A View From Ireland

(Over the last few years, I have encountered some people I respect and trust so much that I value their counsel even when they deeply disagree with me – because of the quality of their steadfast faith. Among these are Pelianito, Mark Mallett, Dan Lynch, Anthony Mullen, Daniel O’Connor, the members who took an the task of running the TNRS Answers team, those who acted as Regional Coordinators during my visits last year, and some others who prefer to remain discrete. It has vastly enriched my life.

One of these people is Padraig Caughey, a man in Ireland who runs the Mother of God (MOG)Forum. It is widely followed in Europe, Australia and North America. Interestingly, I once said I hoped this site would be like a cheery Irish Pub. The MOG Forum is more lake a Wild West Saloon. It brings a lot of people together to discuss Church and faith issues. You have some who are erudite, some who are not but try their best to be, some who are gleeful agitators – but most are simply trying their best to discuss serious issues of faith in an amenable setting. I am amazed at how well Padraig gives people latitude but keeps it from degenerating into an outright brawl most of the time. I know that is a tough job.

Earlier today, Padraig sent me a note taking deep exception to my last post. He heartily disagrees with me on several points concerning the Pope’s comments on avoiding pregnancy and contraception. What he wrote me is entirely contained on one of the forum threads at MOG. I hope you will take a look at it. Interestingly, while I disagree with him on some particulars, I fundamentally agree with him on the matter of respectful dissent. The Pope and the hierarchy need to hear the voice of the faithful authentically. But it needs to be a respectful voice that is fully and firmly committed to the Barque of Peter. I have often heard Padraig get frustrated and angry, but he is firmly committed to the faith and the Church, so I always carefully consider whatever he has to say.

One of the themes that is growing to me in importance is the Church as the Family of God. Families fight and dispute with each other, but they are able to do so because there is a deep commitment to loving and wanting the good of each other. I hope to see the sort of atmosphere where people feel free to speak their honest hearts about serious issues – but don’t burn down the house because of faulty plumbing. Padraig sometimes wants to rip out the plumbing, but carefully protects the structure.

I think it would be a good Lenten exercise to deeply study the Book of Job. Job spends almost the entire book complaining of God and complaining to God, but his faith that if he could but get a hearing, God would explain and give him justice. His pious friends bitterly denounce him for his criticism of God. In the end, amazingly, God congratulates Job on has honest faith and is fiercely angry at the false piety of his friends. We are the Family of God. As we fight, may we treat each other as such, while expressing honestly our concerns.

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
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364 Responses to A View From Ireland

  1. Brigitte Dunn says:

    I feel very uncomfortable when Priest and People speak in tongue , i know it is one of the gift of the Holy Spirit… However a very rare gift I believe that Padre Pio had that give, the nose coming from these , very well intended and good Catholics make me very nervous it is the Protestant that made it popular in the 70th with the Charismatic Movement What is your take on the matter? Thank you God Bless Brigitte

    Sent from my iPad

    >

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Well, St. Paul called it “the least of the gifts” and gave very strict rules for when it can be used. Some assemblies treat it as the greatest of the gifts. That bothers me – and it bothers me that some place such a high premium on it that it encourages people to pretend to speak in tongues. Every time someone pretends to speak in tongues, they invite a demon into the assembly.

      I think the Charismatic Movement has an important positive role to play, but they must always take care to be disciplined and under obedience to their Bishop, lest their enthusiasm for the Holy Spirit degenerate to an enthusiasm for any spirit that will have them.

      Liked by 6 people

  2. Beckita says:

    Charlie, I’ve been a lurker at MOG for a long time and I realize quite a few from this site participate there as well. Mother Superior and I are FB n email pals. There’s a different flavor of dialoging all right. It obviously works well for them yet I appreciate the decorum that’s developed here. Key to this has been your guidance, monitoring, gatekeeping, etc. How would your role possibly change as we developed into more open disputers?

    I think you’ve named the best of the best guildelines, “… respectful dissent… But it needs to be a respectful voice that is fully and firmly committed to the Barque of Peter… Families fight and dispute with each other, but they are able to do so because there is a deep commitment to loving and wanting the good of each other… We are the Family of God. As we fight, may we treat each other as such, while expressing honestly our concerns.”

    Liked by 9 people

    • charliej373 says:

      I am trying, Beckita, and am pretty happy with the results. I get a lot of help from all of you wonderful people on the tnrs answers team – and from readers who have come to value serious discourse on an island of civility.

      Liked by 1 person

      • EllenChris says:

        People do need, I suppose, a place to work through their issues and frustrations out loud. but myself, I vastly prefer the quiet civility. I can smell a Troll when they come around, and I really hate having to deal with them. We also need an oasis of peace, and I am glad TNRS can be one. Maybe when my thesis is done, I might have some time for the MOG Blog, but not now. Shalom.

        Liked by 7 people

      • Beckita says:

        Well, Charlie, it’s obvious to me God’s Grace sustains and is infused in your efforts. You’re a master at this in many ways. Your knowledge and life experiences have produced a mighty accurate BS meter, an essential tool to hold us accountable.

        Liked by 6 people

      • ANDY says:

        Charlie I have written a few times on your site. I am a father of 5 and a Financial Advisor that manages people’s money during the day and worries about the future for my family at night. I have more and more love for Christ everyday and have excepted many of my sufferings on earth and their purpose. I know I deserve more. I began reading your blog with great hope in the fall and although my faith in Christ is strong I have begun to despair in whether the storm will happen. I am certain others who enjoy your writings and hope it will happen are feeling the same. Do you have any words of encouragement for someone who whether the storm happens or not will carry on with God in my heart but still hopes for it.

        Liked by 6 people

        • charliej373 says:

          I think, Andy, you are more worried about whether the Rescue will happen. The Storm IS happening in real time all around us. I have had more than a few very orthodox and sober authorities who were skeptical two years ago send me various versions of the sentiment that, good heavens, I have been right…it is all coming down around us, right before our very eyes – and they are desperately hoping that I am right about the Rescue as well.

          I never much cared whether people believed me about the unfolding Storm. That would unfold whether they believed me or not. What was important to me was to speak on record before most people fully perceived what was already happening around them. That way, when their dim perception of the disaster around us became sharper, they would evidence to help them believe I tell them true on the matter of the Rescue, as well. And that has always been the focus of all I write and do, to ensure people of the Rescue that is certain and to exhort them to help unveil it – by acknowledging God, taking the next right step, and being a sign of hope.

          Liked by 9 people

          • andyb2016 says:

            Thanks Charlie I pray for the rescue as well, imagine making your living as financial advisor in these times. people are worried and it is hard to keep them calm when I am believing the storm will unfold.

            Liked by 1 person

          • charliej373 says:

            I feel for you, Andy. A part of me sympathized with the Royal Bank of Scotland when it began the year by telling its customers not to panic, but to sell everything they had in the markets. But part of me laughed, too, I must confess. You are on the frontlines of the fear every day. That is tough. But there will be Rescue – and your skills will be needed in what will be a renewed world.

            Liked by 4 people

          • andyb2016 says:

            Please may you put in prayer request for my wife. That she may feel better and learn to trust in how mush she is loved. She has a bad back and some emotional scars from the sins of her mother

            Liked by 2 people

          • charliej373 says:

            I have asked the Lord to send St. Gabriel to carry a message to her and hearten her.

            Liked by 5 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Andy, I will keep your wife in my prayers to endure.

            Like

          • Doug says:

            Andy, your faithfulness and constancy will do the most for your wife, but before that, knowing God is with you and sustaining you will give you the strength to love her when it can be a challenge.

            My wife had many emotional scars growing up and later in life has suffered through 3 cancers that required many major surguries. She is in constant chronic pain. She has had major spiritual healing and is closer to God and we are closer to each other than we have ever been. So don’t shun suffering (although I don’t wish it on anyone). It can be the catalyst for something beautiful to bloom in your life.

            I will light a candle for you at Mass this weekend. Trust God with everything in you and he will not disappoint you and the Next Right Step will come naturally. God bless you Andy!

            Liked by 4 people

          • Barb129 says:

            Praying for your wife, andyb2016.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Andy says:

            Andy. We share the same name and profession. Do not fret so much over things we can’t control or God’s plan and will. Play the “game” as I call it by the same rules that have always applied to the game until the game is no more. Place all your trust and faith in the Lord and He will provide. Remember:

            Mathew 6 : [19] Lay not up to yourselves treasures on earth: where the rust, and moth consume, and where thieves break through and steal. [20] But lay up to yourselves treasures in heaven: where neither the rust nor moth doth consume, and where thieves do not break through, nor steal.

            [21] For where thy treasure is, there is thy heart also. [22] The light of thy body is thy eye. If thy eye be single, thy whole body shall be lightsome. [23] But if thy eye be evil thy whole body shall be darksome. If then the light that is in thee, be darkness: the darkness itself how great shall it be! [24] No man can serve two masters. For either he will hate the one, and love the other: or he will sustain the one, and despise the other. You cannot serve God and mammon. [25] Therefore I say to you, be not solicitous for your life, what you shall eat, nor for your body, what you shall put on. Is not the life more than the meat: and the body more than the raiment?

            [26] Behold the birds of the air, for they neither sow, nor do they reap, nor gather into barns: and your heavenly Father feedeth them. Are not you of much more value than they? [27] And which of you by taking thought, can add to his stature by one cubit? [28] And for raiment why are you solicitous? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow: they labour not, neither do they spin. [29] But I say to you, that not even Solomon in all his glory was arrayed as one of these. [30] And if the grass of the field, which is today, and tomorrow is cast into the oven, God doth so clothe: how much more you, O ye of little faith?

            [31] Be not solicitous therefore, saying, What shall we eat: or what shall we drink, or wherewith shall we be clothed? [32] For after all these things do the heathens seek. For your Father knoweth that you have need of all these things. [33] Seek ye therefore first the kingdom of God, and his justice, and all these things shall be added unto you. [34] Be not therefore solicitous for tomorrow; for the morrow will be solicitous for itself. Sufficient for the day is the evil thereof.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Joe says:

            Charlie,
            I think when people say “when the storm comes” i presume they mean the heart of it, the big ticket items, if you will (all out economic collapse, defeat of radical Islam, toppling of government, no US election, wars with North Korea and China). In all honesty, the storm that is currently around us is not REALLY affecting the average American. The political circus is something that happens every 2 years, the stock market is showing signs of entering recession, but that happens about every 10 years or so, talk of North Korea has been there for years going back to Kim Jong Ill and before, etc., etc. Not saying the culmination of events isn’t coming, just that the current fringes of the “Storm” is something that people, quite frankly, are used to. We are trained to think that bad things happen and it is normal. Your message gives us the hope of the ressurection, but Calvary must come first. Most of us experience the agony in the garden on a daily basis, so until we get to the condemnation, scourging and placement of the cross on our shoulders, it seems more like business as usual. Would you agree?

            Liked by 3 people

          • charliej373 says:

            No, I don’t agree at all, Joe. I was still in high school when I developed my fascination with historical societies on the verge of catastrophic collapse. I suppose the reason is obvious to people here now, but it was not to those who knew me then. One of the things that astounded me was that in each of these societies, the overwhelming majority of people did not believe there was anything seriously wrong until doom was right on top of them. And the most common reason voiced for why there was nothing to worry about was that “we have been through this before.”

            Sophisticated Romans laughed at the attacks on its borders by primitive Germanic tribes. They were the most powerful nation on earth and destroyed those who had dared attack them before. Such primitive, backwards tribes were laughable annoyance, not a threat. And so the empire fell. Even after the storming of the Bastille, the French King thought he merely had a communications problem. And so France fell. Czar Nicholas thought the rumblings in the Russian provinces that had reached near Moscow was just the same old restiveness that was common to Russian politics. He was so unconcerned he was out of the country with the Army when Russia was seized by the Communists. German Jews had a world-weariness. They had seen and survived pogroms in Russia and Europe repeatedly over the years, so most thought Hitler was just a virulent form of what they had already seen many times. And so began the Holocaust.

            In hindsight, it is easy to see that the violence ripping these societies was structural and foundational – not business as usual at all. Yet the great majority of people, even the most sophisticated, cannot see the difference between transient and structural damage until all is in ashes. I am not sure if any in Rome understood the danger. In France, only finance minister Jacques Necker knew this was something foundational – and he was reticent to speak of it because he was ridiculed by everyone else in power for his alarmism when he did. There were a few in the Duma and in the Tsar’s court who sensed something different was afoot, but not so as to act with dispatch. Of prominent Europeans, the only two who consistently warned of the danger of Hitler’s toxic populism were Winston Churchill and Cardinal Eugenio Pacelli, the future Pope Pius XII. Both German business elites and British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain believed Hitler was a man they could do business with and bend to their will.

            The problems we face are not transient disruptions, but structural failures. The financial system is not having a downturn in the business cycle; all the structural safeguards and cushions have been gutted. The global collective security arrangements that have held since the end of WWII have often had adjustments, but now they lay in tatters, shredded by the Obama administration’s “smart diplomacy.” Both former Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev and current ruler Vladimir Putin stated this baldly a year and half ago, but the western media almost completely blacked that warning out. The rule of law in the west is dead. We do not have occasional abuses; rather the justice system has been weaponized as a tool in the raw will to power.

            The general public may not be able to discern the difference between a social flesh wound and a wound to the heart. But I do – and so do many of the most historically and financially knowledgeable people. Which is why you can dismiss me as alarmist, but you ought to be terrified when people like Victor Davis Hanson, Admiral Stansfield Turner (ret), and the bankers at Citibank and the Royal Bank of Scotland say things that make me look like a Pollyanna by comparison.

            A flesh wound heals itself, given time. A heart wound bleeds out and you die. Our society is dying around us even as silly officials try to maintain it’s only a flesh wound. If God were not going to intervene with a Rescue, we would be at the edge of a new and brutally dark age of slavery and global misery. It has already happened.

            Liked by 12 people

          • MarieUrsula says:

            Charlie, methinks your excellent comment that begins, “No, I don’t agree at all, Joe. I was still in high school when I developed my fascination with historical societies on the verge of catastrophic collapse. . . .” could be a stand-alone post. Otherwise, it would be harder for us to find again as time goes by.

            Liked by 5 people

          • charliej373 says:

            I think you’re right, Marie. It is important. I have a very significant post I am working to perfect – and events of the last week suggest to me I should have finished it earlier…but maybe the events of the last week will help to underscore its importance. So I think in the morning I will, indeed, modify the comment you reference just a bit as a stand-alone post.

            Liked by 8 people

          • Doug says:

            I agree.

            Like

          • Mick says:

            Prayers for your wife, Andy.

            Like

          • Mick says:

            Charlie, I wholeheartedly agree with MarieUrsula that your response to Joe should be a stand-alone post. It’s easier to forward that way. I wanted to send it to a friend but couldn’t figure out how. It’ll be a breeze once you put it on your “front page.”

            Liked by 1 person

          • Joe says:

            Charlie,
            Thank you for the detailed reply! A couple of points I want to make, to be sure we are on the same page:
            1) I don’t think you are an alarmist; we are on the same team.
            2) I was making an observation of someone who is most definitely in the world (and all too often fall for things OF the world, but I am working on that) and see things from a younger perspective, namely that if the generation in their 20’s and 30’s. This stuff (societal decay, terrorism, corrupt leaders, etc.) seems normal for us, since we never experienced “the good ole days” of the 50’s and 60’s. I’m trying to come about it from the evangelization aspect of that generation.
            3) While you opened by saying you disagree with me, it appears as though you are affirming my (very badly stated) assumption/observation of the general public, i.e. that it isn’t currently having a dramatic effect on their everyday life, which is why they/we can go along our merry little way thinking this is all normal. Just as those in Rome and Russian and England and all the other examples you gave, did. I’m just stating the observation and not making a judgment of the behavior of the masses. Which is where i get my original thought that when people say “when the storm comes” they are referencing the fullness; the sacking of Rome, the invasion of Poland, etc. I know you have spoken against this in the past, but it may be worth repeating (I’m more or less preaching to myself here)
            4) I appreciate the analogy of the mortal vs flesh wound, but it disappointed me you did not take the opportunity to tie it all together with a reference to Monty Python and the Holy Grail. More souls out of Pergatory, I guess. 🙂

            Liked by 4 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Ah, Joe, you struck me to the heart when you noted my failure to cite the inspired Monty Python scene on mortal vs. flesh wounds. But at least you did not condemn me to submit myself to the ministrations of the knights who used to say, “Nee!” but now say, “Icky, icky, patang, patang!”

            Liked by 1 person

        • It’s such a shame, Charlie.
          If only you were better prepared and had a firmer grasp on world history, politics and the catastrophic collapse of historical societies – maybe, just maybe – we would buy into this stuff that “Gabriel” told you. 😉

          Liked by 1 person

        • ann says:

          Hi Andy–I think being a financial analyst in these days–especially a devout Catholic–is to be heroic! Who wouldn’t be worried? It’s so strange about this storm. I knew in the late 70’s/early 80’s it was coming. I just KNEW though I didn’t know how. And bit by bit–two steps forward and 10 steps back, it advanced. i would reach plateaus where I would say, naw I was wrong. I was getting too “mystical”–things go on as they always have. But then something major–a kind of sea change seemingly unseen but you knew the very bones of the earth were shaken, spiritually speaking! Then 9/11 and then suddenly everywhere the rip in the fabric began to appear, rip upon rip and even a dream God gave me that showed me the absolute chaos and destruction that were coming (2009) but a strange thing happened to me. I feel like I am in this bubble, this slow motion place of peace where I look, I see it, I think why aren’t I afraid but there’s such unreality to it. Why is that? Honestly, I don’t know. The human need to reduce frightening things to nonsense? But I don’t reduce, if anything I know worse and worse is to come. the only thing I can think of is that we are spiritually in the eye of the storm right now; That’s why I just love and appreciate the TNRS formula because as the psalmist asks, when evil triumphs what should the righteous do? You just do the next right thing, always acknowledging love for and dependence on God and try to uplift others with “the hope that is in you” as St. Peter would say. Not sure this helps but I guess I know anxiety doesn’t work (been there done that got the T shirt) Lots of time in front of the Blessed Sacrament, prayer, Holy Mass, fellowship–these help. Sensible preparations with food, flashlights, medicines, fuel etc but beyond that, “hope in the Lord”

          Liked by 6 people

      • Charles Walther says:

        why have there been no posts since Brother Gibert’s early AM on Feb. 22? It is the Feast of St. Peter, the Patron Saint of this Pope and all prior Popes? Peter i.e. Francis is being attacked and I believe he deserves to be defended as many of those on TNRS are sure to do, based on the love and respect I have witnessed on this site.

        Liked by 3 people

        • ann says:

          Marie I agree. Charlie’s observations about the fall of societies should be a stand alone post. Wonderful analysis. It’s funny sort of that I find myself fascinated as well going back to my teens when I devoured everything on the Roman Empire that I could get my hands on and then the fall of the Czar and then the rise of Hitler. I am still reading about these things and watching documentaries. The trajectory is so chilling but so obvious. Charles Dickens writes in A Tale of Two Cities about the Ancien Regime suffering a “leprosy of unreality”–what a pithy phrase to describe us right now (and every culture that Charlie mentions that fell). If you can find the passage and read the whole thing you will be astounded at the description. It could be our culture right now. And if you think about it, leprosy dulls the nerves so you don’t feel pain. We seem so dulled we don’t feel or see reality. I say “we” meaning our culture. the bloggers here and so many Catholics and Christians I know are well aware but like Cassandra on the walls of Troy they cry out but are never believed! Charlie I look forward to a post that goes into more detail and extends your excellent observations.

          Liked by 2 people

    • Snowy Owl says:

      Don’t forget humor…it can work miracles when dealing with angry or fearful people! Sometimes it knocks the pbpbpbpbpbt right out of them. 🙂

      Liked by 6 people

      • Doug says:

        Yes Snowy. It can be disarming. Like an open apology. Groaners are the best. For example, Ecclesiasties hints there may be a likeness of animals in heaven. We can have a very dog-matic discussion on it 🙂

        Liked by 6 people

    • LukeMichael says:

      I’ve taken a peek over there. Some of the comments are….. not my cup of tea. I’m sticking with the Grumpy Sherpa and the Bishop with dreadlocks!

      Liked by 11 people

      • charliej373 says:

        Ha, Luke, one benefit is that if you read a controversial thread there, it makes me, even at my grumpiest, seem the soul of gentility. Padraig though my comparison of it with a Wild West Saloon was hilarious.

        Liked by 6 people

      • deereverywhere says:

        Hey LukeM that is really funny especially the dreadlocks part wearing a miter. I agree. If I want to see that stuff I can go to Facebook and see what my great nieces and nephews as well as grand daughter s are doing. My mother always says vulgarity is a lack of intelligence because you dont have an extended vocabulary to choose the proper word. She didn’t graduate high school but I will bet her vocabulary is better than mostcollege graduates.

        Liked by 4 people

      • Tresorgirl54 says:

        Grumpy Sherpa is Charlie? I thought it could be!!! But I’m fairly new and trying to get up to speed. Who is the Bishop with Dreads??? Bishops can have dreads???? 😳😁🙀

        Liked by 1 person

        • charliej373 says:

          I think the rule is that the only time a Bishop is allowed to have dreads is under his screen name. Of course, if there is some Bishop somewhere who has dreads, I pity him for all the people who will quietly approach him and ask, “Are you Yong Duk?”

          Liked by 7 people

        • Beckita says:

          Thanks, Tresorgirl, for calling us out to get to the bottom of this. I enjoy these types of conversations just as much as the in depth wrestling with cultural and spiritual truths. All manner of joyful silliness broke out on this site which brought on a Christmas-like atmosphere even before Advent. And this time it wasn’t liturgical abuse!

          If you read this: https://charliej373.wordpress.com/why-squirrels/ , then go to that major post and read the comments which accompany it, you’ll see it was actually hair extensions our Bishop YD suggested for himself (as if miter tails weren’t enough for his ever-lovin’ head, ever-brimming with knowledge and ever-flowing with wisdom and challenges for the flock).

          LukeMichael, now deemed consultant to the Bishop and granted a new title to boot, has taken the play into new territory, for hair extensions have morphed into dreadlocks. I dunno know. YD is into all things Eastern rite, including, and in a special way, liturgy and music. Now somehow I’m having difficulty imaging him sipping his Ethiopian coffee, humming in a Syriac accent with his Asian hair extensions transformed into dreadlocks. Know any reggae tunes, YD?

          Liked by 3 people

          • YongDuk says:

            I am a bass player…

            And the hair extensions morphed out of or into the East Syriac Churches’ Mitres.

            I refuse dreadlocks.

            Maybe Thidwick…

            Liked by 3 people

      • Mick says:

        No, no, no, LukeMichael! “Hair extensions,” not “dreadlocks.” As someone who in the past had both hair extensions and dreadlocks (don’t ask; I was much young-er and foolish-er then), the two are not similar. Extensions can be quite tastefully done, but dreads make one look like either Buckwheat from the Little Rascals or a drugged-out Rastafarian (mine were of the “Otay!” variety).

        Liked by 6 people

      • YongDuk says:

        Wait, a second, what did I do? I wash my hair extensions regularly!

        Liked by 1 person

  3. leslyek says:

    Two things after skimming The Irish post -I think spiritual matters can never be treated quite like secular matters; except in the sense of that controversial scripture about being as clever with our spiritual lives as those of the world are with their worldly lives.
    And, did anyone here mention John Paul ll’s Pastoral Letter to Confessors on ‘Some Aspects of …’ The issue of contraception? It sometimes seemed to me he almost ok’d it’s use; but it was only because he was so, so Pastoral about it (speaking in terms of gradualness, etc.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Brother Gilbert Joseph of the Divine Presence says:

    It seems rather strange to me that those who criticised the more liberal Catholics of past pontificates when they spoke about respectful dissent are now using this term now. I am afraid I am rather tired of these so-called traditionalist Catholics that jump on every utterance of Pope Francis to find fault in it. So many are putting their own personal politics or worldviews above the teachings and insights of the Pope. Of course the Pope may be wrong or misguided on politics or economics etc but when he speaks about moral issues I will stick with his opinion and rethink my own if it is not in line with his. These people strain a gnat and swallow a camel.

    Liked by 17 people

    • Amen, Brother Gilbert. When I came back to the Catholic faith in ’08, I was in a scriptural study class after mass at the cathedral in Colorado Springs. There was lively discussion and debate about the Church and spiritual matters. Some people were in agreement with certain topics, while others disagreed with the Church and voiced their dissent. Then a thought hit me while some lady was complaining about a teaching….

      I had just finished a book about Saint Francis (the first saint I chose to read about after “coming home”). The author wrote that Francis had an audience with Pope Innocent III, where he allegedly told Francis that he smelled and should go preach to the pigs. Francis heard this as literally the spoken words of Jesus himself, and entered a nearby pig sty and began preaching.

      While this story may be apocryphal (and perhaps a bad example here given Pope Francis’ off-the-cuff comments), I realized in that meeting that thousands of years of the greatest minds to walk this earth had analyzed the words of Jesus and built up the deposit of faith. So who was I to defy them (Augustine, Bellarmine, Ligouri, Acquinas, Bonaventure) or the Church?! I was only 40! I decided to make the assumption that the Church was right and that I had to discover the truth and reasoning behind it. Yes I continue to question, but I always accept, even if I don’t fully understand.

      To those who have not quite let go, I say: Let go and have faith. It is most liberating!


      Saint Francis of Assisi, pray for us!

      Liked by 12 people

    • vicardwm says:

      I have a sneaking suspicion that I’m misisng some context here, but the question is not one of opinion. The Church’s teaching on contraception is clear, and a virus would not be a reason to allow artificial contraception. There are much harder cases, such as a woman’s life being in danger if she becomes pregnant, and that has never been taken as a valid reason to use artificial contraception. If it’s a matter of the previous clear teaching of the Church vs. a Papal airplane interview, I’m going with the previous teaching of the Church.

      In my opinion, this is a primary wedge which Satan could use to attempt to divide and destroy the Church – take impromptu statements of Popes and Bishops which have no Magisterial authority whatsoever and use the media to spread these statements far and wide, creating mass confusion. The vast majority of Catholics have no idea about the subtleties of what constitutes Magisterial teaching of the Church, so they are easily led off course. It makes it all the worse that the media doesn’t understand either, and so interprets the message through their misguided, ignorant lens, and most Catholics don’t bother reading the original language of what was said.

      In general, I agree with you about people who are looking to parse every statement of Pope Francis’ to find fault, but in this case, he did step out of line with Catholic teaching, or at the very least failed to clarify his thought leaving the impression of being out of line with Catholic teaching.

      Liked by 5 people

      • Doug says:

        In that line of thought, he would probably do well to not invite the press on the plane anymore and expose every detail to be taken out of context. We all know what married people do, but married people don’t leave the curtains up.

        Like

      • ann says:

        Yes Vicar. Well said. (don’t know how to hit LIKE….sigh)

        Like

        • prayingflower says:

          Ann, to “like” a comment, you click the word “Like” and wait a second or two and you will see the words, “liked by you.” If you need to “unlike” (such as in the cases when I “liked” my own comments!) you click on the star and your name will automatically be removed from “Like”. (Thank you, Beckita.) For a long time I was not able to activate the “like” button because I was not actually registered with WordPress. I thought I was because I was receiving Charlie’s posts in my email and I was also receiving the comments, but only after responding to a question that came in my email, ” Do you wish to receive comments on this post?” and I would respond “yes”. If you don’t see the “ribbon” at the top of the page as SteveBC and Petra instruct, you are not fully registered. As for me, when I finally put my frustration and impatience on hold long enough to carefully read the instructions set forth by the Team and carefully follow the prompts, then voila!, I was registered and I could “like.” I’m really the last person to be giving any tutoring here as I am very untechie, but that fact just goes to prove that if it can be done by me, it can be done by anyone. I hope my history with this helps you because as I am sure you agree, there is a a lot to like here. I will pray for your efforts. I haven’t found out who the patron saint of computer users is, but I always ask St. John Chrysostom or my best friend and mentor, St. Joseph. God bless you, Ann. P.S. I “Like” your commenting very much. pf

          Liked by 3 people

        • SteveBC says:

          Ann, it’s easier than you think, as Praying Flower has informed us. Go to the “Books/PDFs/FAQs/Extras” page, scroll down to Section 2, look for the subsection on technical assistance, and you will see a Guide for activating the Like button. Click on that link, and you will go to a Google Doc that has all that you need.

          Please let Beckita and me know if this is able to fix your problem or not. If it doesn’t, I would love some feedback from you as to why, so I can improve the writing to make it clearer. On the other hand, if it gets you through the process successfully, we’ll all celebrate and cheer wildly as you Like this comment of mine to prove your new skill! 😀

          Liked by 1 person

    • Frodo says:

      We must be very careful here… I’m not aware of anyone that is advocating “respectful dissent.” I know of many others who are advocating to adherence to church teaching. Can you source those that are claiming respectful dissent?

      Like

      • YongDuk says:

        I think the wording of respectful dissent was/is/maybe sloppy, Mr. Baggins.

        The idea, I think, is that unless something theological is defined with certainty than there is some allowable disagreement and speculation and bantering allowed to help solidify the position. That has been the history of theological arguments.

        One such example is the National Catholic Bioethics Center published in 2004-2005, Fr. Rhonheimer’s piece on HIV and Condom use [in serodiscordant spouses] and the replies from people like Dr. William May of the JPII Institute on Marriage and the Family and Dr. Janet Smith and others, such as Steven R. Moore, M.D., and Peter J. Cataldo, Ph.D.

        We are now coming to a head on those speculations if things pan out as I hope they shall… or this shall be… … …

        See:

        “A Debate on Condoms and AIDS,” The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 5 (2005): 40-48.

        The prior quoted:
        Smith, Janet E. “The Morality of Condom Use by Hiv-Infected Spouses” The Thomist 70 (2006): 27-69

        and her footnote, number 3:

        Several other responses to Rhonheimer are available; see a letter to the editor by William May, The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 4 (2004): 667-68; Fr. Benedict Guevin, in “A Debate on Condoms and AIDS,” The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 5 (2005): 37-39; Peter J. Cataldo, “Condoms and HIV Prevention: Thwarting the Procreative End,” Ethics and Medics 30, no. 5 (May 2005): 3-4; Luke Gormally, “Marriage and the Prophylactic Use of Condoms,” The National Catholics Bioethics Quarterly 5 (2005): 735-49.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Frodo says:

          Hello YongDuk,

          I agree that the term is a stretch (to put it in the best possible way I can). But I also can not see at all how this situation would possible fit in with “dissent” since contraception has been taught and defined in the Catholic Church as an evil – as you well know – since the beginning. To accuse “traditional” Catholics (though I believe that the appropriate term would be Orthodox) as “dissenting” and “jumping on every utterance” that our Holy Father makes (of course I am referring to Brother Gilbert’s post – not yours YondDuk) is tantamount to creating a straw man in my mind – for there is absolutely no wiggle room in the contraception comment that has us “dissenting.”

          I am curious as to how you would like to see this played out (though obviously you are under know pains to further explain:)

          As for me, I can think of an appropriate title of a book that would sum up how I would like to see this all end: There and Back Again.

          Like

  5. Charles Walther says:

    SILENCE SILENCE SILENCE. !!!!!!!!!!!! Does anyone believe the media has given us accurate and truthful reporting? Just like court reporters with total and precise sentences. Identifying each and every speaker, even when two or more speak at the same time. The media has an agenda, and often is antagonistic to the Church the spotless Bride of Christ, and Christ’s Vicar on earth. Context? If you drop a comma or leave out a single word or an iota you change the meaning. , So St. Paul corrected Saint Peter. In a private meeting of Apostles, a Church Council, St. Paul an Apostle pointed out a contradiction to His Holiness St. Peter, who in turn corrected the error. We are not asked to give “OUR” opinion to inaccurate reporting of St. Peter’s words. Most of the posts I’ve read say he seemed to say…he implied,,, is he saying…! Let him tell us through further word or action what he intends to do. Do we think there are insufficient Cardinals ,Archbishops, Bishops, theologians, canon lawyers and holy priests to keep the barque of Pete from capsizing.
    Respectful dissent requires full knowledge as in a trial with the proceeding laid out clearly. You need to be on the jury or your vote DOES NOT MATTER. Don’t form opinions without ALL the facts not the headlines of reporters paid to sell their network, paper or magazine. I will respectfully dissent from statements on soccer, auto racing, climate, etc. etc. We know generally the doctrine and dogmas of the Faith, but it is left to the Pope to “define” these things. Where Peter is, there is the Church! The gates of hell will not prevail against it. Pray for the Pope and all priests.

    Liked by 13 people

    • We must remember this: We have NO OPINION when it comes to Doctrine and Faith. None. We have plenty of opinions on other matters within the Church, but even the Holy Father has NO OPINION.

      Every single opinion that has to do with doctrine and faith and that we speak is considered another god. There is no room for opinion! That is authority! That is the Magisterium’s job. Not ours.
      I am learning more and more in my very orthodox theology class that this is what freedom truly is. TRUSTING CHRIST IN THE TEACHINGS OF HIS CHURCH. Accepting and living them. We can argue till the cows come home about whether the Holy Father is right or wrong in saying something on a plane to a media who is renown for twisting his words and seeks to defame him at every turn. If he is wrong, he is wrong. But he will not be wrong about faith and doctrine. I think all of us are waiting with baited breath for him to make a fatal mistake…and Charlie did say he would and then would apologize. So be it. I don’t even get worked up about any of this anymore. Having read soooo many apparitions of our Lady saying, “Love the Holy Father, support him, defend him…and then; when everyone turns their back on him, you will be steadfast and support him. I often think if I didn’t have FB or my computer or news and didn’t know any of this ‘latest controversy’ I would have so much more peace!!

      “And whoever will not give heed to my words which he shall speak in my name (my name is my mission(which is ‘God Saves’and Jesus Christ is the only one who saves), I myself will require it of him. But the prophet who presumes to speak a word in my name which I have not commanded him to speak, or who speaks in the name of other gods, that same prophet shall die.” Deut 18:20

      Questioning for the sake of understanding -that is not opinion. (William of Thierry-Abbot- 1085)

      Liked by 2 people

      • Doug says:

        Marty, I don’t know if I am misunderstanding you, but it sounds like you are alluding to a sort of blind obedience to the dogma of the faith. In many ways, that sounds pharisitical to me. Isaiah says “come let us reason together. Though your sins are as red as scarlet, they will be as white as snow”. I agree that it is best to seek with an attitude of understanding. But love does not dictate a blind obedience. Also, in todays world of mass information via internet and media, there is no real avoiding of many different discussions or points of view unless you disconnect and isolate yourself which i dont think God calls us to do unless you are in cloistered religious order. Please correct me if I misunderstand you. Welcome here too!

        Like

        • Doug, who do you know whose salvation depends upon your opinion?
          Whose opinion does your salvation depends upon?
          Whose opinion matters in heaven?
          For a non-catholic the kingdom is not and cannot be present on earth as it is in heaven and ones opinion determines truth. For Catholics, the kingdom is present on earth as it is in heaven; which is the Mass.
          Zachariah asked, “How shall I know this? or What proof is there of this? to the angel when he came to him to announce that he would have a son. He had little faith! No blind obedience! Mary, on the other hand asked ‘How can this be since I do not know man? (not it cannot be), she was open to obedience and God’s will, not her will.
          When I unite my will with His will, no matter how much I will that “this cup pass from me” I am now fully engaged in “the act of Love” which is what ‘perfection’ is. Only Christ’s offering was perfect. His offering united with ours becomes a perfect offering(thanksgiving) to the Father. The act of love always comes first.
          So, if the Church’s mission is Truth, then we must be on the side of truth. Dogma is truth.
          ‘Conversion takes place when you take sides with truth against yourself’-Hans von Balthazar.
          We can however, ask questions for the sake of understanding. That is not opinion when it comes to Church dogma. Deut 11:1-Love the Lord your God, therefore and always heed HIS CHARGE: His statutes, decrees and commandments. (His charge means HIS MAGISTERIUM).
          Numbers 12:1-16-(When we are speaking against one who is speaking truth, we are speaking against God.)(My summary of the passages).

          So, when Jesus said, “Follow Me!” he wasn’t asking for their opinion–it didn’t matter! He just wanted them to do it!
          For those who are in apostasy, including priests and bishops, it should be obvious that we should not follow those who are not in union with the magisterium. Being united with Peter is of the utmost importance. Obedient people of the Church do not have an opinion. The Church is the opinion. We have an arsenal of Papal bulls, Encyclicals, writings of the doctors of the Church, Church Fathers and the communion of Saints as magnifiers of that truth we are obedient to; Christ and the teachings of His Church.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Marty, I think the difference may be semantics on the word opinion. I do believe in the Magisterium of the church and adhere to its dogmas, but this does not mean I cannot have opinions on the truths of the church. It could be that my opinions are aligned with the church which is not contradictory. I think maybe you can better express yourself on this. God bless you.

            Like

  6. YongDuk says:

    It’s 05.27 A.M. on the East Coast of America.

    Sort of wondering what’s going on in Rome with consultants and such on these subjects.

    So glad I am here for the moment.

    So glad plenty of ink has been spilt.

    We are in good hands. A man who picks up a phone to call a nobody in the eyes of the world who is suffering or relying on him for business tendered, as Pope Francis does, is a man who won’t leave people hanging in this moral situation either, I believe.

    Liked by 9 people

    • Fr. Frank says:

      Your Excellency — Grace and peace from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ! I beg forgiveness for even asking this question, but, as a bishop are you in full and mutually acknowledged communion with the Apostolic See of Rome and Francis, Pope of Rome and Vicar of Christ?

      Again, forgive me Your Grace for even asking, but I had to. I love your posts so much, but I’m going through a time of great spiritual darkness, and I don’t want to be deceived. I know you will understand, dear Father, and not be offended. Pray for Fr. Frank, the sinner. Thank you!

      Liked by 6 people

      • Another Karen says:

        I will pray for you, Father Frank. Thank you for saying yes to God in your priesthood.

        Liked by 2 people

      • janet333 says:

        I will also pray for you Fr Frank.

        Liked by 1 person

      • LukeMichael says:

        Praying for you Father Frank asking for the intercession of St Pio to guide you, strengthen you, and protect you.

        Liked by 2 people

      • dianebelv says:

        God Bless You, Fr. Frank. You are in my prayers.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Beckita says:

        Including you in Eucharistic Adoration prayers, Fr. Frank. Your gift of bringing us Jesus is a treasure beyond compare. Thank you. May Our Lady of Tepeyac wrap you in Her Mantle and send Her Spouse to overshadow you and all your needs.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Doug says:

        Fr. Frank, thank you for dedicating your life to the church! I am most grateful for our shepards as you have been given the gift to turn ordinary bread and wine into the body and blood of our Lord Jesus. What a profound and beautiful mystery!

        Liked by 4 people

      • deereverywhere says:

        Oh Father, my prayers are with you. Please remember the dark tunnel that the Little Flower suffered through, when she wrote the cread in her own blood on her wall. Don’t forget Mother Theresa. This is a test. You can pass it. “I believe, help my unbelief.”

        Liked by 5 people

      • Robert Cunningham says:

        Fr Frank

        I have chosen to pray more and comment less for a season but wanted to send you a note to say that you are not alone. We are all being tested in various ways these days. It has been my experience that when one enters a time of darkness, suffering, confusion etc it is it is an invitation to enter into deeper prayer that becomes extremely efficacious. It empties one of self-concern as you are poured out like a libation (II Tim 4:6) and God can flow through you to others. Sufferings then become sweet and one even thanks the Lord for the test. It sounds like absurdity to those who have not experienced it but it is like a beautiful Liturgy to the fools Christ.

        There are many fools for Christ on this site. Pray for us as we pray for you

        In IC XC

        Robert

        Liked by 9 people

      • Christiaria says:

        I’ll offer my rosary for you today, Fr. Frank. Please let me know if there is anything else I can do for your encouragement as the Lord shares with you the gift of this painful thorn.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Mick says:

        Oh, Father Frank, I will also pray for you! Thank you for being an alter Christus and for laying down your life for all of us. Mere words cannot express my gratitude for what you, and all priests, do for the rest of us. God bless you now and forever.

        Liked by 1 person

      • YongDuk says:

        Ha!

        Last I checked, yes, yes, indeed. I was ordained a Roman Catholic Bishop under and am a friend of John Paul II… His Angel came to me even the week he was dying, since I was far away from the news. And still am. I consider that to be one of the greatest graces of my life and a affirmation and sign of my dedication to the Holy Father, that I even before Seminary asked to be dedicated and have my Priesthood dedicated / consecrated by the Grace of God to our Lady for Holy Mother Church, especially the Vicar of Christ.

        Are you? 😉

        Thank you for the simplicity of your question; be assured of my prayers. My apologies that I have not gotten to this till this evening.

        St. Polycarp is indeed a great Patron of mine, so maybe it is delayed for a reason.

        +Yong Duk

        Charlie?

        Liked by 3 people

        • charliej373 says:

          You have said it before and I was tempted to just note that, YD, but I have met and visited with Fr. Frank and I thought it would be nice for the two of you to meet – if only virtually. When I spoke near New Orleans with Mark Mallett, Fr. Frank got a team of priests to come down from Baton Rouge, where his Parish is, to hear confessions. It was a great grace, as well over 700 showed up for that talk – and the Priests were kept occupied. As that night was so hectic, I visited with Fr. Frank for about an hour in Baton Rouge after going to Daily Mass at his Parish. I am glad you “know” each other now.

          Liked by 2 people

          • YongDuk says:

            Glad to know who he is and that you answered. I saw you praise him for organising Confessors and Confessions, if I remember correctly (I am certain I do as I was very proud of him in my heart without even knowing why. Now I know why.)

            Fr. Frank, I am going to find a Mass for you this week… Maybe St. Gabriel Francis Possenti of our Lady of Sorrows, if you wouldn’t mind? Or is that Sunday in Leap Year? Oops, looks like I am going to have to strong arm someone to make this happen for you, but I shall, indeed!

            Pax Vobis,
            +YD

            Liked by 5 people

          • YongDuk says:

            Sorry, I meant I saw you praise him several months ago in September, I believe.

            Like

          • Doug says:

            BING! YD gets a soul out. Sorry YD, I did not mean to ring the bell too loud.

            Liked by 2 people

        • Fr. Frank says:

          Dear Bishop,

          Thank you so much for your response, dear Father in God! Again, please forgive me for even asking such a question, but Our Lord and Lady have been showing me in prayer that I trust “my instincts” far too much — and that has seldom worked out well. I am thankful for the darkness I am going through — but not thankful enough to want it *ever* to happen again! I converted to the Faith 22 years ago, and went through many twists and turns along the way, including losing the fellowship of almost all my family and friends. That’s not an excuse, just an attempt to ‘splain why I’m so careful. This Holy Faith is the Pearl of Great Price, and I’m far too stupid to be entrusted with such a treasure. Praise God, I know “His grace is sufficient for me!” Your Grace, please ask the dear Lord, His Mother, and St. Joseph to help me be a good priest, and always submissive to His holy will — because I’m pretty much a bonehead, and that wasn’t cured with the ontological change that occurred at my ordination, dang it!

          Thank you so much for writing back!

          Liked by 5 people

          • YongDuk says:

            If you would allow me to correct you for Charlie one small thing:

            Here I am Yong Duk, pure and simple.

            It is my name where I served and has great meaning ringing with simplicity from the lips of the “poor and lowly” of the world…

            Otherwise, we aren’t brothers trying to take the Right Next Step through a “field” safely.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Beckita says:

            Watch your step. There might be some cow pies ‘n other stuff in that field. I just caught a glimpse of Blinky’s tail bobbin’ in the breeze.

            Like

    • Kati says:

      LIKE!!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. timothy says:

    When the Angel wrestled Jacob, I am confident there was a bit of smack-talk going on and that the ‘touch the thigh’ moment was a cheap shot. Our Holy God delights in the rough-and-tumble of our humanity and participates in it with vigor. This is not to discount His gentle nature; as Chesterton writes, He is both Lion AND Lamb.

    It makes me very glad to hear the roar of the Lion.

    Liked by 9 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Oh, what a great insight, Timothy. I, too, get annoyed that people get so focused on the Lamb they completely ignore the Lion. He is going to be doing more than a little roaring before it is all settled, and we will be right glad of it.

      Liked by 10 people

  8. zeniazenia says:

    Padraig has spotted the same red flags that jumped out for me too. Praise and thank our awesome God- Father, Son and Holy Spirit, of keeping us and our Holy Father real ! Sr. Dismas — pray for us

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Kim sevier says:

    I love this site Charlie. Your Birmingham video brought me here and your posts and everyone else’s keep me here. God bless us all!

    Liked by 10 people

  10. cathyg2015 says:

    Like Beckita, I am a lurker on MOG forum. I learn much there from the comments (just like I do here) but the difference is the rancor that spills over on MOG. I find it disquieting (and it prevents me from wanting to comment myself). Of course, not every post is like that, but several commenters have been banned/deleted from the site for what appeared to me to be polite disagreements and others have made snide personal attacks against other commenters (see the Donald Trump thread) without recourse. In contrast, your blog, Charlie, is always civil and soothing. This is not a criticism of Padraig who is inspiring on so many levels. I guess it just speaks to your point that what constitutes respectful dissent is often a matter of opinion.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Cathy, I agree with you. Rough and tumble debate is fun (OK, this American’s Irish blood is showing) but when it gets mean on a personal level, I’m out. This is, after all, a silent, faceless form of communication, with no tone of voice, facial expressions, smiles, rolling eyes, raised eyebrows or waving hands. How many of us have had really bad experiences with emails that were misunderstood? Let’s see, I think I see all hands in the room are raised. Charlie needs to keep a lid on it a bit because we can so easily hurt each other’s feelings without meaning to. That said, it is fun to get Charlie riled up now and again.

      Liked by 8 people

      • charliej373 says:

        Ha, Flowers! When my son was a teenager, he loved to get his friends over and get me into a rant. He knew my hot buttons and would push. As many times as he did it, you would think I would have known. But I can be kind of absent-minded. So he would press and press, just the right amount for me not to figure out what he was doing, then I would go off and would see him and his friends all snickering and know he had gotten me again. It embarrassed me and tickled me all at the same time. So you have the very same attitude as my son on the matter.

        Liked by 7 people

      • Beckita says:

        Yes, SF… Oh the richness of non-verbal communication! Some studies report it can make up as much as two thirds of our communication style. And Amen to Charlie needs to keep a lid on it a bit.

        Liked by 5 people

      • Doug says:

        PF, you just have to get a little more creative to express yourself in written email form. For example, you can shout like this: YOU ARE AWESOME AND LOVED BY GOD PF !!! There. Not so bad 🙂

        Liked by 4 people

      • Christiaria says:

        To quote Justice Scalia, “I attack ideas. I don’t attack people. And some very good people have some very bad ideas.”

        Liked by 6 people

        • Beckita says:

          Yes, Kitty. I have marveled at Abtonin Scalia’s ability to befreind the opposition. Truly a grace!

          Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Bing! Another soul out Beckita.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Beckita says:

            Thank you, Doug, for catching that. May the Light of Christ shine upon those Holy Souls, forever and always.

            I have had a cloudy head for several days. Seriously, I’m going to start spraying myself with some exorcised holy water in the mornings.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Hi Beckita, is there a difference between Holy water and exorcised holy water? Lambzie would like if you can share some. I will offer a decade for your cloudiness. You know, I think we need something like a storm to distract us from all our woes.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Beckita says:

            Thanks for the prayers, Doug. Many priests pray a simple blessing over holy water.
            Here’s a copy of the prayers for exorcised holy water: http://www.spiritdaily.net/webbackup/blessingsacramentals.htm

            Like

          • Doug says:

            Hi Beckita, this is facinating. I am not sure it answered my question though. What is the difference between Holy water and exorcised holy water? Is just the addition of salt? When would one be used versus the other? Holy water for baptism and exorcised holy water for heavy duty stuff like exorcism? Thanks!

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            Too many laymen are playing around the edges of exorcism. Leave that to qualified priests, You have no idea how deadly dangerous it truly is for one who is not properly prepared and humble. Pray for deliverance, pray the St. Michael prayer, but leave exorcism to those who have been trained for it.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Doug says:

            Oh Beckita, I totally agree. I am not interested at all with playing around with those edges. I just want to understand the differences from a purely educational stand point. Thanks.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Beckita says:

            Hi Doug. Victura adressed the options for prayers as holy water is blessed. Of course Charlie’s right about being careful to describe correctly and be aware of what we’re doing in prayer. I simply use the holy water in all the ways we use this sacramental. I’ve got holy water fonts at the entrances to the doors in our home. Of course, Father uses it all the time when blessing sacramentals and we actually have a little spray bottle which he may use rather than sprinkling water on the object being blessed. As I mentioned to Victura, we call the blessed water, “exorcised holy water,” because of the prayers used from the old Roman Ritual when blessing the salt. As Charlie said, actual exorcisms are completely the work of qualified priests, specially designated by the local bishop.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Thank you Beckita. I keep a font full by the entrance in my house I most often use. Before I go to bed, I usually sign myself and ask God for peace and blessing to all who enter. When I leave or enter, I usually sign myself too. I imagine it like when I give my wife a kiss every time I come home or when we part for the day. By signing, I am giving our Lord a sweet kiss every time enter or part. He is the lover of my soul.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            By the way, 1st glorious mystery for you today 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

          • victura98 says:

            Doug:
            There are many different “recipes” that allow a priest to bless Holy Water. The one Beckita quoted is the one you refer to as “exorcised” Holy Water, which is simply the blessing of water from the 1947 Roman Ritual. That blessing contains prayers of exorcism, and includes the blessing of salt. There are two other blessings from the 1989 Book of Blessings, and two more from the Sacramentary (no longer used) of 1974. All of them make holy water, and all are valid for use. The 1974 blessing includes an option of adding blessed salt, whereas the 1947 blessing mandates it.
            Blessings, unlike the seven Sacraments, do not have to follow any prescribed form, so there are usually many options, any may be used at the priests discretion. That being said, prayers and intentions DO matter, and so many priests (such as myself) choose to utilize the blessings that are most complete…that invoke more prayer, rather than less…more intentions rather than fewer. I hope that helps, at least, to clarify that there are not different degrees of Holy Water.

            Liked by 5 people

          • Beckita says:

            Thanks for that clear explanation Victura. “Exorcised holy water” is the common term our priest uses after he has done just what you describe: “That blessing contains prayers of exorcism, and includes the blessing of salt.”

            This priest chooses this particular blessing for the very reason you convey so well: “That being said, prayers and intentions DO matter, and so many priests (such as myself) choose to utilize the blessings that are most complete…that invoke more prayer, rather than less…more intentions rather than fewer.” Amen.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Doug says:

            Thank you Victura. This is helpful in understanding the differences. If I understand properly, it sounds like differences in discipline or style, but still the same holy water either way. God gives us all kinds of beautiful flowery bouquets to choose from.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Snowy Owl says:

            Thank you Victura, I did not know any of this about the different prayers and rituals- I’m glad its all the same Holy Water! I have Holy Water and Blessed Salt here and use them to keep my home safe and protected.

            Liked by 2 people

          • YongDuk says:

            Ok, I am stepping in now.

            Codswallop!

            It is the Faith with which the Sacramental is used.

            Do you think God will be outdone in Generosity?

            Balderdash!

            That’s like comparing the Rite of Blessing of Water of an Eastern Church with that of the Western Church.

            Victura, I like your theory, I like what you say…

            However, some people use Holy Water or Medals like they are a talisman or a spell, so I am going to step in and say “Balderdash” and “Codswallop” as my Trappist SD taught me to say!

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Codswallop. Now this grass hopper learned a new word today. ☺

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            By the way, in my previous post, I said “I totally agree with you Beckita”. It should have been “I totally agree with you Charlie”. This is in regards to leaving things like exorcism and dealing directly with evil to those experts designated by the church and who have proper humility. I have played with fire in the past with this and have burned myself. I totally get it.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Petra says:

            Charlie said: “Too many laymen are playing around the edges of exorcism. Leave that to qualified priests, You have no idea how deadly dangerous it truly is for one who is not properly prepared and humble…”

            St. Augustine once said, “He (the devil) is tied up like a dog on a chain, and can only bite someone who, deathly sure of himself, goes near him. Wouldn’t you think a man a fool who let himself be bitten by a chained up dog? He can only bite those who willingly let him. It is not by force, but by persuasion, that he harms: he asks for our consent, he does not drag it from us.”

            My mother taught me never to go within range of a snarling, growling chained up dog. I have no intention of making any such mistake going anywhere near the satan. Better to cross the street to go way around…and leave the exorcism to those who have the protection of God to minister in that way.

            God bless.

            Liked by 3 people

  11. Joan says:

    Respectfully, Brother Gilbert Joseph, I must take exception at the broad stroke of generality regarding the “so-called traditional Catholics ” you reference in your post. The Rad Trade have been the mast on the Barque of Peter since it set sail.
    The key word for me in your post is that you will stick with the Pope’s opinion. I will listen carefully and follow whatever our Holy Father designates as to matter of faith and morals but sometimes he speaks as a man and not a pope and an opinion is just that- an opinion.
    I am in my late sixties and have been teaching religious education for many, many years and the lack of true catechesis (even among the actual catechists) is appalling, so when these airplane press conferences come forth, there is mass confusion among the people and they only hear this: contraception is ok.
    Well, we here are fully aware of the nuances and canonical implications, most of the world is looking to be validated for the contraception that they are already practicing.
    I take exception to some of the Holy Father’s remarks, but I have developed a new mantra: “He’s the validly elected Pope and God bless and keep him”.
    I love the new Mass and revere and require a TLM at least monthly. To me the Latin mass feels like going home. And in my home is my Father and Blessed Mother and my Brother, Jesus, whose representative here on earth is Pope Francis. I love them all but recognize that one of them is fully human and can falter. But I will pick him up in prayer and bolster him for what is coming. He is after all the ” validly elected Pope and God bless and keep him”.joknee_99@yahoo.com j.

    Liked by 13 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Marvelous outlook, Joan.

      Like

    • Tresorgirl54 says:

      Hello, Joan. It’s nice to meet you. I’m Mary Ellen. I respectfully ask a question about your remark regarding Jesus, Mary and Pope Francis…”I love them all but recognize that one of them is fully human and can falter.” My question is this…Pope Francis is fully human and can falter if he’s speaking off the cuff on an airplane filled with journalists who often ask skewed, leading and deceptive questions! Their intent is often not quite honorable! The Pope has a propensity to say confusing things “off the cuff” but I am sure you know the Pope is Infallible when he speaks Ex Cathedra, from the Chair of Peter. I agree that off the cuff remarks from an exhausted Holy Father to a “leading” question from a pushy journalist!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Joan says:

        Hi, Mary Ellen. It is good to meet you also. Of course you are right about infallibility. No question as to the Pope’s authority from the Chair of Peter. (Especially today 🙂 ). I just wanted to state my loving objection to Brother Gilbert Joseph’s traditionalist remarks. It’s a mighty broad stroke that paints all trads with the same brush. I agree wholeheartedly with you about the reporters ( I use the term loosely as they more resemble magpies on a fence) but I was not thinking of that angle, only that Brother G J mentioned the Pope’s opinion not a proclamation or declaration. I am a Traditionalist and I do love our Holy Father. But maybe he should nap on the plane when the magpies circle. It certainly would save the faithful some angst!!!! God Bless!

        Liked by 3 people

        • Tresorgirl54 says:

          Hi, Joan! I suspected you did indeed know the difference between “off the cuff”and “ex Cathedra!” I was blessed to have a long line of devout Irish Catholics so I know how easy it is for some people to attack our beliefs, our traditions and our Pope! And reporters ask “baited” questions sometimes! The Holy Father was tired, the question inappropriate and the translation of his remarks was poor. I’m with you on our Holy Father and all those who came before him. They are chosen through the wisdom of the Holy Spirit, and through St. Peter and his Barque, they are representatives of Christ. Hope to get to talk to you again. This site is so awesome.

          Liked by 3 people

        • leel9790 says:

          BINGO I say…..planes are a GREAT place to nap, especially for our dear Papa Francis!
          Like it is said on the radio….That’s a BINGO !

          Like

          • YongDuk says:

            My Breviary fits perfectly on the little tray table in Economy and makes a great pillow as I wedge myself up against the window in complex contortions with my legs.

            Liked by 3 people

          • YongDuk says:

            I have to add this… I was wedged in the back of the plane once, when I heard one of the stewards say to a stewardess that a Cardinal was in First Class. So, I un-pried my feet from the space between the seat in front of me and the wall and meandered up to see my Cardinal friend…

            I figured maybe they upgraded him to First Class, but I am not so sure.

            Archbishop Sample is taller than me, and I am sure that he takes Economy too.

            (I am talking LONG [sorry to yell, Doug] international flights.)

            Take Economy… offer it up… Although I was bumped up twice. Once I tried to give up my seat to an older lady in our group, but only on the condition she had a window (I need the window for long flights, sorry) and another was a short flight into Africa. I met the most splendid gentleman from India on that flight… And here, later he was the inspiration to go minister there.

            Ugh… I am chattier than Doug and Beckinita combined tonight! 😛

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            I am an introvert. I can’t possibly be chatty. It must be Beckita. Also, I usually fly economy plus. I guess I have more penance to do (small tiny quiet letters, picture mouse squeaking).

            Liked by 1 person

          • Beckita says:

            Chat away, YD! It’s always a treat.

            Like

          • Doug says:

            Yes it is Beckita. Even though I don’t understand the deeper meaning of YD 12.3457685 percent of the time, I am at least challenged to learn more; not to mention, I have to say: WOW !!! We have a genuine bishop here who has immensely blessed us with his presence and the honor of teaching us great understanding of our faith. It does not get better than that. Sorry if I embarrassed you YD. I am being an honest little kid just blurting out. Actually, that leads me to Lambzie and what I have heard from Eilene George about heaven. This is not official church teaching. So I thus qualify this. Anyway, Eilene says there are creature like animals in heaven and they will pop out and say “I love you” such that we will understand them. I.e. like bouncing and blurting this out. So every now and then, I pop out and tell Lambzie that “I love you” and say “blurt”. This is to show her how much God loves her and that the Lambies are happy and bouncing in heaven. All of everything in heaven will be speaking to us of love. Ok. Now I am going on again. Time to stop. Back to tea in my Kinkade cottage. While living temporally, I will have to settle for coffee at the local bagel shop for which Lambzie and I go almost every day and talk. Yes. After 31 years, we engage in talk more than ever. I thank Charlie who has given us more to talk about with the storm. Anyway, YD, we are very greatful for you here. You also taught me how to wax amd wane. Ok. I grass hopper stop now.

            Liked by 4 people

    • YongDuk says:

      Joan, I am not sure what “Rad Trade” is.

      However, I must respectfully and vehemently disagree with you if you mean the Radical Traditionalists, yet alone the Traditionalists, have been the [main/central] mast on the Barque of Peter.

      Vice versus Virtue is about the Extremes versus the level-headed and prudent.

      I have seen several so-called Traditionalists destroy the Vocations of Very Fine Seminarians with their quick to judge and quick to call the Chancery fool-hardy arrogance and satanic pride.

      I could go on and on and on and on, but I won’t.

      Satan loves–just loves–to create factions and cliques…

      Pride blinds either extreme side equally to their vice that goes to the point of being unChristian.

      So, please do not think the Traditionalist or anyone else is the mast on the Barque of Peter.

      I am just happy to be on that Barque and I will hit post to save myself from saying more.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Joan says:

        Tried to reply earlier but my post is somewhere in cyberspace. Perhaps, dear Bishop, I misspoke. I definitely misspelled! I would hope that you would not stop yourself from saying something that needs to be said. I can take it. I have 7 grown children and 12 grandchildren. I have done principal’s offices, emergency rooms, police stations and even traffic court with my boisterous offspring. Nothing scares me except what’s coming to us for our good.
        I firmly believe that the original rad-trads were Sts. Peter and Paul. But that is exactly the type of radical behavior that I think we need. I mean no disrespect for anyone but the years following Vatican II produced a plethora of liberal, wishy-washy clerics and theologians that have caused harm even to this day. So even though the satan loves factions sometimes it’s good to know exactly what the factions are all about and how can we bring them back from their splintered way. As a traditionalist, I love my Church and my pope and all the clergy for good or ill. I was the president of the first women only Serra club and worked for several years toward vocations in prayer and deed. I love our holy priests. But funny thing about all this is that we had to disband our Chapter because there are no younger ladies to carry on the work. We tried merging with the men’s club but we were all literally dying off. The Traditionalists of yore are no longer able to do what we did and the younger people these days are too busy. Not all certainly, but so many.
        We older folks were taught to put one foot in front of the other and just do what needs to be done. Much like Charlie’s words. We were traditionally taught by traditional nuns and teachers who were well and truly vetted by our pastors to make sure of their faithfulness.
        So for these times we would be rad-trads just simply by our ethic.
        I also take exception to the “Good Catholics” who prefer law to love but that is found in some liberals as well. Anything goes with them as long as we believe and do as they do. We would all be doomed except for the love of God and the Storm He allows.
        Please pray for me as I will pray for you. We really are in the same faction. Let’s just hope that we stay on the Barque and do not go overboard for semantics. We are on the winning side and I will thank Charlie forever for the work he is doing to keep us on deck!
        God bless all here.
        Joan

        Liked by 4 people

        • charliej373 says:

          Ah Joan, I think this is a matter of semantics. The way you talk you are one of the deeply faithful and loyal trads. Rad-trad is usually applied to those “traditionalists” who think themselves so holy that they hate every Pope since Vatican II and believe, contrary to Jesus’ promise, that the Church, itself, went into apostasy in the early 60’s and that everyone except them is going to hell – and good riddance, they think. They think they are smarter and holier than Christ, not to mention our poor Shepherds on earth.

          That does NOT sound like you at all. And in fact, the deep and beautiful faith of the loyal trads is why I make such an effort to distinguish between the loyal trads and the rads. Frankly, I think the satan raised up the rads to try to discredit the deep, abiding faith of the loyal trads – and I am not having it. A true rad-trad thinks St. John XXIII, St. John Paul, Pope Emeritus Benedict and Pope Francis are evil apostates who are doomed to hell. Again, that sure doesn’t sound like you at all.

          Liked by 3 people

          • Joan says:

            You are so very right, Charlie. It is semantics and I used the term incorrectly although I admit that I am radical in my traditionalism. And I truly forgot the implications that are hand-in-hand with today’s radical Trads. I am sorry to have caused such an uproar but I take umbrage (whatever the harry’s that is!) when traditionalism is demeaned. Whether that was the intent or not has gone so far under the bridge by now….. but I am proud of my Irish Catholic traditional heritage and I believe that I am radical about it. Maybe rabid is the word. Tee hee. There is so much beauty that has been lost in the last half century that it hurts my heart. Mea Culpa for being divisive but that was never my intent. I am Catholic first, trad second. Apologies to all.
            Joan

            Liked by 4 people

          • charliej373 says:

            I could tell by your tone it was never your intent, Joan. A case of the same words meaning different things to different people.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Joan, I would say you are passionate about something you love dearly; a very good trait when for the right cause. Glad you are here.

            Liked by 1 person

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Joan, I do not think an apology is owed. I honor your love for our Catholic faith, no tag/labels required.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Mary Ann Parks says:

            Aw c’mon. A sedevacantist is all those bad things. “Rad-trad” is just a moniker, a bit of lingo, applied in a zillion ways. A really radical traditionalist would be a Roman Catholic. BTW, did you read the faux “Trump for Pope” campaign speech? Hilarious. ” “Trads. I love our trads. Any trads here? We gotta take care of our trads.”

            Like

          • charliej373 says:

            I did read that…and I was falling on the floor laughing at it.

            Like

          • Doug says:

            There may be a few here that are a tad trad 🙂

            Liked by 2 people

      • Kim sevier says:

        Dear Bishop YD, I was told today the new bishop of Memphis will be announced in two weeks. Perchance, is it you? You would love Memphis: Beale Street, Graceland, best bar b cue, Ole Man River, the Peabody ducks, great hunting with my brothers, the green line bike and walking trails, the Wolf River, Memphis in May, etc. And a great Catholic community! Come on down!

        Liked by 2 people

        • charliej373 says:

          Ha YD! You can’t say you’re not wanted here!

          Liked by 2 people

        • Fr. Frank says:

          Dear Bishop, my own Father in God who ordained me to the priesthood has announced his upcoming retirement. If I may, I hope I could convince you to consider a call to South Louisiana. I am familiar with the Bar B Cue fleshpots of Memphis (Mumfis!) You will never pass a happier Lent than here in South Louisiana. We fervently pray that no pope may ever visit us during Lent! We fear he might make us eat meat! Giving up a ham sandwich on a Lenten Friday for fried catfish smothered in crawfish etoufee is not such a bad way to suffer for the Lord! Ha!

          Liked by 3 people

          • YongDuk says:

            Fr. Frank… I have no intention of leaving my flock, even with St. John Neumann being a patron, until the Pope asks me to.

            I offered my life in a very hard Mission region, but the Lord said, “No”, despite Rome’s “Yes.” I still hope, as that Mission is still greatly on my heart and the Coming Rescue to the Storm might bring it to fulfillment.

            I don’t think it would be fair to live so well as you promise.

            If you want to write me privately about anything, please do, through Charlie.

            As far as Happy Lent’s, if you ever happen upon a Vietnamese Lenten service, the Music is glorious!

            +Yong Duk

            Liked by 3 people

          • Fr. Frank says:

            Here in Baton Rouge I am blessed to be in the same deanery with the priests of the enormous parish of Sts. Anthony of Padua and Emmanuel Le Van Phung. They are very holy brothers in Christ! The music at all the Masses is heavenly! How I’d love to talk to you, dear Father in Christ! Charlie has my number thru his secretary, but I no longer have his, since I dropped my last phone in the commode. As I confessed earlier, I’m kind of a knothead — or was that bonehead? Whatevs! Thanking Jesus and our Lady for you tonight, Your Grace!

            Fr. Frank

            Liked by 2 people

          • prayingflower says:

            So funny, Fr. Frank! pf

            Liked by 4 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Father Frank, indulging while fasting, I love it! I will keep you dear Father and your much loved and revered Bishop in my prayers.

            Liked by 1 person

          • YongDuk says:

            (Simply via email… I need to hold hold the hair-extension platypus from Kung Fu Panda persona, you know. 🙂 )

            Glad you know the Vietnamese! Speaking of which, one Priest friend still has my gloves…

            pace bene,
            +YD

            Like

          • Mick says:

            Father Frank, you are cracking me up! I wish I were a parishioner at your parish (I don’t think I could take living in Louisiana, though; it’s too hot.). Keeping you in my prayers.

            Liked by 3 people

      • Fr. Frank says:

        Amen, Bishop! Me, I almost always celebrate the EF in the chapel if the rectory on my day off, but I’ve never let anyone know that. I have a good grounding in Latin, understand what I’m praying, and find the prayers to be beautiful and edifying. None of the Trads in my parish will ever know this, however. In all honesty, if my only exposure to the Faith had been thru the Rad Trads I know, I would have been repulsed. Jesus came to ransom poor sinners, not to hand out good conduct awards to those who give a righteous kick in the teeth to all those farther down the ladder of perfection than they. (Besides, with the EF celebrated publicly, nothing ruins a priest’s morning faster than trying to eat a donut at coffee hour while half a dozen men who said “no” themselves to a vocation to the priesthood helpfully explain to *you* how you screwed up a rubric during the Second Confiteor on a Double of the Third Class, after the Vernal Equinox. OK — I’m being a smart Aleck now, but you know what I mean.

        Liked by 2 people

        • charliej373 says:

          I feel your pain, Frank. I am blessed to have a quiet cadre of theologians and canon lawyers of national repute counsel me when I need it and I am so grateful for it. Some of the amateurs, not so much.

          Liked by 2 people

        • prayingflower says:

          Oh, my, Fr. Frank, you are too, too funny. I love this scenario. God bless you, Father. I am praying for you. pf

          Liked by 2 people

        • YongDuk says:

          Ha! I will be your Acolyte, if you be mine! (I celebrate the EF in my Private Chapel on days that make sense to 😉 ) I foolishly didn’t realise the simplified way of washing one’s fingers until my SD laughed me off the Altar practically: Just wash the left hand wine then water and dip the right.

          Yes, you and I know sadly what we are talking about.

          Joan, no offense. I am a Catholic, Faithful to Rome and in Love with our Lady that is all I want to be known as [Period]. I learned in Seminary that when someone calls one’s self a conservative or a liberal [or a traditionalist] that you have to ask them what you mean.

          If my Gaudete Angel gets to tell the Rest of Heaven that I was a Marian Priest and Thank our Lady for that Grace, I will be most happy 🙂

          Charlie said it best in today’s blog:

          Sadly, I have never heard any amateur canon lawyer discuss the pastoral issues of mitigation and diminished capacity, and how to steadily lead those in disorder onto the path of recovery without causing them to give up in despair.

          Liked by 2 people

        • YongDuk says:

          P.S. I forgot to mention the Polish Priest who taught me the EF here in America years and years ago before it was allowable without special permission, showed me a letter of one of the “servers” who sent the Bishop a list of 80 rubrics that the Priest supposedly broke.

          Like

          • Fr. Frank says:

            Yup, YD (!!), that’s what I’m talking about! People fighting about drinking broth or bouillon on Fridays, since those were V2 changes. Meanwhile, other souls have fallen into despair simply because they have read our canon lawyers and hyper-Catholic apologists and determined they have no hope. I know that Jesus loves me — that must mean he loves poor sinners who have no other hope than in Him! A continual problem the Savior had in his healing miracles was the sick being able to get to Him — eg., the paralytic let down through the roof. God have mercy if our alleged orthodoxy/orthopraxy keeps those who need Jesus’ healing touch most from getting to Him! “It would be better if such a man had not been born!”

            Liked by 2 people

          • YongDuk says:

            I don’t drink broth or bullion on Fridays. Am I going to Hell?

            I have a funny way of dealing with those whom you are dealing with: I give a Homily on “Better that the Floor swallow you up than come up to my Communion Line and receive!” I learned that from my Spiritual Director. You are in the South. Try it.

            Seriously.

            As a Seminarian who was regularly shown the Hearts (Souls) of those I was giving Communion to I asked him what to do… Years later, I heard him give that Sermon and while I do not refuse unless I know I know I know (Doug is that right syntax?), I do not hesitate to warn anybody (and weeks ago spoke of warning the Bishop of Wilmington re: Biden not to mention Wuerl).

            Sadly, we are out of the Time of Padre Pio… But if I ever get to preach in the Mid-West (West of St. Louis, so don’t worry, Charlie) at a certain Trad church, I would lay into them hard and hard and hard again!

            I love the V2. As an Engineer, my mind goes to Germany and London.

            Take your parishioners to task and put it in the context of φιλοκαλία – philokalia. Put everything in the context of love… shutting people out… I was in prison and you visited me.

            I can tell you stories and stories of sitting with Meth addicts… Women who sold themselves for drugs. And I sat and I listened and I honoured them. If only you knew how beautiful… And I get angry, too, Fr. Frank, at their language and their cliquishness and I would love to speak to them the truth, but I have a widow friend who sat behind me for years at daily Mass and she reminds me to be gentle. And so for her, I am gentle when I get frustrated.

            And then there is the lady who sat two rows back when I was most suffering persecution as a Seminarian and she said to me, dying of cancer, that she marveled at the peace I exuded and I told her that I sat where I sat, under the XIIth Station as I was praying for peace to hang there… and not revolt or be angry even though I was…

            So…

            So… Fr. Frank. Go sit there. Sit there and sit there and sit there. I mean in the wrong spot in the church in most people’s estimation, that is, in the pew under the XIIth Station and scandalise them buggers and you will have a small frail old lady who will annoy you with her whispering her rosary and you will have a dying woman mad at the Church rely on you to teach her your peace. But sit there and sit there and sit there. And let the people see you. And have your Stole for anyone who wants to hear Confession.

            How glorious it is to be a Nobody!

            A Nobody with a Stole and to be a weak sinful Nobody in that pew under that Station…

            Liked by 6 people

          • charliej373 says:

            YD, there is such profound beauty in this, the tender love of a gentle shepherd.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Beckita says:

            Profound beauty, indeed, and we are the better for it… We’re all being called to look into our souls… then there’s the widow who reminds us through this tender Shepherd: be gentle. Amen.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Syntax close enough YD. Just need a few comas. No big deal. At one time, my English was poorer than the people Mother Theresa served. When I said Lambzie wrote one of my English papers in college, I was not kidding. This was prior to my conversion. After my conversion, I started reading like crazy and playing catch up. In my conversion, experienced God’s love more in the way the church descibes perfect contrition, but was protestant. Anyway, I am still a grass hopper in the back of the class still learning from my wonderful shepards.

            Liked by 1 person

          • YongDuk says:

            Commas? What commas? I don’t need no stinking commas!

            Is grasshopper one words or two? Helminths is one.

            Like

          • Doug says:

            YD, respectfully, “I don’t need no stinking commas” actually sounds very snarky. I would not recommend that as proper English slang.

            As for grasshopper, I guess I better go further back in the class.

            Like

          • YongDuk says:

            My apologies, Doug, was trying to play off a phrase from some obscure 1948 American film with Alfonso Bedoya.

            Safe travels… 🙂

            Like

          • Doug says:

            No harm to me YD. I figured you were quoting some American movie or something. The saying is a somewhat crass and could easily come across in a not so nice way. The phrase seems unbecoming being used by a bishop. I just want to help you understand the idiom. This grasshopper is grateful and hopes to be able to move closer to the front of the class.

            Liked by 1 person

  12. anna819 says:

    Wow! I just read the remarks over at MOG. That’s all I can say is wow!

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      I told you…they can be a tough crowd over there. But I have grown very fond of them.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Andy says:

      I would urge you to read more of the site and stay away from the heated topics. I try my best to stay away from them but even a “Pollyanna” like myself can’t keep quiet forever. The MOG is a beautiful family but it has been rather heated the past year. I don’t speak as often on there as I used to but I do love every member of that forum like we are to love all our family members despite the differences and heated fights. That place has been a huge part of my spiritual growth after I reverted back to the faith as a far lost soul in 2013.

      Liked by 5 people

  13. BD says:

    I have recently adopted a different view on the so called utterances from the Pope on various controversial topics. Perhaps as a result of this blog “TNRS”, perhaps because I independently concluded as the “Storm” accelerates, these utterances will be forgotten and truly be the least of our worries. What will be remembered and have a profound affect on us all is the Pope’s declaration of the Jubilee Year of Mercy.

    Liked by 7 people

  14. Doug says:

    Respectful dissent. I like the term. I was doing some research last night on Medjugorje and came across a papal statement of old condemning Islam. It seems to counter act what is taught in CCC today about Islam. Now it would be interesting to get a proper perspective of church teaching when on the surface there are appears to be differences.

    Now the CCC is official teaching of the Catholic church, but my understanding is it is not dogma (correct me if I am mistaken). So there is a difference.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Doug says:

    By the way, good short piece Charlie

    Liked by 1 person

  16. CrewDog says:

    I’m an “active” blogger here and over at MOG. As most have you have figured out I’m also an old curmudgeon-n- renegade Catholic or perhaps just an old black sheepdog that you might get a glimpse of as I circle the “camp fire”. Anyway! I’m no expert on The Magisterium nor do I want to be! They pay people Big-Bucks to be experts and you can watch them daily on EWTN. I’ll just keep the simple Faith that was handed down to me by my folks and the good Sisters pre-Vatican II. On both of these sites I see a bunch of chatter about this and that and I find much of it interesting but ….. It could be that my “mission” is to try to keep people focused on that “Here-n-Now”. I’m going deaf but I’m hearing the thunder of “The Devil’s Herd” coming our way! I thinks it’s too late to do much about what’s going on in Rome, London or DC. Oh! I’ll vote and put in my Two Cents on the Blogosphere but I’m spending more-n-more time cleaning off the “Cosmoline” and taking stock of my larder …. and gently encouraging my Family/Friends to do likewise …… and trying to figure out what The Lord wants me to do in The Storm!!??

    GOD GUIDE AND SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Liked by 13 people

  17. Christine says:

    I also believe it is important to know ‘ where people are coming from ‘ in order to get a better feel for what they say. Have you ever been to an Irish Pub ?? I mean a real one not the tourist kind in the US. As an immigrant to the US from Europe , having German and English blood as well as having much experience living in France one understands the nuances of an argument better when one seeks to understand ‘ where the person is coming from ‘ literally. I grew spending most holidays up with a lively bunch of opinionated , stubborn German extended family in which there were often shouting matches between intellectuals followed by a fabulous meal much laughter and goof fellowship. Have you ever watched a Parliamentary ‘debate’ in the UK on C Span? It is often more of a sarcastic sparring match.
    I JUST read an article about the state of the Church in Ireland , it has had extreme power over many social areas of peoples lives and while it has, possibly heavy handidly , educated the children in the faith , in great part it has been over reaching and forgotten about the need to continuously evangelse the adults rather than just ‘ lay the law down’. I would say that what is happening to the Church in Ireland now is possibly the last bit of the Revolt that Luther started. The fresh wind needs to happen so that the Irish can truly exercise free will in their faith. Coerced faith is never a good thing, The pendulum swings.

    Liked by 2 people

    • The coolest bars in every city in Germany are always the Irish Pubs! ☘

      A perfect pint of Guinness, a shot of St. Brendan’s, a bowl of stew with bread, live music, upbeat patrons… 🍺 “Sláinte mhaith!” 🍻 (To your good health!)

      Liked by 5 people

    • Kati says:

      There are gentle breezes winding through Ireland that, at this time in history, still carry the truth across the land. These soft whisperings of truth will continue to grow and become a mighty wind. Check out the book, The GENTLE TRADITIONALIST by Roger Buck. This is a Catholic fairy-tale from Ireland that is potent! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Nancy says:

      Christine, I think the fresh wind is already blowing–all the way from Oklahoma:
      http://vultuschristi.org/ .

      Liked by 1 person

    • YongDuk says:

      I am a manly man (who loathes guns for his own personal use) and order my Guinness with Black Currant–but I lived in Poland, so you have to give me that one, please.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Doug says:

        Oh I went to Dolans, a little hole in the wall, in Limerick last June with Lambzie. Guinness, Violin and Irish folk music. Some of my favorite type of music and favorite memories with dear Lambzie. Sigh…..

        Liked by 1 person

  18. mbrandon8026 says:

    Dear Charlie

    With all due respect I found the thread at MOG to be reminiscent of a bar room brawl among a bunch of drunks. As difficult as it is for me to be mute, I find that when. I have had “a touch of the creature” it is best. If I spoke after imbibing it would sound a lot like what I just read.

    Pope Francis responded to the questions of journalists on a long flight after long days in Mexico. He spoke in Spanish. It was translated to English. We do not have the context of questions that preceded or followed those we took interest in or umbrage to. What I did read of his words had nuance to it, though translated, and none of the words could be skipped.

    In the early Church St. Paul confronted St. Peter directly, face to face, not over the Internet. St. Paul was anointed to do so, and knew the circumstances and details personally of which he spoke.

    Had he blasted our first pope over the Internet instead of face to face, it would have been gossip. The criticism of the Pope and his words is gossip. The clue is that there are too many degrees of separation.

    I found the discussion here at TNRS to be measured and respectful, as I hope it would be in a family built on love. It is one of the things I admire about this community. As the storm rages outside the door of our hearts, we can remain calm here.

    God Bless You and All Who Come Here.

    Michael Brandon

    Liked by 12 people

    • YongDuk says:

      Yes, Michael, I did not follow Padraig’s argument at all on that point.

      There is a huge difference between Noah / Ham and Peter / Paul.

      And I am not at all suggesting that it’s not about knowing one’s place. I simply don’t follow his argument completely–not to mention many here*. I have chosen, as I have personally told Charlie, to take the Noah/Japheth-Shem stance lest I take the Noah/Ham stance, whilst trying to take a Peter/Paul stance.

      *In other words, standing on the periphery, watching the central figures or the reactions is better until the Lord gives you clear indication that it is your time to step into the fray.

      Many of us are given expertise and authorities, but keeping our mouths shut (as one person above shouted “SlLENCE”^3) and seeing the trends, often is the greatest thing to do. Moses reacted too quickly in his anger and, not repenting, lost entering the Promised Land. Abraham and Sarah reacted too quickly and see how Hagar and Ishmael suffered (and gave rise to whom they did).

      It is okay to stay silent and respectful and wait for God to commission you again in your expertise to act, but sometimes He just wants you to realise He gave you expertise as your ministry for that time is over and your obedience now is greater…

      That doesn’t mean being passive. It means relying on God to prompt you to speak with the right authority decisively when.

      (I may be speaking biographically, Beckinita…)

      Liked by 3 people

      • Beckita says:

        Well, the Holy Spirit has certainly fired up your lungs this night and the sweet breath of wisdom has just emerged in this comment. Thank you. Your mother must truly be an amazing woman. Prayers rising for her.

        Liked by 3 people

  19. Anniecorrinne says:

    In looking as best as I can at all these long-winded comments, I can’t but help think of an old teaching ….” Most people have too many answers and not enough questions.” We are more and more into this storm. A storm of words and temperment today. And we need to ask Jesus to keep us strong. He will give us the strength to remain still in His loving arms. He is right beside us waiting for our hearts to turn to Him. PEACE.

    Liked by 5 people

  20. zeniazenia says:

    The Most Reverend Samuel J. Aquila, Archbishop of Denver, is currently giving a marvelously personal interview to Teresa Tomeo on Catholic Connections. (just received his blessing 🙂 ).
    Here is the audio archive page for future listening. Our Lady Queen, of the Rosary – pray for us https://avemariaradio.net/program/catholic-connection/

    Liked by 1 person

    • zeniazenia says:

      I just checked and the interview is already available in the archive. Click on Catholic Connection – February 22, 2016 – Hour 2 — starts at minute 40! :o)

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Rose says:

    I speak in defense of Pope Francis. My instinct is that Pope Francis is a good, merciful, holy man who loves God and is filled with compassion for the suffering masses of the world. His intentions are good and I often find myself wondering what we would be saying about Christ if he were walking among us today since He was considered so radical at the time.

    Liked by 6 people

  22. Christene says:

    I thought I would share a quote from my morning devotion today. It’s from the Liturgy of the Hours;

    “When in your life of faith you are confronted with the deeper mysteries it is natural to become a little frightened. When this happens, take heart faithful Christian. Do not raise objections, but ask with loving submission, ‘How can these things be?”

    What if. What if we all just took a deep breath when confronted with matters of faith that unsettle our souls, went into our inner room, shut the door and humbly asked our Lord, “How can these things be?” And then wait for an answer. BEFORE we light up comment boards.

    I entered the Church in 1994. In 1997, I had the exhilarating experience to take a two year EPS course through my diocese (Fargo). I remember one of the priests who taught a course on philosophy explaining Truth, as in TRUTH. Now, this was twenty years ago, so I’m paraphrasing, badly, but I think I still have the gist; when we are grappling with the TRUTH of God and the TRUTHS in scripture, it can be like seemingly contradictory facts, statements, or realities barreling down parallel tracks, with no path that joins them together on our earthly horizon. They only meet when they burst through the veil into eternity that they become one seamless track.

    l Cor. 13:12 “For now we see only a reflection as in a mirror; then we shall see face to face. Now I know in part; then I shall know fully, even as I am fully known.”

    Liked by 7 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Beautiful, Christene. This actually, is a major them of a piece I have been working on for weeks – and will be up today or tomorrow, I think. This is the sort of thing we should expect as the Storm deepens. But we are to keep our eyes on Jesus.

      Liked by 2 people

  23. Dee Toups says:

    Charlie, put it to bed already. This turmoil has been caused by your words, not the pope’s. Please for the love of the papacy (on the feast of the chair of St Peter!) keep your criticisms of our Holy Father to yourself and shout your praises from the rooftops.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Well I’ll be darned, Dee. Who knew? If I would just have never said a word there never would have been a controversy at all. That is silly and absurd. Sorry, I don’t and will not subscribe to the ignorant notion that if we would all just shut up, controversies would go away by themselves. Now if you have a point, make it without the bitter sarcasm or you will have made your last point here.

      I get the ugliest critics of the Pope writing to tell me what a shameless shill for the Pope and the hierarchy. I get people like you who think if we just pretend that nothing has come up, it will all just go away and can be swept under the rug. But thanks be to God, I get many, including a lot of Priests and Deacons, who write to thank me for my steadfast and effective defense of the Pope and the hierarchy. So I’ll take my chances.

      Liked by 10 people

      • caroltrueman says:

        Thank you Charlie, I totally agree with you that this speculation and comments about the Pope,s words on the plane flying back to Rome , needed to be discussed.Thank you for what you are doing here, and please continue. Carol

        Liked by 2 people

      • dano says:

        As you are fond of white water rafting analogies, here’s another one…In general, you try to avoid large rocks because the water can trap you against it making it almost impossible to get off of the rock again. In some circumstances, however, you know you its too late to avoid the rock so you paddle hard straight at it to build up speed and bounce hard enough off of it to avoid entrapment. Its exhilarating when it works. Don’t get trapped, keep paddling…

        Liked by 3 people

    • …but Dee, this turmoil has brought about an excellent, albeit polarized, discussion. Many of us are learning and growing from this ongoing and civil discourse. But we also all need to feel free to express criticisms, doubts, questions, and opinions here, even of the Holy Father, and then follow them through. It is what makes this blog special.

      By the way, I admire how direct you are!

      (But to be honest with you, I’ve skirted this discussion for the most part and do look forward to its conclusion.)

      Liked by 5 people

      • Phillip Frank says:

        Polarizing is what the storms main goal is Patrick….to separate the sheep from the goats!
        Jesus told Pilot that those on the side of truth hear his voice. As these debates are raised, we separate into two camps usually based on our descisions made long before.
        The few who are on the fence are who this storm is most out for. The fence is getting wider and wider and one must choose before the time of mercy ends. We who are firmly on the side of truth are to pray/help those on the fence. This time of obvious, open soul searching will bring out our deepest sins, conscerns, flaws and self interests. We will soon find ourselves as either the sheep or the goats.
        This forum is a place to contemplate the errors of the world and more importantly our own souls. Do we seek the truth subtly planted here in these lines or do we harden our hearts? God’s call to us here is no accident but are we listening?
        Thank you Charlie, I have heard the Lord’s voice here over and over and I love all of you here for calling Him down to me through your faith.
        Bless you all.

        Liked by 6 people

    • meggie0brien@gmail.com says:

      i havent commented in awhile, but i have been faithfully visiting this site, it gives me hope. however, Dee Toups, i dont know whether to laugh or cry with your comment. im sensing your love for the papacy and church, but i invite you to extend that same love to Charlie. he IS a staunch advocate of the Holy See and one of the few that does not criticize our Holy Father, he makes no excuses for him but defends. I dont know why, but your comment still has me giggling, maybe for its naivety? not laughing at, laughing with. forgive me everyone.

      please send up prayers, my family and i are still in such spiritual turmoil. Charlie and everyone here, i said a rosary tonight for you all.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Dee, ask Charlie about the comet. : )

      Liked by 2 people

  24. Elissa Fruciano says:

    Hi Charlie, I’m wondering if you could click on the B for BOLD in your articles to us. It would be sooo much easier to read; right now it always comes in so pale.Mercy for these older eyes, please.

    Like

  25. Anniecorrinne says:

    I forgot to add on my reply….I’m opening the Book of Job….may make God’s words the meditation
    of this second week of Lent. Thank you Charlie. An excellent suggestion.

    Liked by 2 people

  26. Joe S says:

    It’s not an urban legend, it’s a LIE: Paul VI did NOT give permission to nuns to use contraceptives.
    http://wdtprs.com/blog/2016/02/its-not-an-urban-legend-its-a-lie-paul-vi-did-not-give-permission-to-nuns-to-use-contraceptives/

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Joe, I respect Fr. Z, but I think it a vast overstatement to call it a lie. Certainly, Blessed Paul VI did not give any public approval to that. BUT, both St. John XXIII and Bl. Paul VI did not rebuke or correct the many theologians who were encouraging this, which could mean nothing or could mean they were quietly acquiescing. A signal point is that, at the time, top theologians were divided on whether the pill was an artificial barrier like a condom, or a form of acceptable means like NFP because it changed the regulated the body’s fertility. Even if it was proven that either Pope had tacitly approved it, it would not be evidence of error – for the matter was not then settled. Bl. Paul VI settled it with Humanae Vitae, so it would be a serious matter if the Vatican continued on the course that Fr. Lombardi said the Pope actually meant.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. Fera Henri says:

    At night I had a dream about Papa Francisco! I was in a Church, and I was sitting in one of the front pews. Nobody was sitting in front of me! After a long time, I saw Papa Francisco starting to celebrate Mass and it was at a much later time than the Mass should have been celebrated. Then I looked and he had changed the place of the Altar! It was facing the East. I could see that it was facing a huge window with shuttles. There were many sick people in the street, although I could not see them while I was in the Church, I just knew. When I turned around, I saw that there were only a few people still in the pews. I thought that since Mass was celebrated late, all the people who left must have been busy, they had to go to work or they had appointments, they could not wait any longer. I remember that I was very happy that I was sitting in this spot: on the right side in one of the front pews for when Our Holy Pope would elevate the Host, I would be able to adore Our Lord Jesus present in The Blessed Sacrament, whilst the others were not going to be able to see quite well, since the Altar’s place was changed. Another scene: I was in the garage and Papa Francisco entered and asked me:”why are you sad?” I replied: ” Your Holiness (and I remember saying your Holiness twice) you didn’t continue celebrating Mass and I didn’t receive The Holy Communion! He said: “Yes you did but you forgot!” I was still sad and said that I can only mention the cause of my sadness in confession. Papa Francisco sat down, he was wearing his white cassock and I knelt down in front of him to say my confession, then since the garage door was a little bit open, I could hear some people outside making noise and I turned my head to see what is going on but with his hand, he directed my head towards confession……
    Then my son woke me up saying, it is almost 7 am then I remembered today is the Feast of The Chair of St. Peter!

    Liked by 9 people

    • What a lovely dream, Fera. You must love the Holy Father very much! Thank you for sharing with us.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Hmmm I could give your son a ‘spanking’ for interrupting a very beautiful dream. What could be in those ellipses?

      Liked by 1 person

    • YongDuk says:

      Ha! I had a dream too last night with Pope Francis. I was dressed in jeans and I was running late for Mass. The Security at the Mass looked at me askance and I somehow got past them, some processed a few feet with fellow Bishops and somehow was able to concelebrate… (You can’t walk into Mass late, just a CIC/CCEO FYI)

      Was lovely. Nice Church too… Happy to have had that dream on the Night of the Feast… So, Fera Henri, bless you too for helping me to remember and smile. (And again, Fr. Frank: :-D)

      Liked by 1 person

  28. Nancy says:

    I realize that this whole discussion is necessary in an effort to find truth in order to lead to Truth. That being said, I sense an atmosphere, that I hesitate to put a name to, that seemed to end, for the most part, our anticipation of giving glory to God through processions, etc.

    Come Holy Spirit through the Immaculate Heart of Mary. Fill us with Your love, ardent as a flame,
    powerful as a violent wind. You came upon the Infant Church to give it divine life and holiness, to enlighten and preserve it from error. You are the Spirit that animates the Church and protects its unity. Your divine action produces marvels of grace in the souls of men. Glorify Jesus by spreading His Church throughout the world. Guide and protect the Church in these times of persecution and error. Bless the foreign and home missions with more laborers to reap the harvest of souls.
    (from the meditation for the third Glorious mystery, Mary My Hope, 1954).

    I hope I don’t offend with this comment

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      It did not end it at all, Nancy. Even as this unfolded, I have been quietly working on the matter and collaborating with some others. In fact, in the end, this interruption will be useful in making the larger point and calling people forth for that noble effort. The Storm rages, but I have seen it from childhood – and I know who is Master of the Storm and all things. I have learned to keep my eye on the ball even in the midst of such controversies – and even how to use them to further the main goal. Yes, this was a distraction, in part, by the satan. But it is a distraction that will end up doing HIM great damage. I am glad, though, that you have already seen this for what it is.

      Liked by 6 people

    • Beckita says:

      St Michael the Archangel…

      Amen to your prayer, Nancy! I’m just grateful that it only *seemed* to end our anticipation of continuing to give God glory through processions and additional good works and prayers which originate from and/or are inspired from this site. As Charlie says so well, we can readily carry on…

      BTW, No offense whatsoever taken by your acknowledgment of the atmosphere you perceived. I completely agreed with you last Friday and continue to do so. I was busy when the news and discussion first broke loose last Thursday. By Friday I described the atmosphere this way: ” I quickly discovered yesterday was a busy day on this site and by the time I checked in, peeked at a bit of news, both on the air and online, I was amazed at the level of chaos ramping up *everywhere.* I was not a bit surprised, yet in my humanity, I was amazed at the furor of the demonic at work as we are caught in the crosshairs of this battle in the Heavens.”

      Some of the evil one’s familiar calling cards: chaos, confusion, and division; of course, there are others. To me, the best wrap-up to this segment of time: God can always draw good from evil. Blessed be His Holy Name!

      Liked by 7 people

  29. Tresorgirl54 says:

    Charlie, your post was thoughtfully written and pastorally offered. All devout Catholics must read the Catechism of the Catholic Church, become informed of Encyclicals, and prayerfully seek the Holy Spirit’s gifts of Wisdom and Discernment. At my age of 61, I confess that in my 20’s as a married woman, my rebellious argument against the prohibition against contraception was radically different than my views today. I think that all Catholics need to go to their Parish Priests for guidance and counsel. We forget that they represent Christ. It takes making an appointment and having a pre-determined amount of private time. There’s not enough time during Confession. We all want to get to Heaven, and we can get there by following Christ and envoking the assistance of the Blessed Mother. Also, an hour a week in front of the Blessed Sacrament affords an opportunity to discuss the troubles in our hearts with Jesus Himself. I love TNRS’s focus on Charity, Obedience and seeking Christ ALWAYS! Remember to get enough rest and that you are human….and humans must rest. We apreciate your devotion to your mission but remember to care for yourself, too!

    Liked by 5 people

  30. vicardwm says:

    I know you don’t like a lot of links posted, Charlie, but I think this is a simply marvelous article by Amy Welborn, called “Against Popesplaining”, which I wish most Catholics understood:

    https://amywelborn.wordpress.com/2016/02/21/against-popesplaining/

    Just a small excerpt of the beginning:

    Guess what.

    You don’t have to defend every word the Pope says.

    Even if you consider yourself an enthusiastic and faithful Catholic of any stripe you are not obligated to defend every utterance in every papal interview or even every papal homily or declaration.

    Popes – all popes – can say things that are wrong, incorrect, ill-informed, narrow, short-sighted and more reflective of their personal biases, interests and limitations than the broader, deeper tradition of Catholicism.

    Which is why, traditionally, popes didn’t do a lot of public talking.

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      Oh, I don’t mind links at all, vicar. I just don’t go for stand-alone links. If someone has something to say, they should say it and use the link in support – not as a substitute for their own case.

      Like

    • Kris says:

      I have to say how much your comment coincides with some discussion I was having earlier today with my 18 year old earlier today. The Pope is not our God. He is the head of the Catholic Church and is the guarantor of orthodoxy as he said in his speech at the synod. Yet with that being said just because he is in an open discussion with someone and says something, even expressing thoughts on ethical mores regarding current events, he can be very ‘indelicate’ , speak with the mind of ‘man’, etc. etc. and we must not always react in fear. We were very fortunate that the last many popes were more regulated , formal in their words. Charlie one time expressed how important it was as a public speaker/radio DJ to speak with words that can be less twisted around by the listeners, how much more for this Pope. yet, with that being said, he is a man, has his own personality, will express himself according to his skills. What we must do is listen with the heart of one who knows the church belongs to God and the Holy Spirit guides it and IT , the church will always be lead to its fulfillment in time. We have all the means we need to know what the truth is and we do not need to be in fear of any one person speaking out off the cuff. When something is said we must always put it in the context of the deposit of faith and when those two cant be reconciled we must chose the deposit of faith as our guide. I am almost 60 and have lived through the craziness of the Spirit of Vatican II!!! That spirit took on its own identity according to whatever person was referring to it. Take that anyway you like….and I learned that I must stay anchored in the promise of the barque of Peter, act according to the faith handed down to me through the official teaching magisterium and pray, sacrifice for the beloved church which has been sullied almost beyond belief. Take faith people!! Be of courage! do not be afraid! On a lighter note, I highly recommend the new movie , Risen. It is a great literary expression of the faith of the early apostles and one new pair of eyes seeing things from a whole new set of events. It is very good. Please take time away from worrying and be of great joy.

      Liked by 3 people

  31. Tresorgirl54 says:

    May I respectfully ask another question, Charlie? In your post you mentioned individual’s names and their respective blogs or websites, and a name and website you previously approved of or liked and linked under your “Blogs I follow.” Why is Spirit Daily no longer linked? It is one of my favorites and I am just wondering why it is now absent? It led me to you!

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Tresor, Spirit Daily is still there under “spiritual sites I like.” Steve Baker, head of the answers team, moved some things around to make it more user friendly, but a link to Spirit Daily has been up since near the beginning of this website. Michael Brown is an acquaintance I respect.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Tresorgirl54 says:

        Charlie, thank you for your explanation. I’m desperately trying to learn to navigate the site after being an intermittent reader. Thank you for your helpful instructions! I’m learning, but not as rapidly as I would like! I like the respectful, encouraging civility here. Being Irish myself, I much prefer the nuanced graciousness here than an Irish Pub Brawl!!! My Irish grandfather, Walter Joseph Clooney would shake his head and mutter, “Shanty Irish!”

        Liked by 4 people

  32. mbrandon8026 says:

    Charlie:

    The dialogue to date on words of our Holy Father has given me significant pause, and so I have written an article just posted that brings to the fore sage advice from one fictitious philosopher, and one now deceased pragmatic philosopher, and concludes with sage advice from a 17th century philosopher.

    http://freethroughtruth.blogspot.ca/2016/02/the-lightning-rod.html

    I think it is time to move along. There is nothing more to see here.

    God Bless You and All Who Come Here

    Michael Brandon

    Like

  33. Joe says:

    I almost commented twice today. Both I thought good commentary, but decided not to. At mass today as I was thinking of Pope Francis and all the commentary, this came as a thought. I had to look it up, I think it applies. Mathew 3:1-6. At least it makes sense to me.

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Charles Walther says:

    Why no further comments after Br. Gilbert on the latest post re: Ireland/Mother of God comments. respectfully, Charles

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      I have cleared a ton of comments since then, Charles. Maybe you just need to refresh your browser.

      Like

    • Petra says:

      Charles Walther: I too stopped getting comments in my email yesterday, and thought maybe Charlie was taking a break, was out of town, his internet was down, or he was ill. But then I checked my WordPress settings and somehow (an upgrade by WordPress?) the “Emails for new comments” setting for Next Right Step had been switched to “Off”. So check your WordPress settings.

      God bless.

      Liked by 3 people

  35. Joyce Brown says:

    Charlie, you spoke in “The Challenge of the New Year” on January 1st, 2015, of a vision you had in December of the previous year.

    “I have been deeply concerned with the visitation I briefly referenced from the early morning hours of December 20. In part of it I saw a great multitude of demons, spewing up as if from a great fountain and spreading across the whole earth. Their primary target in this year, knowing their time is short, are those who are most overtly pious and faithful. If they can cause despair here, they can destroy many. ”

    And in “The Summer of Our Discontent” written in July of last year you spoke of a major blunder by the Pope that was coming, but had not yet happened. Then on the “Confused” thread at MOG there was much discussion about this blunder, some thinking it was in Laudato Si where the blunder took place, another mentioned that the blunder had to do with the Synod. Then there is a post by you from October of last year, indicating that the Pope’s emphasis on the temporal and political at the expense of faith and morals was the blunder, and it was ‘behind us.’

    In light of last weeks Papal presser statements, this translation from the Italian,

    “Paul VI — the great! — in a difficult situation, in Africa, permitted sisters to use birth control for cases of violence. It’s necessary not to confuse the evil of avoiding pregnancy, by itself, with abortion … avoiding pregnancy is not an absolute evil, and in certain cases, as in that I mentioned of Blessed Paul VI, it was clear.”

    Could this be that blunder which has unleashed the demons targeting the overtly pious and faithful?

    Liked by 1 person

  36. Hey, guys and gals. Here’s a fun link of Catholic trivia. I’ve got no good reason to put it here other than it may help some of us learn some new tidbits about the history of our Church.

    http://epicpew.com/catholic-facts-that-will-make-you-look-really-smart/

    Pray for us, Rocky Johnson!

    Liked by 4 people

  37. Dolly says:

    I read a quote by Ronald Knox in the Magnificat this morning that pertains to the Feast of the Chair of Saint Peter the Apostle which is today. I thought about all the pope discussion for the last several days. The quote is, “Perhaps it would be a good thing if every Christian, certainly if every priest, could dream once in his life that he were pope, and wake from the nightmare in a sweat of agony”.

    The other quote that came to mind is one of G. K. Chesterton’s. “We are all in the same boat and we are all sea sick”.

    Liked by 7 people

  38. Tom says:

    “If you can keep your head when all about you; are losing theirs and blaming it on you!” (LOL!!!).

    It’s incredible how this “DIS-INFORMATION” continues to swirl in relation to Pope Francis’s words, that are skewed by old red legs (the satan) spin doctors in the press. What does surprise me is how quick fellow Christians can turn the guns inwards, but you have dealt with Padraigs comments with charity I feel.

    What you bring to the meld Charlie is heartening, and shows us how we should put our focus on Jesus, otherwise like St Peter we run the risk of slipping under the waves in this perfect storm. I have learnt a lot about humility through these last couple of postings, Our Blessed Lord does indeed have a sense of humour, thank you Jesus!

    As an aside, I have only just watched the Birmingham video tonight, loved every minute of it, your humour and especially your ordinariness (hope that doesn’t offend) really gives me hope. Loved your description of “if you can meet with Triumph and Disaster and treat those two impostors just the same.”

    Hope you don’t mind I thought I’d post the following poem by Rudyard Kipling called “if”, which seems very apt at this time:

    If you can keep your head when all about you
    Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
    If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
    But make allowance for their doubting too;
    If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
    Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
    Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
    And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:

    If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;
    If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same;
    If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
    Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
    Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
    And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:

    If you can make one heap of all your winnings
    And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
    And lose, and start again at your beginnings
    And never breathe a word about your loss;
    If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
    To serve your turn long after they are gone,
    And so hold on when there is nothing in you
    Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’

    If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
    Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
    If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
    If all men count with you, but none too much;
    If you can fill the unforgiving minute
    With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
    Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
    And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!
    Source: A Choice of Kipling’s Verse (1943)

    Liked by 8 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Thanks Tom. On the ordinariness I guess it must be a disappointment to some who were hoping for a great hero to come encourage them through great trials and just get me, instead. On the bright side, most of us are ordinary…and I suspect to some it is a great sign of hope that if someone with as many quirks and foibles as Charlie can press on, then the odds for them being able to do it, too. Thus, my plainness, in its way, reveals God’s tender mercy and the great truth that each and everyone of us is called to be a hero. Maranatha!

      Liked by 5 people

      • Tom says:

        Hope to meet you when I make a pilgrimage to Mt Seeker after the rescue, I’ll look for an ordinary guy, sporting a cowboy hat, smoking on of those vapour things, with a squirrel under his arm, with an infectious laugh.
        I am hoping to walk from my home in Liverpool to the shrine of Our lady of Walsingham (which dates back to 1051 AD, destroyed in the reformation) later this year, storm permitting LOL. England is a lot narrower than the states a mere 230 miles. I will definitely take your intentions with me!

        Liked by 6 people

        • charliej373 says:

          Truth is, I don’t much like hats. The only time I regularly wore one was when playing baseball and when I was on my pilgrimage – both occasions when they were really needed. But I was so honored when Fr. Mitch gave me a hat – and even more so when an EWTN exec told me Fr. Mitch NEVER gives anyone his hats, that I have to wear that one at some special occasions.

          Liked by 6 people

        • janet333 says:

          Seeing as we might not get to Mt Meeker after the storm Tom.. then I’ll see you in Walsingham for a celebration. 🙂

          Liked by 3 people

        • jayman92 says:

          I’m not so much thinking of a pilgrimage to Mt. Meeker as I am looking for a good real estate agent in the greater Mt. Meeker area.

          Liked by 4 people

      • Doug says:

        Amen Charlie!

        Liked by 1 person

    • deereverywhere says:

      Tom, I was raised on that poem. We, as a family, still recite it when we get together. There sure are a lot of knaves around these days

      Liked by 1 person

  39. prayingflower says:

    My reaction – I am grateful this is the blog the Lord has led me to. (God knows, I don’t have enough time for another one!) I have come to highly respect Charlie and his team. Civil, respectful, prayerful dialogue is what I look forward to any time there is a discussion to be had. I feel I am part of an esteemed family here and I always look forward to learning on this site. What I have decided to do is pray that Pope Francis will take Beckita’s cue and say the St. Michael prayer before he speaks. Just kidding, Beckita ;). (Although I guess I really do that anyway when I say the St. Michael prayer for him with every rosary I say.) For what it’s worth, I appreciate everyone’s efforts here, especially Charlie’s, to keep this place calm and sane. And I enjoy being with you, all of you, my brothers and sisters in Christ. pf

    Liked by 12 people

  40. zeniazenia says:

    I am so thankful for Holy Father Francis. I have never witnessed a man with such a great heart. He makes the world such a fun place… ex bar bouncer, one lung, slightly obese, still loves to tango, has intimate philosophical conversations about culture, with the press, conversations that he knows will be contested and misunderstood 😀 — filled with the joy of the Holy Spirit he engages anyway. Even Elton John needs to talk about him with love. What a beautiful person and how lucky are we to have been gifted him as the Vicar of Christ!!

    Liked by 10 people

    • Anne says:

      Right on Zenia…… He sure ain’t dull.

      Liked by 1 person

    • janet333 says:

      Hi Jane…I couldn’t agree with you more. 🙂

      The pope’s openness is a signature of his Jesuit training..and that sometimes means that not even he is sure where the spirit will lead.

      “I confess that, because of my disposition, the first answer that comes to me is usually wrong,” …..“I don’t have all the answers. I don’t even have all the questions. I always think of new questions, and there are always new questions coming forward.” Pope Francis said in a 2010 interview.

      God Bless You

      Liked by 3 people

      • YongDuk says:

        Janet, I think this will pan out as you say… I think the easy answer that makes sense humanistically came to mind and then the hard question of what that means regarding the marital act will come later…

        I wrote Charlie last night, in one of those waking thoughts that you have to write someone, that marriage for some or many Catholics has lost what it means in the Book of Tobit and rather has become permission in part for those initially entering it as a way to allow unabated lust. The concept of chastity has been lost. (I shall not wax further.)

        There is a lot more at stake in what is not being affirmed.

        There can be so much gained by speaking to the reality of the sexual act once again and its purpose for marriage and within marriage. And the necessity for marriage to protect that act.

        So many beautiful reflections can be made on the Face of God and the faces of Marriage and the Family, and the healing of brokeness in Marriage and the brokeness of human sexuality that is made worse outside of marriage…

        Luc Michel and Philipp Franko, I leave it to you, along with Michael Patrick to flush out, with a beautiful summation from Doug and Lambzie and then a word from Beckinita’s Deceased Spouse and Charlie’s glorious learning from what he has gone through with Divorce and then continuing to minister to his ex-wife and her [friend].

        Liked by 4 people

        • Doug says:

          About 6 months ago, the Holy Spirit impressed on my heart that celibacy protects the church. I cannot explain this theologically, but some how, I know this interiorly.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Doug says:

          Arrrrrgh! I typed my reply and lost it. I need to go on a bike ride. There must be a dead squirrel in the road. No. Can’t do that. It’s snowing and late.

          I am reminded of an Eastern rite priest who gave a sermon on when youg men who constantly ask how far can I go with my girl friend. Can I kiss? Can I do more? His answer is: wrong question. These questions show only self interest or only what they can get. The young men should ask: how can I lead and inspire you to be more holy? How can I help you to make it to heaven?

          Now I wish I could say I was like that a long time ago, but God in his mercy has been working on me over time. God has been showing his covenantial love for me. In sickness and in health, he still loves me. How can I respond any less to my bride? I strive to get her to heaven so I can have tea with her in one of Kinkades cottages of light.

          I will never forget this sermon (it was not a homily since Mass was not involved). It was also at a Catholic tent revival meeting. How cool is that!

          Liked by 5 people

        • janet333 says:

          Regarding these papal flights I hadn’t realised that the cost of the charter plane is paid for by the press. No wonder then the Popes feels obliged to have these question and answer sessions!

          Pope Benedict used to hold a press meeting at the beginning of his trips.

          ” They were highly choreographed affairs, with the Vatican spokesman collecting questions 48 hours in advance by e-mail and picking a few to ask the pontiff. Sometimes reporters would be called upon to put the questions, and sometimes the spokesman would just do it himself. Even so, those sessions did sometimes make headlines. When Benedict went to Cameroon in 2009, for instance, he sparked a firestorm by claiming that distributing condoms in Africa makes the problem of HIV/AIDS worse. (The line drew a formal censure from the Belgian parliament, and prompted the Spanish government to airlift a special batch of condoms to Africa in protest.) ”

          With Pope Francis the session usually begins about a half-hour after takeoff and runs for an hour.

          “He usually speaks in Italian, so English-speaking reporters divvy up his comments afterwards to translate them into English, often having to play and replay the tape several times to get it right.” (John L Allen Jr. Crux)

          Liked by 3 people

  41. I also like this quote from Lou Holtz (former head football coach of the Fighting Irish): “If you burn your neighbor’s house down, it doesn’t make your house look any better.”

    Hot dog, we’ve got an assignment: The Book of Job. Every time I revisit the Book of Job it feels like a comfy old shoe until I really dig in, then it’s as I’m breaking in new shoes –– like I’ve never read it before! Right off the bat he loses donkeys, oxen, sheep, servants, camels, sons and daughters… then he falls down, worships and praises God. Now that’s a fella who truly knew how to love. Seems to me that we’re given the key right up front, while the rest plays out over many pages of dialog.

    Admittedly, I only revisited through Job 1:22, then jumped to Job 42:7-16. That’s a bit like walking to the trailhead and only looking at the summit on a map. I’m up for it though, if the rest of you squirrels are.

    BTW – loved the idyllic Thomas Kinkade cabin scene posted earlier. How comforting to imagine my feet propped up somewhere in that toasty cabin, smell of tasty stew wafting, and a good cigar with my buddies. Oh, wait… see that towering middle peak in the background? We’ve got to make that treacherous climb first and time’s a-wastin’.

    God Bless,

    MP

    Liked by 5 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      MP, I started my homework and read the first chapter today. I will read the Book of Job it in bits and pieces too until the end during Lent. I would love your play by play commentary (to keep it light and fun.) Deal?

      Liked by 1 person

      • JLB, I was just trying to get the ball rolling and was hoping to hear insights from everyone else. That was about it for me, but I’ve got a few more choice Lou Holtz quotes for when it gets around to Eliphaz, Bildad and Zophar.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Phillip Frank says:

          I love the Book of Job line where God talks about a dragon in the river.
          Scott Hahn uses the original language text to describe the “serpent” in the Garden Of Eden story.
          Anyway, Hahn looks to the use of the same words throughout scripture to help decider with greater accuracy other passages and insists that the serpent in the Garden is actually a great fierce dragon in his appearance and not some little snake slithering about stealthily. This gives a bit more punch to why Adam and Eve May have been impressed enough to dialogue with him in the first place.
          Of course, Satan is called a dragon in the book of revelation as well.

          Liked by 4 people

  42. deereverywhere says:

    Father Jeffery Kirby is going to Rome with his dissertation. His last sermon that I heard he spoke of being in the seminary in Rome. He was assigned to give tours of the Vatican which were free to the English speaking public. One day an older priest called him over and asked him what he was doing. Father told him that he was giving tours. The priest said “you need to slow down.” Then they walked over to the statue of St. Peter. The one that Father Kirby showed the tourists 1,000 times each day. The one with the toes worn down over the centuries from people caressing them. The priest asked “What do you see?” Father Kirby said”St. Peter” The priest said “What is St. Peter holding?” Father Kirby said “the keys” the priest said “Look at his arm.” Father said for the first time he actually saw St. Peter. The arm that holds the keys is in a sling. The keys to the kingdom are held in a broken arm. We need the grace that God gives to hold the keys because we are broken. Only God can heal us. Only God can give us the grace. I will miss Father Kirby.

    Liked by 13 people

  43. Anne says:

    So Charlie…. TDL….. We are being formed for the Storm here and coming…… The Storm including the Bubba Effect.
    Just heard Glen Beck explain the Bubba Effect. Says it is upon USA and showing in recent results of primary in S Carolina .
    I found it sadly interesting . come Lord Jesus Come.

    Like

    • deereverywhere says:

      Nikki Hailey, Tim Scott, and Trey Gowdy endorsed Marco Rubio. So Glenn Beck pulls out the Bubba effect from his hat because South Carolina allegedly picked Trump? New Hampshire picked Trump. Their state motto is ‘Live free or die’. Sorry if I misunderstood you Anne, but red necks are everywhere, not just here. I find it fascinating that these three top republicans chose a Catholic when none of them are. While I breathe, I hope. SC state motto. May people see Jesus in us until He gets here.

      I didn’t watch Glenn Beck’s interview because I have limited internet. I merely read what the bubba effect was. I think they are everywhere.

      Like

    • ann says:

      I am so out of the cultural loop. What is the “Bubba Effect”? Sounds like something from the era of Bill Clinton but I really don’t know what it is.

      Like

  44. James Ignatius McAuley says:

    I would respectfully suggest to all readers of the Book of Job that they utilize the finest Commentary produced by the Church Fathers, that of St. Gregory the Great, Pope of Rome (died 603), Moral Reflections on the Book of Job. This is the only complete Commentary on the Book of Job by any Church Father. The older, complete 1844 edition is out there, with a cheaper price. A new translation, based on the critical test is being published by Cistercian Publications/Liturgical Press. Volume 1 with books 1-5 and Volume 2 with Books 6-10 are published (out of 35 total books by Gregory). It may seem daunting, but Gregory will bring you through the Book of Job in a way that no modern commentary, based on the historical-critical method, can. The book was the equivalent of a bestseller in its day, and when you delve into it, you will see why.

    Liked by 3 people

  45. James Ignatius McAuley says:

    Charlie,

    Regarding your comment that “Sophisticated Romans” did not see the collapse coming, I would qualify your statement by noting that there were those who recognized that late antiquity was plagued with a grave spiritual sickness that needed to be addressed. We see this in the writings of John Chrysostom, for example. Others, during the beginning of the governmental disintegration recognized that the true sources of societal collapse was a spiritual sickness, such as Jerome, Augustine, Sulpicius Severus, John Cassian and so on.

    While there are those who, in every age can point out governmental/economic ills and problems, few have noted, like you have, that the source of these problems is a spiritual sickness. As a young man, I usually read such comments in line with commentary about Fatima. The first person (outside of a devotional/religious source) who I can recall who stated that these problems were due to a spiritual sickness was Peter Kreeft in his 1992 book, Back to Virtue. This is a marvelous book, and I would also recommend this book to all of those who wish to follow the next right step.

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      I am a fan of everything I have ever read by Peter Kreeft. And perhaps my word choice was not quite precise…there were sophisticated Romans who understood the spiritual sickness that would lead to collapse, but they were ignored or mocked by elite Romans who actually held temporal power.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Bob says:

        Last night my wife was researching something in the constitution which states that states can overrule the supreme court decisions by a 3/5 majority but with our country at best evenly divided between good and evil and at worst with public opinion weighted downward, I fear, I plan to tell her I don’t believe that is a viable option to make any changes in our present corrupt system. And as Charlie says above those who hold temporal power tend to mock those of us who believe the system is collapsing as they too often believe THEY and not God are the saviors!!

        Liked by 3 people

  46. Kathleen Vacheresse says:

    Father Frank I have a special love for priests and have prayed for each by name and by the gifts of the Holy Priesthood. I have asked Our Lady through the Immaculate Trust prayer to hold you in her arms and protect you under her mantle through the intercession of the Holy Trinity,Holy Angels, and the Queen of Heaven and earth and the Community of Saints. Thy will be done.Amen

    Liked by 5 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Hey Kathleen, off topic for a moment, my friends in Birmingham tell me your son took on a big new responsibility. Please let him know I am thinking of him and have offered a prayer for his fruitfulness – and for you.

      Like

  47. Kathleen Vacheresse says:

    Thank you for your prayers David isManagManager for St Gabriel Radio. His office is at his parish St Theresa in Leeds. We are going to Rome in May with Father Bean on their parish pilgrimage. We will remember all our friends and their intentions. God bless

    Liked by 2 people

    • charliej373 says:

      How wonderful! I went to several Masses when Fr. Bean was the Pastor of St. James in Gadsden. I absolutely loved his lively wit, solid orthodoxy, and warm pastoral care. I will keep all of you in my prayers for a most fruitful pilgrimage. With Fr. Bean there, it will surely be a lively pilgrimage!

      Like

  48. Kathleen Vacheresse says:

    Charlie. The Raido Station that David is with is Our Lady of Guadalupe. My local Raido in Ohio is St Gabriel. Father Bean has a wonderful conversion story I heard him on Journey Home years before i meet him at St Theres’s. God bless

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      He touched on it in one of the homilies I heard him give. The son of a Baptist Minister who wanted to know why they didn’t follow the Lord’s command to eat this Bread and drink this Cup. The thought I had as he was telling it is that he must be one tough guy behind that affable, cheery demeanor – because leaving the Baptist church to become a Catholic and a Priest in Alabama a few decades ago took really steadfast fortitude. To do it and still be regarded with much affection by his family and old friends speaks loudly about the quality of his character.

      Liked by 1 person

  49. Kathleen Vacheresse says:

    Father Beans mother is very sick and he is asking for prayers.

    Like

  50. janet333 says:

    Praying for Father, Kathleen.

    Like

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