The Politicization of Doctrine is a Blunder

 

galileo-trial

Galileo before the Catholic Tribunal

By Charlie Johnston

In the early half of the 17th Century, the Catholic Church got deeply involved in scientific debates about heliocentrism (whether the sun revolves around the earth or vice versa). The Church formally banned the books by astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus that claimed that the earth revolved around the sun, rather than vice versa as the errant scientific consensus of the time maintained. This culminated in the formal condemnation of astronomer Galileo Galilei in 1633 for maintaining the same. It was one of the greatest embarrassments for the Church in its history.

It did not have to happen. As early as 1615 the man who would become the Church’s main point man on the matter, St. Robert Bellarmine, warned that treating heliocentrism as literally true would constitute “…a very dangerous thing, likely not only to irritate all scholastic philosophers and theologians, but also to harm the Holy Faith by rendering Holy Scripture as false.” The case was more complicated than is commonly known. Galileo was a good scientist, but dabbled in some very bad theology and some controversial politics. In the end, in an imprudent bargain, the Church did the state a favor by condemning Galileo on errant theological grounds to vitiate his political irritation to the state and theological irritation to the Church – neither of which had much of anything to do with his scientific research. In short, the stated grounds for his condemnation were not the actual grounds – and in the process, the Church gave itself a major, unforced black eye.

The simple truth is that while authorities of the Church often have good reason and always every right to weigh in on scientific, economic, and political (including diplomatic) matters, it has no binding formal authority on these matters, except to condemn means that are illicit by their very nature. Now the media is filled with reports that the Vatican is going to require Priests to preach about “global warming.”  At this point, the reports are a bit overblown, as it is not yet known what tack that requirement will take. If it is about man’s duty to act as good stewards over nature and our environment, it is in perfect accord with the Church’s responsibility to the faithful. If it is to prescribe which are the sole means to accomplish this, it is an usurpation of the primary prudential responsibility of the laity and can only lead to another black eye.

I do not argue that no politician has anything useful to say about the faith. But I have been a lifelong defender of the faith against efforts by political classes to usurp the Church’s lawful authority on faith and morals. Neither would I suggest that Church authorities have nothing useful to say about science, economics or politics. But I will defend the laity’s primary prudential authority on such matters against any illicit efforts by the Church to claim formal authority it does not and never has had – and that when it has tried to expand it, has usually badly damaged both the faith and the polis. The great danger when an institution claims formal authority it does not have is that it risks diluting and discrediting the authority it legitimately has.

I have noted consistently that on those matters on which Pope Francis has spoken definitively and Magisterially on matters of faith and morals, he has been solidly orthodox. I have had occasion to be dismayed at times by his seeming reflexive personal preference for temporal methods that are coercive and authoritarian – and that, when tried historically, have almost always yielded the opposite results of his nobly stated ends.

This is a time when the spiritual authority and prestige of the Church should be carefully shepherded and guarded. St. John Neumann once encapsulated the heart of shepherding prudence by stating that if a Bishop did not HAVE to speak on a matter, he SHOULD NOT speak on it. I pray that authorities of the Church will not add to the confusion that is rising in the world, but I am aware that some of these things must come.

I have been and will remain a consistent defender of the Church against illicit assaults on its legitimate authority by the imprudent ambition of the polis. But I will also be a consistent defender of the polis against any illicit assaults on its legitimate authority by imprudent clerical ambition.

 

About charliej373

Charlie Johnston is a former newspaper editor, radio talk show host and political consultant. From Feb. 11, 2011 to Aug. 21, 2012, he walked 3,200 miles across the country, sleeping in the woods, meeting people and praying as he went. He has received prophetic visitation all his life, which he has vetted through a trio of priests over the last 20 years, and now speaks publicly about on this site. Yet he emphasizes that we find God most surely through the ordinary, doing the little things we should with faith and fidelity. Hence the name, The Next Right Step. The visitations inform his work, but are not the focus of it. He lives in the Archdiocese of Denver in the United States.
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186 Responses to The Politicization of Doctrine is a Blunder

  1. BillB says:

    Very insightful Charlie. Good contemplation for a snowy day! Thank you and God bless!

    Liked by 5 people

  2. Charlie, thank you for your insight. I have great concern that the Holy Father’s “blunder” is his open agreement with Agenda 2030. This UN Agenda is chock full of anti -life policies working their way into law. It’s worse than agenda 21. I fear that that the Holy Father’s advisors have misinformed him to make him look bad. After all, agender 2030 mandates birth control and population control which is against church teaching. The whole global warming thinges is a slippery slope. Chastisement looks like global warming. ..and vice versa. The Encyclical he wrote was good, but so few read it,and so many took it out of context. Frankly, I am dealing with good solid priests thinking Francis is an heretic for every other thing that comes out of his mouth. I see a lot of distraction here while my main focus has been on his good work uniting the Orthodox Church and the Protestant church with us. The Satan Above ALL ,doesn’t want that! Saint JPII & Benedict XVI worked diligently to accomplish it. The dates of Easter will be the same. Christ desires it. It all seems like distraction to me until that is accomplished. Lord knows the “commemorative get together ” with the protestants is going to cause heart palpitations in many! ! I have to tattoo on my forehead, “Be not afraid!” For others to see! !
    Gaudette blessings Charlie!

    Liked by 7 people

  3. Vladimir says:

    Very good Charlie,
    one of the ticking bombs of many world´s politicians is a push to enthrone a global LGBTI hound, which is going to be voted on by all the UN members this upcoming week. A guy from Thailand had already talked about his agenda – Hitchcock horros are a kiddie literature in comparison to this. Check c-fam.org for that. I am very ashamed that on a preliminary vote only African countries stood against it and the EU was represented by my homeland, Slovakia. What a shame.
    I wish to ask all the readers, you sisters and brothers, please, pray and fast this week that this shameful thing will not pass – it is a hellish affront to Christmas, to God and to the very nature of man. And sign petitions of a very good world over organization that fights against all these terrible things citizengo.org. It is led by Catholic people of Spain and in under 3 years the petitions signing members rose to 5 million. Thanks God. (Join us for the good of all peoples nad nations.)
    And we are very happy for your new President, he is going to dismantle lots of sick stuff. We really rejoice, he is like a bulldozer, we like it here. I loved his words about wishing Merry Christmas from now on in your beautiful country. So MERRY CHRISTMAS, AMERICA. (Hopefull they notice in Canada as well.)
    God bless you all.
    Vladimir

    Liked by 22 people

  4. Another Karen says:

    Thanks for your thoughts on this, Charlie. I always feel a little less crazy and a bit more vindicated when I realize that you (and many of the others here) have similar ideas on the Pope’s foray into climate change and all things environmental as being somewhat distracting and problematic. I still do not know how much of this is truly attributed to him vs, words being twisted or fabricated, but it sure does lend to all of the confusion that we definitely do not need in these times. Prayers for all seminarians, priests, bishops, cardinals and the Pope himself for wisdom, courage, fortitude and understanding!

    Liked by 10 people

  5. RJW says:

    Pray more, talk less is my 2017 goal.

    Liked by 13 people

  6. Sean Sullivan says:

    Avery and Singer compiled a work of scholarship titled Unstoppable Global Warming: Every 1,500 years. An 11 minute video accompanied the book for those visually inclined. Here it is on youtube.

    The video speaks for itself while the book provides a detailed analysis of Global warming alarmists propaganda refuting the same with facts (science). Scientists (hundreds) proving the falsehood of man made global warming. Humans are not the cause of climate change.

    Liked by 11 people

  7. ann says:

    OK –going out a limb here hoping not to offend anyone’s sensibilities but willing to take the blow back because this needs to be said . I think that “climate change implementation” in the Church is only one of the problems our Pope presents. There is also the strange way he has reacted to the four Cardinals “dubia”–a very proper method in the Church for asking for clarification. Jesus Himself lays out the process in the gospels. the Pope’s responses about rigidity and phariseeism are troubling, at least for me, because all of us who survived the chaotic Catholic craziness of the 70’s and managed to remain serious Catholics, these statements–even going so far as to call young people who love the traditional Mass psychologically impaired–are “dog whistles” that denote a kind of totalitarian progressivism that many of us dealt with in those unhappy times before St. John Paul II. I remain watchful and prayerful but that troubling paragraph about Catholics divorced and remarried– and not annulled–receiving Holy Communion–that paragraph must be clearly and concretely explained because there is so simply no way to undo the words of Christ on the matter of the nature of the sacrament of marriage. These are very very serious matters and the Pope owes the Cardinals and us very definitive teaching. No vaporous statements about “progressing on a journey” or such wobble words. We heard all that in the 70’s and what it boiled down to then was: contracept if you want. it’s your conscience. I could give many other horrible examples. I don’t blame the priests back then. What did they know? It was the wild west out there. Anything and everything was suggested, tried and later in sorrow regretted. As a survivor of that time I look with great sadness on this current situation. Clearly, God has allowed it for His purposes. I am sure it is part of the chastisement. I continue to trust Him but I also continue to be sober watch and pray. The lion is out there prowling. It seems to me that if our Pope does not give us a definitive reassurance on the sacrament of marriage and the sacred requirements for receiving Holy Communion, then he must apologize to St. John Fisher, St. Thomas More and St. John the Baptist and who know how many other martyrs who died for the sanctity of marriage in our Catholic Church. I pray and hope that he does. May Our Holy Mother Refuge of Sinners and Help of Christians keep us close to Jesus as the narrow way gets more murky and more confused. Especially when the confusion comes from the Vicar of Christ himself.

    Liked by 14 people

    • Deborah Seiter says:

      It is a bit disconcerting, I just ramp up my prayer for our Holy Father when the comments come. I do not understand why he would not have given the Cardinals a response before it ever went public. It seems to me they had handled it with all due respect for our Holy Father and confusion should not be allowed to go without a response. Praying for Pope Francis to see all for how it TRULY is and lead us with great courage and wisdom. Mater Dolorosa, Causa Nostra Laetitiae, Ora Pro Nobis!

      Liked by 2 people

    • zeniazenia says:

      Hi ann,
      You may find it interesting to learn how much of Holy Father Francis’ pastoral outlook comes directly down the line from Pope St. JPII through Pope Benedict. The book, ‘What Pope Francis Really Said: Words of Comfort and Challenge’ by Tom Hoopes may be right up your alley because it digs deeply into these topics. –ZJ

      ‘His likeable, spontaneous, unguarded manner has drawn both estranged Catholics and even non-Catholics to take a closer look at the Catholic Church. He has also puzzled and even outraged the faithful who listened uncritically to the media’s interpretation of Pope Francis’s off-the-cuff commentary on hot-button issues such as abortion, marriage, divorce, the environment, immigration, and a host of other issues. Meanwhile, younger Catholics aren’t analyzing him. They are simply gazing with him at Jesus Christ.
      In What Pope Francis Really Said, nationally respected Catholic journalist Tom Hoopes explores how Pope Francis is bringing the Catholic Church to bear on a dramatically changing world, not by altering its teachings but by applying enduring truths to new realities in fresh ways. This book takes up the primary themes of the first three years of the pontificate and challenges American Catholics to see the pope and his teachings as a pathway to personal renewal.”

      Liked by 7 people

      • Alfred says:

        Good analysis. The back and forth between one end of the spectrum and the other in our Church calls to mind Jesus’ criticism of some of his listeners. I.e., how some criticized John the Baptist because he was such a severe ascetic, but then criticized Jesus because he came “eating and drinking” and dining with sinners.

        Liked by 4 people

      • ann says:

        From your mouth to God’s ears, Zenia, as the old Jewish lady used to say. May God grant it to be so. In the mean time, I remain sober and watchful. And pray many many Rosaries. God bless.

        Liked by 5 people

  8. Simone says:

    Thank you, papa Charlie. That is a tall order. We all have our duties and responsibilities in our posts. May we all be at God’s service. I struggle with the authority I have as a teacher, especially of a course like global geography where we talk about touchy issues of social justice, human rights, economics, environment, and population. God grant me grace to know when to speak, and when to shut up. It is scary what influence I have. Again, I want to be the servant soldier. Please pray.

    Liked by 13 people

  9. ktfjmt says:

    If I may recommend “The Principle” – a movie which documents the latest scientific discoveries pointing to a Geocentric cosmos which – if true – would vindicate the Church’s original understanding of the Galileo matter.

    Just food for thought

    Keep the Faith
    jmt

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      The point was not whether the Church was right or wrong, but that it hit the shoals by pretending to infallible authority on something it lacks authority on. The proper sphere of the Church is to enunciate man’s proper ends. The proper sphere of the temporal laity is to devise effective means to accomplish those ends. That is not to say there is no overlap. The Church is obligated to consider the vox fidelis (voice of the faithful) on faith and morals – but the Church’s voice is both authoritative and infallible when it speaks Magisterially on such things. Church authorities and the Church are part of the polis. As such, they have an equal voice to any other person or institution in such affairs – but they have no definitive authority over them (except to condemn means that are objectively illicit). There is an apostolate of orders and an apostolate of the laity – and they each have spheres of primary prudential responsibility and authority.

      As for the heliocentric view, the latest scientific discoveries do NOT point to that. If it were a heliocentric universe, every space mission would have been a failure and the reliable predictions of the positioning of planets and the stars would be wrong – but observations has proven them right. This actually is settled science, where the results completely confirm the hypotheses. In the mid-400’s St. Augustine condemned those who abused Scripture as mere science or history (in his “Confessions”). It is the inspired Word of God, he said, for our direction and edification.

      Liked by 10 people

      • Alfred says:

        Well said Charlie.

        Liked by 2 people

      • andyb2016 says:

        The World fell from paradise with Adam and Eve so Global warming could be true or not, I feel it is not and wish it was a non church issue. The elites and the left will of course use it to control the population and by judging the left by their fruits I would trend to believe it is not true since their other fruits include abortion, sodomy and the protection and promotion of Islam . I wish the Pope would say, like Al Gore or any HUMAN, remember you will pass away long before the Earth so let go of it and protect your soul. I think though if their was less sin there would be less pollution and bad things for the Earth and ect…

        Liked by 4 people

    • Owen says:

      I just watched “The Principle”. Very good documentary. It’s not about abandoning the Copernican model of the solar system. It’s about reexamining the Copernican Principle, which states that the Earth is not unique in its location relative to the rest of the Universe. The need for the elusive dark matter and energy goes away if we adopt the model that the universe is centered around the Earth. Also the cosmic background radiation appears to be centered around the earth.

      Liked by 2 people

  10. Vickie says:

    Nice article Charlie – but what is polis? Sorry for my ignorance here, but I’m not familiar with that word- or it meaning – thank you and God bless. 😇

    Liked by 4 people

    • charliej373 says:

      Polis is all the citizenry and institutions of the state.

      Liked by 4 people

      • Vickie says:

        Thank you- so much – now I will reread with a better understanding . 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

        • jaykay says:

          It’s the root of the word “politics”, Vicky, from Greek, “to polis” “the state” or “the city”, literally, since their cities were their states. Hence their never-ending turf wars… there never was a unified Greece in classical times, until they were conquered by Rome. And that wasn’t exactly unity, in the best sense. But the sort of nation state we take for granted now would have been quite alien to a classical Greek. To them, all politics really was local.

          Meh, sorry about this – former archaeology/classics student on his soapbox. And I’m not even drunk yet 😋

          Liked by 3 people

    • Mick says:

      Ha, Vickie! I didn’t know what “polis” was, either; so I took a guess. I was too lazy to either look it up or to ask the question that you asked. So, thanks. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

  11. Theresa Morris says:

    Oh Charlie, I love your posts but sometimes they make my brain hurt. I’m not as politically or theologically learned as some of you, apparently, and laymen words and sentences would do this girl well! It’s like reading the fine print on contracts. I wish i had your level of intelligence on things such as these. I will muddle through, so keep them coming!!

    Liked by 10 people

  12. shjihmhs says:

    Well said Charlie and absolutely correct! In matters such as these (i.e. – “global warming”) the Church would (as you said) best teach the moral responsibility we have to be good stewards of the planet, and let the scientific community “hammer out” the truths and fallacies of the current debate as to the authenticity of claims by both the “naysayers” and the “believers”. Total transparency of the scientific facts must be presented before any decisions are reached and all politics must be put aside. Once the truth is known, then actions can be taken. But until then, I trust that our heavenly Father will take care of the matter, one way or another. God bless and stay safe!

    Liked by 7 people

  13. As usual Charlie, well thought out and presented. By some quirk, I was in the midst of reading my daily “The Catholic Thing.” Today’s short essay by Rev. Jerry J. Pokorsky. of the Diocese of Arlington, VA, makes a great comment which dovetails with your piece here:

    “Humanly speaking, there is something audacious, nay miraculous in this most poignant saying of Christ. Without a single scribe at His side, Jesus says, “Heaven and earth will pass away, but my words will never pass away.” Wisdom Incarnate shall never die.

    And Wisdom Incarnate will remain for each of us to discover again and again with His grace reminding us of a fundamental reality: our wisdom is not our own and never was or will be. Wise men are merely God’s good stewards of Divine wisdom, a wisdom to be placed reverently in the service of the Lord according to His plan.”

    Amen!

    https://www.thecatholicthing.org/2016/12/11/wise-men/

    Liked by 8 people

  14. paul meyer says:

    The hidden agenda behind this MMGW fraud is population control. It has been determined that the earth has gone through 5 or 6 separate ice ages. The obivious lesson is where is the evidence of a stable climate and what caused the end of the last ice age? For all the money spent on MMGW every person on earth could have been given access to clean drinking water!

    Liked by 11 people

    • Carole Kimbrough says:

      Wow Paul. You hit it right on the head when you said – “Where is the evidence of a stable climate”. I’m sharing that line with others!.Thanks!

      Liked by 4 people

      • jaykay says:

        Yeah, climate changes. Always has, always will. It’s the “anthropogenic cause” theory that’s open to debate, and should be open, as all theories should be, but so frequently is treated as “settled” and opponents demonised, and worse. I’m no climatologist, God knows, but I am pretty sceptical generally, and don’t like mob rule, especially in scientific fora. Honestly, that “97% of scientists agree…” they constantly parrot really riles me.

        Liked by 3 people

    • joanne1950 says:

      Yes, Paul, you did hit the nail on its head. About 2 years ago I was concerned with PF’s committee on global warming or climate change or whatever they deem to call their political agenda for the planet. I read that real scientists who dispute climate change or MMGW were purposely kept off the committee. (So much for the scientific method.) When I explored some members of the committee it became apparent that neither were they followers of Christ (aka atheists) but were indeed global population control advocates. How could this be? I have been educated in Catholic schools from first grade through
      university. I attended two Jesuit universities. Their intent was to educate me despite my gender and to teach me to read and think. I made the mistake of calling my pastor to discuss what I had read and to seek reconciliation with the Pope’s agenda. I was promptly called a Pharisee and told I didn’t respect the Pope. I was flabbergasted. The conversation brought me to tears after I hung up and it has taken almost all this time to forgive Monseigneur’s words and realize that he just was not paying attention to the details. In any case, I have often wondered who has the Pope’s ear because sometimes he seems so beret of the details or the effects of his often glib comments. For one he seems light on European History as it relates to Islam which, of course, being from South America is understandable but there is nothing like continuing your education when you have been given the task of representing Christ to the whole world. Does he even know how many Muslims are being evangelicalized by Christ himself? His dismissiveness smacks of some of our own Progressive leaders and yet they served God’s purpose to bring us to the realization of their hidden agenda on our Faith and freedom. Well, I still have faith in Christ’s agenda even if I don’t see where this is all leading. There is still heaps of pride out there and stubbornness is its twin. I so loved JP II and Benedict; I am still waiting for my heart to leap for Francis even as I totally admire the kind of priest he was in Argentina.

      Liked by 1 person

      • joanne1950 says:

        PS I have often compared in my mind the heliocentric church failure to MMGW too. It just seems like the bent of the few to hold power over the many and to deny freedom to whole populations is just another remix of communist doctrine. It’s like we can’t help ourselves. Well, perhaps, that is exactly how original sin has effected us forever. I often think the first sin wasn’t disobedience but that it was self pride. Lord in Heaven it seems like nothing changes. I am really getting myself down, time to close up this computer and run to a few prayers and drop all this worry for reliance in Christ.

        Liked by 1 person

  15. Magdalene says:

    I have read comments from two priests. One said that he already preaches on ‘global warming’ by letting the people know that hell is hot and lasts forever or something like that. Another priest has declared that his church is a ‘global warming preaching safe zone’.

    I don’t know about the pope being solidly orthodox although there are kernals of that but far too much of what he says and is gleefully reported cause many of the faithful to cringe. One day it will be undone.

    Liked by 5 people

  16. To separate the wheat from the chaff or the good fruit from the bad fruit it is necessary to identify which is which. The Divine judgment of God is to allow for both to appear & grow to maturity before sending the harvester lest their be a mistake that has an eternal consequence. Those who are destined to remain within the grace of God regardless of fear, doubt, or trepidation even those who openly question the course of direction will remain aboard the sinking ship knowing through faith & holy obedience that this is the Will God. Those who will later convert will set their own sails or swim toward the ailing ship at the time God calls. Those who through obstinacy attempt to subvert, rebel, & mutiny from within the ranks or from shipmates as well as those who abandon, viciously assail the ailing ship, or join the enemy of God are destined to Hell.

    Liked by 5 people

  17. Marci says:

    So much better said than I sometimes think which is… both Pope Francis and Mr. Trump might have something in common – runneth at the mouth problems. Gotta love it. 🙂 Blessings to all

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Katherine says:

    I figured something like this was bound to come. Global warming is another source of division for people. The very name has become something that now elicits a knee-jerk response of “That Liberal Crap” or “Yes, we’re Doomed! Better monitor cow flatulence”. The term Global Warming has become nothing more than a political tool of manipulation and division. The basic problem with Global Warming isn’t the numbers indicating warming . . .it’s the attitude of deep distrust in our creator it fosters . . . even more so now because it has been picked up by the politicians. This Earth is amazing, it’s beautiful, it’s surprising and there’s so much more to nature than we have figured out as of yet, and we have a God who ultimately governs all . . . Global Warming paints a grim picture that we have so much control over everything, that there is no benevolent Higher Power to turn to and that only by careful monitoring, regulating, bullying and loads of worrying will we have a chance at barely avoiding Doom. Global Warming creates a dependency on a political entity for ‘salvation’ and ultimate security. Priests already have all the tools they need to teach about care for the earth, for each other, love of God and neighbor . . . these are the things that will result in proper stewardship . . . they have the tools to help us all achieve holiness . . . why go out of the way for a course on “Global Warming”? It’s so stupid. How about a course on exorcism?? Hmm? I talked to a young priest last year who said that his seminary NEVER touched upon what to do if a parishioner has a problem that looked like it might be linked to demons? I was pretty shocked. He told me that he had parishioners telling him stories of levitating furniture among other things and he felt totally unprepared to deal with it. Now that’s a program the Vatican should look into putting in place for priests, that’s part of “things that priests should be taught”. You are absolutely right Charlie, when politics picked up Global warming and turned it into a cult . . .it’s basically propaganda at this point, really . . . it will only make matters worse if the Church picks up this politicized scientific theory as if it were fact and teaches it alongside the Faith. It’s annoying and has the potential to be really embarrassing. Oh well.

    Liked by 11 people

    • David says:

      About 40 years ago I was speaking with a Trappist monk. Abortion was just made legal in the US and the “ecology” movement was just getting off the ground. He told me it was his belief that the reason people were becoming very “concerned” with saving the whales and the trees was due to their over guilt for abortion. In other words, I may consent to end the life of a child growing in my womb but I’m not all that bad…look at how much I care for Mother Earth.

      Liked by 14 people

      • charliej373 says:

        I agree with that. I think a lot of those sorts of things is a neurotic response to our casual degradation of human life.

        Liked by 14 people

      • G.F. says:

        I’m sure you and the original commenter didn’t intend this, but doesn’t that come off as a bit judgmental?

        Like

        • charliej373 says:

          We are called not to make judgment in final things – that is reserved to God. But Our Lord calls us to “judge righteous judgment” in intermediate things.

          Liked by 7 people

          • leel004 says:

            THANK YOU!!!!! I have heard it said MANY a times NOT to judge, but Romans and a few other places in scripture are CLEAR to judge actions.

            Abortion was brought up in connection with justifying being ‘good’ because of saving the whales while silent or participating on killing babies, which is such a true minipulation of the human thought process. The same can be said about the other sexual issues. Sex before marriage without a covenant has wrecked such havoc to the family foundation. Words are constantly being redefined… whether it be redefining ‘gay’ ( one NO LONGER can use the word without homosexual association) or ‘family’ (now being pushed with such destructive force to include non labeled sex identity). Such tragedy and unneccessary confusion just like this whole global warming issue.
            And LOVED Magdalene’s priest comments about the warming of Hell!!! Let us assist in prayers (and suggestions if opened to it) that priest more often teach
            Hell is real but we don’t NEED choose it! God bless

            Liked by 1 person

      • Snowy Owl says:

        David, my comment isn’t so much concerning abortion, but people in general, anyway there’s a show on National Geographic running right now called, “I bought a Rainforest,” it’s about a photographer named Charlie Hamilton-James who bought 100 acres of Peruvian Rainforest, site unseen, for $10,000.00 to do what little he could to help save the forests from the illegal loggers clearing all the trees out and killing the forests.
        A funny thing happened though, while he was there. He ended up meeting and getting to know these “criminal Loggers” and their families, and this changed everything for him! He is now helping them solve the problem of illegal logging. He is teaching them, has hired them to change jobs, and is paying them to help him plant food bearing trees along side the indigenous trees so that they are able to support themselves, feed their families and at the same time, not harm the forests and animals. It’s a new way and it’s working and it’s wonderful.
        That’s my kind of environmentalism! 🙂 I’m praying his ideas reach others all over the world and people learn to put people first, and yet also learn how to protect the world God gave us! It does not have to be this or that..both are possible! With God all things are possible!

        Liked by 9 people

    • sodakrancher says:

      Thankfully Katherine ,there has been much more emphasis placed on exorcism and training exorcists in the Catholic Church according to some stuff i’ve heard and read

      Liked by 3 people

  19. Deacon Rick says:

    Hello,
    I did some searching and found the source document for the “quote” that is circulating in the secular media. The source is the Congregation for the Clergy’s updated norms for priestly formation, entitled The Gift of the Priestly Vocation:
    http://www.clerus.va/content/dam/clerus/Ratio%20Fundamentalis/The%20Gift%20of%20the%20Priestly%20Vocation.pdf

    Section 172 (the one the media has focused on) discusses the need for seminarians to have:

    172. A sufficient number of lectures should be dedicated to teaching the Social
    Doctrine of the Church. This is because the proclamation of and witness to the
    Gospel, to which the priest is called, has significant implications for human society,
    and aims, among other things, at building up the Kingdom of God. This implies a
    deep knowledge of reality and a reading of human, social and political relations,
    which determine the lives of individuals and peoples in the light of the Gospel. In this
    perspective one finds important themes pertaining to the life of the People of God,
    treated at length by the Magisterium of the Church such as the search for the
    common good, the values of solidarity and subsidiarity among peoples, the education
    of the young, work and the rights and duties connected with it, the meaning of
    political authority, the values of justice and peace, social support structures, and the
    accompaniment of those most in need.
    For some time now, experts and researchers, active in different fields of study,
    have turned their attention to the emerging planetary crisis, which is reflected strongly
    in the current Magisterium regarding the ‘ecological question’. Protecting the
    environment and caring for our common home– the Earth– belong fully to the
    Christian outlook on man and reality. They constitute in some way the basis for a
    sound ecology of human relations. Hence they demand, today above all, a “
    profound interior conversion. It must be said that some committed and prayerful Christians,
    with the excuse of realism and pragmatism, tend to ridicule expressions of concern
    for the environment. Others are passive; they choose not to change their habits and
    thus become inconsistent. So what they all need is an ‘ecological conversion’,
    whereby the effects of their encounter with Jesus Christ become evident in their
    relationship with the world around them. Living our vocation to be protectors of
    God’s handiwork is essential to a life of virtue; it is not an optional or a secondary
    aspect of our Christian experience. Therefore, it will be necessary for future
    priests to be highly sensitive to this theme and, through the requisite Magisterial and
    theological guidance, helped to “acknowledge the appeal, immensity and urgency of
    the challenge we face”. This must then be applied to their future priestly ministry, making
    them promoters of an appropriate care for everything connected to the protection of creation.

    This quote is on page 70 of a 91 page document, and does not refer to preaching on such matters. Most of the second paragraph is a quote from Pope Francis’ encyclical, Laudato Si, published May 24, 2015. Hopefully this will give people a good perspective on exactly what is being put forth for the formation of seminarians.

    The homily is mentioned in section 177, and only gives general guidelines for priestly formation on this topic.
    .

    Liked by 4 people

    • G.F. says:

      Nothing much wrong there, it seems.

      Like

    • Mack says:

      The document seems one sided in that it says some ridicule climate change, but it says nothing about the dubious evidence for it. Remember ” climategate” a few years ago when important data that did not fit the climate change narrative was being suppressed? This is what bothers me about Laudato Si. The pope never seriously considered the evidence to the contrary. I think that was a blunder. Also he seems to often say “rigidity” is so bad, but what does he even mean by that? At t point I don’t really care.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Alfred says:

        Just my take Mack, but it seemed to me Pope Francis might be criticizing the unwillingness of some to accept anything but the Latin Mass. One might say that of a person who liked, say, Michaelangelo, but believed that all the other great artists weren’t worthy of the name.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Judith says:

      thank you

      Liked by 2 people

  20. the phoenix says:

    Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI said in his first homily as Pope on Sunday, April 24, 2005:

    “The external deserts in the world are growing, because the internal deserts have become so vast.”

    However, his answer is not to jump on the political bandwagon of “global warming” or “climate change” proponents or endorse their brand of politics. His answer is more spiritual, for he goes on to say:

    “Therefore the earth’s treasures no longer serve to build God’s garden for all to live in, but they have been made to serve the powers of exploitation and destruction. The Church as a whole and all her Pastors, like Christ, must set out to lead people out of the desert, towards the place of life, towards friendship with the Son of God, towards the One who gives us life, and life in abundance.”

    The way I interpret it, the answer is to follow Christ out of the desert of sin.

    The source link for the quoted material above comes directly from the Vatican, for your reference:

    https://w2.vatican.va/content/benedict-xvi/en/homilies/2005/documents/hf_ben-xvi_hom_20050424_inizio-pontificato.html

    Liked by 5 people

    • Tony says:

      Yes, and as a matter of fact, those deserts that were growing when Benedict spoke, are now green with lush vegetation again. It was a natural cycle.

      Like

  21. Laurie says:

    Heee is a wonderful site for those who are considering the faith. It has been a great sign of hope to me: fortheloveofgodworldwide.org

    Liked by 2 people

  22. Laurie says:

    Charlie, do you mean to be ambiguous with your use of the word “polis”?

    Like

  23. Brilliant Charlie. Sometimes I get overwhelmed with all the “noise” in the media and find it trying to shake my peace. It’s when I have to go back to the basics of prayer and recognition that the gates of hell shall not prevail. Incidentally, I made it to Mither Angelica’s shrine for the first time this past Friday. I know you went there a few weeks back. It was just what I needed. I wrote about it here; https://veilofveronica.wordpress.com/2016/12/10/duc-et-altum/

    Liked by 4 people

  24. Randy131 says:

    OXYMORONIC STATEMENTS:

    “The simple truth is that while authorities of the Church often have good reason and always every right to weigh in on scientific, economic, and political (including diplomatic) matters, it has no binding formal authority on these matters, except to condemn means that are illicit by their very nature.”

    “The Church formally banned the books by astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus that claimed that the earth revolved around the sun, rather than vice versa as the errant scientific consensus of the time maintained. This culminated in the formal condemnation of astronomer Galileo Galilei in 1633 for maintaining the same.”

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      What is oxymoronic about these? An oxymoron is self-contradictory. There is nothing self-contradictory in these statements that I can see.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Josh P. says:

        Charlie, I think he is trying to say that the Church had and exerted (in Galileo’s time) the power and authority to ban books with scientific, economic, and political content (such as Galileo’s works) and therefore that contradicts your assertion that the Church has no binding formal authority on scientific, economic, and political matters.

        Randy131, I think Charlie is making a distinction between legitimate and illegitimate authority. Although Galileo was banned on theological grounds, the Church was actually overstepping it’s boundary by banning his scientific works. It had the power but not the God given right to do such a thing, and therefore it ended up being a catastrophic blunder for the Church.

        It would not be a contradiction to say, “An employer has the authority to expect hard work out of an employee because he pays him, but an employer does not have the authority to prevent an employee from speaking freely” even though you could point out examples of employers extorting employees into silence by threatening to fire them. They may have the power but they don’t have a legitimate right to do so.

        Liked by 1 person

        • charliej373 says:

          I can see the misunderstanding a bit, I suppose, but it completely missed the fundamental point I was making – which was that when Church authorities usurp authority they do not have by right, they risk embarrassing themselves and diluting the legitimate authority they do have. To use one of the most glaring instances of that simple truth does not contradict that point, but reinforces it. That was the point.

          Liked by 3 people

  25. usafriendofgoodwordofgod says:

    He often seems to equivocate between what is pastoral and what just irritates him. He has no real idea of what fake news vs. real news is either and yet he jumped into that fray with both feet that was not thoughtful if only even its timing when emotions are raw no matter what he actually meant by it. It seemed a good time to me to bring up how none of the saints had that problem despite living in the equivalent of the information age instead of shooting from the hip. Same with his comments on Latin Mass. I just trust that Jesus has a plan and somehow we’ll get through it come you know what or high water but do I miss a thoughtful steadiness, yes.

    Liked by 3 people

    • charliej373 says:

      In fairness, some of the saints did, indeed, have that problem. In fact, our first Pope, St. Peter, often exhibited that quality.

      Liked by 7 people

      • usafriendofgoodwordofgod says:

        Point taken, I was thinking of Ignatius in particular. Call me when we get to Mayberry, maybe everyone’s nerves are a little frayed at times and I know reading the news does not make for a peaceful interlude for me like it did 30 years ago when all I had to ponder was Peanuts.

        Liked by 3 people

    • aj says:

      USA friend…we sometimes think of the Saints as these “always perfect” men who saw GOD’S light as clear as though they were already in Heaven. There is absolutely no difference between the Saints of the first century and us Saints in the making…all of us see GOD via a tinted gaze. It’s why prophecy is never always expressed perfectly. I’m glad Charlie used St. Peter as the example because he seemed to speak first without sometimes thinking through what his next right step would be 🙂

      Our prayer for our Pope will make a difference…let’s keep praying that he becomes a Saint!

      Blessings
      aj

      Liked by 8 people

  26. Jeff in Minnesota says:

    Hello everyone…

    I have the luck in my parish to be spending four evenings with Fr. Chris Alar, who directs the National Shrine of Divine Mercy in Stockbridge Massachusetts. He is leading my little parish through a retreat on Divine Mercy, and St. Faustina.

    He has told me some things I knew about St. John Paul II already, but there have been surprises. Most notably, he told a story that came from a priest who spent 40 years at his side. Apparently (and this was kept more or less a secret), St. John Paul II every day would go into a side chapel, close the door, and have direct conversations with God; he was told many things, and among them was the idea that the purpose of his pontificate was to make sure that Faustina became the first saint of the 21st century. Divine Mercy is our last and only chance, and most of us know this.

    He was not to be interrupted, unless a very important phone call came, like from Ronald Reagan. Reagan was also shot in the same breath of years, and after this he did not make a single major policy decision without consulting with the Pope.

    I offer this not to confute you Charlie, nor challenge what you know of politics. I am an English teacher who has never belonged to a political party. Just the same, I dream such days may come again, when world leaders turn not away from heaven, but towards it, and consult with men who just might be in touch with it like St. John Paul II.

    It is not impossible Pope Francis is having the same conversations; it is very possible he knows things we do not.

    Liked by 11 people

  27. StClare says:

    For anyone who likes the Latin Mass and can’t make it to church for some reason (weather, sickness, “STORM”), Christ the King Catholic Church in Sarasota offers a daily live Mass:
    http://www.christthekingsarasota.org/Christ_the_King_HOME_2_7.html
    This does not take the place of going to Mass but it’s best we have found.

    Liked by 6 people

  28. sodakrancher says:

    Hail Mary ,Full of Grace
    the Lord is with thee.
    Blessed are you among woman
    and blessed is the fruit
    of your womb, Jesus

    Holy Mary Mother of God
    Pray for us sinners now and
    at the hour of death
    Amen

    Liked by 4 people

  29. caelids says:

    Charlie would you weigh in on the censorship issue, when you get a chance? Gov’t just approved another bill allowing CIA to fabricate news while EU and tech giants are blacklisting sites. Re the whole Michael Savage thing, I know you are concerned.

    Liked by 4 people

  30. andymh1 says:

    Dear Charlie

    Thank you so much for being a truthful and honest Prophet for our trying times. Here in South Africa I try to compare what you are saying to our position here and I am struggling to accept some of you writings.

    To me you sound like a racist and bigot when you condemn all that President Obama does, to us he is the hero for triumphing over racial prejudice, when he took office he came in when the American and world economy was in total failure and he managed to come through. He fought for health care for the poor. Yet he is criticized and condemned. Why????????

    Trump to us is a bully, a bigot, a rude person and very egotistical yet you praise him. In my stupid and humble opinion you speak as though America is the world, and God is only concerned about America.

    I hope I am wrong and you can berate me for it.

    Kind regards

    Andy Harris

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      And yet, Andy, Obama has inflamed racial divisions terribly since he came in, badly worsened the American economy, has made health care worse and less accessible. Everything he has touched he has made worse. He stole defeat from victory in Iraq, helped let the “Arab Spring” become murderous chaos in the Mideast, made relations between Russia and the US much worse with the “Reset”, dithered while China has militarized, excused terrorism and presided over growing terrorist attacks on our home soil. He has made us poorer, less safe, more sick, more out of work and more divided.

      I do NOT subscribe to identity politics. You seem to think that with a black man, even historical levels of incompetence should be celebrated or I am a racist. That is, in fact, a racist statement as it implies that black folks are not capable of the routine competence of even bad white officials. My black former son-in-law and I, who are close, were once ruefully discussing some of the president’s failures. He, like so many, was proud that to have a black president. I cheered him by suggesting that, though Obama was the first black president, Camron (his son and my grandson) would be the first effectively competent black president.

      To me – and all serious Christians who have had to endure his rule, Obama is a bully, a bigot, a rude person and insufferably egotistical in addition to being utterly incompetent – yet you praise him for it. When America is more stable and less divided, the world will be more safe and prosperous.

      Liked by 15 people

    • Mick says:

      Andy, I think that the difficulty you’re having is that since you don’t live in America, you’re not getting an accurate picture of what Obama is really like and what he has really done.

      And are you implying that everybody who dislikes or criticizes Obama is a bigot and a racist? Forgive me if I am misreading your comment; however, if that is in fact your position, then that, to me, would be a position utterly lacking both logic and Christian charity (aren’t we called not to judge others rashly?).

      As a black American and a descendant of slaves, I can tell you that in my opinion, Obama has been the worst thing to happen to race relations in this country perhaps since the Jim Crow laws were enacted in the Southern states after the Civil War ended in 1865. In fact, it’s quite possible that no one American has done more to foster racial animosity than has Obama (well, except perhaps for Francis Galton, the father of eugenics). Every word that Charlie has said about Obama is true; and if you lived in this country, you’d be able to see that for yourself.

      You call Obama a hero. In America, Obama is a hero to no one but the hopelessly uninformed, the ultraliberal, the “special snowflakes,” the Black Lives Matter and Occupy Wall Street types, and those who think it’s awesome to persecute people (like florists, bakers, and the Little Sisters of the Poor) who practice authentic Christianity and support/promote Judeo-Christian values.

      God bless you and your loved ones during the remainder of Advent and during the Christmas season.

      Liked by 14 people

      • Beckita says:

        Well said, Mick!

        Liked by 4 people

      • ann says:

        Eloquent, Mick. Just eloquent! It carries such a ring of authenticity and so articulate. I hope Andy reads it. God bless you and your loved ones this beautiful Advent season.

        Liked by 5 people

      • stclareseeds says:

        Beautifully said, Mick, with charity and truth! I love the community here, and how the “regulars” or TNRS team-members can stand up for things with charity instead of getting riled up and slinging frustration at each other. It has been a truly unique experience in so many ways, and a blessing to us, growing spiritually and in knowledge.

        Through Jesus and Mary,
        Sarah

        Liked by 5 people

        • Mick says:

          Thanks, Sarah (love your name, as it was also my grandmother’s). It’s super cold here in Michigan, which is making me think of next year’s garden. Think I’ll head over to your website and get me some garden seeds. 🙂

          Liked by 4 people

      • Doug says:

        Hi Mick, my farmer friend, who is black, says virtually the same as what you said about Mr. Obama causing more to divide on race relations than to build up. I see the same thing. Well articulated.

        Liked by 4 people

    • Lake Johnson says:

      Not to belabor the argument, Andy, but I’m curious for some examples of how Obama triumphed over racial prejudice. Being black and getting elected is a type of triumph to the extent that it proved that most people are not racist, at least insofar as they elected a black president. But specifically what did he do in 8 years to leverage that triumph into real progress for racial harmony? This is similar to his getting a Nobel Peace Prize for running a successful campaign. He didn’t do much after that to further peace.

      I’m not one to bash every single thing Obama did, but I also don’t like to hear blanket platitudes when they are false. For example, he didn’t fix the economy. The financial system learned no lessons from 2008 and after their bailout continued the same behaviors and even amplified them. Why wouldn’t they? Zero people were prosecuted by Obama’s justice department for fraud.

      I will give Obama credit for improving the health care access for some people. However the system is still massively overpriced and broken, as we are seeing by these huge premium spikes and massive pharmaceutical company profits while lifespans decrease and opiate addictions spike..

      To use a non-USA example, what has happened in South Africa since Mandela? Much more so than Obama, Nelson Mandela was a great symbol of perseverance and the defeat of racist ideals. But his party unfortunately was corrupt and ineffective, and the country’s political situation is not looking good. We need competent leaders, not just symbols.

      Liked by 2 people

    • sodakrancher says:

      i am a conservative white man Andy . I have nothing against any man or womans skin color , There are a number of black americans I would vote for in a second to be president of our country. Because they are honorable people who respect life , our country, and our constitution . None of which by his own actions and words does Mr Obama.

      And he did not fight for health care for the poor people . he fought for what was basically a Government takeover of the largest industry in our country . Our medical system. It had nothing to do with helping the poor people . As Charlie correctly replied to you , He and his co-horts in our national legislature and the supreme court has worsened health care for all Americans. Made it hugely more expensive. As has happened in any Country in history that has experienced “Socialized medicine” and that is what Obama Care is or what its outcome will be .

      There are many very good and honorable Black men and women in this Country who understand that true freedom is not free.

      Some of the Black Americans worst enemies in our country are some of the black communities own self professed “leaders ”

      Who empower themselves politically and economically by keeping their black communities in political and economic slavery by insisting that their people remain dependent on Government entitlements rather than their own independence and God -given natural abilities to provide for themselves

      Read what Walter Williams , Thomas Sowell , or Clarence Thomas (all black men) have to say about these issues

      Liked by 4 people

  31. Linda says:

    I have had to “remove myself” from “so-called” Catholic groups out there…I can’t believe how catholics who should know better are not knowing better…Thank you Charlie for defending our Pope.. Father Larry Richards is doing a good job of it too with all his..”I stand with the Pope. Period” tweets and posts. Time to buckle down, I think, let go, and let God. TNRS.😊

    Liked by 7 people

  32. zeniazenia says:

    Good morning TNRS,
    I believe Holy Father Francis is asking us to become integrated, grown up Catholic persons, adults leading the Church in the 21st Century. He is asking us to walk our talk, digging deeper below our surface than we have ever been asked to dig in previous generations or by previous Popes, (although all the saints successfully modeled this for us in their own lives, including JP and Benedict). It has been my experience that ‘Integrity’ results in the gift of a peaceful life. In his teachings and statements, Holy Father Francis is intentionally blurring the treasures and responsibilities of the Church; liturgy, orthodoxy, pastoral assistance, evangelization, pedagogy and charity, so all the branches culminate in Jesus, Our Vine. How often have we heard from JPII, ‘Jesus Christ is the answer to man’s most profound questions about the meaning of life’. Francis is teaching us that our ideal is to live in Jesus, the Word made flesh –all goodness, all the time, all mechanics, well oiled, operating at the same time. Happily the generation of Francis seems to get this and is already amazing at performing in this way, while we also have the generation of JPII living their charism and the generation of the church in the 60s fighting still, the dysfunctional lack of integrity from those days. Everyone is welcome but beware– Francis may call you out -ha !!!
    As a servant to this model, I see that Charlie is ‘doing his darnedest’ to teach us all to recognize and honor the God-given mechanics found in philosophy, authority, politics and science– the mechanics that we will successfully integrate (unlike the Galileo mess), if we continue to do our homework and our stretching exercises with prayer and trust and patient endurance. Charlie’s lessons ask us to use some labels so we can be sure to organize societal ideas and responsibilities into the corresponding compartments, similar to a science lab and also similar to the proper use of language. Only after we know what we are looking at can we tie it all together and funnel it all into our yoke with Jesus, Who is the goal of our catechism. :0) Our Lady of Tepeyac — pray for us

    Liked by 2 people

  33. susan0409 says:

    This is a post I saw any thoughts on this man post

    TRUMP IS FILLING THE WHITE HOUSE WITH INTERNATIONAL BANKERS AND BUSINESS MEN … THE 7 HEADS OF ROME WHICH ARE DEMONS IN THOSE HILLS AND FALLEN ANGELS IN OPPOSITION TO OUR FATHERS AND OUR 7 CHURCHES ARE THESE… (edited out the rest)

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      Susan, as I noted, I edited out the rest of this screed. Please do not get caught up in overheated, feverish nonsense given in apocalyptic terms. Do not be distracted by such things. God calls you to acknowledge Him, take the next right step and be a sign of hope. The devil loves to distract you from what YOU are called to do with panicked screeds like this. I have gotten such things from disturbed minds since the day I was first involved in media. They did disturb me at first, until I realized how many disturbed minds there are out there and how reason has no power over them. You simply stumbled onto such a thing. That is not the way to Rescue, but to barking at the moon. Don’t let it disturb you or keep you from doing the little you can right in front of you.

      Liked by 10 people

  34. Meriadoc says:

    Charlie, you wrote: “I have had occasion to be dismayed at times by his seeming reflexive personal preference for temporal methods that are coercive and authoritarian – and that, when tried historically, have almost always yielded the opposite results of his nobly stated ends.”

    Agreed, but the Holy Father does himself no favors by speaking into every live microphone available and opining about every little thing. And although he is not heterodox, isn’t that kind of a low bar for a pope? He has a terrible habit of introducing confusion gratuitously. He is not as well-spoken as as previous popes. In fact , I consider Pope Francis the most verbally maladroit public figure since George W. Bush (Sorry if that comment raises peoples’ hackles here, and if it’s inappropriate you can refuse to post it.)

    I’m fully aware that his comments are often taken out of context. I know that the press willfully distorts what he says to promote false agendas. But is it too much to ask the Holy Father to speak in ways less easy to distort?! The hostility of the press to the Church is not a new problem. This pontiff seems to have special problems maintaing clarity and dispelling confusion.

    His recent comments on “fake news” were accurate enough, but not particularly profound (the old Don Henley song “Dirty Laundry” makes the same points more memorably). Francis’ one addition was needlessly introducing the notions of “coprophilia” and “coprophagia.” Really?! And please don’t tell me that I’m missing Pope Francis’s “peasant charm” or overlooking his “endearing earthiness.” No no, I’m sorry, those comments are just gross!

    Liked by 2 people

    • ann says:

      Meriadoc–I have to agree with you. The scatological references were so disturbing. So utterly disturbing. How does he even KNOW about this? I had to look it up to find out what he was talking about. And then knowing what it is, why in the good heaven would he use such references. Just so troubling..

      Like

      • Meriadoc says:

        Ann, I went back and read what Pope Francis said, and I can a certain humor in his comments. I guess you had to be there. He certainly has an offbeat sense of humor. Nevertheless, his comments had an “ick-factor” that won’t quite go away.

        I guess that’s the problem with talking about Francis’ statements–there’s sense to them, but you have to try so hard to figure it out. You read what he supposedly said, then what people said about what he said, then what people said about what the other people said, and oh my gosh, it wears you out! I’ve taken to a avoiding discussions of Francis’s comments on most things. It’s just not worth it.

        Like

        • ann says:

          Nope, it’s not worth it. You’re right. Starting now, I’m invoking RJW’s wise “mantra’–talk less, pray more. the one thing that will help in all situations with PF or anyone else is to pray for them and for us. Now to take my own advice!!

          Liked by 2 people

  35. ann says:

    StClare thank you for the link! I do have high regard for the Priestly Fraternity of St Peter. It’s wonderful to know that this live Mass is available daily. Wow. One of the many wonderful things about this blog site is finding so many treasures of this sort that people share. I go to Mass wherever I can find it–Novus Ordo or Traditional. The Mass is the Mass and I am so grateful to have access to it at any time and anywhere. Fortunately where I live we have a wonderful daily Mass schedule between three venues–two in the morning–one in the evening. We are blessed. No Latin Mass but if I want to drive a bit it is available. Thanks again for the link.

    Liked by 4 people

    • StClare says:

      Because of a snowstorm we had to fall back to the online Mass this Sunday.

      We go to church at St. Mary’s Oratory in Wausau, Wi, a 1hr and 20 minute drive 1 way for us. 72 miles one way.
      http://www.institute-christ-king.org/wausau/
      It is ran by “The Institute of Christ the King Sovereign Priest” and is in union with the church. It is a very vibrant young church that has been growing faster and faster. Just recently we were awarded a second priest because our first priest was becoming overloaded. The choir is almost professional quality.

      Liked by 1 person

  36. Tony says:

    The new directive about seminaries is much more dangerous than people have pointed out. First, they relaxed the rules on gays entering the seminaries. Before, they could not enter seminaries at all if they had deep seated gay tendencies. Now, in the new directive, they can enter seminary, but must be cured of their tendencies three years before graduating. Now, we all know what this will mean in practice. This new rule will allow large numbers of gay men to enter the seminary. They will pretend they have been cured, and then go on to become priests. So, now Pope Francis is going to let large numbers of gay priests back in the seminaries.

    Second, Pope Francis says that priests have to learn how to not be “rigid”. In years past, if any faithful Catholic tried to get into the seminary, they would kick him out and say he was “too rigid” simply because he was a normal Catholic man.

    Third, now they say that priests will have to be full blown global warming advocates. The document even says that there are some who refuse to accept global warming, and these people must be “converted” This is so bizarre, using religious language of conversion to apply to anyone who does not share your political or pseudo scientific beliefs.

    Pope Francis is now out to change out seminaries, and it is all for the worst, I am afraid.

    Liked by 1 person

    • LukeMichael says:

      Tony my grandmother charitably called this kind of stuff malarkey. Perhaps you might at least provide a reference for your discourse. Just last week the Vatican said gay men are not appropriate candidates for the priesthood.

      https://cruxnow.com/global-church/2016/12/07/vatican-reiterates-homosexuals-shouldnt-priests/

      Also the stories about preaching global warming from the pulpit are greatly exaggerated. These stories are coming from websites with “Catholic” in their name but are privately owned. Certainly they have political allies in high places but do not ascribe their motives to Pope Francis!

      Liked by 4 people

      • charliej373 says:

        Thanks LukeMichael. I have been rushed at the site the last week and have not been vetting comments as carefully as I should. I will get back on the ball. Thanks for picking up the slack.

        Liked by 3 people

      • Mick says:

        Ha, LukeMichael! My grandmother, a farmer’s wife, had an earthier, agricultural term for “malarkey”; but since this is a family site, I shan’t repeat it. 😉

        Liked by 4 people

      • Tony says:

        LukeMichael, everything you said was wrong.

        As for changing the requirements for admission to seminary

        http://www.churchmilitant.com/news/article/vatican-oks-transitory-gay-seminarians

        While the above quote [from the new document] is in keeping verbatim with a 2005 instruction from the Congregation for Catholic Education, it nevertheless contradicts the updated and more restrictive guidelines put out in 2008 by the same congregation titled “Guidelines for the use of Psychology in the Admission and Formation of Candidates for the Priesthood.”

        The 2008 guidelines direct seminaries to dismiss men who have not only “deep-seated homosexual tendencies” but also an “uncertain sexual identity.” Of this latter group, the 2008 guidelines say their “path of formation will have to be interrupted.”

        But this isn’t the case in the current manual on seminary formation just promulgated by the Congregation for the Clergy, which leaves such men in the seminary to work out their “transitory problem.” Paragraph 200 of the manual says of these men, “Nevertheless, such tendencies must be clearly overcome at least three years before ordination to the diaconate.”

        The 2008 document, on the other hand, spoke of psychological deficiencies in seminarians, pointing out, “Such immaturity would include … uncertain sexual identity; deep-seated homosexual tendencies; etc. If this should be the case, the path of formation will have to be interrupted.”

        It went on to list problems that “block the vocational journey,” which include “a sexual identity that is confused or not yet well defined.”

        It also didn’t allow conflicted seminarians to stay in formation to work out their psychological difficulties. “If it should be ascertained that the candidate needs therapy, this therapy should be carried out before he is admitted to the seminary or house of formation.”

        While I don’t particularly like Church Militant, it does look like they have a good grasp on what has changed here.

        This article does a reasonably good job of demonstrating the changes made from the 2005/2008 documents on this subject. As a matter of fact, Father James Martin, a pro gay priest, has already tweeted out that he believes the new document allows gays to become priests as long as they remain celibate. It looks like he is relying more on the fact that Pope Francis and company will do nothing about it if seminaries do take that course, rather than the actual wording of the document.

        As for global warming, YES, the new instruction indicates that priests are to be advocates for global warming, and it indicates that those parishioners who do not believe in global warming need to be “converted” and it is the priests responsibility to do this.

        Simply go read the actual document. I don’t know how you can come away with any other interpretation.

        Liked by 1 person

        • LukeMichael says:

          Tony

          I would be much happier if you had said: “your mother wears army boots.”

          No doubt there are divisions in the Church and devious conspirators, even in the Vatican. But Jesus says they will not prevail against his Church and I believe Him. So should you.

          Church Militant is a privately owned website that has taken on the office of St Michael, probably without permission. They have put me on the side of scepticism with regard to their points of view.

          Their article is based on directives from 2005 and 2008 and the reference I gave you was from 2016. Have you read them all?

          The guide on priestly formation was very general but did encourage priests to be informed about our obligation to be familiar with general known scientific concepts. I believe this is appropriate and I also think individuals may twist these guidelines. Still, the Church will prevail so let us not get our knickers in a twist!

          Meanwhile, Francis was not Pope in 2005 or 2008. Why do you rail against him?

          Liked by 2 people

        • LukeMichael says:

          DOUG!?

          Liked by 1 person

          • We renamed him DDP.

            Liked by 1 person

          • DDP? I’m confused. I thought he just rebranded himself as DPC.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Doug says:

            Hi LM, are you looking for me to back you up here or are you referring to YD referring to me as DDP?   I think I know what DDP is and if it is true,  then YD gets a sad face.

            Anyway, I view a vocation as a calling and not a job or a career.  So I don’t see a shortage of priests.  I see a shortage of men answering their calling.  Never the less, God gives us free will.  I believe people are called by God and thus, it is a discernment process between the individual and God and the church and the individual.  As an individual, we need to check our motivation and our objective is to uphold the “official” church teaching.  I think there is a lot of confusion today in what church teaching is and there are powers trying to change it to suite their desires.  I still go back to what I once heard a Holy priest in the Eastern rite church say when he got lots of questions from teenage boys looking to see how far they can go with their girl friend.  He said they are asking the wrong questions.  By their questions, they were looking at themselves and not the interest of the girl.  The question should be “How can I respect you or make you more holy?”.  A vocation is a call to service and that includes all vocations including marriage.  Our goal whether a priest or not is to live Holy lives, to love others, to get ourselves and as many others as we can to heaven.  This is a call to action for all of us with faith.  For some of us, it’s being faithful as a wife or husband or just raising our kids right.  For others, it may be more public.  We are all different and all have a unique calling to do the good in front of us that God calls each of us to do.  It’s taking our own next right step and being a sign of hope for others.  It’s in these little things and if God calls us to bigger things, he will lead us.  Ok.  I wax on too much.  Merry Christmas LM!

            Sent from Doug Pounds mobile

            Liked by 2 people

          • Doug says:

            Ok.  My opinion on homosexuals and priesthood.  If one still has tendencies and inclinations, then I question whether they should be ordained and probably should not be ordained, but if one is working to reform and agrees with the church and the churches teaching then they could possibly enter the seminary, but need to show humility and willingness to change. Could one sneak through?  Possibly.  I hope the vetting process could weed this out. Now, Roman’s 3:23 “since all have sinned and all have fallen short of the glory of God”.  So it’s not just homosexual tendencies that need to be looked at, but the person as a whole.  There may be other sinful tendencies that hold us back.  Again, what is the motivation?  Is the person taking active steps to change?  Are they showing progress?  James 4:1 “Where do wars and contentions among you come from? Is it not from this: from your own desires, which battle within your members?”  Then there is James 3:1 “My brothers, not many of you should choose to become teachers, knowing that you shall receive a stricter judgment.” Lastly, James 3:14-18 “But if you hold a bitter zeal, and if there is contention in your hearts, then do not boast and do not be liars against the truth.15 For this is not wisdom, descending from above, but rather it is earthly, beastly, and diabolical. 16 For wherever envy and contention is, there too is inconstancy and every depraved work. 17 But within the wisdom that is from above, certainly, chastity is first, and next peacefulness, meekness, openness, consenting to what is good, a plenitude of mercy and good fruits, not judging, without falseness. 18 And so the fruit of justice is sown in peace by those who make peace.” This part of the above scripture really jumps out at me “But if you hold a bitter zeal, and if there is contention in your hearts, then do not boast and do not be liars against the truth”. If we are struggling with resentment and have a zeal against a truth then this is a form of pride and arrogance.  Again, what is my motivation?  Am I asking the right questions?  Do I look to uphold the church?  Do I look to make her Holy?  OK.  I wax on again.

            Sent from Doug Pounds mobile

            Liked by 1 person

          • Yup: Double-speak Doug: So I don’t see a shortage of priests. I see a shortage of men answering their calling.

            [Sad Face]
            🙃

            Liked by 2 people

  37. madkatmomma says:

    Well, on a lighter note, Happy feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, or Tepeyac as she is affectionately known here! She loves us and the Holy Father and guides us all to her Son! Let us rejoice in her honor and trust in her love and intersession!
    http://www.bigccatholics.com/2015/12/seven-amazing-facts-about-miraculous.html

    Liked by 9 people

    • Beckita says:

      Beautiful madkat! A recent finding of the Tilma is the song our Mother left for us. (I call it a Love Song for Her children.) When the Tilma is laid on its side, horizontally, a musical staff can be constructed and the stars become the notes of the melody. When I first heard this music, I was venerating a Relic Image that was a replica of the original Tilma to which it had been touched. It was commissioned by Cardinal Carrera to bring the graces from the Shrine to those who could not make the pilgrimage to Mexico. Lee shared this hauntingly beautiful music a few posts back. When I first prayerfully received this song, I experienced an interior shift bringing inner healing. All Glory to God for such a Mother!

      Liked by 7 people

  38. Tim Crawley says:

    After reading a biography, and I believe it was by a Protestant author, we should try to look through the lens at Galileo Galilei with eyes of the sixteenth century. The Church was trying to figure out how much of the Bible was steeped in reality. Until that time, for fourteen hundred years, the belief was that the sun revolved around the earth. The proof of the earth revolving around the sun was actually instigated or hypothesized during the times of the Pharoahs. What the Church was trying to do, according to this author, was to make sure the laity, who for the most part could not read or write, would not make the mistake of straying from the Word of God. That’s the bottom line. It was also common knowledge at the time that one got a cold from a ‘miasma’–a dark cloud that floated through a bedroom window in the middle of the night.. And we all know how that worked out.

    Like

    • charliej373 says:

      If you read the history in detail, Church authorities were NOT terribly disturbed by this discovery, that was routinely being proved. Authorities knew that much of the scientific material and some of the historical material in the Bible was figurative or metaphorical. Rather, there was a tacit agreement between some clerical and religious authorities to be rid of this troublesome crank on terms that had nothing to do with the actual irritants – but were still defensible in the 16th Century. I do not care for hagiography that tries to excuse the Church’s secular blunders (which it is NOT infallible on) as somehow holy in a clever way. St. John Paul did well when he bluntly apologized for the Church’s blunder on this matter in no uncertain terms – and recognized it was one of the dangers of the Church asserting authority it does not have. St. John Paul spoke bluntly, clearly and took responsibility for such things.

      Liked by 4 people

  39. Padraig says:

    Charlie – always an interesting read. I argue that the Church was right to condemn Galileo because he was examining the stars outside of faith (reason without faith), and so while his measurements may have been accurate, the final result of his work was disastrous for souls taken in context.

    I just wanted to comment about your predictions concerning the peaceful transfer of power on Jan. 20. Like everyone else, I guess I will wait and see what happens. However, just my cynical analysis of world events leads me to argue that a confrontation with China, and an alliance with Russia, are MUCH more likely under a Trump presidency.

    Anyway, I renew my support for you, and my promise of prayers for you.

    Liked by 1 person

  40. Matthew says:

    For those interested in a thorough, readable and humorous account of the Galileo affair or more accurately the history of the transition from a geocentric to a heliocentric model of the solar system I would suggest this series of posts by the inimitable Mike Flynn.

    http://tofspot.blogspot.com/2013/10/the-great-ptolemaic-smackdown-table-of.html

    If you have a taste for dry wit, you will not get through the first few paragraphs without laughing out loud. Enjoy!
    Matthew

    Liked by 2 people

    • charliej373 says:

      This was absolutely hilarious, Matthew! Sometimes I look at moderns and think we are midgets who stand on the shoulders of giants and think ourselves giants because of it. We better start growing more and whining less.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mick says:

      Matthew, I’ve been reading for about 90 seconds; but already I have tears in my eyes, and my stomach muscles are aching from laughing so hard. OK, I’m gonna go read some more….

      Liked by 1 person

      • charliej373 says:

        Is this just not brilliantly inspired, Mick? I love it!

        Liked by 2 people

        • Mick says:

          I know, right? I’m going to have Joseph (our resident science nerd) read it. He’ll dig the science as well as the quirky humor.

          Liked by 3 people

        • Matthew says:

          If you are interested in some great leisure reading check out his science fiction novel, Eifelheim. Aliens crash land in a German parish in 1320. The pastor has just returned from studying scholastic philosophy in Paris. He meets the aliens and must decide whether to evangelize and baptize them since they are clearly rational souls combined with material bodies (that is your basic philosophical definition of a human being).

          Liked by 2 people

  41. joni bunte says:

    Please see the recent interview with Lord Monkton of England on how he and several scientific/mathematical heavy weights have disproved the global warming. Their findings took 10 yrs. and what was discovered is that the original mathematic calculations that were used were flawed to begin with!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  42. Harriet says:

    as a convert, I find this pope on the scary side. prayers.

    Liked by 1 person

  43. nanannda2 says:

    Kris R and I are on a mini retreat together. We have been praying and sharing about the confusion around us and seeking direction in the midst of it. How are we to discern truth with all the chaos swirling around us? How are we to make sense of so many of the Pope’ s words and actions? As we’ve prayed and listened, it seemed to make sense that an important element of the Pope’s blunders is their foundation on his focus on social justice. “Social justice” is a philosophy that embraces the idea of serving the needs of man, the priority being his temporal needs: of the body (food, clothing, shelter); emotions (to be valued, accepted, understood); the mind ( to be educated and given the tools to succeed in life). It is serving man for .an’s sake. The social justice influence in our society today has produced the prevailing philosophy of tolerance, relativity, “I’m OK, you’re OK”, personal freedom and individual choice without consideration of others or of consequences, false mercy and compassion, entitlement and all the rest. It is secular humanitarianism. It is doing good without God.
    The difference between humanitarianism and true social justice is demonstrated in the life and ministry of St. Teresa of Calcutta. She served the poor because she saw and served Christ in them. She showed mercy and compassion because she saw Christ suffering in them and wanted to relieve his suffering. She treated them with dignity because they were created by God in his own image. She cared for their human, earthly needs with her eye on their eternity. She cared for the body because it housed the soul beloved by God.
    It seems that the social justice mentality might explain the reason for appointing a Cardinal to a prominant position who is radically pro- homosexual, to the point of declaring that gay sex can be equated with Christ’s own self- giving!! The message of this appointment is one of false mercy and misguided compassion, and it is deadly. Giving communion to the divorced and remarried, whose status is made clear both in Scripture and Church teaching, that they are in the state of mortal sin) is the same – – false mercy. This kind of mercy leads to scandal, confusion and even death. The statements on global warming focus on human concerns as well.
    The whole world has been led astray by the ideology of social justice, and is intent on doing good without God. It is a way if declaring ourselves god’s so that we have no need of him who is truly God.
    Charlie has said that Pope Francis is definitely th Pope of the Storm. That seems to mean that he is an instrument in God’s hands to accomplish his purposes in the Storm: to reveal the lies, expose the enemy, test the faithful, separate the wheat from the chaff. Let us pray for our Pope and for each other, that each of us will be faithful to the task before us- – – to follow God’s will and be a signpost that leads to Jesus, our only hope.
    From the beginning Pope Francis was embraced by liberals and the media because they interpreted his words and actions as a sign that the Catholic Church is (finally!) changing and moving into the modern era. They were delighted to think that the Church might be coming out of the Dark ages of moral judgement and intolerance into the light of this new age, where everything is acceptable and everyone is free because their is no right or wrong and truth is what I believe it to be.
    Perhaps, sometime soon, the Pope will say, “I made a mistake. Forgive me. Our God of mercy forgives all and restores all. Let us come together in truth.” OUR pope Francis May be making blunders along the way, but we need not worry that the truths and teachings of our Holy Faith will be changed, distorted or lost. Jesus promised us this. He has founded his Church on Peter, and the gates of Help shall not prevail against it. We are his Bride and he will, in the end, deliver his Bride unto himself “without spot or wrinkle or any such thing”. So let us be in perfect peace and have unbounded confidence and hope, no matter how deep the darkness gets. JESUS IS LORD!

    Liked by 4 people

  44. nanannda2 says:

    Please excuse MY blunders! I am typing this on my phone with a very small window and also the auto-correct did some strange things. Don’t you hate that??

    Liked by 2 people

  45. mdg2007 says:

    Hey Everybody,
    This is off topic, but something I’ve wanted to ask you all for awhile. Do any Next Right Steppers want to friend request me on facebook? I was hoping there was a fb group that included some of you, but there doesn’t seem to be. I’m guessing there is a reason for that? I’m relatively new here, so maybe this has come up in the past. The community here often gives me that extra bit of strength in unity to joyfully participate in whatever battles the day brings. I would certainly welcome some signs of hope on my feed! Here is where you can find me: https://www.facebook.com/lisa.mancini.161
    In Christ, Through Mary,
    -Lisa

    Liked by 1 person

    • charliej373 says:

      There is no Facebook group…but we have a woman on the team now – Lisa Huber – who specializes in social media, so we may get something going. I have been keeping her busy putting together lists of coordinators for me.

      Liked by 3 people

      • mdg2007 says:

        Thanks Charlie- I know you and your team are BUSY. I can’t be alone when I ask Lisa Huber to (pretty) please put a social media group together! This forum is wonderful, but a fb group (or something like it) would create an easier way to share and offer prayers, encouragement, and insights (especially as we get deeper and deeper in “it”) with those of us who don’t wish to remain anonymous. I’m happy to help if you let me know what I can do.

        Liked by 2 people

      • mdg2007 says:

        Also, Have you read “Time To Meet The Angels” by Mark Miravalle? If so, would you recommend it? After I found your story and this forum, I became very interested in Angels. This little book has been extremely helpful to me as I had almost no prior knowledge of angelology.

        Like

    • Doug says:

      Lisa, I don’t use Facebook. I consider Charlie’s site to be the healthy alternative, but I can certainly see FB being used as a witness referencing many things that are said here. Welcome by the way!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Mick says:

      Lisa, in lieu of a FB group, Tom (one of us here) started a private forum where we Steppers can get together and hang out. Here’s the link:

      http://nextrightstep.forumotion.com/login

      Also, welcome to the TNRS family. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  46. LisasMania7 says:

    Greetings, Lisa Huber here:
    I’ve worked in faith-based communication for years now, and began a facebook page for marketing purposes just when it started, even before my 7 kids entered the arena. As a result, I now maintain a page of almost 3,000 Christian “friends” worldwide who are mostly Catholic.

    About 20 years ago, when I first started homeschooling my youngest 5, computers & the internet were new and I joined a discussion group through Bud McFarland’s website called CatholicCity. A group of about 10 of us moms started connecting in a meaningful way. In fact, to this day, we truly believe that facebook was created for us, but we have generously welcomed many others to join in 🙂

    Pope Benedict once asked us to “give the internet a soul,” and I believe that when used properly, fb and twitter can do just that.

    I was encouraged during the Egyptian revolution a few years back, to see that many were able to communicate to the outside world through fb even after the gov shut some stuff down. I was told that they could do this using satellites. I love this concept way too much to research whether or not it is true 🙂

    Besides butting into my children’s Iives, I primarily use fb for evangelizing. I have friended many priests and deacons over the years and delight in giving their work a larger platform. I also promote Charlie’s work extensively, through posts on my Timeline, as well as sprinkled throughout many many other people’s posts when I believe that interjecting his messages is appropriate. I’m responding to all prayer requests with The Prayer of Miraculous Trust now too, as well as the Full Of Grace website for ordering it.

    From what I have heard, many other online gatherings, like dating sites and certain chat rooms, really do simply create a false sense of intimacy. I don’t find that to be so with fb IF you gather your set of ‘friends” wisely. Over the years we have all shared in births, deaths, weddings, graduations, illnesses, vacations, moves, etc…and just an endless array of human events. It is kind of like we are all connected spiritually, heaven-tied while still incarnated. FB is a God-send, literally, to many shut-ins and older folks who would otherwise have little to no social interactions with others. It is always so moving when an adult child of an older fb user posts on their parent’s page to report on their passing. That we can mobilize thousands of prayer warriors in a few hour’s notice is thrilling to say the least!

    I have no idea whether or not it will ever be put to use again after The Storm, but I certainly hope so because then everyone will be able to check-in, so to speak, and share their stories about how they weathered their trials. If so, from what I have heard, it will certainly serve as an alarming source of shame for many after their conversions. I have never experienced anything horribly sinful, simply because my friends are all practicing Christians. Go figure. But from what I have heard, like every other thing in the world, the evil one has certainly stirred up the lower selves of many rendering parts of fb terrible 😦

    Facebook can be a wonderful tool when used sincerely, and maybe once the right people are converted, it will continue to be so. I have recently upped my usage greatly as the Storm heightens because people are literally freaking-out out there and desperately in need of comfort and an outlet to be assured that they are not alone in their reactions.

    That being said, I invite anyone reading this to please feel free to “friend” me. You should be able to find me as Lisa Maria Huber in Georgia. I have no doubt that when you find my page, you will see that I already have many of the same friends that you have, we really are one. 🙂

    I DO ask, however, that you do not go “liking” any of the personal photos in my albums, especially of my kids, because then it will insert them back into my newsfeed and others will start liking them again as well and annoy my children GREATLY. I really don’t like to make my fb about me anyway. Kids have moved much of their activity to instagram and snapchat anyway because “old people have taken over facebook.” 🙂
    I allow debates on my posts, but never vulgarity or meanness, and I take no prisoners. 🙂
    Do, however, consider sharing posts that you believe could bless and inform your own circle (especially Charlie’s) because for the time being, this is the best way to answer the call to evangelize globally, or at least in your own little part of the world.

    May God Bless Us All In A Mighty Way~~~

    Liked by 3 people

  47. Bob says:

    And article on the atmosphere at the Vatican:
    http://cal-catholic.com/climate-of-fear-at-the-vatican/

    Is this the blunder of Francis that Charlie speaks of? Let us pray for our church and for our holy father!

    Like

    • Bob says:

      And from this article and from several other snippets it is certainly true that Francis is good at being compassionate and kind to poor sinners but he may need to learn the same compassion and kindness with those he considers “rigid” and whom he may disagree with. Remember to pray for the Pope daily folks.

      Liked by 1 person

  48. Two words, Love It!
    Excellent work, with a clear and concise point.

    Liked by 2 people

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