Trust – Without Hubris or Presumption

stones across brook

By Charlie Johnston

One of the Priests who comments here regularly, Victura, asked about the danger of failing to do the things we should because we expect it to be taken care of by the Rescue. The concern is a serious one about how to avoid presumption. It is related to another key question: when does ‘preparation’ become a matter of trying to outwit God by depending on your own prowess, thus a matter of hubris?

I am going to tackle the matter of hubris first, the sort of things survivalists and preppers engage in. As things visibly disintegrate, I run into more and more people who are frantically “prepping.” I have been saddened to learn that even a few people who did not believe me last year now do because of the striking things that have happened and have responded by going off the deep end on prepping. I would rather people did not believe a word I say then to believe the half about the troubles upon us while ignoring the half about our only proper response to it.

I have said many times before and I firmly reiterate it today: the reason we have reached this point is because we think we are sufficient to ourselves. God allows the Storm to proceed to shake us from that deadly notion. If, seeing the visible rise of the Storm, you start restlessly trying to prove you really are sufficient to yourself by relentlessly prepping and planning for all contingencies you can imagine, you are not preparing. Rather, your are notifying God that you are particularly stubborn in your conviction that you are sufficient to yourself and that He will need to give you special attention to show you that you are not.

I indulge people who want to take prudent steps. The reality, though, is the only preparations you can really make are the sort of preparations a four-year-old would make for a camping trip his parents are taking him on: a few comforting things, maybe a little stash of candy and a stuffed bear. But whatever he takes will NOT be sufficient for the trip without the protection, guidance, and beneficence of his Mom and Dad.

I have congratulated many I have met who have put aside some stores and supplies to help others in times of trial. Most are absolutely sincere, but I have detected occasionally that the “helping others” is actually a justification for self-absorbed prepping. Occasionally I give a gentle nudge, usually I leave it alone. God is not someone you can play sly with. He knows all our hearts, I don’t. If you truly can have as if having not and have not as if having; you can do just about anything. But it is dangerous to get absorbed in it, for soon you are tempted to rely on your own prowess. God will correct these errors. But I sometimes get depressed when I see how many people think they are protecting themselves when they are actually marking themselves targets for remedial work on what trust actually is. Mark Mallett had an elegant column a few days ago about what is called for now.

A more subtle form of this hubris can be found in some who, by all appearances, are strikingly faithful. They do all the right things, they care for those around them, they live their devotions well and truly. On the surface, they are identical in every way with those who are truly and fully faithful. But on the inside, a little spiritual tumor of pride grows. They think they know what the right path is (and they are not far wrong, which is why it is such a useful tool for the devil against the pious) but they also think that they have made a sort of deal with God: by living so well, they don’t believe anything fundamentally bad can happen to them. They actually are not wrong about that at all, but they are wrong in assuming they know what is best and that their obedience obliges God to do things their way in their lives. When something happens that is fundamentally bad (or, actually, different than how they think it should be), they think it is either an attack or that God has abandoned them. It rarely occurs to them, once this line of thinking metastasizes, that God may be making a course correction in their lives to protect them. We are a stubborn race, hard to convince that we often do not know best even when we say we trust in God. The grave danger is that some of these, though they have never shown symptoms of apostasy so long as things went basically as they thought they should, can suddenly and catastrophically lose their faith. Not because God has not kept His word, but because He did not act as they thought their behavior would force Him to (even though that is not how they consciously think of it).  

At the other end of the spectrum are those who expect God to do everything for them. It can give rise to a presumption that makes of God a personal valet rather than our Father and Lord. The best people struggle with how to do our part well, to act in trust without veering into either hubris or presumption. It is why I named this site, “The Next Right Step.” It is in recognition of how little, objectively, we can do – and how vital it is that we faithfully do the little we can that is right in front of us.

The first thing to get out of your mind is any comparison between what you do and what others do. Some are called to things that are more publicly influential while others have only the day-to-day that they can reasonably do. All should do what they can, realizing that how important things appear to be here and how important they actually are spiritually are usually two very different things. On the first Christmas Day two millennia ago, the most important thing that happened was hidden to all except His parents, some shepherds and a few magi. I can guarantee that on that day kings issued proclamations, warriors fought battles, and schemers schemed schemes, all thinking that what they were doing was earth-shaking; completely ignorant of the truly earth-shaking event happening in their midst. Had they known of it, they would have laughed with scorn that anyone could think this impoverished child born in a cave was important to anyone, much less to all ages.

A fellow like David Daleiden is doing big public work on behalf of the resurrection of a culture of life and exposing the culture of death for what it is. That is to what he is called – and can do right now…so it is what he should do. I have a dear family in Colorado I treat as a sort of surrogate family. The Mom sometimes comments here as ‘Lil Wild Rose.’ They have seven children. I walked with them in the great Jericho Procession around Planned Parenthood in Denver. They are called to make their house a joyful one, to take care of those kids…and they do a great job of it. When I got back from my Southeastern swing, I decided to try cutting my own hair to see how it would come out (barbers never cut it short enough at the beginning of summer). Well, it looked like I was undergoing a chemotherapy regimen. So Lil Wild Rose stopped over one night with her husband before they went out for a rare date night, brought some clippers, and cleaned up my mess. Now I just look like an old Marine. But I thought of the enormous grace of that…on the rare occasion when they had a date night, they both thought of coming out and taking a few minutes to clean up their buddy, Charlie’s, mess.

I want to emphasize to you that nothing is lost in God’s economy. I thought when I first publicly revealed my visitations, at least I would no longer be burdened with politicians seeking counsel. Once again, God’s sense of humor kicked in – and I have as much of it to deal with as I ever did. Some of the officials who call me ask, poignantly, if they are just spinning their wheels on what will be a moot point, given what I have to say. I almost always tell them the same thing – that nothing is lost in God’s economy and the genuine good they try to do will bear fruit, even if it is not anything like the fruit they were expecting. So keep on doing what you can until you can’t any more, then trust God to guide you to the…next right step. So to plumbers I say, keep plumbing; to sculptors, keep sculpting; to builders, keep building; to honorable officials, keep rowing against the tide. Nothing is lost in God’s economy.

I also encourage people not to resent that other honorable people make different choices in these terrible times. I have friends in politics who are working to help Donald Trump. I have friends who would never support him. One of the noblest men I know was an early supporter of his. I love them all. Do your best to be true and take responsibility for the choices you make, then trust God to guide you…to keep you on the right path if you are there or to put you on the right path if you are not. Know that whatever you think, at least some of it will be proven wrong. That goes for me, too. It is why I work much harder to be true than I worry about being right. (For any wondering what I mean by that, it is the subject of an entire column coming up – but being true includes working hard to get it right without the vanity of getting vested in proving whatever you say to be right).

In the Gospel of Matthew we are told of the man with the withered hand who asked Jesus for healing. “Stretch out your hand,” Jesus instructed the man (Matthew 12:13). I often think of that verse. Jesus could have healed him with a mere thought. The way the man was described, there is a good chance it was painful for him to stretch out his hand. Jesus intends for us to reach out to Him, even in the most wretched circumstances…even when literally all we can do is stretch out our hand.

I love the story of the feeding of the five thousand (Matthew 14:13-21). Jesus commanded His apostles to feed the crowd. All they could come up with was a pathetic five loaves and two little fish. So they gave them to Jesus – and the entire crowd ate its fill. This, I think, encapsulates the whole thing. All any of us is ever likely to have to offer is a piece of bread and maybe a fish. It is not enough, not nearly enough. But when we give it to Jesus, all are fed. We must not neglect coming up with what little we have to offer because of our knowledge of Jesus’ great power and charity. He intends us to give Him what little we have. If we neglect it and offer nothing, what does He have to multiply with such extravagant abundance? Do not worry about how little you have to offer – nor neglect to offer what little you have. This is how the Lord has set things up.

So if the Lord puts something grand in earthly terms right in front of you, do it. If He sets only little things in front of you, do them faithfully. When you are weary, rest. And know that, no matter how things look, you do not know whose offering is the grandest from the perspective of eternity.

 

 

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
This entry was posted in Discernment, Preparation, The Storm and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

496 Responses to Trust – Without Hubris or Presumption

  1. I must chime in: This was a very cool article, Charlie.

    When I read the gospel stories where Jesus is knocking the scribes and Pharisees, I usually think Jesus is talking to them and not me personally. (“God, thank you that I’m not like other people” Lk 18:11). But when I put in the effort, I see how I am guilty of many of the same things those hypocrites were.

    At first while reading your article, I thought, surely he’s talking about someone else and not me. But I see glints of hubris, presumption, and pride in my thinking and actions at various points during my preparations. I think today I’ve nearly reached a state of trustful resignation, but I still needed to read these words from you. This article was great for helping us see flawed thinking versus the proper attitude we should all have as we move toward the Rescue. Thanks.

    Liked by 10 people

    • charliej373 says:

      I see glints of the same in mine, Patrick, despite all the instruction and training I have had. I don’t know what each person is called to…only God does. That is largely why I don’t give a formula for what to do, but perspectives to consider so that each of us does what God calls us particularly to do. If we are asking the right questions we are much more likely to come up with good answers that are uniquely fitted to our circumstance and call.

      Liked by 9 people

      • Hi, I’ve been wondering how to send you, Mr. Johnston an email, but I can’t find how. I’ve read that you do receive emails, but can’t figure how.
        It may sound like the silliest, but about four years ago I had a dream about The Storm. In it there was a very particular man. Years later I came across Mr. Johnston and this blog. Then it was I realized it was Mr. Johnston the man in my dream.
        The thing is, it keeps on bugging me, I need to tell you the dream. Is there a way I could do it privately? Is not that it’s a secret or anything like that.
        On a different note, I read one comment about the prepping. My two cents is that the least you have, the lighter you travel, the more room you leave for The Lord to do his thing. Whatever comes to you, receive it and make the best use of it. Try to stay in the constant motion of receptive release. Receiving and detaching as a flow, in the big and the little things. And everything in between.

        Liked by 1 person

        • charliej373 says:

          Just send a note to tnrs.answers@gmail.com. They will forward your dream to me. I chuckled at your comment about lightening the load. In the first few days of my pilgrimage, I dumped about half of what I began with carrying. I ended up with about 40 pounds to start with. Within a month and a half, I had gotten strong enough that I was aqble to carry 75 pounds comfortably. But I had to learn by experience that some of the things we think are vital are actually just dead weight on our journey. All will have to confront those decisions.

          Liked by 2 people

    • Doug says:

      Yup Patrick. Prepping just gets plain tiring after a while. As I have heard others articulate, there are so many different angles or scenarios it gets exhausting trying to think about them. Our storm dinners are mainly so we can establish connections and work with each other where we all share our talents and goods. Most importantly, we are focusing on spiritual preparedness now. How can we be a sign of hope to others? I’m sure I have much hubris, but God will fix that. He is good at that.

      Liked by 5 people

  2. caelids says:

    Been lurking here as it is usually too late in the discussion to add anything…FWIW, we accumulated some preps back in 2008 as I panicked–ahem–er, prudently decided to prepare ourselves for “interruptions in services”. Earlier this year I revisited those preps and began to add to them, after hearing about Charlie/Mark Mallett. It got a little crazy…then I realized one day that it would simply never end. I would become more and more attached to my house and all the “stuff” that was in it and if we ever faced a choice of leaving or staying, I might even put my family in danger because I couldn’t face the storm without being in our home with all the supplies. Which is rather silly, because if you have to leave, they do you no good. And even if you can stay, you would be sharing those supplies around to build goodwill with your neighbors and those in need.

    Nowadays the discernment tool I use is to ask myself, “Is this something I would do even if I didn’t expect a crisis?” So the ten cans of tuna on the shelf seems to fit this rubric, but an additional 100 lbs of wheat does not (at least, not for us, anyway!). Another question I might ask myself is to visualize a post-Rescue future in which exists perhaps far more scarcity, but more community cooperation, and ask, “Would this thing help build up our community in such a future?” I find these two questions cut through a lot of clutter and fear. Now I experience a bit more detachment as I walk around the house. Also going through some of my deceased stepmom’s things after she passed away from cancer, made me realize, it really is true, “you can’t take it with you.”

    Having said all that, I am truly hoping that my latest interest is from the Lord and not my own anxious attachment to the house. I seriously think that God puts certain ideas out there at a certain time in which they will become needed, so I hope I don’t test anybody’s patience. Now some people have stored food and some people garden, and there are preppers who do both. I even have one of those sealed cans with the 100+ seed packets in it to grow a “survival” garden if shtf. I always asked myself why I even had it, because if you’re in a crisis, well, “gardening” just doesn’t seem like something you’d have the composure to just be able to go and do. And besides, who can live on parsley and carrots? I mean, it’s a nice idea, but not very practical. And then…I can hardly remember what led me to it…I watched the film, “Back to Eden.”

    Now if you’ve seen the film I wouldn’t say another word. But this is paradigm-shifting stuff. Even if you don’t think we are facing economic crisis, we are already facing a health crisis of pandemic proportions. And it’s because our food is so depleted, and full of chemicals, that we are all getting sick. But organic gardening is just too hard. Paul Gautschi flat out admits it. “I worked so hard to fail,” is how he puts it. But then the Lord showed him that by replacing the covering that He intended the earth should be covered with, the soil opens up and softens, retains moisture and minerals, and with the earth under its natural covering (whether you use hay, leaves, or wood chips), it is then easy to plant, with no soil preparation, fertilization, irrigation, and no disease or pest issues. And the harvest is not only abundant, but health-, life-, and water- giving. Paul walks around his property all day (he is somewhat disabled) and eats a few leaves and a few pieces of fruit and he is satisfied. He is satisfied. That was powerful to me.

    We think we have a population problem, we think we have a water problem, we think we have to come up with all these thousands of calories to feed people when what the Creator intended was so simple…anyway, there are hundreds of clips now online that you can watch and learn from. Simple, but powerful. And elegant. So all the energy that I used to put into anxiously ordering things off Ebay now goes into hauling wood chips and spreading them around, covering the soil and watching things grow. Do I hope to have food stored right there in the ground, this winter, just in case? Sure. But even if I don’t, by putting the covering down, I feel like I am participating in an act of hope. Ideas like this make me feel less like hoarding…and instead, realizing how perfectly and powerfully God intends to provide for us, no matter what.

    Liked by 11 people

    • darknite says:

      Awsome thoughts caelids!

      Liked by 1 person

    • deereverywhere says:

      Wow, first welcome to commenting. Second, it is never too late to comment, third, I never heard of this movie but I think I need to. Thank you for sharing this information. You are a bright light of information. Please comment more.

      Liked by 4 people

    • SanSan says:

      Great post. Good belly laughs enjoyed too! All I can say is “ditto”.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lily says:

      We watched the film last year, and it was life changing for me too. This is our first year actually working in wood chips, and it is mostly like he said. we are still working to get the esptablised weeds out, and planting in it takes some getting used to, but the moisture levels and plant health are incredible. Gardening is something I desire, crisis or not, because I grew up with it and love it. My parents grew all our own vegetables, corn, peas, potatoes and everything else. It was all we did all summer. My garden is way smaller, but God willing, that is my eventual goal. I started out as a herbalist, then to realize the role that nutrition plays in health, and seriously a few days ago, reading Exodus 9-11, realizing the spiritual and perhaps cultural role. Anyway, last year we started a garden share ‘program’ with a few people to raise some funds for our garden. It is pretty neat. It opens doors for chatting and getting to know people. In some ways, I feel it is a ‘spiritual act of service.’ It is not much, we are not going to be self sufficient any time soon, and even if we were, I can plant and water but God makes it grow. I can’t control the outcome.

      Liked by 4 people

    • I love Paul’s work and am on my 3 rD year of BtE garden. Good stuff!

      Liked by 2 people

  3. KimS1111 says:

    I’ve prepped, I admit it! I read up on how to baptize someone and printed lots of copies on how to pray the Rosary.

    Liked by 12 people

  4. Mark says:

    It dawned on me that some of the best ways to prepare is not so much to just store food (and we have a bit), as it is to learn how to identify it and/or how to cooperate with God.

    Trust in God to supply, but learn some of what he could provide. Dandelions, chow down! Purslane very nutritious. This is a bit of a mis-application but rings true, “the stone the builders rejected has become the cornerstone”, well the weeds the world rejects might be the feast God gives us at times.

    Having a garden long term is better “prep” than storing perishables, as it replenishes when we cooperate with God. Gardening is in part trust in God. We do work in cooperation with God and he provides as he sees fit.

    A garden may provide what we want, but remember that the weeds God provides at times may well be all we need.

    God replenishes.

    Liked by 11 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Oooo…I love your second paragraph, Mark.

      Liked by 3 people

    • sweetwaterhaven says:

      Nice perspective, Mark.

      I admit to doing a little prep, which didn’t amount to much, after the banking scare. A couple of years later I revisited my preps including the shriveled water bottles (the Arizona heat is a challenge) as well as the rest that was way past its prime.

      Imagine a diagram of a very large rectangle with a small dot just on the inside edge along with another dot on the outside of the rectangle. The first dot represents my house, and the second represents the nearest grocery store. The large box is the desert wilderness.

      I remember that first trek into the desert as a kid and how fascinated I was with identifying potential water sources and all the flora and fauna. For example, you can carefully knock off some cholla spines, burn off the barbed spikes with a lighter, slice it two, then squeeze out some H2O along with the pulp that is rich in nutrients.

      Fast forward through a bunch of decades, and I suppose I’ve gotten fairly familiar with God’s natural grocery store. By extension, so have my kids… and a whole bunch of their friends. Depending on God’s plans, I may or may not be of any use on that front, but I can rest assured that I did my best to rethink “prepping” and what I am called to do. I’m satisfied that the children could lead at this point (and I’m not just talking about physical survival). If nothing else, they’ve always had a blast on those treks.

      By contrast, who really enjoys a trip to the grocery store with the kids? Hey, there’s no long lines in the wilderness. No clean up on aisle 3. No need for paper or plastic. No impulse buys at the check-out counter. No carts with that wobbly wheel…

      When’s the last time anyone gave thanks to God at the grocery store? Oh, hit the wilderness… it’s work, but folks will be full of awe, wonder and gratitude… right down to the smallest of God’s provisions.

      God Bless,

      MP

      Liked by 10 people

      • Doug says:

        As I read this MP, I am watching the chipmunks scurry around my front steps and front porch. Its fun to watch them chase each other too. I have been dropping bird seed for them every morning and enjoying their company while I do my devotions and prayers outside. The little guys are not afraid to run around Lambzie’s and my feet to scoop up the seed like little vacuum cleaners. What a joy in these little things. The little guys are sometimes afraid and really have no idea where the food comes from. I can’t help but wonder if we are like that with God. How much do we fear? How much does he provide for us without us knowing or understanding? Matthew 6:25 to 6:34 comes to mind. Your pondering are so packed with wisdom.

        Liked by 7 people

    • During an imaginative vision several months ago, I had a brief glimpse of a possible future. In it I saw vegetable gardens in the most unlikely places. One was of a residential neighborhood with front yards turned into gardens of various sizes. The other was in a major city like Boston (I was facing East toward the sun and could see red brick buildings) where I had a perspective of several adjacent rooftops of different levels with makeshift gardens growing. It reminded me of the victory gardens of WWII.

      Liked by 7 people

      • Beckita says:

        Love it, Patrick! I’m a direct descendant of Uncle Sam Wilson. His caricature has been used for good and for ill. From what I know, the original man had a good heart.

        Liked by 7 people

      • Katherine says:

        I am totally into edible landscaping. My friends all love beautiful flowers, but for years I have been into plants that look great but also serve some other purpose. My front garden is made up of blueberry bushes, lavender bushes, sage, rhubarb, echinacea . . . and mint that I can’t ever seem to quite eradicate due to a mistake I made years ago. I have another batch of mint safely sprawling away in another location. I let the Oxeye daisies that flower wild in my field make a home in my front garden. You can eat those too. I love vegetable gardens. Rows of lovingly tended vegetables just look so wonderful! OH, by the way, I planted black beans, pinto beans and kidney beans from two year old Goya bags from the supermarket . . . everything came up! Germination rate was as good as the beans I bought from a seed company. Thought I’d pass that along.

        Liked by 4 people

        • A neighbor reported seeing a fox that had a big litter just a week or so ago. This might be a good year for growing.

          So, I love mint as a medicine. What mistake did you make so I may avoid it?

          Liked by 3 people

          • Katherine says:

            Oh, I just planted it in a place where it will crowd everything else. I didn’t realize how invasive it was. I pull it from the front garden every year, and I always think I got it all, and yet it comes up again the following year in new places. I also actually had it “crawl” out of a pot, onto the ground and then root itself everywhere. Mint is best planted in a place all of its own. I have mine on the edge of a clump of woods in my yard. It does just fine. I’m getting into dried herbs for medicinal purposes. I have an herb garden with feverfew, chamomile, raspberries, sage, borage, oregano, comfrey and lemon balm. I’m drying my first batches of these for use as tea later on. I might make some infusions with oil too. I am not doing it for prepping reasons, it’s a convenient coincidence, I just flat-out LIKE doing this stuff. I went out today and picked myself a nice lamb’s quarters side dish for dinner from my garden pathways . . . it was really good! I’d consider growing it on purpose, it was that good!

            Liked by 3 people

          • Ann Seeton says:

            Plant mint and other invasive edibles where nothing else will grow or where you want a ground cover to snuff out other plants, like around the bushes that are large enough not to be over-come.

            Liked by 3 people

        • Doug says:

          Cool! I have a big Courtland apple tree, blueberry bushes and strawberry bushes all planted as ornamentals too. This was before I started reading This blog.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Snowy Owl says:

            Doug, I ate a pear 🍏 and planted the seed and got 2 baby trees. Then I froze a few apple 🍎 cores with seeds and planted them after a few months and got 3 baby trees. I planted them in the yard. Did the same with some plums- they never germinated. My puppy chewed the ones that did, to shreds this winter- he chewed everything to shreds. (bad dog!) but he missed one tree and it is about 4 inches tall now…lol. I’m pretty sure someone 🐻 will enjoy those apples- but it won’t be me….sigh! 😎

            Liked by 2 people

          • Doug says:

            That’s funny Snowy.

            Liked by 1 person

      • Barb129 says:

        We built our house on my parents’ farm and our front yard has always had a garden in it. For anyone with small children, it’s a great way to keep your kids away from the street! =)

        Liked by 4 people

    • SteveBC says:

      Absolutely, Mark. It’s one reason why my mother and I are shifting our lawn care to fully organic methods this year after a few years of transition. We get a beautiful high lawn now, and after the Collapse we’ll cut it low or let it fade and let the dandelions and purslane thrive! 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

    • Doug says:

      Well, I do think it is worth pointing out that Joseph, in the Old Testament was allowed to see that there would be seven years of plenty followed by seven years of famine and that he would use the seven years of plenty to save for the seven years of famine. So it is conceivable that God is allowing us to understand via Charlie that times will get though and it is ok to do some preparations. This can also be part of God’s plan. It takes some discernment and each individual is different. I do believe that spiritual preparedness is by far most important. I have been doing some physical prepping.

      I would love to make it through the storm to see my grand children grow up and be a part of their lives. I am also contemplating maybe I will not make it and ask myself “am I ready to die?” I pray the Lord grant us all courage either way.

      Liked by 3 people

    • I’ve thought the same! And, in God’s ironic way, wouldn’t be interesting if the weeds we ate made us healthier. Lamb’s Quarter is an especially nutritious weed and quite plentiful!

      Liked by 2 people

  5. victura98 says:

    I cannot think of a substantive comment to add, at the moment, but I simply wish to say “thank you” to Charlie for this post. I never imagined I would receive an entire post as an answer to a question. 🙂

    Liked by 8 people

  6. amen Lisa thanks for sharing

    Like

  7. Denise Eagan says:

    Thank you for this post, Charlie. God must have put it on your soul to write this judging from all the comments i have read here and from my own feeling of peace after reading it. I had begun putting away just a few of the basic necessities late last year and planned to continue to add to it. We were financially stable and were able to do so a little at a time, But it seems that since then, no matter what I do, i come up lacking in any extra funds to do anything but make it to the next paycheck. We put my husband’s house in N.C. for sale in January, had an offer almost immediately, put an offer on a house I have loved for over 20 years, and i became almost obsessed about everything working out. By selling my husband’s home, we would have been able to pay off almost every debt we have and have been more than comfortable to take care of ourselves, our children and others in need. At the last moment, the sale of our home in N.C. fell apart and although i kept telling myself that i trusted that God knew what was best for us, i couldn’t really let it go. My anxiety and stress levels were affecting me physically. I couldn’t understand why God was letting this happen. In the last few weeks, financially things have been getting harder and harder, and this month i’m not even sure i will be able to pay all my bills. And i keep thinking i don’t know what i’m doing wrong. I had just started realizing that God is allowing these things so that instead of trusting in my/our plans, i have to trust in Him, and I needed a strong push to do so. We are getting a small foretaste of the trials to come, and this is in a way, a practice run to strengthen our trust in God. The last few days i’ve been worried our water will be turned off, and every morning i am grateful to still have it and truly appreciate every minute it is on and i am able to do what i need to do. And it has made me realize that people around the world go through this every day, and what we are dealing with is absolutely nothing compared to what most of the rest of the world deal with everyday. So my trust is now growing and my gratitude is once again in place for every little gift we receive every moment of every day. And I know that God loves me enough to “discipline” me gently but at the same time forcefully, so i will be more prepared for whatever is to come. And this article has even allowed me to let go and let God even more so that my inner peace and trust is has been restored even more. I pray for all of us here and around the world and ask for God’s mercy and for Him to heal us and save us in the ways that only He knows will heal and save us for eternity, not life as we want it here on Earth.
    It is so easy for me to get off course, slack off in prayer time and be undisciplined. So I just thank my Abba, for loving me as much as He does despite my unworthiness.

    Liked by 7 people

  8. al chandanais says:

    I was wondering what the first day will be like. Will power be off the first day? if not we will watch tv and see what the news reports. I will go to the bank and get my money out. But what if it happens and there is no news??? Ok, i will get the money out before then, but when?? Ok, i’ll take it out now…No that doesn’t work where do I keep it? Freezer, no, uh, under the mattress?, no, how about I keep it on me…I lose things, ok I’ll wait. Let me get food, uh, how much is enough for my family…my neighbors will come by for help…hmmm, turn them away? Out of the question, Conclusion? It doesn’t matter, whatever I do will birth other problems and is unending. This is not war with God, it is not the end of the earth, nor is it zombie apocalypse. If everything is taken from me today and I am left with only my love of God then isn’t this what God asks of me every day? To trust in him no matter what? Ok i have weapons and ammo, but that is not so i can take from someone else, that is for feeding and protection of family and friends and those friends are not my friends but God’s friends. For me I would rather be a victim than a perpetrator but I will protect those who can’t defend themselves and better do so or will have to answer to God for standing by and doing nothing. There is little to prepare for now, nothing has happened so my only recourse is to give more to God as he allows right now, to sacrifice little things for others and my family to speak up for what the church teaches and listen and give hope instead of advice.
    The only thing that matters is what God wants of me, I no longer matter, my fight is to give him his desire as often as possible and ask for the grace to give him everything all the time, I have a heart that is poor, a mind that is even poorer but that doesn’t matter God can deal with these things, it is my will that must be given to him every moment because for all the prepping, this is the only prepping that matters to me, letting God be God in my life and me be his son. Lets face it the reason we go through the storm is to drop all the attachments I have accumulated so I can be the man he has always wanted me to be.

    Liked by 8 people

    • jwjohn says:

      Gerald Celente says prepare emotionally, physically and spiritually. He says you have to prepare for any type of event because you never know what that will be, did you think the people of Fort MacMurray knew that one morning they’d be waking up and told to leave town and you have 10 minutes to prepare? Actually, in this case the astute prepper knew there was fire and had an action plan because he/she knew there could be a problem, but even if they had future vision they still couldn’t save everything of theres. The best example of total unpreparedness were those who went through the blackout of the northeast USA and eastern Canada around 1998. That was sudden. It lasted 3 days. The first thing I did was to listen to the radio in the car and turned to various US and Toronto stations to find out what was happening ( our local stations were not even on the air, it took a few days for the emergency station to get on air and all they did was play soothing music), once I knew what happened and knew how long hydro would be down I acted.
      Now for today, we see the economic problems, we see the social problems, we see the spiritual crisis, we see the migrant crises, we hear the drumbeats of war, we see all the problems around us, you know something is coming, you don’t know what, but you know
      you have time to prepare for something that you don’t know, it could be anything, and after that the only person who can help us is our Lady – Hail Mary Full of Grace.

      Liked by 6 people

    • Jose says:

      The first day of what? The first day after the dollar collapses?

      What I wonder is when is that day going to finally arrive?! We have 81 weeks left before the end of 2017. It seems like everything will happen so fast and come to an end so fast, that well…. it will all be over before you know it!

      The economic/social collapse seems to be dragging its feet though. What I tend to believe/think is that the collapse will not come until towards the very end of this Jubilee Year.

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Patricia says:

    Charlie,
    I did my best a few years back to store what I though was needed and then stopped. I stopped because I did what I did but I never had any interest in doing anymore. Sort of like the feeling Steve described. However, I was thinking since you posted this that since God is going to do something new, maybe a lot of things we think will help us, will not. For instance, I know a lot of people who bought a great deal of pre-1964 silver dimes and quarters. The thought being that if the dollar collapses, they will have something to use to buy or barter for whatever.
    However, what if God is doing something so new, the silver (or gold whatever the case may be), may not be helpful at all. What if we are to use that now so that we are more helpful now. Because, really, we do not know what God will do afterwards. What do you think?
    I am guessing you will say that we should pray and discern. Just wondering cause it got me thinking.

    Liked by 5 people

    • charliej373 says:

      You are asking the right sort of question…but only you can find what God authentically calls you to.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Another Karen says:

      Hi Patricia,
      You mentioned something that many here have also have mentioned regarding prepping that may be key. It seems that many who felt the need to prep came to a point where they (including me) felt they were finished. That said, it is likely that we have prepped in different ways with different things, so perhaps whatever we each have accumulated will be what we each need to do our part during the storm….part of the whole and a compliment to what others have to offer. One of the strangest things for me to get was heirloom seeds….anyone who knows me will tell you that I do NOT garden and would probably kill everything if I did. I have a black thumb, plus I am petrified of snakes which come as part of the experience. ( My idea of sharecropping has always been for someone else to grow veggies and share with me). So now, I have the seeds to share with others as I still doubt that I could (or would) grow much myself! Maybe a neighborhood garden?
      Maybe God will do something else, but the coins (for example) might have value to another simply as a collectors item who happens to have something that the one with the coins needs.
      Anyway, my two cents….See, we need coins just so we can explain that phrase to future generations!.

      Another Karen

      PS….I also stocked up on wine…..I could never have too much of that!

      Liked by 8 people

      • Patricia says:

        Thank you Another Karen,
        Wine? I’m thinking vodka nips cause they are small, but wine would be my first choice. 🙂

        Liked by 5 people

      • Doug says:

        Nice Karen. You are welcome to bring some of that wine to our storm dinner 😎 One family in our group bought a farm close by (before they knew about the storm) and they are raising organic pigs, chickens and veggies. So maybe they can use your seeds next year. I kinda hope I lose my job so I can go over and help them every day. I just so like the thought of farming (storm or no storm). God bless you!

        Liked by 4 people

        • Another Karen says:

          Hi Doug! Yes to both – absolutely my pleasure to share (and I am most happy to have someone else tend the field, so yeah that you like to farm!!!!!). As to the wine, I’m not sure that it is as much the storm as the Italian in me……better to have more than not enough, and I may be entertaining big time with many guests during the storm!

          Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            A ha Karen! So the storm is an excuse to break out the wine. The fellowship and company make all the difference. I can see us getting much closer as a community during the storm. It will be nice to share wine during those times. Wait until the rescue…..

            Liked by 3 people

      • Another Karen, the wine may come in handy for barter. You know, it isn’t difficult to make wine from scratch. Maybe a wine-making kit would be the cherry on top of your finished prep ( she says as she takes a sip from her after dinner glass of red wine ).

        Liked by 2 people

    • darknite says:

      “After a while, even gold can lose its luster, but there is no luxury in war quite like toilet paper. Its surplus value is greater than gold’s.”
      http://www.thesurvivalistblog.net/survivor-war-sarajevo/

      Liked by 8 people

      • Patricia says:

        darknite,
        first thing stored. still thinking wine vs vodka nips, though. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

      • jwjohn says:

        Darknite – your quote although correct is a bit misleading. First of all, the quote is taken from a list of survivalist tools provided by Bix Weir – Road to Roota, Bix lives in Mexico to escape the USA problems, Bix is very knowledgeable and is a known Gold/Silver bug as part of a survivalist strategy. Second of all yes toilet paper is better than gold and yes food is better gold for a period of time, however those times don’t last forever. I proceed with 2 examples – if you survived the US Civil War and had a $1 paper dollar and a $1 gold coin, which is worth more? To this day paper civil war dollars are used as wall coverings and toilet paper while the gold coin is still worth its value and may even be worth a small fortune, #2 I have paper money from the old Yugoslavia of which Sarajevo belonged to and you know what its worth – toilet paper. In fact my Canadian paper (plastic)money of today if I bring it across the border into the US is virtually worthless and the deeper I go into the US the more puzzled looks you get – to them it is worth less than toilet paper (plastic). Things may get dark and things may fall apart but things will get up and running again, gold and silver have been there as long as history is recorded there is no reason to think otherwise.

        Liked by 1 person

      • JudyM says:

        You can never have too much toilet paper. 🙂

        Liked by 5 people

      • mdasteel says:

        We used to use old phone books or newspaper in the outhouse.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Linda says:

        Hahahahaha…i sure do love all you tnrs people…you sure do give me a lot of laughs 😇😂

        Liked by 3 people

    • Daniel O'Connor says:

      Well said, Patricia. Everything will indeed be changing so radically that preparations now made out of the motive of fear will doubtless prove in vain. Thankfully we have the assurance of Our Lord that, of our treasures stored up in heaven, by way of our works of mercy, “…moths and vermin do not destroy, and thieves do not break in and steal.” And by extension I believe we can safely assume that superinflation will not harm such treasures either 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

      • Patricia says:

        darknite,
        first thing stored. still thinking wine vs vodka nips, though. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

        • JudyM says:

          I almost feel like I am going to confession.

          Bless me Father for I have prepped. I have 6 bags of Starbucks French Roast Coffee, 40 rolls of toilet paper, and a fishing rod. I bought a fishing rod, even though I have never been fishing, because one of Charlie’s columns said if you can fish you can eat, or something like that.

          I am sorry for these preps and all of the preps of the past 4 months. God Bless you Father.

          Oh and one more thing, after reading some recent blog posts, I may have to put up some wine and perhaps some scotch. I will do extra penance for that, I promise.

          Liked by 13 people

      • Patricia says:

        Daniel,
        Thank you. We shall see. 🙂

        Like

      • SteveBC says:

        Daniel, you say, “preparations now made out of the motive of fear will doubtless prove in vain.” I gently but firmly disagree.

        First, God can certainly allow a person to find rest by covering a fear with earthly action. The particular prep may turn out to be useless in the Storm, but the letting go of the fear is often of great value in itself.

        Second, I see no reason why someone driven to cover a fear cannot have God turn that action into something worthwhile. Charlie has said that we are to take the next right step as we see it, and that if we step wrong, God will somehow make it right. A prep done from fear may fall within that ambit.

        Personally, I think God has allowed my mother and me to do some preps because they will be helpful and some other preps because they assuage our current fears and help us calm down and open up to others and to what is coming. They may *all* turn out to be useless. They may *all* turn out to be useful. Neither you nor I can know for sure until well after the Rescue.

        Where I think people can go wrong is by carrying any particular prep past the point where God says “Stop” out of unremitting fear or as Charlie says, presumption, etc.

        Therefore, I disagree that any prep done out of fear will “doubtless” be in vain.

        Liked by 7 people

        • Doug says:

          Steve, I think that is spoken with lots of wisdom.

          Liked by 2 people

        • Another Karen says:

          Thank you for that, Steve. I find your thoughts very comforting and I agree with you.

          Liked by 4 people

        • deereverywhere says:

          Steve, that is how I see preparing, as something to focus on to keep you brain operating similar to Kipling’s first line of “If” (if you can keep your head about you when all about you are losing theirs and blaming it on you.) I see potential in so many things. The used dryer sheets, they are nothing but interfacing used in constructing clothes to add stability and strength, not that I am any good at constructing clothing but the potential of this simple used dryer sheet, to me, are endless. It can be cut, tied, braided to make rope. I could be turned into yarn by a cutting method and crochet, knitted, woven into a fabric for a blanket or rag rug. It could be used as an initial strainer for water from the pond. It could be used as a bandage to cover a wound. It could be used as a wash cloth, writing paper, tea bag, holding bag, fire starter, insulation, turned into a doll or a stuffed toy for a child that needs distraction. I would not use it as a white flag of surrender because I have no intention of that. I could use it right now as a dryer sheet again by soaking it in white vinegar and putting it back in to dry again. This is what ‘prepping’ is, figuring out ways to give yourself a plan of action, a means of bettering your situation. What do I have and how can it be used. Don’t even start me on cans…..I see so much potential in stuff that gets discarded every day, but you cannot keep everything, or your spouse will freak out more than usual. That’s why Elijah was sent to a widow and orphan on the edge of starvation, to show His providence. Trust in God it’s all we have. I only use the dryer sheet as an example because I just picked it up off the floor. I just finished folding clothes. Is my husband looking? Is it safe to add it to my secret stash of used dryer sheets or do I have to put it in the trash.?

          Liked by 7 people

          • Kris R. says:

            Dear Deer, I loved your comment. I understood perfectly and could relate totally. By the way, I use old dryer sheets to wipe the dust bunnies from my floors. And cans can be made into little camping stoves. Check it out online. I grew up in a family where everything old became something new. It’s a habit I can’t quite shake.

            Liked by 6 people

          • deereverywhere says:

            Yes, Kris, aluminium foil, rubber bands, straws, hand me down clothes, paper, bags, bread bags grocery bags plastic bags before the world of zip lock bags etc. Were all reused until they wore out. We had only one pair of scissors and they had better be in the second drawer or there would be an inquisition as to who used them and why they weren’t put back in the proper place.

            Liked by 7 people

          • SteveBC says:

            Deereverywhere, please don’t use those cloths if they will touch the skin, nor to filter water. They are saturated with hundreds of chemicals after use. Environmentally very dirty. Put it in the trash. 🙂

            Liked by 4 people

          • Snowy Owl says:

            Deer, did you dryer sheets also deter mice? 🐹They hate them. When we have one of the cars sitting around and not being used, we put dryer sheets on the seats, floors and trunk..no mice. Of course, I could toss one of the cats in there for an hour too… anyway I was thinking about trying them out in my shed… but then the cats would not have any fun at all! 🙀

            Liked by 4 people

          • deereverywhere says:

            Oh boy, I am going to see if they make a bathroom sized dryer sheet. Those little buggers like the bathroom. Sticky traps worked for awhil but the last think I caught on a sticky trap was a giant dog (and my slipper) I am going to give that a try.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Snowy Owl says:

            Well Deer, if that doesn’t work, I certainly have some extra cats 🐱 🐱 🐱 I could send you, how many do you want? 😉😄 (lol) 🐱

            Liked by 2 people

          • deereverywhere says:

            Funny, I think zero, followed by a bunch of zeros. Three is too many all they do is irritate, whine and complain, while they demand attention and service. I’m good. No more ever. I wonder what it would be like to leave the house without having dog and cat hair on one’s clothes? Will I ever find this out?

            Liked by 2 people

          • Snowy Owl says:

            Hahaha, Deer, I just had to poke at you! Such adorably cute fluffy hairy smelly annoying expensive little nightmares 🐯 heeeeeeeere kitty kitty. 😉

            Liked by 3 people

          • Sue Rineer says:

            Dryer sheets? We roll up a piece of foil and put in the dryer. One ball lasts many weeks and does a great job of preventing static and cloths come out soft. Now what am I gonna do??

            Liked by 2 people

          • deereverywhere says:

            I will have to try that because the reason I use them is static. I use white vinegar in place of fabric softener in the washer because it works better and sets the color on cloths. You can use dryer lint to make fire starters?

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            The electrical engineer in me says that makes sense. Cool!

            Liked by 2 people

        • Daniel O'Connor says:

          Fear does not tell us what the next right step is. Trust, Faith, Hope, Love… even Prudence, yes. Fear, never. Sure, a broken clock is right twice a day… but it’s still a broken clock.

          Liked by 2 people

          • SteveBC says:

            You are missing my point, Daniel. No matter what we do or why, God can and does make good come of it. No father would leave a child in fear if something harmless or even ridiculous can assuage that fear. Did you not have a security item when you were a small child? I did, and my parents did not take it away and insist I couldn’t have it because I needed to handle my fear directly. No father would judge a fearful child as committing wrong acts that are worthless and make all results of those acts arbitrarily disappear to teach the child a lesson. He *might* but doesn’t have to and probably often doesn’t.

            I didn’t say we are doing proper prep if we are fearful. I said God would make even fear-driven preps turn out useful – to someone – should He so wish to do. One possible benefit of that prep could be to assuage the prepper’s own fear. I would be unsurprised if God is indulgent – for a while – if one of us does something out of fear in order to assuage that fear, but I also suspect that when He says, “Enough,” then we do need to stop assuaging that fear, choose trust, and go on to something else.

            Liked by 5 people

          • Mick says:

            Daniel, I see the point that you are trying to make; but I think it does overstate your case just a wee bit. For instance, when one in mortal sin goes to Confession and confesses his sins because of a fear of going to hell otherwise, he has in fact taken the next right step out of a motive of fear. Certainly, perfect contrition (sorrow for sin because it offends the all-good God who is deserving of all of our love) would be better; but imperfect contrition (sorrow for sin because of the fear of the loss of heaven and the pains of hell) is good enough to get even mortal sins absolved through the Sacrament.

            Fear can be a great motivator. Suppose my husband is out of town and an unjust aggressor breaks into my home and threatens harm to my children. Although I have my concealed-carry permit and own more than one firearm, I hate the idea of having to pull the trigger and take down a living creature. But you can bet that my fear of my kids’ being harmed would motivate me to take the next right step of blowing away the perp, if that is what it would take to neutralize the threat to my kids.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Daniel O'Connor says:

            Good points again, Mick. But also again, I am differentiating Fear of God with fear of worldly pain (when I condemn acting out of fear, I am condemning the latter), and also, I am certainly not condemning acting out of prudence *even if* fear exists along with it. All I’m calling out here is the notion that it is okay for an adult to act specifically *and only* out of worldly fear, under the pretense that “security blankets” are okay. I really don’t think that’s trusting God. It reminds me of a jealous and untrustful spouse who, though married to someone perfectly good and trustworthy, insists on always sneaking onto her husbands computer at night to read all of his emails. It may be her “security blanket,” as it helps her believe that no adultery is happening… but it is an offense against her good husband, and if he were to find out about this it would no doubt (rightly) hurt him greatly.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Daniel O'Connor says:

            God brings good out of everything, Steve. However we should not, looking forward, justify acting imperfectly on these grounds. Paul dealt well with that notion in Romans 6.

            *If* you know full well you are merely doing something out of fear — not out of prudence — then abandon it you ought; whether or not you deem it a “security blanket.” What is licit for a child is not necessarily licit for an adult (1 Corinthians 13:11). Quite the contrary, an adult who carries a security blanket of any sort is in need of fraternal correction, not encouragement.

            I’m not saying that yours or anyone’s prep is merely out of fear. I’m just saying that IF one recognizes it is, then one should cease.

            God’s will is not followed by acting out of pure fear.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Daniel O'Connor says:

            Good point, Mick. Imperfect contrition (i.e. fear-based) is indeed sufficient for absolution.

            Fear can be a great motivator, but it is usually paired with prudence, and one should at least *try* to act out of the prudence involved, not the fear involved. As a mere physical passion, “fear” is morally indifferent. It is simply what gives one’s legs the extra energy they need to outrun the enemy pursuing him, for example.

            But when we are talking about actual *willed* fear (not of God, nor of Hell, but of worldly pain), then we are talking about something that is not ever the correct course of action. If we realize that anything we are doing is entirely a consequence of nothing but willed fear (without any legitimate prudence being paired with it), then we really need to stop. That is the very definition of not trusting God; “security blanket” or not.

            Like

        • Mack says:

          I think you are right, Steve. God knows we all have fears and often can’t simply will them away. So we do what God calls us to regardless of the fears we experience. In fact that is the road to great holiness, to feel the fear (about doing something good) and to do it anyway.

          Liked by 8 people

          • Daniel O'Connor says:

            Very true; we all feel fear. My point is merely that we should not justify acting FROM the fear, but rather, we should strive to do what is good *despite* the feeling of fear.

            Liked by 5 people

        • Prepping does keep my mind off of my troubles, or it did… Funny thing is, my horrible year of loss ( of which I have spoken in previous posts) completely wiped out my preps. It wiped out everything I own. I am currently homeless ( prayers would be appreciated) and have been for months. God’s way of saying preps aren’t going to help; I can make them all vanish in an instant. It was a most needed lesson for me. I had it all figured out. I had a plan. I was taking care of myself, unlike those poor slobs who weren’t prepping. Yeah. Right. To me it was clearly, CLEARLY, a p r e f I g u r a t I o n of the coming storm. I have just lived through what thousands or tens of thousands or millions of people are going to live through. I know what it feels like, what kind of shock and grief they will feel. I could say “God, why did you do this to me? ” or I could say “Thank you, God, for showing me how silly I was being. How can I help those who will soon be in the same boat?” The former is just wallowing in self-pity. The latter is productive. Folks, if it happens to you (and it will to some of you) believe me, God isn’t abandoning you. He is doing a great and mysterious work in your soul. You will look back on it and marvel at his goodness toward you. That’s not to say you won’t cry and grieve; you will. It will hurt like heck. But so does hydrogen peroxide in an infected wound. Just trust him and love your neighbor. Having said all this, if I get approved for the house I’m trying to rent I will begin my preps all over again. But this time not for me. I am looking forward to prepping for anyone God chooses to send to me for help. As for me, what’s to worry? I have lost virtually everything dear and useful to me…and God took care of me. He did it once. I’m pretty sure he can do it again.

          Liked by 5 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Praying for you, Flowers. You know, sometime in the midst of my pilgrimage, it occurred to me that at some point I might be called to comfort people who had been dislocated and made homeless. I thought how much more consoling it will be for them that I reassure them not from a life of ease, but that I actually knew something about what they were living, having chosen it for a time before it was imposed on them. And I thought again how wondrous God is in all His ways.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Mick says:

            Praying for you, Singingflowers. Please let us know if you get the house. 🙂

            Liked by 4 people

          • Barb129 says:

            Thank you for sharing this singingflowers. I am praying for you and please keep us updated.

            Liked by 3 people

          • SteveBC says:

            SingingFlowers, you are an inspiration to us all. May all in your life come back together now in the best possible way. 🙂

            Liked by 4 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            Singingflowers, thank you for your witness and yes, He will see you through it until the end if you just keep the faith dear one! ❤

            Liked by 3 people

          • Charlie, I’ve always thought that this is what your pilgrimage was for. You have no idea how much your stories about that pilgrimage helped me stay calm throughout my ordeal. You just seemed so at peace about all the hardships. I figured that if you could keep your peace of mind and sense of humor so could I. I loved the old Mother Earth News magazines. They had a regular feature called “Report From Them That’s Doin'” (as opposed to articles written by professional writers who just write about what others are doing). I always thought of you as “them that’s doin'”. When you say to us “You can do it” I believe you because you did it.

            Liked by 3 people

          • charliej373 says:

            Ha…sounds like a cool column. Makes me wish I had paid a little more attention to Mother Earth News.

            You did discover that fear of hardship is much tougher than actual hardship.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Beckita says:

            Joining in prayer for you, SF. Thank you so much for sharing HOPE.

            Liked by 1 person

          • marie late to the table says:

            You’re on my beads, SF.
            God bless you

            Liked by 2 people

      • Yes, Daniel, it’s a solid observation that fear shouldn’t be the motivation for anything. That’s why I appreciate yet another sound piece here from Charlie on Trust. I suppose that discussion wouldn’t be complete without considering the pitfalls of hubris and presumption.. how we can positively consider the various perspectives for ourselves, identify the creep in our lives, and root it out.

        I also understand what you mean by “everything will indeed be changing…,” certainly to an extent that some folks will find shocking. I also take it that you’re not saying “everything” to the extent that the need to work and such will be suspended. Here, we’ll always be faced with getting our food by the sweat of our brow, even if that work entirely consists of trusting sometimes. In short, I give you the benefit of a doubt without over-analyzing… made all the easier because you always offer some good nuggets for pondering.

        I know of several places up in the mountains where the honey bees bees build their hives every year. Is it hubris and presumption to even consider it? Well, I don’t really over- analyze it because that sort of experience gives me nothing but peace (oh, how the adversary likes to mess that up). I’ve never gone out there looking for provisions. In fact, I never even made that connection over the decades until the past couple of years. I think that it just happened to be a period of preparation that I never considered as such, until God (sometimes via Charlie and others) connected the dots. I also suspect that is the case in other people’s lives… that there’s peaceful pursuits, talents… hobbies that just aren’t being considered as valuable. Still, there are still so many folks fretting over what to do.

        Some of those hives are easy to get to. To reach others, you have to climb up a mountain, then drop down a stretch of cliff face. The Don Bosco Adventure Club (a bunch of kids) has done it, though I realize not every person could do it. Again, is there hubris and presumption there? Well, one could consider that… or simply find some joy and peace in the fact that there are folks around who have something to contribute, even if it’s just something small like a honeycomb… of course relying on all help from God.

        What should happen if some of the Club was faced with helping to sustain a much larger group with those limited honeycombs? Well, they would have to get down to the real hard work of trust then, wouldn’t they?!

        Hm. It always seems to come full circle back to Trust.

        Jesus, I trust in You.

        MP

        Liked by 9 people

        • Snowy Owl says:

          I don’t know what God will do with you, MP, but you sure got a wonderful gift from Him!

          Liked by 6 people

          • I don’t know either, Snowy. I find that each moment packs plenty, so I don’t think about it much (listening and discerning can be a real challenge too).

            I was just thinking about sharing a hopeful experience I had this weekend and asked Jesus if I should share it. I was sitting quietly out back for a bit and had this thought: if the answer is “no”, would that stop me? Well, I chuckled a bit at that… at my silly sense of humor… then I sat there for another hour in silence thinking about that thing I wanted to share. I finally got up to go into the house but had to pause for a moment because I couldn’t help but think, “wait…. were You serious about that or just having a chuckle?”

            Now I’m just going to finish the honey-do list that I started at sunrise, but haven’t finished yet.

            Liked by 4 people

          • Snowy Owl says:

            Ooh yes, the honey-do list must come first!
            I just love how you see things. It is so fresh and brings me, and I know many others here, joy and contentment! Nature is a such great gift given to us! How wonderful God and His creation is!
            I have often thought of St. Francis and his wonderful little band of brothers while reading what you share with us.🌵

            Liked by 3 people

  10. KimS1111 says:

    Part of my morning routine is to listen to the daily readings on Laudate with a mediation from Father Al Lauer. The morning after Charlies blog post, Father Al was talking about doing good works. It struck me how much what Fr Al said matched up with Charlies last paragraph, “So if the Lord puts something grand in earthly terms right in front of you, do it. If He sets only little things in front of you, do them faithfully. When you are weary, rest. And know that, no matter how things look, you do not know whose offering is the grandest from the perspective of eternity.”

    From Fr Al’s meditation : “God has placed and planned good works in our lives and we are to do them. God has designated these works for us. We are to do the works God has designated for us, don’t do someone elses work. Pray for those God as designated us to pray for. You will know the ones God wants you to pray for.
    God has chosen to do these works through us and we better do them!”

    Charlie talks about taking The Next Right Step. Well God has put it there for you and we better make sure we do it.

    Here is a link to his mediation if you would like to listen to it in full:
    http://www.presentationministries.com/player/playerPopup.asp?mp3ID=4318&player=wmpqtime&incAC=False

    Liked by 6 people

    • Barb129 says:

      Thank you for sharing this Kim! Mark and I have been active members of Presentation Ministries for many years. Fr. Al Lauer was a faith-filled priest on fire with the Holy Spirit and many times when I read his daily devotion, One Bread, One Body, I think that his teachings were prophetic and timeless. =)

      Like

  11. Momma of Flowers says:

    Denise I just LOVED your post. I too have experience significant financial problems over the last seven years, and yet in a spiritual sense it has been the best thing that every happened to me. It rekindled my faith big time and my husband converted during those years.
    I think too that in “preparation” God is bringing people into our lives for very specific purposes. I am a total city gal, I love all the “city activities” theater, museums etc. and yet I met and fell in love with a “country guy” who is an expert shot and skilled hunter. Even more improbably we met when I was 38 and he 40. Yet God in his glorious grace gave us two beautiful daughters.
    While I haven’t physically prepped I’d like to think our little family is trying to spiritually prep. I look each day for the next right step and don’t ya know it usually shows right up…often with a wink of humor from the good and gracious God. Blessing to you all,

    Momma of Flowers

    Liked by 9 people

  12. Brett Urban says:

    I can relate to what Charlie is saying. About 4 years ago my wife and I started prepping food. We bought several drums of wheat berries for when the SHTF. It didn’t take long before I started having blood sugar issues and my wife became gluten intolerant. God can undo any plan where you rely on yourself.

    Liked by 11 people

  13. Patty says:

    Very nice article. Today I met a woman at the grocery store. People were rushing about and very stressed. This is the God part: we stood next to each other (out of the way of the onslaught of crazy cart drivers) and had a great conversation about letting people pass by how they want. We were absolutely hidden in the midst of chaos. Peace and Joy in a completely protected space – protected by God Himself. We both sensed it. Then, after a bit, we blessed each other and went our ways. I believe this is how I want to walk during these times – slowly, with a big prayer in my heart.

    Liked by 13 people

    • Doug says:

      Now that is so cool Patty!

      Liked by 3 people

    • deereverywhere says:

      Patty, I really liked that story, especially the blessing part. When I am standing in line at the dreaded Wal-Mart , envious of Jlynn cause she has a sit down walker because of her poor foot, wondering who the idiot is that put 100 checkout registrars in when only three are opened, and their is a fussy child or adult I try to engage them in a lighthearted conversation and when I finally get to the checkout person I try to say kind words to them because they are abused for the most part . I offer the pain and burning of waiting to the holy souls. When I think of the holy souls I automatically switch out of my time and into God’s time. That was wonderful, and picked you up and lifted your spirit. That is what is needed today. You lifted the other lady’s spirit.

      Liked by 7 people

  14. Kris R. says:

    Life has been busy…just now catching up with a late comment. I’ll try not to get too wordy. Fifteen years ago my hubby and I moved back to rural SD after raising our kids in the MN Twin Cities. We bought an acre on a lake, built a house, planted 10 different fruit trees/shrubs. We built a bunk house overlooking the water. I gardened, canned, made cheese from raw milk and homemade soap. The neighbors had chickens. I envisioned all my adult kids with their children gathering here during the storm. A few weeks ago my husband announced we are moving back to the Cities to be closer to our kids and to help out while our son-in-law goes through cancer treatment. Noooo! Not now. There’s no time. Well loose everything. The city!? Really!? No fruit trees, garden, farm milk or egg source. This home was blessed and dedicated to our Lord. We could all survive here. My spiritual director said, “let go of the leash”, so I did. We are busy trying to “un-stock” all I stocked.
    I certainly never saw THIS coming. I realized I was acting sufficient onto myself. Now I will have only what God in His mercy will give.
    To the rescue…

    Liked by 12 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      Kris, I will keep your family and especially your son-in-law in my prayers as you take the next right step for the here and now. May you all be abundantly blessed.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Beckita says:

      Prayers for you and your family, Kris, as you make the transition.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Nancy says:

      Kris, you are probably also being called to be a resource person (teacher) for all those of us in the cities who will need the information you have received from God. You are His messenger of the “good news” of hope and trust.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Debra says:

      Kris R, I have to respond to you because the EXACT OPPOSITE has happened to us. Eight years ago we were living a wonderful life in Colorado with a beautiful home, horses, kids through college already, ski condo in the mountains, etc., etc. when God comes calling with only one sentence: “Prepare for what is to come.” Huh? I, of course, ignored it for a few years. But it became insistent. Over and over again. “Prepare for what is to come.” Very clear. So…… I ran out and bought tons of prepper supplies, put them away and continued with my very happy life. That was not what God meant.

      This is where I am now 8 years later. I was to learn the “old” ways. Gardening, canning, spinning wool, crafts and woodworking, etc. Chickens, pond and water maintenance, and many other things associated with self-sufficient living. Two years ago we moved here to a homestead in a different state, because I tell you…when God gets serious, He closes doors. He closed every door in Colorado as I ignored Him. Every one. He, of course, in His goodness opened the new doors we needed to go through – if we chose to TRULY follow His will and not our own.

      This is not for everyone. I would never discourage anyone from prepping supplies. If you are called to do so by God, then by all means do so. I thought we might be called to be some sort of “refuge” for others during or after The Storm. Not quite. I think we will be some sort of “way station” to help others. Not only in the physical sense, but the spiritual as well, sharing the Gospel (as well as food and supplies) with others who are in need. To bring others to Christ.

      Always pray on every matter God brings before you. It may save you wasted time! We try everyday to do the will of God in all things. We are trying to be faithful to what He has called us to do. Right now we live a very simple, (and may I add debt-free) life here in the Heartland of America. I thank God every single day He has brought us to this life. Is it hard? Yes! Has it been worth it? Yes!

      Oh, one more thing…when God closes doors on you….let go of the handle.

      Blessings, Debra

      Liked by 8 people

      • Kris R. says:

        Funny, we have moved back and forth several times and with each move I think it is the worst possible timing. Yet each move proves to be part of God’s perfect plan. My 92 year old father will come along and live with us. SD has been his home for about 90 of those years. When I asked him how he felt about it he said, ” the Lord’s feet and mine are one”.
        Wow. Now that is surrender.

        Liked by 8 people

      • Simone says:

        Jeepers, Debra, I can SO relate to this. God kicked us (my family) out of my beloved States to live in exhile here in Canada (I am Canadian, but identify as Yankee ;-)) . I have been scratching and clawing trying to get back there. Ain’t happening. I have to resign myself, but it isn’t easy. I am slowly getting to that point of joyful resignation instead of grumpily going about God’s business. 😉
        Simone

        Liked by 4 people

    • Kris R. you are describing my dream life. I know how much it hurts to give it up. But you will find that God will miraculously take care of you.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Prayers for you!

      We left the country to move to town. I hear you. I had chickens and land… But this is where God cornered me ( I came kicking and screaming) but you know what? I love my neighbors. I’m here to help them. I’ve a widow on one side and a devout Catholic couple on the other side. My poor widow… We adore her. So I believe God will do the same for you. He needs you somewhere and He will get you there even if you have a tantrum on the way. 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

      • Kris R. says:

        I realize I must sound selfish in not wanting to move closer to my kids. That is not the issue. I wanted to gather my little chicks under my wing like a mother hen. That is the perfect life I envisioned… All of us here in the beautiful haven God gave us. But obedience is everything and thanks be to God, that is one of the few lessons I have actually learned. Reading the preceding comments has helped greatly. Thank you all.

        Liked by 5 people

        • charliej373 says:

          Not at all, Kris. My son and I talked long ago about his desire to settle in Colorado. As much as he and I both love the idea…he is in a position to be a profound sign of hope during trying times right where he is…several thousand miles from me. Each of us is called to what we are called. If we live that well, our family bonds will become stronger, even when there is great distance between us.

          Liked by 5 people

  15. starxedee says:

    An excellent piece Charlie. I feel like my spiritual tank was running on empty and this helped to fill it up a bit. Thank you and thank God for your words of encouragement and wisdom. God bless you!

    Liked by 5 people

  16. Julie from PA says:

    Every spring there is this weed that descends on my yard like a shroud. It covers everything and is totally miserable to clean up. It’s Sticky Willy! (Galium aparine) I have to pull it off all my flowers and shrubs. When I try to throw it into the trash bag it sticks to my gloves and it leaves a billion tiny little green pickers all over my clothes that I have to pull of one by one. I asked God, why did you make this stuff?! So, I googled it. It turns out that Sticky Willy can be eaten, it can be used as a medicinal for a variety of ailments, it can be roasted and used for coffee, it can be made into a tea, geese love the stuff, and the ancients used it to stuff their mattresses with it. Those are just some of the things it’s good for. I don’t see any of this stuff in my neighbors yards, I’m not a survivor, I don’t plant vegetables. It seems the Lord has blessed me with this manna, plague that it is. So, don’t worry, just trust in God. Frustrations can actually be blessings in disguise.

    Liked by 14 people

    • Jill Marie says:

      Hey Julie from PA! You answered something I was wondering about. Found that weed for the first time growing in my flower bed this year. Not recognizing it as something I planted, I promptly pulled it out before it took over – made the mistake of doing so without gloves. My first thought, “What the heck is this prickly velcro stuff and how did it get here?” Just looked up your reference. Yep, that’s it. Now I know! Thanks for sharing 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

    • Sandy says:

      Funny Julie, I googled my garden nemesis this weekend as well. We have a massive cottonwood tree that gave birth to two others (on the other side of the fence of course!) that now shade my vegetable garden. Every year, turning the soil means battling and ripping cotton wood roots that are literally everywhere! Every year, I also have to clean away the bug like looking buds that it drops into the garden. Well, it turns out that those buds can be made into an oil that will both sooth sore muscles, arthritis and even sun burn. Who knew? Well, I battled the roots and planted my garden about a month ago. But then last week the hail storm took out everything. Looking at the stems that are all that is left of my tomatoes, I’m thinking that my next right step is perhaps meant to sooth the weary body rather than feeding the hungry tummy 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

  17. Peter says:

    Dear Charlie,
    I have never posted before but have been following your site for about 8 months. I will try to be brief. Let me first say that I don’t like to post things because I do not like attention. For the last 12 years God has done great things to me through His mother. I go to daily mass and adoration, I meditate and have been given beautiful insight into many areas of life.
    I see a lot of people who talk about prepping for what’s coming, I have felt that something is coming for about 1.5 years now, I truely believe that the only real prepping we can do is to grow humbly and lovingly closer to God. I am the father of 6 children and our family has been through one tragedy after another. I have found that through each one it is only prayer and faith in God that had sustained us. All the other things we did fell apart, it was always an unexpected miracle that helped us.
    Our world needs a miracle and if this storm does what you say it will, then it is God’s mercy that will allow it. Anything that will draw even one soul to God, no matter how seemingly tragic, is Gods mercy and goodness. I desire nothing from this world, except that each day I may glorify God who has loved me so very much. I pray that every heart on earth will become a furnace of love for Him! Only then will we truely be able to love and help one another.

    Liked by 17 people

  18. mbrandon8026 says:

    Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ

    Prepping, as it were, or more clearly Taking the Next Right Step, seems to be somewhat unique for each of us. But then why not? Our God is very big, and very good. If we all do the same thing, that would be weird.

    For My Dear Wife and me, we have taken different steps. For 9 years we left our home in Southern Ontario and went to our small metal mansion in a RV resort in Tucson Arizona. Because of perceptions of what we were being called to do, we sold our park model trailer this winter, and braved the cold northern clime for the first time in recent memory. This reduced our personal footprint, but opened us up to other things.

    We have been more present to our family. They are all over North America, but we are stabilized in one place, and one of our six kids even moved back home from the west coast, so two are nearby and one is just two hours down the road. 3 to go. The kids who are in town look forward to our weekly dinners, and are growing closer to each other and to us, and more importantly are looking towards returning to the Faith.

    Because we were gone for half the year, we did not get involved with our local parish, but this winter we told our pastor we were available. He engaged me with the Life in the Spirit programme which I knew from past days, and tomorrow a good group of 20-75 year olds will be baptized in the Spirit. The blessings to our parish are already evident, but we ain’t seen nothing yet.

    Recently, at the Vigil of Pentecost, Father Remark processed the Eucharist through the Church stopping at each individual, and the effects of this up close and personal encounter with Jesus were profound. Tomorrow, before we pray with participants for the Baptism of the Holy Spirit, he will process Jesus again. Once again, Jesus precedes the Holy Spirit.

    Father asked us all to receive the sacrament of Reconciliation prior to this event, and to see MDW prepare for her appointment with him this morning, and the glow on her face afterwards was a delight.

    So, we are currently storing up spiritual food, and preparing our hearts. We are not immune from doing other more material things, and are playing fervently to be shown and to take the Next Right Step.

    As to hubris, and pride, that was in my confession this morning. Two weeks ago in confession, I told Father that I wanted to be “on the way, not in the way.” Hubris and pride put me in the way, and I hope to grow better in discerning when I am running ahead of the Lord.

    Another part of our preparations has been praying the Litany of Humility. Hubris is not specifically mentioned, but it is very evident that hubris and humility are polar opposites.

    May Our Loving God prepare our hearts in this time of Mercy, so we can be signs of hope in the coming time of Justice.

    God Bless All who come here.

    Michael Brandon

    Liked by 11 people

  19. BD says:

    I encountered quite the storm on my way to 4 o’clock mass earlier. I will no longer use the phrase it rained cats and dogs. I now prefer it rained like Charlie was back in town…

    Liked by 5 people

  20. LS says:

    Hi Charlie,
    I just came across Tin Tin’s story and thought of you all here and didn’t know if you had seen this: http://decan.dk/tintin/ the squirrel also has his own instagram page: https://www.instagram.com/tintin_the_squirrel/
    LS

    Liked by 3 people

  21. MarieUrsula says:

    Here’s an example of taking the next right step, doing the little that’s right in front of you. This story is going internationally viral.

    Oregon cowboy lassos bike thief

    Liked by 4 people

  22. Vanessa Joy says:

    True confessions. Prepping has been a part of my journey of late. In fact today I received a copy of my “Sos”survival product invoice I bought one Sunday almost 5 months ago! Strange to say the least. I glanced over my all important preppy items and thought why did I do that? Adrenalin and reacting to the tyranny of the conversation over yet another cup of Denny’s coffee among my hubby and church friends. Indeed, I got sucked into the frenzy of preppy while trying to balance between Noah and his call to build a rather large refuge of sorts and my 5×5 preppy storage sheds stragically placed in my side yard.

    We are indeed being tempted to jump on the band wagon and store up , just in case you might need an extra case or twenty while pondering the question of our time to prep or not to prep. Suddenly, Another surge of andrelian races thru my body while chewing my greens and sipping on my 4th cup of Denny’s coffee and feeling way too important about my task and challenge to be PREPARED. In a matter of a few minutes , I eagerly ordered a few emergency supplies. My Online SOS purchase included a 50 gal water barrel, collapsible wash basin and to keep it feeling ” homey” in the midst of the crisis: “dehydrated oatmeal with strawberries”! I won’t mention the other 20 items I bought that morning with a sense of urgency of a pending EmP attack happening the following day! Indeed our minds are our biggest foes as the Psalmist laments.

    God please I beg you deliver me from my enemies within and let me be still and know you are God and I am not. Unplug my deaf ears so I might hear your tender still small voice within.

    BTW, despite all my preparing, yet thankfully willing to give it all away as needed, as you may have heard, southern Ca had a rather large earthquake in the wee hours of the morning. I am a light sleeper. I always wake up at the sound of a snore, sudden rain or wind outside. Ironically, I slept soundly through the 5. 4 southern Ca shaker the other morning that woke even my hubby up. The humor of God is new every morning and indeed His ways are not my ways.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Snowy Owl says:

      Funny, Vanessa! That made me giggle ✴😊😃! I got as far as one bag of pinto beans, 2 bags of rice…and a sack of wheat berries- all which will end being fed to my chickens when I run out of food for them (so I can eat eggs)..oh well, at least they’ll have a little food 🐣🐥🐤🐔 We’ve already eaten anything I though I was going to save.I tried! 🌷

      Liked by 4 people

  23. Julia says:

    Funny how this article turned to prepping.
    Many of us think of a crisis that may come, while there are a lot of people in our communities already in crisis through unemployment or poor income. So I try to put some items in the collection boxes we find in our shops at least here in the UK when I go shopping. I call that my contribution to Saint Anthony’s bread for the poor. And I have also put some emergency supply aside, just in case.

    My earliest memories are before electricity was available in homes. And there were no bathrooms or toilets. Water had to be brought from the nearest well. We survived.

    Someone suggested we should have a non electric, non battery clock….in case
    and make sure we have a phone that does not rely on power. The old fashioned type.
    and a battery operated radio with spare batteries, to have access to news.

    I remember reading in one of Charlie’s articles it would be a good idea to have a hunting type knife. I suppose you could use it to kill pigeons and rats (yuck). And I think an axe, in case we had to chop up firewood.

    I think loo rolls toothpaste and soap sound good. But did you know in the old days people used to use soap to clean their teeth. They would put it on a face cloth and clean their teeth that way. We are all so spoiled these days.
    Nough said on that. God protect and preserve us for eternity. Trust, do, love.

    Liked by 6 people

  24. Peter Kreeft’s book ‘Making Choices’. Get it and read it. I’m only on page 7 and it completely describes how to handle these time. Just like Charlie says.
    To paraphrase his work from page 7: bad times are for good people and good people are for bad times. All saints lived in the middle of crises- if not global then personal.
    Augustine lived through both times and wrote Confessions and The city Of God. The City of God was written to show that even when civilizations fall and tomorrow morning is the Dark Ages- even when we are to look and work and hope and be joyful, because we are citizens not of the dying world but of the living world by of the City of God. While we live in the dying City of the World, we must live by the principles of the imperishable City of God. ” page 7- Making Choices, Peter Kreeft. Also if there is a Cursillio center near you- pray about it and join the 3 day retreat. It’s great prep work to prepare for what to come. It changed my life and strengthened my trust and healed me. Just did it last weekend. THe book was recommended to me from there. God bless!!

    Liked by 5 people

  25. Mack says:

    With the Orlando news the Storm is getting closer to home. Truly it was a terrible thing, also because the people killed may have been in that club for sinful purposes. I pray they had the grace to repent at that last moment. How important it is now more than ever to always be in the state of grace, avoid sin, and go often to confession. May God have mercy on us all.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Snowy Owl says:

      Mack, we could all pray a Divine Mercy for them. I will tonight. Jesus made some wonderful promises for those who die in bad state- that even the worst sinners would be given Mercy with this prayer!

      Liked by 3 people

    • Beckita says:

      Amen, Mack. I also have this interal tug to pray more assiduously for the millions who will lose their lives as the Storm’s events continue to unfold. Here’s where Our Lady of Fatima’s exhortation continues to ring a bell calling for sacrifices and prayer: “Sacrifice for sinners and repeat many times, especially when you make a sacrifice: O my Jesus, this is out of love for you, for the conversion of sinners and in reparation for the sins committed against the Immaculate Heart of Mary!” Always a NRS I do believe.

      Liked by 5 people

    • Doug says:

      I’m with you Mack. Lord have mercy on us all!

      Liked by 2 people

  26. dianebelvs says:

    Praying for all those murdered and injured in the Islamic terrorist attack last night in Orlando. Lord have mercy on us all.

    Liked by 8 people

  27. Dorothy says:

    Charlie one of the commentators here mentioned
    A movie on organic wood chip gardening
    ” Back to Eden ”
    I watched it and am absolutely fascinated by it !

    Truly everybody should watch it !

    God is teaching is a powerful lesson trough this movie !
    How to garden with little effort and gather big harvest following
    Simple principles !

    Thank you to a person who recommended it !

    Liked by 3 people

  28. Mary Ann says:

    Mack: as soon as I could I prayed
    Chaplet of Divine Mercy after hearing about this tragedy

    Liked by 2 people

  29. Bob says:

    With the Orlando atrocity how confusing and how many issues there are besides the obvious pure evil of the murders. I suppose the radical Muslims will see this as the perfect target and proof that they are attacking unrepentant infidels. With a confused country which is increasingly calling good evil and evil good and in which discussion of the evils of distorted sexuality is increasingly suppressed, how much more can the radicals be confirmed that they are attacking the “great satan”. Clearly our world is in grave need of God’s mercy and the inability to create a good society without reference to God is becoming clearer!. I too pray for all involved as there were many times I dread to think of what would have happened if my time of judgment would have been then!!

    Liked by 2 people

  30. Julie from PA says:

    Hi, Jill Marie and Sandy. Regarding Sticky Willy, I found out too late about the irritating effect it can have on your skin. Wound up with a bad rash on both of my arms because I was too lazy to go back in the house to put on gloves and long sleeves. Some cortisone cream cleared it up in a couple of days. And, I, too, do battle with weed trees. My problem is the Rose of Sharon buds that drop in my yard and grow everywhere!. They hide behind the big weeds and grow too big for me to pull them out before I can see them. I hope they have some redeeming quality because despite their name I call them “evil trees!” That’s sort of ironic – a ‘storm’ wiped out your tomatoes. Hope you were able to salvage something.
    On a more serious note, that devastating tragedy in Orlando is so sad. Fifty people murdered, fifty three injured. That’s one hundred and fifty three families affected, not to mention friends and associates. I prayed for the souls of those murdered and for the injured. I thought of the storm and how it seems to be strengthening. And, even politically, as things get closer, there’s a lot of dismay and confusion among voters. Things are heating up.

    Like

  31. Bob says:

    This from Crisis Magazine on resisting Islam as well as it’s comments on the “sexual revolution” are worth reading:
    http://www.crisismagazine.com/2016/benedict-teach-usccb-muslim-dialogue

    Liked by 1 person

  32. deereverywhere says:

    Hi everyone, today only is” St. Therese of Lisieux a model for our times” by Wyatt North is being offered free on Amazon. Whispersync , their audio book is two dollars.

    https://www.amazon.com/Saint-Therese-Lisieux-Model-Times-ebook/dp/B00U470N24?ie=UTF8&_bbid=1980329&_bbtype=email

    Liked by 1 person

  33. kate says:

    Saw a clip about a guy who is in a competition as “papal ninja warrior” on his shirt. He said during competition he focused on just the next thing and the next thing, and I couldn’t help thinking about “taking the next right step” All the best to all of you papal warriors

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Linda says:

    Waiting for the Cavs to play. ..prayers for a win appreciated😉…but I just read through all these wonderfully funny and insightful posts and feel called to chime in… My husband Michael had a bad fall in Mexico approx a month ago ….when we landed, He fell hard and had terrible concussion and we spent next two days in Mexican hospital. (Note to self and others: you do not want to end up in Mexican hospital for one moment) lol …We found out what happened: i put him on a new diet approx 3 months ago called “Eat fat, get thin” basically its eating less processed foods n more good fats like xtra virgin olive oil, nuts acavodos, fish..etc..etc..etc.. the diet is so healthy it caused his bp to drop significantly …enough to make him pass out. Its called syncopy…. The diet was so healthy it almost killed him! Ha! But something else happened to him. ..before Mexico he wasn’t really believing in storm & would scold me for prepping…now he believes in storm and is Godstorming along with me about ways to prep that I never thought of…e.g. use water from pool to flush toilette and if its winter…use the MILLION plastic grocery store bags we have under our sink to put in toilette to gather & discard. Lol kind of gross but in the event of negative trash removal and no plumbing..could be quite helpful. It takes a man to think up that one..haha! My deduction thus far: None of us know where God wants us to be during the fullness of storm….but God is definitely working miracles… even in our calamities 😊

    Liked by 2 people

    • Linda says:

      I neglected to mention my husband Michael had been on two strong bp meds..both pills have been reduced by half..we are monitoring daily☺

      Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Well, Linda, good luck with the Cavs…but I suspect that God is not the Great Fixer of Sporting Events in the sky 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • Linda says:

        Thanks Charlie.. lol I know it’s probably silly in the scheme of things to pray for such a thing but it sure would be nice for poor Cleveland… lol And Lebron went to St Vincent St. Mary so maybe they have some pull??? lol

        Like

  35. Donette says:

    After the Orlando disaster, I was wondering if it is time for B.O. to abdicate.
    Are we there yet, Charlie?

    Liked by 2 people

  36. Linda says:

    Cavs won..thank you all ahead of time😇

    Liked by 1 person

  37. Katherine says:

    My family and I are off to visit a first class relic of Saint Maximillian Kolbe today. It’s making a tour of the U.S. at the moment, and its not far from me. We’ll be sure to say some prayers for you there, Charlie.

    Liked by 2 people

  38. CrewDog says:

    Some Happy Signs 😉

    David Daleiden vs PP
    http://www.breitbart.com/texas/2016/06/14/charge-pro-life-planned-parenthood-videomaker-dropped/
    … about those awful anti-gay Chic-fil-a people
    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/06/14/chick-fil-a-makes-selfless-gesture-to-supporters-of-orlando-terrorism-victims/

    It’s sad to say …. but I seem to be finding fewer & fewer Happy Signs ;-(

    GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Liked by 5 people

  39. Boy, Charlie. Just heard the President’s very unpresidential speech. The man is a pure politician and idealogue, not a leader. He gave nothing but straw man arguments and sounded like a spoiled child — talk about thin skin! How sad to watch him dig in his heels, doubling down on his politics during this latest crisis rather than lifting up our nation. I can’t imagine that the victims of this attack were heartened by his words. Also, his bias toward Islam is so apparent it’s embarrassing. Obviously he’s feeling the pressure from the expanding global terror threat which he has failed to stop (and in some cases fostered). So in his frustration he once again lectures the American people with a wagging, accusing finger and attacks those on “the other side of the aisle”, of course. This man is well on his way to becoming the worst U.S. President in history.

    That speech showed that he is in way over his head, and, unfortunately, we are soon going to pay for arrogance. Christians in the Middle East already are.

    Liberalism is a mental disorder.

    (Not important to post this if you want to minimize political talk on your blog. I said nothing here that we don’t already know. I just felt the need to respond to BO’s one-sided lecture.)

    Liked by 5 people

  40. Ann Seeton says:

    I am new to your blog but am enjoying it very much. I think of prepping, and there are people doing it many ways and I wonder at it because there is simply no way of preparing for a future we cannot predict. No matter how fanatical you get about it, no matter how many shelves of food you have in your basement, it isn’t going to cover everything. I do however think about Joseph in Egypt, and then I think, OK, maybe God would have us do something, as long as we recognize that it cannot even begin to be sufficient and we should best remember the widow who made food for the prophet and her oil and flour never ran out. If things get as bad as they could, it will require miracles.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Mick says:

      Welcome to the TNRS family, Ann. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • CrewDog says:

      Yes AnnS, We can’t possibly Get Prepped for Every Contingency but those with means, I believe, should make some common sense efforts … even if it’s only the very basic “Lists” that are recommended by the Red Cross, DHS or your State’s Disaster Preparedness Office … If Ya really want to get serious about Prepping, Check-Out The Mormons! They have always been Preppers … I don’t know why … but they know their stuff!!
      Yes … God will multiply the “Stuff” of the Faithful … there are simply too many examples of that to explain away!

      GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

      Liked by 3 people

  41. Ann Seeton says:

    Planting edible landscapes is always good. Even if you do not get the good of it, it might bless someone else. It won’t be wasted because it is there for God to use however he chooses. That is how I think whenever I plant a tree that I will not live to get anything out of– that to do good isn’t always about my benefit but because it will please God.

    Liked by 4 people

  42. Cindy Baca says:

    Regarding the prepping of toilet paper…. Buy boxes of baby wipes. Guess, you could ever barter with them. I buy a box everymonth. Baking Soda, is good for brushing teeth, washing face and hair. Yes, save them plastic bags,they will come in handy for something.

    Liked by 5 people

  43. Cindy Baca says:

    Thank you Charlie, for the post. Was on my way to the Blessed Sacrament and got side tracked by reading all the comments. Sometimes I think God, gets lonley waitin’ on us just to say “Hi”
    Again, thank you and to all TNRS’s. Will remember you all, in my time before the Blessed Sacrament.

    Liked by 4 people

  44. louiseyvette says:

    This is beautiful. Thank you.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s