The Fog of War and a Papal Field Hospital

3_popes, faith hope and love

(As I get back to work focusing here, I am worried that we are spending way too much time finding things to deplore and getting the vapors over everything the Pope says. If we are reduced to defining ourselves almost exclusively by what we are against rather than by what we are for, we cede a big battle to the devil and go more easily into despair. If we treat debatable comments by the Pope as if they are fearful pronouncements, we could spend all our time in panic. I have been contemplating since the weekend. I have a post going up on it tonight, but our regular commenter, James I McAuley wrote a nice piece that I think is a good lead-in.-CJ)

By James I McAuley, Esq.

Throughout the internet there is an angst, unease with the pronouncement of Pope Francis, especially those that are off the cuff or given at press conferences. Regrettably, this angst has led to the Pope being treated in a disrespectful matter. It is much ado about nothing.

The Catholic faithful throughout the 20th century had a series of popes who were articulate and precise in their public speaking. Three of these popes, Venerable Pius XII, St. John XXIII, and Blessed Paul VI were at one time diplomats and thus were trained to speak in a fashion that was appropriate to the circumstance. To illustrate this point, as Americans, we could compare these Popes to great orators of our history such as Daniel Webster or that great Secretary of State and ambassador to France, Thomas Jefferson. When these Popes spoke or wrote, there was no ambiguity in their statements.

With Pope Saint John Paul II we had a Pope  who was a trained actor, teacher, diplomat, pastor and philosopher. St. John Paul came into a Church in crisis and a world in crisis. Swinging his rosary, he examined the big picture and then went to battle. The soul saving Divine Mercy devotion was encouraged, and magisterial, philosophical and theological issues were addressed in a series of incredible encyclicals (Evangelium Vitae and Veritatis Splendor and Dives in Misericordia, to name a few). Rounding out this spiritual arsenal was a new catechism of the Church that John Paul issued. His ability to see the big picture made John Paul much like General George Washington or General Ulysses Simpson Grant. Like these men, John Paul never lost focus of the grand strategic picture of the spiritual war we are engaged in, and no mistakes or scandals could make him lose focus. Like Washington at Monmouth or Grant in the Wilderness, John Paul never lost his head in any crisis. Such a leader restored the confidence of Catholics worldwide.

Pope Benedict XVI was cut from a different cloth. Primarily an academic, he was a theologian. In his position as the head of the Holy Office, Benedict acted as theological Chief of Staff for John Paul. On any major theological issue, John Paul knew he could rely on Benedict to give him a clear answer. As Pope, Benedict kept this approach and it showed in his great motu proprio Summorum Pontificum. Benedict could be compared to General George C. Marshall, a behind the scenes planner who saw the big picture and, by his clear and precise articulation of theological issues, gave orthodox Catholics confidence in the stability of the Church, despite the growing storm.

However, Benedict was a man not comfortable with being on the public stage. Recognizing the growing strength of the spiritual storm, Benedict, like a true chief of staff, thought it prudent to resign his post as Captain of the Barque of Peter and hand the wheel of the ship over to someone else.

Enter Pope Francis, a man best known for speaking imprecisely, but a man who gained managerial skills overseeing a Jesuit province and a south American Archdiocese. Through it all, he has been primarily a pastor. In other words, Francis has spent a lot of time during the reigns of Saint John Paul II and Benedict in the spiritual trenches, field hospitals, and fields of battle. Because of this background, Francis has learned to deal with situations in a matter appropriate for a parish priest. Think about it – have not each one of you heard his parish priest answer a question in language/manner that is more like that of Pope Francis? Francis has not been refined in the papal diplomatic service as Pius XII, John XXIII and Paul VI. He is not a man with stage talents such as John Paul II. He most certainly is not an academic theologian as Benedict XVI. Rather, he is a pastor, first and foremost. As a pastor, he is looking at the operational situation. In this he is like General Patton – inclined to open his big mouth and stick his foot into it, but at the same time, tell the truth and get the job done by addressing the problem. Because of this background, Francis is not equipped to answer questions/issues in the way we are accustomed to. Unfortunately, in response, many people respond by getting angry, hysterically losing their heads and then spew statements that cause only spiritual harm. Others play the diplomat and attempt to spin/nuance Francis’s statements in whatever fashion that suits their particular opinions.

But take comfort, with Francis we now have a trained pilot at the wheel of the Barque of Peter. Like Admiral Farragut at Mobile Bay, it is damn the torpedoes of Satan and full speed ahead. The storm is not stopping Francis from preaching the truth in charity, as confusing as it may be – do captains on board ships in the middle of storms have the time to sit down and write detailed orders? No, of course they do not! Rather they give brief, terse and often confusing answers/orders, such as Custer’s last message at the Little Big Horn. Now the smoke is thick, the enemy is weakening, and the battle has not even reached its crescendo yet – but let us man our battle station on the Barque of Peter and keep praying for the pope! We will win, and Francis is leading us to victory with our Lady of Tepayac, as sure as Don Juan and St. Pius V did at Lepanto!

 

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
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300 Responses to The Fog of War and a Papal Field Hospital

  1. joncraft84 says:

    Reblogged this on Handicap and commented:
    He is going back to his roots, all priests start out as a pastor. He just wants to show everybody that he can still be a pastor and still lead the whole Catholic universe. I don’t think that is bad, in fact I think it is good. In fact I don’t think he is going in the wrong direction at all. Peace be with you, your Brother in Christ. Jonathan.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. ecactus54 says:

    Thanks for this informative post, Mr. McAuley. I never quite thought of it that way, comparing popes to historical figures. This will help me to remember to pray for Pope Francis more and to support him in his efforts to lead us through the Storm.

    By the way, Charlie, this is my first comment. I’m Cyprian (Mick’s oldest). Really enjoyed meeting you last September when you were in Michigan.

    Liked by 5 people

  3. CrewDog says:

    The anti-Christian Lefty Global Elite can’t stand The Truth and will become evermore angry and vicious as “These Days” come to pass ;-(
    “Paris Cardinal Under Fire for Speaking Truth”

    http://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=2674:paris-cardinal-under-fire-for-speaking-truth

    GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Liked by 4 people

  4. Monica says:

    Dear James,

    Your writing on the Popes of our times was beautiful and has obviously touched many hearts. I do however, respectfully disagree on a few points which I will briefly list below. Following these points I would like to share my thoughts about Pope Francis and his manner of speaking, which I do not see as frequently “imprecise”. I am not trying to “spin” Pope Francis’ words as you have stated in the past that you believe some are doing. I am simply listening to him through the filter of love and simplicity which I will try to express in the writing below. Thank you for your obviously loving defense and explanation of Pope Francis and the Catholic Church. Many blessings, Monica 🙂

    1) When you were discussing the last 3 Popes we have had, perhaps you just didn’t emphasize this, but I believe that the last two Popes both had beautiful Pastor’s hearts as well. I agree that Pope Francis does have a wonderful and special Pastor’s heart.

    2) I do believe that Pope Francis has learned much more about diplomacy being a Priest, Bishop, Archbishop, Cardinal and now Pope than you seem to state. I believe that perhaps his diplomacy might be of a different style than some of his predecessors. Perhaps he is in some respects less formal. I agree with you that God has refined and equipped our beloved Pope Francis well for the times and he has answered the call with great love.

    3) Concerning Pope Benedict XVI, I don’t know if we truly understand all of the reasons Pope Benedict XVI stepped down at this point. I’m not sure personally that it was because as you suggested he “was not comfortable being on the public stage”. I believe he officially stated it was because of his “advanced age”. Whatever the reasons, I am sure he did so after much prayer, listening and discernment.

    4) I do not believe that Pope Francis is known to be “imprecise” in his speech, at least not to me, many others and no doubt to many Argentinians. There are many in Argentina especially among the poor who seemed to have appreciated his beautiful, from the heart conversations as he rode public transportation with them, visited their homes, walked with them through their neighborhoods and lovingly and relentlessly attempted to alleviate the suffering of the many poor and sick. They seemed to have found in him a loyal advocate and humble friend who spoke to them with sincerity, love and simplicity.

    Pope Francis: A Way of Love and Simplicity

    Matthew 11:25
    25 At that time Jesus said in reply, “I give praise to you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, for although you have hidden these things from the wise and the learned you have revealed them to the childlike.

    I have no difficulty understanding Pope Francis, but I am a simple person. I do not mean that I am unintelligent. I simply mean that I strive to have a simplicity about me that seeks to reflect Jesus. He lived in simplicity. No castles, no fine robes, no lavish meals. He sought out the simple, the poor, the sick, those who were in need of forgiveness, the brokenhearted. He spoke to people on their level. Not in a condescending way, but with simplicity and humility. He loved, He simply loved.

    Perhaps, those of us who understand Pope Francis are able to do so because we understand simplicity. We hear the call of Jesus to live a life of love. To be simple is to be like a little child. Trusting in God, innocent. Full of trust in our Father. When we pray, Jesus taught us to say “Our Father who art in Heaven…”. I trust in the love of God. I am not worried. I do not panic nor do I “spin” the Holy Father’s words to be what I want. I listen with my heart where God dwells and speaks to me. My heart tells me that I can trust this man. He is God’s chosen son. God has chosen Pope Francis to lead us in this our time. Pope Francis is a simple (not unintelligent) person. Again by this I mean that he is like Jesus, like Saint Francis his namesake. The name he chose because of Saint Francis’ simplicity and love.

    In this world we are used to running here and there. We want all of our answers now, quickly and to our complete satisfaction. This is not always God’s way. Very often He reveals things as we are ready for them. At the proper time. Pope Francis is not frequently imprecise in his speech. He speaks with his heart, with love. He speaks with simplicity. God will help him to define things in His time, in His way.

    I hope that we all, realize that God loves us. He holds each one of us in the palm of His hand. He will lovingly lead us closer to Himself and the Catholic Church. He will be with us in the storm. However, Jesus does so with love and simplicity as does our humble and beloved Pope Francis.

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      I want to be a little careful here, Monica. While I often condemn the frequent reduction of theology, doctrine and canon law into an arid and forbidding legalism, I also recognize the great need for it. Imprecise language can and does have consequences. To say that we know what he meant is not the same thing as saying he spoke with precision. Sometimes, speaking with ambiguity is most appropriate to a situation. But I would not replace a dry legalism with a soft relativism. As Christians, we are always called to navigate a knife’s edge between extremes: justice and mercy, doctrine and practice, always animated by a spirit of love. Most of the greatest abuses have come from someone taking one authentic aspect of the faith and emphasizing it to the point where it eclipses all other aspects.

      Liked by 6 people

      • Monica says:

        Dear Charlie,
        I think I am feeling like Pope Francis must sometimes feel. Misunderstood. I hope you were not implying that my words are the “soft relativism” you spoke about. I was simply saying that some of us perhaps don’t see his speech as frequently imprecise because we are looking at it through the perspective of simplicity and love. I believe I have expressed my belief in the past that sometimes (not frequently) he is not precise in his statements or misspeaks, sometimes he is being cautious to avoid escalating war among other things and sometimes what Pope Francis says is not the full answer some of us expect, but that God will reveal things to us in His time. I don’t see anything in my above writing that is “relative” hard or soft. It was an attempt to increase understanding, not to change meaning. I was NOT saying that it means one thing to me and something else to you. The truth of whatever our Pope is saying is still the same. I was just stating that I believe I understand his perspective and this helps me make sense of what he says much of the time. That for those of us who try to trust as Jesus has asked us to do in Him, our peace will not be disturbed. Much of what people write here is our own opinion on living a Catholic life, Catholic issues of the day and prayer among other things. We are not writing about our own opinion on what truth is. There is nothing in my writing above (or anywhere) that is meant to be “relative” in the sense I believe you might be implying. I respect and understand that your duty here is among other things to moderate this blog and make sure that no one is misinterpreting what another blogger is saying or to allow anyone to speak against what the Catholic Church teaches without defending it. So let me be clear. I am not. I am a loyal daughter of the Catholic Church. I believe everything that the Catholic Church teaches is true and I try to live it. Many blessings, Monica

        Liked by 2 people

        • charliej373 says:

          No, Monica, I wouldn’t have published your comment as a column if I thought you were mushy or relativist. But I worried that the referenced comment today could invite that. I don’t think your advocacy of simplicity and love as the filters works out as clearly as you do. When I thought Pope Francis was blanket excusing Islam of any connection to terror, I was reading his words in plain simplicity. To see it as the beginning of an effort to define terror out of any legitimate definition of any religion or as a diplomatic reach out to genuinely moderate requires more subtlety. It may be a better read, but it is not a simpler one. And I feared that saying that his words are always clear provided you look at them with simplicity and love implies that anyone who is puzzled or troubled by anything he says lacks simplicity and love – and that seems a bridge too far.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Monica says:

            Dear Charlie,
            I am certainly NOT implying that anyone who is troubled by Pope Francis’ words does not have simplicity or love. That is not what I said anywhere is the post. I said those of us who “understand” simplicity NOT “have” simplicity. I am saying that if people who are troubled by his words would try to reflect on the simplicity and love of Jesus they will better understand how Pope Francis speaks and it would help them make sense of his words. Perhaps I should have said “reflect” on simplicity. Jesus spoke simply, but often had a deeper meaning than was first perceived. He would give more truth and explanation in His time.
            I am also not implying that that Pope Francis is not subtle or that he will not be continuing to define issues for us or does not have a plan. You know I do not feel that way as I have written on that before. I am speaking of “reflecting” on the simplicity and love of Jesus that brings understanding to his words, not using simplicity to bring presumption by looking on the surface only.
            If my words were not clear and in any way led anyone to believe that I was saying if they are troubled by Pope Francis’ words they do not have simplicity and love, I apologize. This was not my intention. Please try to read the post again with my present commentary. I think you will see that I do not say this anywhere in the post. The most important point of my post is that if we trust in Jesus we will not need to worry. Jesus I trust in you. Charlie is concerned for the clarifying of things and I appreciate that. Many blessings, Monica

            Liked by 2 people

    • Joj says:

      “We want all of our answers now, quickly and to our complete satisfaction. This is not always God’s way.” Monica

      “Sometimes, speaking with ambiguity is most appropriate to a situation.” Charlie

      I think you are both in agreement Monica and Charlie, just expressing it differently?

      It seems to me that deeper spiritual truths are sometimes beyond formulaic statements, and that is why our Lord used parables, and why He did not always explain Himself when others misunderstood. His disciples needed to ponder things, and see with the eyes of the heart. His Holiness expresses himself much like Christ did. I would not call it relativistic or ambiguous, but nuanced, yes, indeed.

      As one who studies St. Thomas regularly, I see very much the danger of thinking we have it all worked out when it fact God is incomprehensible. St. Thomas recognized this, but Thomists often don’t. We get secure in our limited understanding and need to be shaken up to recognize our spiritual blindness. That’s not to say a limited understanding is bad. We have to start somewhere. It’s just that we need to be ready to go deeper when we’re called. And Christ is calling, through the Pope.

      The Pope is out there smashing our idols, while we feverishly try to patch them up. Tough job to have!

      Liked by 4 people

  5. Alphonsus says:

    This astonishing statement comes from the Holy Father’s recent Q & A session with Polish bishops. Nobody I have read in several years has nailed the truth of what we’re witnessing as precisely, succinctly, and profoundly as Pope Francis did here. A dreadful truth that so many are blind to.

    “We are living through a moment of annihilation of man as the image of God.”

    http://www.lastampa.it/2016/08/02/vaticaninsider/eng/the-vatican/benedict-is-right-its-the-age-of-sin-against-the-creator-fFhzoClvpJmpt0lHPvIh0H/pagina.html

    Liked by 8 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      Amen Alphonsus! I was telling a friend recently society has played God in many arenas, removed God from the public square, and now are distorting and mocking His fundamental absolutes too!!

      Liked by 5 people

  6. Maria says:

    Good description .. however I believe his ‘Jesuitism’ is what will differentiate him from any previous pope, teaching the SJ views rather than the traditional conservative Catholic teachings, like emphasizing the schism between capitalism and the poor, only when it is needed to make his point.

    Like

  7. zeniazenia says:

    Good Afternoon TNRS, This morning, Journalist Alan Holdren, Rome Correspondent for EWTN News Nightly, spoke with Teresa Tomeo, host for Catholic Connection.
    He made a point that Holy Father Francis is being very careful about how to treat this weekly news of terrorism. Scholars understand that there are so many different strands, currents, so many different varieties of Islam and ISIS, which Holy Father named for the first time on the return flight from Krakow, which is just one of them. Dr. Shahid Mobeen, a Christian and professor of Islamic history and thought at the Pontifical Lateran University, told Alan that he respects the Pope for what he has said. He believes this is the approach he needs to take. If he doesn’t decry what has happened then he is not representing the Church well, but he does have to be sensitive to these issues. In the Islamic extremist world, the Pope is the head of the modern crusade. The leader of the crusade is saying there is no war with world religions. This is extremely confusing to ISIS. Dr. Shahid Mobeen says this is a very smart move by the Pope. It creates a space for dialog and it has made a huge difference. His parents back in his home country of Pakistan concur. Dr. Shahid Mobeen believes that, in private, the Holy Father may have a different personal opinion of the matter.
    You will find the Ave Maria Radio podcast for Catholic Connection August 3, 2016 – Hour 2 at
    https://avemariaradio.net/resources/podcasts/
    The interview with Alan Holdren starts at minute 39:15. He first answered questions about women deacons and then discusses, at minute 51:03, the real reason Holy Father is holding back on making obvious critical statements regarding violence within Islam and speaking about a war of religions.

    Liked by 5 people

    • charliej373 says:

      An erudite article, Father. Many thanks to you and all the brave Religious, Deacons, Priests and Bishops who have girded their loins to be God’s sentinels to the faithful through these trying times. You are heroes now and will be greater ones yet.

      Liked by 5 people

  8. johnjwblog says:

    The Holy Father is actually right it is not a war of Religions. According to VT Gordon Duff and Jim Willie and others too numerous to mention, ISIS morphs into what it wants, without getting into specifics it really is a creation of money and politics not Islam, it is funded not by Islam but by interests and I’ll leave it at that.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Deacon Rick says:

    Just finished reading this article by Fr. George Rutler, and I thought it would be a benefit to the conversations happening as a result of this latest posting:
    http://www.crisismagazine.com/2016/tolerating-terror

    Liked by 1 person

  10. mellensequoia says:

    I regularly read Fr. Longenecker’s blog. He is a down to earth Anglican Priest convert to Catholic. His blog, Patheos, is always (in my opinion) spot on. The subject of his blog today is “Ten Things for Confused Conservative Catholics to Remember”. Here you go if you’re interested (& Charlie approves):
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/standingonmyhead/2016/08/ten-things-for-confused-conservative-catholics-to-remember.html?

    Liked by 6 people

    • charliej373 says:

      I am a very big fan of Fr. Longenecker. He is always solid, insightful and straightforward.

      Liked by 3 people

    • janet says:

      He is right….”Regarding Islam – Use common sense. We all know that the vast majority of Muslims are peaceful, ordinary people who only want to follow their religion and culture in peace. We should distinguish between the religion of Islam and the Jihadist terrorists. They are the enemy and we should be clear about that, but we should not fall into the trap of scapegoating all Muslims. Is the Islamic religion abhorrent to you? Be at peace. It’s not your battle. Christ has overcome the world. He will eventually prevail.” Fr. Longenecker

      Liked by 3 people

      • leslyek says:

        Forgive me if it seems contradicting; but again, it may be legitimately impossible to distinguish violent jihadists from Islam, as Muhammed himself exemplified Islam violently in his acting it out, according to some of his recorded actions; which is all Muslims they have to go by, with no magisterium and no forgiving philosophy.). Or else by modern Imams who change it to be more Christian-like.

        Like

    • janet says:

      Thanks melensequoia .

      Like

    • moreen67 says:

      I read this article yesterday – really liked it.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Mack says:

    This is a sign of hope; in Syria there’s a castle built by the Crusaders. Recently the first Mass was celebrated there since 1271–it took 745 years but there was a Mass there again! The video is in French but it made me think of what the Rescue may look like: people converting, the Mass being celebrated again in areas where it had been absent for so long. Beautiful! In Syria, too, not so far from ISIS lands.
    http://wdtprs.com/blog/2016/08/first-mass-in-the-krak-des-chevaliers-in-745-years/

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Julia says:

    Holy Father Francis is the first Pope to speak in a language everyone can understand. I think we should be relating to him like we do or did to our own earthly fathers. With love and respect and praying for him to fulfil the mission God has intended for him in his papacy.

    In the final analysis we know right from wrong, and to be honest, who actually listened to the previous Popes. If they did, why are so many Catholics no longer practising. And with the world falling apart, or do some think that is the Popes fault. Sheesh!

    Trust God, Do the right thing, Love those God sends your way.

    Liked by 4 people

  13. janet says:

    I think we should also be looking at Pope Francis’ achievements… and there have been many… rather than just examining his sometimes clumsy way of speaking…

    Pope Francis continues his tradition of visiting those in prison…making it clear to them that nobody is beyond redemption.

    He condemned the mafia…telling them they have blood on their hands and could go to hell.

    He reminded those who are caught up in same-sex attraction that they are loved by God…yet he clearly rejected the sin.

    Pope Francis has apologized several times, personally and directly to victims of child sex abuse. He has handed over pedophile priests and threatened those who protect such predators.

    He continues to cleanse the Vatican of corruption though investigations, dismissals, and even criminal charges where appropriate.

    Pope Francis ditched a luncheon with members of Congress to attend an event with the homeless.

    In Poland recently he spoke about “Gender Theory.” Warning that this idea is spreading in schools and around the globe as misinformation propagates.

    I could go on and on….

    The is a passage in Scripture which I think is important to this topic.

    “……But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selves. 23 For if a man be a hearer of the word, and not a doer, he shall be compared to a man beholding his own countenance in a glass. 24 For he beheld himself, and went his way, and presently forgot what manner of man he was. 25 But he that hath looked into the perfect law of liberty, and hath continued therein, not becoming a forgetful hearer, but a doer of the work; this man shall be blessed in his deed.

    26 And if any man think himself to be religious, not bridling his tongue, but deceiving his own heart, this man’ s religion is vain. 27 Religion clean and undefiled before God and the Father, is this: to visit the fatherless and widows in their tribulation: and to keep one’ s self unspotted from this world.” James 1, 22-27

    I think the Pope is doing exactly what the Word teaches!

    Liked by 6 people

  14. Peg says:

    Excellently stated!! I have always heard n do believe: “if u can’t b a part of the solution, don’t b a part of the problem”. Pray for our Most Holy Pontiff, Pope St. Francis & the entire Pastoral community. We are only as good as we pray so, pray n pray often! If u don’t know what or how to pray then, by all means, give it to the Two-Hearts; Sacred Heart of Jesus n Immaculate Heart of Mary. Pray without ceasing! Jesus, we humbly trust in You!

    Liked by 5 people

  15. CrewDog says:

    Today’s Verse is a good reminder that Almighty God is the only Know-it-All in the Universe. Even the most sainted people were, at times, mistaken, sinful ….. and had “bad” days!:(

    HeartLight Daily Verse – 4 August

    Jeremiah 33:2-3:
    This is what the Lord says, he who made the earth, the Lord who formed it and established it — the Lord is his name: Call to me and I will answer you and tell you great and unsearchable things you do not know.
    Thoughts on today’s verse:
    In a universe of billions of stars, think of the power of the God who made them and knows each of their names. Think of all he knows that we don’t. Think of all he has seen that is not in a history book. Think of all he has done and can do. Add to this that he invites us to speak to him about the things of our heart.
    Prayer:
    Almighty God, there are so many things I am simply ignorant about. There are so many things in my world that I can’t understand. There are so many things about you that I long to know but I can’t begin to comprehend you. Please, dear Father, please give me more of you, and about you, that I may know you better. You are beyond me, so deal gently as you reveal yourself. I look with anticipation at the thought of knowing you, the Unsearchable, the Almighty, God, my Abba. Through Jesus I pray. Amen. Visit heartlight.org for more

    GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Liked by 4 people

  16. janet says:

    I am becoming worried….If we are to enter times of civil disorder and need to stand together..how on earth are we going to do that when, we disagree over the Vicar of Christ?

    I was so glad this time last year to find Charlie’s blog and get away from the false prophets who condemn the Pope and those so called Catholics who criticise him at every turn on facebook. This was my oasis…not any more! I’m almost considering removing myself as it is so frustrating.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Doug says:

      Janet, I for one would be sad if you pulled back from here. You bring a lot to the table here in my opinion. I have little concern over pope Francis as I believe God has chosen him for this time. I also think when things ramp up, you will see many hearts change in this regard because we will be very busy manning our battle stations which will bring us closer together. I am very hopeful and optimistic. Hang in there! God bless you!

      Liked by 7 people

      • Beckita says:

        Hear Hear, Doug and Janet!

        Liked by 2 people

        • janet says:

          Beckita…I’m going nowhere. Where else could I go? 🙂

          Liked by 4 people

          • Doug says:

            Hey Janet, somebody famous named Peter once said that. You must know him 😎

            Liked by 2 people

          • janet says:

            Ha ha Doug. I had him in mind when I wrote that. 🙂

            Liked by 3 people

          • Beckita says:

            So true, Dear Janet. We can do this as we walk in solidarity together. While thanking God for Charlie’s mission of heartening the faithful, I think we all must continue to breathe deeply the Sweet Breath of the Spirit in these days. Sooner rather than later, everything will come down and we know we need to be well practiced in becoming totally dependent on God. May we, by His Own Power, be given this grace even now. May we all be imbued anew with Faith, Hope, Love< Trust and the Peace of Christ.

            You are all we have. You give us what we need.
            Our Lives are in Your Hands, O Lord. Our Lives are in Your Hands.

            1. Protect us, Lord. I come to You for safety.
            I say, “You are my God.”
            All good things, Lord. All good things that
            I have come from You, the God of my salvation.

            2.You are near, the God I seek.
            Nothing can take me from Your side.
            All my days I will rest secure.
            You will show me the path that leads to life.

            Liked by 3 people

          • Doug says:

            Very encouraging Beckita.

            Liked by 2 people

      • Another Karen says:

        I second that, Doug. Janet, I think that the different perspectives here, discussed respectfully, help us all grow so that we can be better prepared to take the next right step. We all want to do what God asks of us, which may also include contemplating ideas that may be outside of our comfort zone, so that we are better prepared for the fullness of the storm. Different parts of the same body, as it were. Please stay and continue to share with us.

        Liked by 4 people

      • janet says:

        Thank you Doug. I am not going anywhere. I just got a little sad yesterday. I know you are right..soon hearts will change.

        God Bless you.

        Liked by 4 people

    • MarieUrsula says:

      Hi, Janet ~ I agree with Doug. We’d love for you to stay. But maybe you could rest awhile from the pro-con Pope Francis fray to renew your strength?

      I am among those who don’t worry about Pope Francis because he’s God’s man for this time.

      Also, I know from any dealings with media over the years ~ even friendly media ~ that rarely does the reporter get it exactly right. Furthermore, there’s so much information we just don’t have access to ~ not necessarily because it’s hidden, but because it’s voluminous and thus hard to write about succinctly. And then you’ve got the lenses through which readers view anything they see or read. It’s not a pleasant thing to be unnecessarily prone to suspicion about the Vicar of Christ. Unfortunately, the bitterness seems to want to spread itself.

      Mary, Queen of Peace, pray for us.

      Liked by 4 people

    • LukeMichael says:

      Amen, amen,Janet! We all want you to stay here.
      I, too, do not worry about the Pope anymore. Say the prayer of miraculous trust for him and let go of your worry. Come sit with Jesus in the back of the boat while the storm rages.

      Liked by 6 people

  17. ktfjmt says:

    Forgive me if this has already been shared. It came across my Facebook page and I’m still digesting it myself. Keep the Faith

    jmt

    https://cruxnow.com/analysis/2016/08/04/pope-francis-refuses-play-game-islamic-radicals/

    Liked by 4 people

  18. Paul says:

    Charlie,
    I thought this was the year of market collapse internet collapse; what is the status of this

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Paul, I do not go through specific timing of specific types of events. I have given you the general outline, with a few specifics, with the emphasis on what we are called to do and how to behave whatever happens and when ever it happens.

      Liked by 3 people

  19. Gods Will says:

    It’s obvious that there is doubt among many just by following this blog.. So confusion is amongst us.. Pray for the pope, be obedient, but if he changes any doctrine, resist.. It’s that simple.. Remain faithful to Christ’s church…

    Liked by 2 people

    • janet says:

      He can’t change doctrine, God’s Will.

      .”….Confess the Faith all of it, not part of it! Safeguard this faith, as it came to us, by way of tradition: the whole Faith!,” the Pope exclaimed. ….But if we Christians believe confessing the faith, and safeguarding it, taking custody of the faith, and, entrusting ourselves to God, to the Lord, we shall be Christian victors. And this is the victory that has overcome the world: our faith.” (Plenary assembly of the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue)

      Liked by 6 people

  20. CrewDog says:

    Sadly, “catholic” Kaine can and will get away with the “Pope Francis Catholic” mantra thanks to the Liberal (Democrat/godless) Media, spineless &/or Liberal USA clerics ….. even, more sadly, some of the Pope’s “Off de Cuff” comments! ….. all part of The Storm we be in ;-(

    “Tim Kaine must not get away with styling himself a Pope Francis Catholic”
    http://www.catholicherald.co.uk/commentandblogs/2016/08/09/tim-kaine-must-not-get-away-with-styling-himself-a-pope-francis-catholic/

    GOD SAVE ALL HERE!!

    Liked by 2 people

    • janet says:

      .”…even, more sadly, some of the Pope’s “Off de Cuff” comments! …..

      The Pope has spoken up loud and clearly regarding the unborn, CrewDog

      Like

  21. Gods Will says:

    If he can’t, then someone forgot to tell this Cardinal:

    If Pope Francis changes the doctrine of the Faith… “I WILL RESIST”
    “It is always my sacred duty
    to defend the truth
    of the Church’s teaching…
    Therefore, if any authority,
    even the highest authority,
    were to deny that truth
    or act contrary to it,
    I would be obliged to resist.”
    Cardinal Raymond Burke (February 2015)

    Like

    • janet says:

      God’s Will…..”Cardinal Raymond Burke said he was “responding to a hypothetical situation”

      According to a translation of the interview on the blog Rorate Caeli, the cardinal stressed the need for attentiveness to the power of the office of the papacy in Catholic understanding. Papal power is “at the service of the doctrine of the faith,” he explained, “and thus the Pope does not have the power to change teaching, doctrine.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Joj says:

      The difficulty with this attitude, GW, is that when we say, “I will stick to the Truth despite the Pope” we have to ask ourselves how do we know it’s the Truth and not just our own opinion. As Christ’s representative, the Pope is our guarantor of the Truth. As long as we interpret him in the light of perennial Church teaching, we can’t go wrong. But once we abandon him for our own opinion, call it our own truth, well, then we’re really not Catholic anymore but protestant.

      Catholics have a real gift in the Pope, because he is being backed by Christ Himself. Remember that, whether you like his personal style or not. In his teaching office he is guaranteed to be free from error, but that doesn’t mean you or I are guaranteed not to misunderstand when we interpret him according to our own personal filter.

      Liked by 3 people

  22. Great article. I remember listening to a tape by Bishop Sheen who talked about Peter and how many mistakes he made and how flawed he often was. Nonetheless, God chose him to build his Church. Pope Francis is our chosen leader and like Peter, he makes mistakes, but also like Peter his faith is GREAT!

    Liked by 4 people

  23. janet says:

    Thank you Joj and Neil

    Like

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