouble. I just happened to listen in a week ago to Sunday Night Live and it was a delightful interview with a Fr. T Morrow. He’s written a great little book: Overcoming Sinful Anger. Doug, I’m not *at all* saying you need the book. It just comes to mind as I reply to your comment.

            Hmmm… think Charlie will let us keep some rackets in the dugout, just in case they’re needed?

            Liked by 4 people

          • Doug says:

            Beckita, you are so right. I am sure there were some pent up feelings. I first read “Saturday night live” on your post and thought, they are interviewing a priest on SNL? How did that happen? Then I re read and see it was Sunday Night Live. The best kind of SNL! I like to be in control. It’s not easy to let go some times. Frustration is usually due to un met expectations. Jesus went to the cross knowing what would happen and set his expectations accordingly. May I align my expectations to the cross. Lord have mercy on us all!

            Liked by 2 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Well, back in the old days of SNL when I was a Protestant, I thought the priest character on the show, Fr. Guido Sarducci, was hilarious. I recently saw some clips of him again. I still saw some humor in his shtick, but I was uncomfortable enough that I would not want to watch it all again.

            Liked by 2 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Charlie, I remember Father Guido! I was sometimes referred to as “The Church Lady” myself!! 🙂

            Liked by 4 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Hmmm…with all this confusion, could it be…satan?

            Liked by 3 people

          • Beckita says:

            Well, Doug, no wonder you thought, “Saturday Night Live,” ‘cuz the program I was viewing was actually “Sunday Night PRIME.” My bad. I took you down the path of confusion. May all the souls of the faithful departed through the mercy of God rest in peace. Amen.

            Thank you for expressing in such a humble way. Sometimes I think “control” is the ultimate human issue. We all face it and daily. I’m telling you, tennis rackets are handy control leverage. Each wallop = new levels of release and surrender.

            Amen to the Lord having mercy on us all. Praying for pain relief in your shoulder however God takes you through it, Doug. Prayers continue for Lambzie as well.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Lambzie is doing well and we are both grateful for everyone’s prayers. I’m not used to asking. So that is humbling too. We are both at peace and we are thankful for this week. We are. We are very thankful. God is so magnificent with his graces.

            Liked by 4 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Doug, I am praying for Jacki in her emergent needs and for you both in your difficult trials lately. Be well and {{{{HUG}}}} for Jacki.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Doug says:

            I will convey your hug. Thank you Jen!

            Liked by 3 people

          • Kim sevier says:

            Praying Doug!

            Liked by 2 people

          • Doug says:

            Thank you Kim! Would love some warm Tennessee air!

            Liked by 2 people

          • Kim sevier says:

            Y’all would have loved it today! It was 70°!

            Liked by 4 people

          • Doug says:

            Oh drool!

            Liked by 2 people

          • Barb129 says:

            Praying for Lambzie!

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Thank you Barb! She is doing ok now.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Thanks for the hug. Right back at you. Now, I think I will go rescue a spider for Mick……..

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Facing the prospect of shoulder surgery too. Lord, I love you! You are so kind and gentle to us. Our life here is passing away.

            Liked by 4 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Indeed Doug, let’s offer it up!

            Liked by 3 people

          • Beckita says:

            Praying for your shoulder, Doug.

            Like

          • Doug says:

            Thanks Beckita. I had an MRI this past week. I find out Tuesday what the next step is. The injury occurred at Medjugorje. I received a spiritual healing for a physical injury. Well worth the trade off.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Mick says:

            Lily, my kids range from college kid to toddler. None of them has ever gone to the kids’ activities during Mass. It has always been important to my husband and me to worship as a family with our kids. Having been raised as a Protestant, I understand your past experience as well as the uneasiness that it caused you. I think that your instincts are very good. If your child is making normal “kid” sounds, you might get a dirty look every once in a blue moon; but way, WAY more often, someone will turn around, look at you, and smile.

            Plus, your kids will learn way more if they stay with you during Mass. You can always do a kid-appropriate explanation of the readings at home; but the kids will learn about the liturgy and about proper behavior at Mass much more quickly if they are with you than they will if they’re gone for a bunch of the Mass. 🙂

            Liked by 4 people

          • Doug says:

            I went to Mass twice in Florida recently. Probably elderly sections of town. No more than 1 to 2 kids max. It was really sad to not see bunches of kids. I appreciate what we have in NH.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Mick says:

            Ouch. Praying for you, Doug.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Mick says:

            Praying for Lambzie, too.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Thank you Mick. She is ok. Home and sleeping now.

            Liked by 3 people

          • prayingflower says:

            Oh, thanks be to God.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Prayers for you, Doug!

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Thank you Briana! God is merciful!

            Liked by 2 people

          • YongDuk says:

            Doug and Lambzie, praying!

            And yes, I like kids at Masses.

            My humor soars with them during the Homily… blank stares or not…

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Thank you YD. Hearing this from you brings great comfort.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Petra, I think you hit the key word with “consequences”. Seems like everyone is getting away with everything without having to pay any consequences. You are so right about our prosperous culture feeding into it. I did not grow up in a church at all, but I instinctively could see the culture shifts and knew something was not right. I don’t know if this was a gift or we all have some sort of innate understanding of right or wrong. I understand natural law and Romans 1. I think this is what Charlie keeps saying about the storm. It has to unfold in such a way that we see we brought this on ourselves and we will suffer natural consequences of all the poor choices we have made.

            We were discussing at work yesterday about this. There is thought that you have to let kids experience this themselves and make their own choices. I say poppy cock (what ever that means). You don’t have to eat cyanide to know that it kills you. After they grow up, they will have to make their own choices, but I do not have to support if they make bad choices. This is not judging. Oh how we need a storm!

            As an aside, my one daughter waited to give herself away in marriage and is using NFP. It gives me so much hope for the next generation! I talked with her yesterday and two friends of hers (couple) just adopted a beautiful new baby that the birth mother decided to bring to term. She said she offered her labor pains 9 months ago to her friends to adopt and that is when this baby was conceived. So it is now 9 months later (this means my grand daughter is 9 months now). The birth mother got to pick the parents who are strong Catholic. The birth mother also got to pick middle name. The couple who adopted have an older child with initials JP1. The new baby has initials JP2. After what happened to us this week, this helped put a better perspectuve on everything. Life is such a treasure, good bad or otherwise! Ok now I am ramblig. Time to stop waning. Anyway, nice reply Petra.

            Liked by 3 people

      • lambzie37 says:

        Petra, you are so right on the money. Our kids are now exposed to the secular world almost from birth or at least pre-school age. My four year old granddaughter knows how to run almost any high tech device better than I can.

        I believe praying for and with your kids, daily if possible, is the ideal gift we can give our children. Easy to suggest, difficult to consistently achieve. It is however, the best place to start in keeping the lines of communication open. Open communication lines are vital to every relationship. Unless you talk with your teens about the real issues they will and are facing and give them real answers that stem from truth not relativism, they are bound to embrace a seemingly easier path that promises them instant acceptance and affirmation with little personal effort.

        I do not speak as an authority but rather as a mother who has real deep, painful regrets about my failures to keep the conversation going with my kids while they were still within earshot. I felt it was important that I remained their parent (meaning in authority) without acting like their best friend. Now I realize that I should have worked much harder to be their cheerleader. They needed that the most.

        One of our children has turned completely away from God which breaks my heart and makes any conversation with her difficult. Her identical twin is on fire for her faith which brings me great joy. Their brother is somewhere in between. He keeps his emotions and thoughts on faith to himself. He is good at steering the conversatiion away from himself and his private life.

        When all is said and done, you do the best you can. I seek God’s mercy for my failures and pray for his loving providence to call the wanderers home. Hmmm, do I not hear the basic idea of Gid’s salvation plan! 🤗

        Liked by 2 people

        • Beckita says:

          Praying with you, Lambzie, for your children, my children and all the sons and daughters of the world. The Rescue is underway.

          Liked by 3 people

        • Doug says:

          Dearest Lambzie, given where you have been and your own past personal struggles. You have done the best you can. As your beloved husband, I am quite proud that you have been and still are the mother of our kids. You have done a remarkable job. Even though they are not all there with the faith, they have a strong sense of justice and are positive contributors to society from a work perspective. They are all in God’s hands now and like you, I do grieve for the lost ones to come back to the faith. I hope and pray they experience the magnificence, grace and love deep in their hearts such that it becomes their faith and not just appeasing their parents. I am graced by your friendship.

          Liked by 4 people

  2. Beckita says:

    A extraordinary story of God’s Mercy poured out in a humble, loving next right step. May the soul of Antonin Scalia and all the the souls of the faithful departed, throought he Mercy of God, rest in peace. Amen. http://www.catholiceducation.org/en/faith-and-character/faith-and-character/justice-scalia-s-great-heart.html#.VsPymTY_Uxc.facebook

    Liked by 5 people

  3. Jerry Bonagofski says:

    Charlie, when I learned of Justice Scalia’s death, I immediately saw this as a potential turning point in the collapse of our entire system, the most conservative and key figure on the Supreme Court. This crisis could easily degenerate into riots and huge civil disruptions. I could not help but wonder if you were shown this in future events. As 2017 comes closer, an awful lot has to happen by late 2017 and the rescue.

    Like

  4. lambzie37 says:

    Charlie you set such a good example for us with your procession across our country! Perhaps our processions should stop at the front doors of those key places complicit in the breatk down of our country: our homes, each and every PP, the Supreme Court, on to the State House and finally we’ll meet up at the White House. It would be a wonderful public statement to do such a thing with Mary and our religious leaders (of every Judeo-Christizn faith) leading us. Perhaps though, in this proclaimed year of mercy,, we should first make a personal procession with speediness from our own front doors to our local dioceasan door of mercy.

    We are after all the citizens of the once United States of America who marched down this sad road together. We clamored for freedom from puritanical governance, voting election after election for progressive leaders who would bring forth a new “freer” society. We proclaimed that “God was dead and kicked him out of our schools, our government and now more and more out of our families. The nucleus of our society, the family, has split apart. Any wonder that an intense wave of destruction, hatred and anger has erupted? Perhaps you protest you did not contribute to this degradation. Maybe not directly but … “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” — Edmund Burke

    And in this regard I am no saint. I shamefully cringe when I think of how more often than not, I remained silent not wanting to make others uncomfortable or because I was too uncomfortable! When I was growing up, at least in my family, politics and especially religion were never openly discussed. I was a shy timid lass who never felt free to express her opinion. When I entered a debate, I was woefully inept at it, usually unable to hold my own. And so I let others fight my battles for me freely jumping into the fray only when I was among friendlies. But I have done something right. I was quiet but I was also carefully taking notes as I formed my convictions.

    And so I pledge to be silent no more. I will use the gifts that God has given me to express my beliefs and convictions. I now realize, rather late in my life, that in the rare times I did speak out, motivated by love, nothing horrible ensued. Yes I stepped on a few toes and put my foot in it, even offended some, but ultimately good come of it. Now my family and friends recognize me as their go to gal when someone needs prayer. God has strengthened and shaped me in the past decade through fierce adversity. I dread the storm intensifying even more but I KNOW from personal experience that should we survive we will emerge so much better than we were. We will have no doubt that God is real, he loves us and that he keeps his promises.

    Squirrel Squad, ready? MARCH! 🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿🐿

    Liked by 9 people

  5. BJ says:

    when you see at a ´cultural´event in Barcelona, Spain this week the reading of
    a ´sexualised´ version of the Our Father (pro abortion etc.) ….. i kid you not,
    you have to wonder how much longer will these blind and deaf souls be allowed to
    damage their eternal futures….. surely only a massive shaking can save us all from
    our pride and stupidity ….. and then you have fence sitting wimps who mumble about how they
    don´t agree with the sentiments but respect the right to free speech ….. yea right! would the insulting of Islamic prayers from a public stage be tolerated so readily? we all know the answer..
    Charlie i hope you are right about late 2017, because my heart is already broken and 2017 seems a long way off right now ….

    Liked by 3 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      BJ, there are no words to describe the horror of the evil you describe. I believe I read recently about a local artist in Spain who stole > 200 consecrated hosts and is making sidewalk art with them too. I offer up my pain and suffering as reparation. Lord have Mercy.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Beckita says:

      BJ, from what we’ve come to understand about the Rescue, it is comprised of both a process *and* the final Rescue by Our Lady. As I have come to understand it, people will be on their knees before late 2017 and we, walking in the Merciful Footsteps of Jesus, will be part of a tremendous resuce mission.

      I have especially pondered that as events unfold, those who have sinned in the most grevious ways will begin to know their need for God. Christ will need our hearts, heads and embracing arms as we assure the returning prodigals and speak, with the Breath of the Holy Spirit, the very words of Christ to St. Faustina: “The greater the sin, the greater right that sinner has to My Mercy.”

      (We adore you O Christ and we praise You because by Your Holy Cross You have redeemed the world!)

      Liked by 4 people

  6. zeniazenia says:

    Good morning! A friend has recently directed me to a twelve weekly one-hour lesson program by Scott Hahn’s institute. ‘The St. Paul Center for Biblical Theology is a non-profit research and educational institute that promotes life-transforming Scripture study in the Catholic tradition.’ New videos are posted weekly and will remain available for two weeks. Very edifying! To begin, it requires you enter your email address. Happy Lent :0) –ZJ
    http://www.bibleandthevirginmary.com/lessons

    Liked by 3 people

  7. ann says:

    Patrick–your dream was really very strange and powerful. The fact that it was in black and white interests me. Like an old 1940’s movie–and I thought “this time we’re in is nothing new–we have lived this before as a people and we will most likely live it again–the rise of godless power and the defeat of godless power. ” I have been reading and watching things that deal with Germany in the 20’s and 30’s and the rise of Hitler. They say history doesn’t repeat, but it rhymes. So many elements seem chillingly familiar. People just beside themselves with what they see “coming on the world” and someone telling them “I’ll fix it. Just give me the power.” Thank goodness we know the end of the story! But as Gandalf says to Frodo, when he says he wishes he had never gotten involved in the ring and the whole mission, “So do all who live in such times.” And he goes on to say we just have to do the best we can with the time we are given (TNRS!) We are definitely on a pilgrimage and all the elements of a pilgrimage are behind and ahead. At least we are not traveling alone. Another thought. In the written accounts of the martyrs Felicity and Perpetua, Felicity says to Perpetua, “how do you think you will endure this suffering? You can’t even stand a pin prick.” And Perpetua answers, “but that was me suffering in myself. This will be Christ suffering in me.” I can do all things in Him Who strengthens me!

    Appropo to the encroaching overreach of the government in the lives of our children and families, has anyone read Michael O’Brien’s Plague Journal? That family escapes with their children into the wilderness to protect them from that very thing. His novels written in the 90’s are very prophetic. And besides that, they are a good read.

    Liked by 6 people

    • MarieUrsula says:

      Ann, I have Plague Journal and I’ve read it. Perhaps it’s time to read it again.

      Also, I’m almost finished reading a book called Fatal Crossroads: The Untold Story of the Malmédy Massacre at the Battle of the Bulge by Danny S. Parker. Now I’m not a WWII buff who reads everything about the war. I stumbled across this on the Internet because my grandfather was one of the main Army inspectors who interviewed and documented testimonies of the survivors. I was g**gling around for something else and this showed up (it’s a fairly new book). I sent a “contact” email and, lo, Danny S. Parker immediately responded and sent me a copy of the book.

      The whole incident documented in the book remains with me. It also reminds me a bit of Michael’s dream.

      The massacre occurred near the small town of Malmédy, Belgium, on December 17, 1944 (a few months AFTER D-Day). A group of about 150 Americans ~ most of them in the 285th Field Artillery Observation Battalion (a lightly armed non-fighting unit) ~ was driving along in jeeps and small trucks and, to its great surprise, encountered a huge group of SS tanks, etc., which had broken through the friendly lines in one of Hitler’s last big offensive drives (which ultimately failed). The SS unit was in a hurry and didn’t have time or means to deal with prisoners of war. Hitler’s men rounded up these unarmed American soldiers and made them stand, hands up, in a field. Then the order was given to kill them. An officer fired the first fatal shots. The SS tanks sprayed them with bullets, then SS soldiers methodically walked around the fallen bodies in the field and shot any who appeared to be still alive. This is a war crime according to the Geneva Convention of 1929. At one point, some of the men (who were playing dead) saw an opportunity to make a run for it. It started with one injured man shouting, “Let’s make a break!” About 50 men, some of them seriously injured, managed to escape and survived. My grandfather interviewed some of these men in one of the nearby field hospitals.

      Danny S. Parker spent about 20 years doing the research for this book. He interviewed several American survivors and also some still-living German soldiers and Belgian townspeople.

      Here are some of my hasty takeaways from this:

      1. The SS soldiers were following orders and would have suffered repercussions ~ including execution ~ had they refused. (Some of them obeyed eagerly, however.) How many of us cave in to pressure in subtle or stronger forms? Think about government whistleblowers and ethical journalists and what they have to contend with. Think about ourselves in our everyday lives.

      2. When cultural conscience is injured, one bad thing leads to another. In 1949, Doctor Leo Alexander, the chief medical investigator in the Nuremberg Medical Trials that followed World War II, wrote in the New England Journal of Medicine: “Whatever proportions these crimes finally assumed, it became evident to all who investigated them that they had started from small beginnings. The beginnings at first were merely a subtle shift in emphasis in the basic attitudes of the physicians. It started with the acceptance of the attitude, basic to the euthanasia movement, that there is such a thing as a life not worthy to be lived. This attitude in its early stages concerned itself merely with the severely and chronically sick. Gradually the sphere of those to be included in this category was enlarged to encompass the socially unproductive, the ideologically unwanted, the racially unwanted, and finally all non-Germans.” (From “Medical Science Under Dictatorship”) Hitler et al had reached the point of incinerating millions of people in concentration camps; a massacre of soldiers who were in the way must have seemed trivial.

      3. A number of the Malmédy survivors believed that God had delivered them from this desperate situation. Several of them also helped one another to escape, especially those who were injured, and some of the local villagers risked their lives to help the Americans.

      4. I think most of the world rather quickly forgave the German people for the atrocities committed during the war, while punishing those in authority who were the main perpetrators. Is that not symbolized in Michael’s dream?

      5. Here we are now, throughout much of the world, being strangled by the ever-extending tentacles of the Culture of Death. And we are in The Storm.

      6. Acknowledge (and trust) God. Take the next right step. Be a sign of hope to those around you.

      Liked by 7 people

      • MarieUrsula says:

        Oops ~ Patrick’s dream. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • Doug says:

        MU, very good reflection. Thanks.

        Liked by 1 person

      • ann says:

        Powerful, MU. Very powerful. My father in law was captured at the Battle of the Bulge and kept prisoner by the Germans and came to deep Christian faith as a result. Fearless faith, I would say. Thanks for recounting the story of Malmade. All I could think of was, “where sin abounds there does grace much more abound.” (the wounded helping each other to escape etc)

        Liked by 1 person

        • MarieUrsula says:

          Hi, Ann. I forget where I post things and don’t always see replies!

          That is a beautiful story about your father-in-law. Danny S. Parker also wrote an earlier book, Battle of the Bulge: Hitler’s Ardennes Offensive, 1944-1945.

          We surely do need God’s grace to be able to respond well during crisis times, especially when brutality and personal suffering are involved. Accounts like that of your father-in-law are inspiring.

          Liked by 2 people

      • Mick says:

        Wow, MarieUrsula. I’m not a war buff; I never watch TV shows or read books about war. But I think I’m going to have to get a copy of this book. My dad’s wife’s father fought in the Battle of the Bulge and was taken prisoner. This past Christmas Day, he and I had a lengthy discussion of his fighting and POW days. It has gotten me thinking a lot about the Greatest Generation, and about how we are being called to fill their shoes (or combat boots, as it were). God help us all to rise to the occasion.

        If any of you are so inclined, please pray for this dear man and hero. He was raised Catholic but lost his faith decades ago. In the past few weeks, he has recommitted his life to Christ in an evangelical congregation; please pray that he come all the way home. His name is John. Thanks.

        Liked by 4 people

    • Snowy Owl says:

      ann, SO funny you typed this! I was watching Lord of the Rings and had paused it to read some more of Fr. Elijah~ An Apocalypse, by Michael O’Brien, which I had just put down to respond to Patrick’s dream! This all just has to mean something! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. CrewDog says:

    Getting back to unpleasant thoughts as Charlie posted above ;-( “In this piece, five major former U.S. national security officials write an almost panicked warning about the imminent danger from North Korea and Iran. They end by noting that North Korea is working with Iran to coordinate nuclear capability. Hey, you heard it here first.”

    It’s been 12 years since Congress was warned in hearings that a man-made or Solar EMP “Event” could end our “Way of Life” … and in a worse case end the lives of 80+% of the population. As far as I know, absolutely nothing has been done to harden our Electric Grid! The amount of $$$ needed to do that task is a small % of the $$$$ that has been squandered by Obama/Pals on Union Pay-Offs, Green Boondoggles and Vote-Buying. It’s just another “SIGN”, to me anyway, that some Evil Force is at work to “blind” and misguide ……… and The Storm?:

    “EMP Expert: ‘We Are Still Vulnerable; Frightfully Vulnerable”
    http://www.theblaze.com/contributions/emp-expert-we-are-still-vulnerable-frightfully-vulnerable/

    GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Liked by 6 people

  9. Patricia says:

    Charlie,
    You have often said that we will pick up the pieces of a civilization shattered and we will carry on as before albeit within the context of the Triumph of the Immaculate Heart. You have also said you will and we will be traveling and building and doing the things we do now. My question then is may we assume that the many careers that people have today will not be viable after the rescue? I am not speaking of the NASA scientist who will need to use his skills to do something else during the crisis. I am speaking of the millions of people who are in banking, finance, politics, media, advertising, etc. Clearly, these will fall in the short term and it would appear that they are not conducive to a healthy society in the long term as they have been practiced for the last few decades. You have said you will speak of how to rebuild when it is time and you may put this under that topic and if you do, I understand. I have been thinking about this lately because we are at that time of year when kids are getting into college and making plans for their majors. Suggesting that people start looking at other areas like farming, welding, ranching, mechanics, plumbing, may be appropriate (and a late to the game for today). But, even then, if the above is correct, millions more of working Americans might need to look at these things even though they have not worked with their hands ever. Thank you.

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Banking, finance, politics, all of these things will be needed in times to come. These are not evils – but they have become horrifically disordered in modern times. For all of us, the question is not to root out characteristics that sometimes present themselves in sinful ways. Rather, it is to properly order them. King David’s passion often led him to sin. But had he destroyed that passion altogether, he would not have had the strength and drive he needed to establish the Kingdom of Israel. In politics, I had the capacity to inspire people, fill them with a common resolve, and get them to act in real unity. I also could be mulishly stubborn and prickly at times. These qualities were just branches of the same root. For most of us, our lives are a challenge to take the authentic gifts God has given us and learn to properly order them, while not letting them degenerate into disorder. When an entire society has given itself over to hideous disorder, it can be tempting to condemn the root. But to do so is to deny the possibility of virtue from such characteristics – and if we root up what is the authentic root of our characteristics in order not to sin, we root up the virtue that can come from it if we properly order it.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Goodness I need to read that a few times. So many applications.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Patricia says:

        Charlie, I understand that part of it which is why I wrote “as they have been practiced for the last few decades’, meaning as you said in a disordered manner. I am not thinking that we will not have banking, politics, media etc but that every starry eyed kid will not be majoring in it or so many working in it. I remember a lovely gentleman telling the story of his life to a group of Christians. He is in his late seventies. He had gone to Annapolis and later off to Harvard Business School. He said when he graduated, he was looking to acquire a business where the owner was retiring and it would be a business that needed updating and improving. I got the impression that is what the majority of the class was hoping to do back in the day and that is what this gentleman did. Comparing the those HBS classes to today’s HBS classes, it would appear they go to Wall Street and cause havoc with Main St. It is that distortion of the media, banking, etc that I speak of. But in order to correct this, many will not be doing this anymore since we just never needed it and will not need it. It is a fake economy. Maybe what will change will be that we will have manufacturing back in the country and people will live like they did in the 40’s and 50’s with the president of the company, the white and blue collar people, the janitors, the caf ladies, the lawyers of the company all living in the same town and their kids all going to the same high school. Today, the president of the company is making 40 million and he travels and lives with other corporate executives and they have no idea how the half live. A great book on all this is Charles Murray “Coming Apart”. He argues just that and said our greatest days were from Pearl Harbor to the day Kennedy was shot. He is a Harvard/MIT guy who bucks the trend of PC and uses stats to back up his premises (along with common sense). He said the country shared five major things and one was everyone went to church on Sunday. Otherwise you were suspect. Great read.

        Liked by 4 people

        • charliej373 says:

          Oh, thanks Patricia, that is deeply insightful. People have gotten so disordered that at the structural level of their ambitions, they desire to excel in disorder. I was stunned once to read that, for a time, after the Soviet Union fell, the most widely desired occupation among young Russian women was to become a successful prostitute. But when everything is reduced to a relentless, worldly materials, our desires become warped along with it. We try to excel in the environment we find ourselves in – and when it is a toxic environment, we can be seduced into desiring to excel in toxicity. Sorry, your insight was far deeper than I originally discerned.

          Liked by 4 people

        • Mack says:

          That is an excellent book, Patricia. Murray documents the decline of marriage, the work ethic, respect for law, and religion, and how that has affected society. He provides evidence that these trends are much more pronounced among people in lower economic brackets. I think that the decline of religion is at the root of the other things.
          In the time of the Rescue, a renewed religious observance should lead to a return to marriage and family as the cornerstone of society, further supported by a healthy work ethic and respect for just laws. Those are the areas we will need to focus on.

          Liked by 3 people

        • diane says:

          Patricia,
          I certainly mirror your comments because it seems to me we will have to be a people walloped by the Holy Spirit if we are to order the disorders. Man-kind has a propensity toward selfishness and worldly desires – nothing to do with the satan tempting us – we many time do more damage to ourselves because of our desire for wealth and fame. So if we are asked to better the broken system, I suspect all of us will be changed by the Storm and we will be very aware that we are fearfully and wonderfully made by our Great and Glorious God. Our very senses will have to be increased in order to remember who we are and why we belong to God, my goodness the very Heavens will be revealing to us what will be necessary to do in order to order things aright. We are too veiled now to get it back on track without God intervening. I cannot wait to have the little faith I have to be increased ten-fold, to not have to argue with myself in order to be kind and gentle, for generosity to be as easy as breathing, for passions to not get the better of our young adults, but for clear thinking to be done without a struggle. My goodness, how very alert and bright we will be. God will be always foremost in our thoughts, communities will be bound together by Love and goodwill. Taking care to take care of each other, sharing our talents and knowledge, not hoarding them for fear someone else get the credit. I know that we will still have our battles with Pride, Anger, Jealousy, Greed, Gluttony, Sloth and Lust, but I see us as being able to recognize the temptations a bit more clearly and have a boldness to defeat the satan’s attacks more easily, as he will certainly be deflated. I see us all a better people because God will have revealed a bit more to us than ever before in the history of mankind, and just that little bit will give us the fuel we will need to order the disorder. Love. I do. Diane

          Liked by 4 people

  10. Mack says:

    Just sharing this from a Marian website, about Mary’s victory. I didn’t realize that 2017 will also be the 300th anniversary of the founding of Freemasonry. Not a coincidence..

    “In 1917, Freemasonry celebrated the 200th anniversary of its founding, in Rome. Flags and banners were posted in the city, representing the Archangel Michael defeated by Lucifer. This slogan was shouted on Saint Peter’s Square: “Satan will rule the Vatican, the Pope will be part of the Swiss Guard!”

    In reaction to these marches that issued threats for the Church, Brother Maximilian Maria Kolbe, then a theology student, asked this question: “Should we do nothing while our enemies are working so hard to dominate us? Don’t we have more powerful weapons than theirs in the Immaculate and our Lord Jesus Christ? ”

    Having studied and pondered the dogma of the Immaculate Conception, and the apparitions of the Virgin Mary in Lourdes, Brother Maximilian Kolbe came to this conclusion: “The undefiled Virgin, victorious over all heresies, will not give way to her enemy if she finds faithful servants that are obedient to her command. She will win victories, larger than we could imagine …”

    Liked by 11 people

    • Snowy Owl says:

      Amen! Mack!

      Liked by 3 people

    • prayingflower says:

      LOVE IT!!! Thank you, Mack! Give a shout out to our Blessed Mother, everyone! Oh, how we love you, dearest Mother. ❤ ❤ ❤ I only know how to make hearts. Does anyone have flowers? pf

      Liked by 3 people

    • Bob says:

      Mack what website did you find this info about Masons on?

      Like

    • Beckita says:

      Interesting, Mack. I wonder if the article is actually referring to the formation of the first Grand Lodge in London in 1717. Some reports claim there is not solid documentation for the founding of the first lodge in Italy, yet an 1845 record suggests it occurred in 1723. Freemasonry has such a complicated history and I’ve never taken the time to sort out how and when levels of perverted and sacriligious evil infiltrated the transition from operative to speculative masonry. Fr. Gobbi’s messages certainly had much to say about the dastardly deeds and plans of this organization.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mick says:

      Wow, Mack! I didn’t know that 2017 was a relevant year for Freemasonry. Thanks for the info.

      Like

  11. YongDuk, on the subject of secondary offerings..I have no idea what anyone is talking about–or your corrective post– could you please explain? Thank you.

    Like

  12. Rick says:

    That is great, Diane! I saw those prayers. 12 years daily is a monumental but very worthy task.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Kim Sevier says:

      My daughter has said them for a year now—I keep goofing up and starting over—I guess I will be saying them for the rest of my life–they are awesome!

      Liked by 2 people

  13. Frank says:

    Drudge via Reuters is reporting that nuclear material was stolen in Iraq in 2015. This has always been a concern but now, unless the report is bogus, it is a reality.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Mick says:

      Well now, THAT’S cheery. Looks like the junior varsity are a bit more adept than Obama thought.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Frank says:

        I honestly regret sharing that piece of bad news. Nothing is gained. I apologize for my bad taste.

        Like

        • YongDuk says:

          Meh, it was informative for me, Frank…

          This is where I come for my current events. (Thus, why I didn’t know who was in the Super Bowl until a few minutes into the game and I already forgot who it was exactly.)

          P.S. I do travel a lot.

          Liked by 5 people

        • the phoenix says:

          It’s a call to prayer for us, Frank.

          Liked by 7 people

        • It’s where we are. I look at it as checking our surroundings with the periscope.

          Liked by 5 people

        • Snowy Owl says:

          Frank, I have mostly stopped watching the news so I appreciate hearing things in here that are serious…CrewDog usually keeps us well informed too!

          Liked by 5 people

        • Mick says:

          Oh, Frank, my sarcasm wasn’t aimed at you! You have absolutely nothing to apologize for; and I apologize for making you think that I was offended by what you said. My snarkiness was aimed directly at our pathetic excuse for a president, and indirectly at those who think it would be just peachy to let in countless unvetted “refugees” from the Middle East (but only the Muslims, mind you; not the Christians. And anyone who opposes this must be afraid of widows and orphans… Dear Leader said so.).

          Your comment was not in bad taste. And it is not the case that nothing was gained by what you wrote; on the contrary, your comment will help all of us to focus our prayers. Please forgive me for making you think that I was delivering a smackdown.

          (I think I may have just sprung a whole dormitory-full of souls from Purgatory, am I right?) 🙂

          Liked by 4 people

          • janet333 says:

            “(I think I may have just sprung a whole dormitory-full of souls from Purgatory, am I right?)”

            Right or wrong..we claim the souls anyway…hahaha 🙂

            Liked by 3 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Frank and Mick, most news posted about our POTUS I consider a training drill for the wise-as-serpents, simple-as-doves objective in a sort of know and pray for your enemy tactical and spiritual approach. 😉

            Liked by 2 people

          • Frank says:

            Mick,

            I know that your sarcasm wasn’t aimed at me. I just regretted posting something so negative that I read on the internet. We are all inundated with bad news all of the time and I would do better if I reminded people that the Lord is our Rock and our Fortress.

            Regards,

            Frank

            Liked by 3 people

          • Beckita says:

            Love it, Mick! 😉
            Eternal rest grant unto them, O Lord, and let perpetual light shine upon them. Amen.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Petra says:

            Mick: “(I think I may have just sprung a whole dormitory-full of souls from Purgatory, am I right?)”

            This made me imagine the poor souls in purgatory in rows and rows of bunk beds like was often depicted in old time movies of orphanages or prisoner of war camps, trying to push out the door all at once as the guard flung it open (and sunlight spilled through) and said, “You’re free!” and them all chanting as they shoved through the door, “MICK! MICK! MICK! MICK! MICK! MICK! MICK!”

            (As you can tell, I’m quite the *image* thinker. I don’t know what that says about me, but I do often get some chuckles from it. 🙂 )

            Yea Mick!
            God bless.

            Liked by 5 people

          • Mick says:

            Petra, I’m trying to stifle my laughter so as to not wake Little Miss Awesome, who is sleeping on my lap. 🙂

            Liked by 3 people

  14. A Quiet Person says:

    This is just an addition to the comment by Diane from a few days ago about the water crisis in Flint. (There are so many comments I could not find it easily so I am just posting down here.)

    Just more observations, variations on the theme of evil being exposed from my little corner of the world.

    Flint’s emergency manager, the one who implemented the disastrous plan to save money by hooking the water up to the Flint River was then appointed to be the new emergency manager for the Detroit Public Schools. Well, you can probably imagine how well that has been going. Teachers have enjoyed about as much of that as they could stand so in January there were a series of “sick-out” which effectively closed down the schools for a few days. Horrendous conditions were finally exposed . . . mold, falling ceilings, rats, mold, no heat, let alone no books . . . The situations exposed got international media attention. People were likening some of the DPS schools to that found in 3rd world countries. Ellen Degeneres was so concerned that she donated $500,000 along with Lowes to one of the worst schools.

    So, you would think that DPS would get down to business and clean up the mess. There has been plenty of time for them to say, “Gosh, golly, we didn’t know it was so bad. Let’s roll up our sleeves and get this together” in order for them to save face.

    No, here are some of the things that have happened instead. Some eager beaver got a bill pushed through in no-time flat. If approved, teachers in the future would lose their teaching certificate if they participated in another sick-out. DPS also sent a letter to all the principals to call the police if and health inspectors from the union attempted to enter the building. The city sent inspectors but that isn’t enough. Ivy the interim DFT Union president responded, “We applaud the city’s inspection efforts to look for building code violations. However, our inspectors intended to supplement the city’s and look for health concerns as mold, asbestos, lead, water damage, and vermin and rodent droppings.”

    And DPS ‘s response is to call the police? As if the police don’t have enough to do in Detroit already?

    Now there is talk of DPS splitting into 2 districts with all of the chaos that would cause. Our principal said about 5 times at a recent staff meeting that, “That’s what you get when you open Pandora’s Box.” What is that supposed to mean? The rats did not come out of Pandora’s box, that much I know.

    Layer upon layer of evil is being exposed in DPS but no one’s heart has changed yet.

    Here’s another big problem. The American Federation of Teachers (who recently took over the Detroit Federation of Teachers for the time being) is staunchly, in-your-face supporters of Planned Parenthood. From a press release of 7/27/2015, AFT woman’s right’s committee stands in support of Planned Parenthood ” . . . in the face of the latest round of scurrilous attacks against an organization that provides high-quality, affordable healthcare . . . ”

    Later, in the same press release, again referring to the Daleiden tapes, Dianne Jackson, vice-chair of the AFT’s woman’s rights committee says, “We are standing with Planned Parenthood and will continue to stand with them in the face of these outrageous attacks.”

    And they are supposed to be helping children? And, it is not possible to disengage from the Union. They will take your money anyway and call it “working fees.”

    DPS has a teacher shortage of about 150 teachers. Any wonder why? And today, I just found out that someone is trying to push through another salary slash.

    It is just unbelievable, yet we see it everywhere.

    And here is the real kick-a-roo . . . DPS will not have enough money to make payroll in April. Our union building rep has told us twice to save our tax returns.

    I though about posting this under prayer requests because I sure can’t come up with a reasonable prayer for DPS on my own. Maybe something like, “Dear Lord, if You are still thinking about that comet, could you aim it at Detroit. Please?” Or, “Dear Lord, is there any way You could time the financial crash with DPS’s inability to make payroll in April?”

    I guess I will just stick with “Lead all souls to Heaven, especially those most in need of your mercy.”

    I have told my kids a few times that I can easily imagine a time in the future when their kids would come up to me and say, “Wow, grandma, did you really work in Detroit during the onset of the fullness of the Storm.”

    And I will say, “Oh, yes children and now gather ’round. Let me tell you about those times and listen well because you are now the keepers of the story . . . “

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      There are some areas of Detroit that would need to be remodeled just to get them condemned. Some of your public officials seem to want to make the whole region that way. I must confess, I was tickled by the comet prayer.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Doug says:

      I pray bring on the storm Quiet!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mick says:

      Hi, Quiet! It’s nice to “see” you again. 🙂

      I’m so sorry to hear about how horrible it is in the DPS. I have a high-school friend that teaches in one of the high schools in Detroit; but I don’t see him often, and he never talks about work. So I had no idea things were so bad there. It’s such an injustice to the students, to the parents, and to the teachers.

      Your suggested prayers, though, made me laugh. It amazes me how in the midst of trying situations, you can still always rattle off something funny. That is a real talent that I believe God will have you using a great deal during the height of the Storm.

      Keep fighting the good fight, sister. You are truly quite amazing. 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

  15. Phillip Frank says:

    Petra said;
    (As you can tell, I’m quite the *image* thinker. I don’t know what that says about me, but I do often get some chuckles from it. 🙂 )

    Or maybe you had shared in with Patrick on the Little Dickens mini weenies?

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Bob says:

    I had a dream last night before my frequent nightly wakeup and prayer time. I was riding along with an F16 crew and was riding in back with seat belt loosely strapped but was excited to be there and was holding on despite some loops and they were doing Gs up to about 8 Gs and I was holding on and breathing through them. I heard an ad saying “Civilians won’t be able to ride along for long so we’d better do it now.” and I woke up partly with an impression that the crew was going to do one more set of tricks including flying as high as possible before the plans would reach it’s peak and fall back down”.
    To me the meaning of the dream is clear:” Buckle our belts, hold on, breath deeply and say our prayers because a rough ride is ahead!
    And in a post yesterday on “Storming the gates of hell’ I was thinking yesterday of how God took me by the hand when I was so lost and could have easily lost my way with so many false tangents as i was returning to the faith. Le’t pray that God will Himself lead us each and our country and our world back to Truth and love for Him again. For that we must trust that God is our loving Father and will do so!

    Liked by 5 people

  17. CrewDog says:

    YUP!! It appears that any number of People of Faith are now “Singin’ off the same sheet of music”! …. People of little/No Faith are at the Mall ;-(:
    “Franklin Graham: ‘World Is Unraveling From Middle East to North Korea, Jesus Is Coming”
    http://www.christianpost.com/news/franklin-graham-world-unraveling-middle-east-north-korea-sign-jesus-is-coming-158153

    GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Like

  18. janet333 says:

    I agree Yong Duk..ours is so cute. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  19. I received this email from the president of Louisiana right to life who is a dear friend. When he said how much justice Scalias presence was missed today, Charlie’s words that his death was like a hole being punched in the damn echoed in my mind. Here is a summary of his observations from today’s hearing on the abortion laws that attended. Please pray for these justices, especially Justice Kennedy, as it seems he is the linchpin in all of this. -Caroline

    “Here are some thoughts on the hearing today:

    It seemed that Justices Ginsburg, Sotomayor, Breyer, and Kagan were committed to returning our nation to the 1970s and 1980s when states were prohibited from enacting any basic health regulations on abortion. Instead of analyzing the legal facts before them, these justices were looking to replace the judgments of the people of Texas and their duly-elected legislators with an abortion-on-demand mandate.

    Their lengthy and mostly legally irrelevant questions forced Texas’ attorney to defend points that were germane to testimony in a state legislative hearing, not a Supreme Court hearing. They quickly brushed aside any concern Texas might have had about safeguarding against Gosnell-style facilities. Justice Ginsburg repeatedly pushed the pro-abortion mantra that “abortion is safer than childbirth.”

    Chief Justice Roberts and Justice Alito questioned the abortion plantiffs at length about whether they had presented sufficient evidence to show that the law constituted an “undue burden.” Justice Alito twice referred to the similar case in Louisiana, indicating the outcome of this case will likely directly impact Louisiana’s case.

    Unfortunately, Justice Thomas remained silent after he asked questions for the first time in 10 years during another hearing on Monday.

    Justice Kennedy asked only a handful of questions, and he seemed to be grappling with the question of whether the Texas law constituted an undue burden or not on access to abortion in Texas. The future of the case will almost certainly rest in is hands. If he sides with Texas, a 4-4 decision is anticipated, meaning the 5th Circuit precedent stands and the Texas law (and likely by extension the Louisiana law) will remain in effect. If he sides with the abortion attorneys and the four other justices, the Texas law could be struck down in part or in whole, producing a disastrous precedent against a state’s right to enact common-sense health standards on abortion facilities and physicians.

    The absence of Justice Scalia cannot be understated as his presence, combined with a Justice Kennedy vote with Texas, would have led to strong precedent in favor of a state’s rights. His presence was missed today.”

    Liked by 2 people

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