Faith and Reason and Miracles

In these days of making the novena together, encompassing all our intentions in prayer, I discovered an article by Fr. Dwight Longenecker too great to keep to myself.

Fr. Dwight Longenecker says the Miracle of the Sun happened in Fatima on October 13, 1917. We have documentary, eyewitness, and photographic evidence that 70,000 people ‘saw’ the sun spin, felt it was yanked from the sky and that it plunged to earth. Everyone said they saw the same thing. Everyone was so frightened they screamed and ran for their lives. Clearly something happened, what was it? The answer given by believers is more rational than the answer given by atheists.

Fatima and the Atheists

Fr. Longenecker takes on Richard Dawkins’ faulty refutation of the Miracle of the Sun. Father quotes Dawkins from his book, The God Delusion:

“On the face of it, mass visions, such as the report that seventy thousand pilgrims at Fatima in Portugal in 1917 saw the sun ‘tear itself from the heavens and come crashing down upon the multitude,’ are harder to write off…It is not easy to explain how seventy thousand people could share the same hallucination. But it is even harder to accept that it really happened without the rest of the world, outside Fatima, seeing it too – and not just seeing it, but feeling it as the catastrophic destruction of the solar system, including acceleration forces sufficient to hurl everybody into space. Obviously the sun did not dance and plunge to the earth. We know the sun is billions of times bigger than the earth. If the sun plunged to the earth there would be no earth. Clearly there was no miracle of the sun at Fatima…”

In delicious thinking, sweeter than lemon meringue pie, Fr. Longenecker rebuts:

Dawkins is relying on the Scottish philosopher David Hume’s pithy test for a miracle. Hume wrote, “No testimony is sufficient to establish a miracle, unless the testimony be of such a kind, that its falsehood would be more miraculous than the fact which it endeavors to establish.”

Hume’s test applied to Fatima would be to observe that it is very improbable that 70,000 people could simultaneously be deluded, or simultaneously collude in a mass lie. It is also very improbable that 70,000 people experienced the same hallucination.

However, all of those improbabilities are far more probable than the alternative: That the Sun was suddenly yanked sideways in its orbit, spun around and crashed to the Earth destroying the balance of the whole solar system with nobody outside Fatima noticing.

This is typical of the dull literalistic “reasoning” of the atheists. We who believe in the miracle of the sun have also taken science classes. We do understand that the sun is much bigger than the earth.

We also know that if the sun were really spinning that everyone on earth should be able to see it. We also know that if the sun plunged to earth we would all be toast.

Yet we believe in the miracle of the sun.

Scientists are supposed to objectively and rationally examine the evidence. At Fatima we have documentary, eyewitness, and photographic evidence that 70,000 people ‘saw’ the sun spin, felt it was yanked from the sky and that it plunged to earth.

Everyone said they saw the same thing. Everyone was so frightened they screamed and ran for their lives. Clearly something happened, what was it?

Obviously the sun didn’t literally fall to the earth. But 70,000 people saw it fall to the earth. The miracle therefore occurred somewhere within the process of perception.

We see with our eyes, but what do we see? Whatever we see is transferred to the brain and the brain interprets what we see. It is well known that if we do not have the mental capacity to “see” certain things they are invisible to us.

There’s more detail in Father’s article and it’s worth the read here, entitled: Fatima and the Atheists, published at Crux on May 8, 2017. And I love his references to what people saw:

Marian researcher Donal Foley records, that the poet Alfonso Lopes Vieira who lived over 30 miles away from Fatima witnessed the phenomenon. He wrote, “On that day, 13th October, 1917, without remembering the predictions of the children, I was enchanted by a remarkable spectacle in the sky of a kind I had never seen before.”

Foley tells the story of a young boy, Inacio Lourenco, who was a schoolchild of nine when he saw the miracle at a village about 12 miles from Fatima. He described how the children and their teachers were attracted outside by a commotion in front of the school to see the miracle of the sun. He tells of how he could look at the sun, which looked like “a ball of snow revolving on itself,” before it suddenly came down in a zigzag toward the Earth.

As he says, “During those long moments of the solar prodigy objects around us turned all the colors of the rainbow. We saw ourselves blue, yellow, red, etc. All these strange phenomena increased the fear of the people. After about ten minutes the sun, now dull and pallid, returned to its place. When the people realized that the danger was now over there was an explosion of joy and everyone joined in thanksgiving and praise of our Lady.”

The miracle was also seen by sailors on a British ship off the coast of Portugal. Foley recounts an experience in England. He gave a presentation on Fatima at a college in England and was told by one of the teachers that her grandfather saw the miracle from his ship and wrote about it to his wife – “without obviously understanding what it meant or its significance.”

And finally, what most convincingly shows that the miracle was not only in the minds and perception of the witnesses is the fact that the crowd at Fatima felt the heat of the sun as it approached them, and their clothes and the ground – which had been soaked by torrential rain – were dry at the end of the miracle.

The descriptions of the Miracle of the Sun bring memories of how this miracle still occurs. I first saw it at Medjugorje in its HUGE HOST appearance with the colorful rays, spinning in praise of God and His Plan. Again I gazed upon it in Betania, Venezuela and even from our own backyard during a Marian Movement of Priests Cenacle. The similar look at each occurrence, no matter from where it was seen, reminds me of how the apparitions of Our Lady are connected and how our Mother has worked unceasingly to bring us back to God. Most of all, they remind me that God loves us so much that Jesus gave us His Mother, from the Cross, and it pleases Him to draw us to Himself through her Immaculate Heart. She, united perfectly to God’s Will, has maternal concern for billions of souls, each and every one of us, as if each was her one and only precious child, for her Son came to redeem all of humanity, throughout time, as St. Paul said: “There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither bond nor free, there is neither male nor female: for ye are all one in Christ Jesus.” And I am reminded that the Miracle of the Sun points to THE Miracle of THE Son, available to us every day, with spiritual food that nourishes, heals, transforms and fills us with grace upon grace upon grace.

I don’t know about you, but I feel excitement as we approach the centenary celebration on Saturday. St. Theresa of Avila encouraged using images to stir our love and fervor for the Lord in prayer. In Missoula, we will bring a statue of Our Lady of Fatima from our home to our chapel while also bringing the statues of the two little shepherd children to be canonized on Saturday, Blesseds Francisco and Jacinta. The wreath of multi-colored roses is ready for Our Lady’s crowning, the music’s prepared (perfect day to recount the story with all fifteen verses of the Fatima hymn, The 13th of May, interspersed throughout the Rosary and Mass), Consecration to the Immaculate Heart of Mary sheets are set and people will stream in, filling every seat. Also remembering, at this time, the joy of a procession, in 2001, in the plaza of the Fatima Sanctuary with the Ave Maria prayed in a panoply of languages. On Saturday, let us unite our preparations and celebrations, be they in churches or homes, on streets or in deserts, on mountaintops or down by the sea, with those who will gather in gratitude, in a few days, with Holy Father Pope Francis in Fatima.

Our Irish friend Jaykay told us:

Blessed First Saturday to all (already Sunday over here) and May 13th coming. We’ve organised our parish public rosary and procession through the town. May Our Lady of Fatima help us all through these times. J.

Our friend Barb Wattery extended this invitation:

I wanted to let the Denver area folks know that my parish, St. Vincent de Paul, will be holding a Marian Procession, with the Knights of Columbus carrying our Blessed Mother, this Saturday, May 13 (100 years) after the 5 pm mass, starting approximately 6:00 – 6:15 pm. We will be processing through the neighborhood around the parish, reciting the rosary, Divine Mercy Chaplet, Litany of our Blessed Mother, concluding with a concsecration to our Blessed Mother. The route and prayers will take approximately 1 hour. This is the work and planning of our wonderful Respect Life coordinator, Lee Ann. If there is anyone in the Denver area, all are welcome. I would love to meet other TRNS’rs.

Our friend Kathleen Murphy announced:

A Fatima Eucharistic Rosary Procession will take place in Pittsburgh on May 21 at 1:30 p.m. Presided over by Bishop Winter, starting at Epiphany Church the theme for this 81st Eucharistic Procession will be ‘CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OF FATIMA.” Here are the details:
SUNDAY, MAY 21, 2017
EPIPHANY CHURCH, 164 WASHINGTON PLACE, PITTSBURGH, PA 15219
After Liturgy of the Word there will be a PROCESSION with the BLESSED SACRAMENT and Statue of Our Lady of Fatima through Pittsburgh. The Holy Rosary will be prayed and the Divine Mercy Chaplet. There will be Benediction and the Crowning of our Lady of Fatima.

How about you? Are you getting ready? May the full Triumph of the Immaculate Heart of Mary soon be upon us!

                                     Immaculate Heart of Mary, pray with us and for us!

 

About Beckita

Beckita, widow, mother and grandmother, lives in Missoula, Montana. After more than thirty years of service, she retired from two careers: elementary school educator and director of liturgical music ministry in a local parish. Serving the Catholic Church in many capacities since early childhood, she now provides care for a nearly 90 year old priest of Chinese origin and collaborates with him in evangelizing the Chinese people. For more than twenty-five years, she has welcomed words from heaven concerning these sobering times in which we live and, like so many, takes seriously Our Lord and Our Lady’s call to intercede for the return of souls to God. Responding to heaven’s call for prayer, for her, included making pilgrimages to shrines in Europe, Asia and South America. She says these travels, added to her years as a Peace Corps volunteer in West Africa in the mid-seventies, have expanded her heart to hold dear all peoples of the world. She is a longtime member of TNRS community and when she began reading Charlie’s posts, immediately, she found that his mission and message harmonize well with Church approved private revelation of our times. In September 2015, she accepted an invitation to become part of TNRS Answers Team. As events of the Storm evolved, last fall (2016), she accepted Charlie’s invitation to become managing editor of TNRS should he need to leave the site. With great gratitude to and for Charlie, founder of TNRS, and with great respect and admiration for the lifelong experiences and God-given gifts he brought to bear on his work at this site - she knows we all know he’s irreplaceable – still, she considers it a great privilege to serve the TNRS community.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

131 Responses to Faith and Reason and Miracles

  1. Carol Ingraham says:

    In Kennebunk, Maine we are having a conference on the 13th and 14th at our Franciscan monastery with masses, adoration, confession, procession outside, talks by 2 priests and a deacon, rosary, and more.

    Liked by 10 people

  2. Centurion_Cornelius says:

    “Holy Mary, …Mother of God,…pray for us…now!”

    Liked by 14 people

  3. Phillip Frank says:

    OUR LADY OF FATIMA CATHOLIC CHURCH
    550 U. S. HWY 41 S, INVERNESS, FLORIDA 34450
    (352) 726-1670

    SCHEDULE for Saturday May 13, 2017

    7:30 a.m.- 8:00 a.m. Morning prayers

    8:00 a.m. Mass

    9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Adoration in Chapel

    9:00 a.m. -10:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast In Hall

    10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Movies of Fatima in Room #206 & #200

    11:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m Lunch / Dinner on the grounds

    11:30- 1:30 p.m. Music in hall provided by Dan, Jeff and Phil- “In the the Light Band”

    12:00 p.m.- Public Rosary in Church

    2:30 p.m. -3:30 p.m. Confessions in Church

    3:00 p.m. – Public Rosary in Church

    3:30-5:30 p.m. Music in Hall provided by Mark Smythe, Phillip Frank and Matthew Garnell’s band “OPEN”.

    6:00 p.m. Public Rosary in Church

    7:00 p.m. Mass in Church followed by a Procession on the grounds

    Information:
    Movie schedule will be posted on doors of Room #206 and #200
    Gift Shop will be in Church and Hall B
    Children’s entertainment will be by playground area

    Liked by 11 people

    • Beckita says:

      WOW, Phil! A full day and evening of events. I would love to hear your bands. Do you compose?

      Liked by 6 people

      • Phillip Frank says:

        Beck, I’m lacking in composure most if the time!
        Both bands do original music…I’m the drummer for both…..
        ( you know, that guy who hangs out with musicians)
        I sing back-up harmony too.

        Back in the day, we used to have these events several times a year. The Blue Army was an active group here and we had events called The Maryopolis and multiple priest would come from different states and Fr Stefano Gobbi officiated a few times!
        This event is VERY exciting for me as it is a kind of renaissance of those times.

        Liked by 10 people

        • Beckita says:

          😂😂😂 Great one, Phil. A drummer and harmonizer is a mighty force of beauty for a band. Great history in your parish named for Our Lady of Fatima. When we hosted Fr. Gobbi here in the northwest, he was irritated with a group that was leading his MMP song. His insistence on tempo and style had me laughing. God’s blessings on your event!

          Liked by 5 people

  4. PrayerPartner says:

    Oh Beckita, this combined writing, Father Longenecker’s, and yours, is just wonderful. What a fitting way to prepare our hearts and minds and our very souls to recall this beautiful event, so long ago, and these innocent children, so open to giving. Their example is timeless.

    I absolutely love the phrasing “in delicious thinking, sweeter than lemon meringue pie…” Can’t think of better words to capture that wonder.

    Let us all, whether at a public event, at our local church, or even in our own home, lift our hearts and join together in joy and praise, knowing that this miracle is every bit as relevant today.

    Thank you so much for bringing this forward to us. It brought me great joy to read it.

    Liked by 12 people

  5. Wow is right, Phil! For the first time in my life I wish I lived in Florida! Or at least visiting on Friday! 🙂 Prayers and blessings to all who attend your spiritual celebrations!

    Liked by 8 people

  6. Doug says:

    Beautiful Beckita. Our friend, Christine, who has a nearby farm, will be dressing her two small children and a friend as the 3 little children of Fatima and playing a narration of the Fatima story. She is trying to get some lambs to add to the enactment.

    Liked by 12 people

  7. moreen67 says:

    Thanks for this Beckita! Everything that is going on in our country and in the world right now is crazy and it seems to me that Our Mother knows that we need her. I can’t help but feel joy right now after reading this and knowing how much we are loved. My sister sent to my house a dozen multi-colored roses for my birthday yesterday (50 and I’m grateful for turning 50) and I thought of Our Lady – I feel blessed to have my birthday in Mary’s month and also to share a named derived from Mary (Maureen – little Mary – although I’m 5’10” – ha). Have a blessed day and weekend coming up TNRS folks!!!!

    Liked by 14 people

  8. jtbrannigan says:

    Beckita: Great post in anticipation of this holy anniversary. I think Thomas Aquinas had the reaction of unbelievers to miracles figured out when he said: “With faith, no explanation is necessary, without faith, no explanation is possible.”
    This discourse reminds me of my father. He was an analytical chemist. He spent his life, into his seventies, working, researching and being surrounded by atheist fellow scientists. Whenever challenged about his beliefs, his constant answer was that only God could create and govern the incredible, complex and beautiful universe in which we find ourselves. To him, what he learned from science only made the mysteries all the more profound.

    JT

    Liked by 11 people

  9. Snowy Owl says:

    Beckita, I have been reading through the story of Conchita from the link you posted and she is absolutely amazing! How beautiful- incredible is the mission she was given!! It makes my 💗sing!
    But you know it’s painful and more than a little hard 😔 to read about souls like her because I was such a rotten sinner- still am, but all I can say is thank You, thank You, thank You, Jesus for Your incredible Divine Mercy!!! 💔! A truly broken heart is also wonderful gift! God is so good!

    Liked by 8 people

    • Beckita says:

      Conchita is a special one, Snowy, and so are you.

      Liked by 6 people

    • Doug says:

      Yes he is so good Snowy! Reminds me of when my kids were little and did something wrong. The simple apology and sorry daddy or sorry mommy melted away any anger we might have had towards whatever they did. In fact, I dont remember what they did, but their sorry forever remains entrenched in my heart. You suppose our heavenly father is like that? You are a gift here.

      Liked by 6 people

      • Snowy Owl says:

        Yes, Doug I believe He is- and ! And what you said is so true and beautiful! After reading Conchita, I read something about what Jesus suffered during the scourging for our sins… it’s just so painful knowing I added to that. But without Him doing this for us (me) well… thank God He did!
        Okay I give up I can’t see what I’m typing… everything is freezing up later.

        Liked by 4 people

    • audiemarie2014 says:

      Snowy, can you please tell me where this link is to the story about Conchita? I missed it somehow and can’t find it. Thank you!! xo

      Liked by 1 person

      • Snowy Owl says:

        Here it is Audie, I couldn’t find the original comment either so I posted this here. http://www.apcross.org/conchita/diary.htm 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

        • audiemarie2014 says:

          Thanks Snowy!! 🙂

          Liked by 2 people

        • Cindy Baca says:

          Here in Modesto Ca, we are very blessed and lucky to have a convent here, I call them
          Conchita’s nuns. They are cloistered but, not cloistered. I have not have the nerve yet, to join the classes that they do give. There are only 8 or 9 here. We are allowed to pray with them everyday from the hours of 7 a.m. till 6 p.m. As they have exposition of the Blessed Sacrament. ALL of their books are in Spanish regarding Conchita, and I don’t read Spanish, but these ladies, make the best Tamales. The best part, is Sunday Mass at 6:45 a.m. and it has to be in English, per the Parish Priest. I love the cross with the dove, its very moving. Thank you for posting, now I can read in English, what they are selling in Spanish. Thank you so much.
          Cindy

          Liked by 4 people

          • Snowy Owl says:

            Cindy, that is so wonderful.. I’m jealous- seriously 🙂 haha. Beckita posted the site originally and Conchita is an amazing woman with a an amazing mission! Amen.
            🥙🌮<– closest I could get to a tamale with an emoji!🙌

            Liked by 2 people

    • leel004 says:

      Snowy Owl, the beauty of seeing our many flaws and sinfulness, is so in allowing God to clean us up, He can put His light into us. When one is too busy or lacks insight or DESIRE to grow in God, they don’t see the lack of light in them. Look at all the people who believe…”EVERYONE goes to Heaven”…scary, deadly, and demonic.

      And i think it was St. Vincent Ferrer(?), who said that many men’s souls are saved from prayerful wives. He said this after a woman DESPERATE for her husband’s salvation after an untimely death, would daily weep in the Confessional to the poor priest, who told her to go and BELIEVE in the power of her prayers, that God is INDEED hearing them, and will be answered! Think of all those beautiful bouquets 💐 you are giving to our Mama, the QUEEN of Heaven and earth for him !
      God bless you Snowy, and thank God you give a HOOT !!!!!! Aloha 🌴

      Liked by 6 people

  10. Phillip Frank says:

    Snowy, remember when I wrote in my piece about that the saints think they are the greatest of sinners because as they get closer and closer to God they see themselves as they truley are?
    I see a parallel here with you and your statement as being a “rotten sinner”!😉
    I’m sure Conchita thought as you do (and like Padre Pio did), considered herself an enigma (mystery) as to how and why God was using her, such a “rotten sinner”!
    Job was left with his hand over his mouth as to why God allowed his trial. I’m sure the real reason was made clear to him in Paradise, but the point is that the mystery of God is part of our relationship with Him and is satisfied in us by our gift of faith.
    Dawkings isn’t interested in mystery, he is a man of reason. Miracles, by their very nature, are mystery- unreasonable.
    Athiests give reason even to miracles by forging a HUMAN element to the cause like ectoplasm, mass hysteria, hallucinations, Psychokinesis, etc. The main thrust here is that by referencing man as the cause of the event they can rest easy in their belief that there is no God. Your husband lacks this gift. All the “evidence” of God before him is not “reason” enough to believe. He has to be reminded its not his power of belief but Gods gift of faith that renders him capable to believe! This takes an act of the will to trust, to humble ones self to a greater authority. The miracles your husband sees are the epitome of the unreasonable -mystery- of faith. God is not asking him to be reasonable, He’s asking him to believe.
    Pride dictates that we are right by the course of the power of our intellect. When a mystery has us admit that we just don’t know, it is easier to diss the mystery than our ineptness to comprehend there are things we just can’t know. But its OK not to. Conchita didn’t. Padre Pio didn’t.
    Job didn’t. Your husband is in good company there.

    Liked by 8 people

    • Doug says:

      Well said Philip!

      Liked by 5 people

    • Mona says:

      This comment says a lot to me right now. I have a friend that have rejected me because I told him of Charlies words and my belife in God. Thank you Philip Frank. Your words made me understand it all on a deeper level.
      Mona from Denmark

      Liked by 9 people

      • Mona says:

        Please pray for me. I am so sorry, but I know that this happens for a reason I do not understand right now.

        Liked by 7 people

        • Phillip Frank says:

          “There can be no true knowledge of Jesus Christ that does not involve the knowledge of his cross. The cross is -The Greatest Secret of the King- the key to unlocking the mysteries of Jesus Christ. This is why the spirit of the world, which is opposed to the self-giving Spirit of the Cross, could not know Jesus Christ. Those who have begun to empty themselves in Trust-filled surrendered to Our Lady, however, are formed by the self-giving Spirit of the Cross and, armed with this key, can begin to enter into the very heart of the Life of Christ. One must be warned that just as our knowledge of Jesus must be genuinely personal, so too must our knowledge of the cross be personal and experiential.”
          (St Louis De Montfort ;Total Cosecration to Jesus through Mary)
          And this is the reason, Mona, its happening.

          Liked by 7 people

        • jlynnbyrd says:

          Mona, I will keep you in my prayers. ❤

          Liked by 5 people

        • Doug says:

          I will say a prayer for you Mona.

          Liked by 5 people

        • Joe Crozier says:

          Mona, we are in the best of company in our lack of understanding. Scripture tells us that Mary and Joseph did not understand when Jesus went missing. We believe that understanding is a gift of the Holy Spirit. May we all be blessed with this gift as we watch and wait.

          Liked by 7 people

        • Mick says:

          Dear Mona, I will keep you in my prayers; and I will pray that you and your friend may be reconciled.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Beckita says:

        Praying for you, Dear Mona. Praying for strength and consolation. “The Lord is near to the brokenhearted and saves the crushed in spirit.” Psalm 34:18

        Liked by 9 people

      • Doug says:

        Hi Mona!

        Liked by 4 people

      • Joe Crozier says:

        Hi Mona

        I am getting old and repeat myself so I hope the others will forgive me if I am doing so again.

        I once had a Vietnamese friend, Luong, who was imprisoned and tortured by the Vietcong when he was very young. One day he promised God that if he escaped he would become a priest. Eventually he did escape and became one of the Vietnamese boat people.

        In their over-crowded, hardly seaworthy boat, the refugees took turns at steering by the stars. One night there were no stars. Looking to the bow of the boat the steersman saw a lady pointing in a particular direction. The man pointed his boat in the same direction. After following that course the boat was picked up by a Danish vessel and the passengers taken to Denmark. On alighting the passenger saw a statue of the Madonna which he recognized as the Lady who had pointed him in the right direction. The man was Muslim by faith and he and his whole family became Catholic.

        Luong completed his priestly formation in London and became the chaplain to the Vietnamese community.

        You say you do not understand right now. You are not alone. We are all in the same boat, all in the same storm, all seeking the right direction in which to take the next right step. One of my relatives made it a condition of continued communication that I never mention Charlie stuff again. Other friends have done the same throwing their shoulders up and sighing in disapproval and disbelief. Yet others have mocked me and poured scorn upon me in their misunderstanding and misinterpretation. But of course we know who went through this sort of treatment before us and in this knowledge we are pointed in the right direction – Jesus Christ and His Passion. Mary always points to Jesus.

        As Philip so wisely says in quoting St Louis de Montford, “…. just as our knowledge of Jesus must be genuinely personal, so too must our knowledge of the cross be personal and experiential.” I have been labouring under a heavy, heavy cross for over two years which I have not embraced but from which I have sought only escape, not like Luong’s escape in which he was unconditionally surrendered to the will of God. Beckita often advocates the Surrender Novena. Now I may be more open to its graces. Joe’s no saint.

        Your contribution here has helped me come to this point – this new direction. So thank you. And all because you signed off as Mona from Denmark. I have never been there but just the thought of Denmark makes me happy. When I think of Denmark I think of Luong and his great escape closely followed by happy memories of Danish bacon and Danish butter and Danish pastries. mmmmmm.

        Tomorrow I finish my novena to the Blessed children of Fatima, Francisco and Jacinta, in which my intentions were all about escape – escape from harm for my nephew in Iraq and escape from my cross. Now on this last night of the novena I change direction. God bless Denmark and God bless you, Mona.

        “Jesu, Jesu, Jesu: esto mihi Jesu.” St Edmund Campion as he faced death on the scaffold at Tyburn.

        “If ever you feel distressed during your day – call upon our Lady – just say this simple prayer:
        ‘Mary, Mother of Jesus, please be a mother to me now.’
        I must admit this prayer has never failed me.” St Mother Teresa.

        I have just received a text from Martin, my oldest friend in Scotland
        “Well Joe,,,happy anniversary of Fatima soon. I am going to the all night vigil starting here at the cathedral (St Andrews, Glasgow) and ending at 6 am mass tomorrow …hope you have a great day.”

        What a wonderful world – this Catholic world in which we live and breathe and have our being.

        Liked by 4 people

  11. Joseph Antell says:

    Yes We too are looking forward to our celebration and devotion to Our Lady of Fatima for a prayers,Massesr and rosary processing this week end on Sat and Sunday at the Franciscian Monastery in Kennebunk ,Maine .We already have 160 people signed up to attend.andare expecting more as we get closer May 13 .God Bless to you all and Best regards to Charlie.
    Joseph

    Liked by 5 people

  12. Our Mother Mary is a beautiful intercessor to Christ. I am especially touched that she would appear first to poor little children. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners.

    Liked by 8 people

  13. Bob says:

    Our collaborative of St. Mary & St. John in Chelmsford, MA will celebrate a Mass on the 13th from May to October & gather to pray the rosary afterwards. Anyone in the Chelmsford, MA area are more than welcome.

    Liked by 5 people

  14. Beckita says:

    Answering Holy Father’s request to prayer for him as he goes to Portugal.

    Pope Francis: I will entrust the destiny of humanity to the Virgin in Fatima
    http://www.romereports.com/2017/05/10/pope-francis-i-will-entrust-the-destiny-of-humanity-to-the-virgin-in-fatima

    A few days before his trip to Fatima, Pope Francis held his usual Wednesday General Audience in St. Peter’s Square. He embraced affectionate gestures from the youngest pilgrims.

    The pope continued his catechetical cycle on hope. This time, the protagonist was the Virgin Mary, in which he said that she is the greatest example of courage and hope.

    POPE FRANCIS
    “It was not easy to respond with a “yes” to the Angel’s announcement; and yet she, a woman still in the midst of her youth, responds boldly despite not knowing the fate that lay before her. Mary is there, faithfully present, every time That you need to keep a candle lit in a foggy place.”

    He also spoke about all of the mothers in the world, and their ability to abandon their fears and fight for their children, even in the cruelest moments. This is similar to Mary, when she had to watch her own child die on the cross.

    POPE FRANCIS
    “Mothers do not deceive, and in that moment, at the foot of the cross, none of us can say what was the cruelest passion: that of an innocent man who dies on the cross, or the agony of a mother who accompanies his son in the final moments of his life.”

    He explained that the Virgin Mary is a model for Christians, because she teaches one to be patient even when nothing seems to be making sense. The Holy Father then concluded by asking for prayers for his upcoming trip to Portugal.

    POPE FRANCIS
    “I will go to Fatima on a pilgrimage, to entrust to the Virgin the temporal and eternal destinies of humanity.”

    May 13 marks the 100th anniversary of the apparitions of the Virgin Mary, and Pope Francis will canonize two of the visionaries.

    Liked by 11 people

  15. leel004 says:

    Regarding Hawkins….How…in ALL the 70,000 people “halllucinating the spinning of the sun” get the clothes instantly dry???? Please explain the defied logic explanation.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Doug says:

      To me, atheism would be depressing. What does this life matter or where would hope be if not for the next life? Without this, everything would be meaningless and would not matter.

      Liked by 7 people

      • leel004 says:

        Nor is logic on their side,

        Liked by 5 people

        • Doug says:

          That is true Leel. The irony is it takes a certain arrogance and egoism to be atheist which I think blinds them in their logic. They think because of their brilliance, they are right. I was there once.

          Liked by 1 person

      • One of my favorite quotes comes from an atheist, Bertrand Russell:

        “Unless you assume a God,
        the question of life’s purpose is meaningless.”

        You nailed down the same thought, but coming from the opposite direction, Doug. No matter how much they try to hide it or smother it, desperation and despair hounds these non-believers their entire lives, consciously or not. Conversely, we believers could not imagine living without the hope in the joy that awaits us as promised by Our Lord and Our Lady.

        Liked by 4 people

        • Doug says:

          So true Patrick. I imagine, unless you are young, beautiful, wealthy (or well to do), have a girlfriend (or guy friend if female), popular, you will feel left out if you do not have a faith. I honestly believe that is what is driving a lot of teen depression and suicide. If you are the one left out of all the above gifts and you do not have a faith that teaches you understanding of your personal worth and dignity, then what is there to live for?

          As you say, desparation and despair will catch up to everyone eventually because the trappings of youth I stated above will fade as we become elderly and our own mortality sinks in. This is actually a gift from God so that we may actually ponder the reality of his existence. If we stayed young and beautiful forever, why would we search for God? Going old is a suffering, but also a great gift because it gives us opportunity to find God. Blessings to you my friend!

          Liked by 7 people

          • jaykay says:

            Just want to chip in on that, Doug. I agree totally. It was bad when I was a teen in the 70s, the incessant pressure to join in and be cool, but how much more innocent we were then, really, because of the relative lack of pernicious influences that are now everywhere. My parents still had a black and white TV up to 1979! Videos etc. only coming in, and pornography very restricted – still illegal, in fact, here in Ireland. It was pretty much like your “Mayberry”. No, really.

            Contrast that with the deluge of Babylon over the past 25 or so years, and see how far we’ve fallen. Yet. Yet, I couldn’t but observe that there were a great many young, joyful, people at our (highly successful) Fatima procession today. I mean, teens, early 20s. These youngsters are true warriors, brought up in a toxic culture and yet… able to discern the Truth. More so than I was at their age, I have to say. So many of them must know friends etc. who are utterly given over to the despair of our modern “culture”, and they themselves are bombarded with it, and yet… they’re a hell of a sight “sounder” than I was at their age, albeit I was brought up in a still highly Catholic culture. The last hurrah of the old days, really. And yet… here they are, glorious flowers of the real New Springtime. That’s why I call them warriors, because it’s so hard for them to go against the flow, but they do, they fight. God strengthen their faith, and may I be there to help them.

            So, a glorious day. The church was overflowing, a large contingent of young Dominican Friars in traditional habit giving witness, and young Franciscan Sisters. It was… glorious. Our Lady of Fatima, you smiled on us. Saints Jacinta and Francisco, pray for us, and may Lucia be soon raised to the Altar. God bless all. J.

            Liked by 5 people

          • Doug says:

            “pernicious influences that are now everywhere” so true Jaykay. Society use to back up the parents with traditional Christian values. Now it fights against this and supports the pernicious influences. It even celebrates them and governments push them. Lord have mercy on us!

            Liked by 2 people

          • jlynnbyrd says:

            JayKay, thank you for sharing your inspiring witness. ❤

            Liked by 2 people

        • moreen67 says:

          That’s why we should pray for them as Our Lady says at Medjugorje – pray that everyone would come to love my Son. We can’t give up on souls! The satan would like us to just talk about others with no faith in Jesus but we disciples of Jesus are in this to fight for souls for Our Lord who suffered for all humans. Maureen. God bless all here.

          Liked by 7 people

    • jaykay says:

      Like Phillip Frank said above, leeloo4, that there ‘ol atheistic ectoplasm, it’s wonderful stuff!

      (sings) “ya can’t see it with your eyes, hold it in your hands, but like the wind that covers our land, strong enough to rule the heart of any man, ooops, no, strong enough to deceive 70,000 men, this thing called atheistic ectoplasm… ”

      Well, Phillip didn’t quite put it that way but…😋

      Meanwhile, the weather over here unfortunately has taken a bad turn after a glorious few days. Oh well, it is Ireland after all, and the Procession will of course go ahead – we’re sorta used to that kind of thing anyway, over the last few thousand years or so. God bless all for tomorrow. J.

      Liked by 6 people

  16. Judith says:

    Great celebration tomorrow – “A Fatima Pilgrimage” at The Shrine Our Lady of Martyrs, Auriesville, NY. (birthplace of St Kateri Tekakwitha, and site of martyrdom of Sts Issac Joques, Rene de Groupil and Jean de Lalande). Starts at 0930 with Rosaries – 4 times throughout the day, procession with Pilgrim Statue from Fatima, Mass for Our Lady Of Fatima at 1100 and a 4 PM Mother’s Day Mass with our bishop, Bishop Ed Scharfenberger, plus many other activities. Is this great or what! Oh, I want to do this. I’m just asking Jesus and Mary to take care of everything and keep my body/heart strong. (And the weather is finally acting like spring :>)

    Liked by 4 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      Judith, how lovely! ❤
      A dear woman in our Storm Group has arranged a “A Fatima Pilgrimage” for our us with her family at the Basilica of the National Shrine of Mary Help of Christians at Holy Hill in Wisconsin to celebrate our consecration to Our Blessed Mother. https://holyhill.com/index.php/basilica
      We will attend the Vigil Mass at 4:30pm and also partake in the Our Lady of Fatima plenary indulgence granted by Our Holy Father, Pope Francis this year.
      It would be a joy to meet up with other TNRS family during the day!
      You are all in my heart and prayers.

      Liked by 6 people

      • Barb Watry says:

        jlynnbyrd, how I love Holy Hill. It is great to hear that there is a Storm Group, somewhere in Wisconsin. I am moving back there, from Colorado, this summer, I hope. Maybe some day I can connect with the group.
        May all who celebrate the 100 years of our Lady of Fatima’s apparitions be filled with much grace and peace this day.
        God bless all here.

        Liked by 3 people

  17. Carmel says:

    Wishing everyone a blessed feast day of Our Lady of Fatima! Praying for peace in all families and in the world generally. No special celebrations in our parish, unfortunately, but perhaps more people at early Mass, followed by rosary as per usual on Saturdays in honour of our Blessed Mother.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Karen says:

      Thank you Carmel, and the same to you. There were only two Masses and devotions promoted in our city and metro area in honour of of the Fatima Centenary! I was at least able to participate at Mass in a neighbouring parish which focused on the Feast Day. My heart is both heavy and joyful today. Our parish has organised a pilgrim statue for families and we are including a special prayer at Masses on Sundays nearest the 13th until November. It is up to us to do our best as we head further into the Storm – one step at a time.

      Liked by 2 people

  18. It fills me with so much joy to wish all of you a happy Feast of Our Lady of Fatima! 100 years! And two new saints!!

    UPDATE FROM THE WILD:

    I apologize to those following my outdoor living experience in a wall tent, for I have been remiss in my posts. The change of seasons brings some welcome changes, while others not. On the plus side: the nights are nearly warm enough that propane heat is not needed, I can open the windows now to allow more air in while also being able to look out at the beautiful pine trees 🌲 , the birds have returned from their winter homes in the south, green grass is sprouting up tall. Hmm, that’s all I can come up with. Oh, I don’t have to shovel snow anymore or wear long johns.

    On the down side: the birds have returned from their winter homes in the south, and with first light start chirping like wild at ~4:30 am, waking me from a typically restless sleep. The crows are the worst, surrounding me on all sides and cawing loud and clear from high up in the pines. Turkey with their comical call are also part of the maddening chorus. When the various bird species are finished proclaiming the new dawn, around 5:45, the sun then strikes the tent with a bright orange light. Now I’m completely awake. (I have but don’t use an eye mask and ear plugs so as to be alert to my surroundings…what with fire hazards (inside and out) and lurking mountain lions prowling for meat (just kidding)). Also, the tent gets blazing hot in the afternoon, and we’ve had days in the 80s already. I now need to buy ice for my cooler to keep that bottle of ketchup cool. Thunderstorms are rolling around the Black Hills, forcing me and Mimi into my hard-top Dakota pickup until they pass. Dust and pollen seem to be up cuz I’m a bit congested and sneezy. Flies and wasps are trying hard to buzz into the tent, and many succeed; but I can hold open the door and they usually show themselves out. Crawling critters have returned, like big carpenter 🐜 and 🕷, but this doesn’t bother me much.

    And last but not least, Mimi is shedding. That beautiful winter coat is now all over my hands, pillow, and clothes. (Everything is already dusty and dirty, so this is just one more layer). She’s been happy, catching mice around the one acre property we’re on. I say, “Go get me a mousie!” and she tears out into the grass. But yesterday she came back wounded. Not sure if a critter didn’t take kindly to her advances and took a swat at her, or she dove hard into a slash pile after a mouse and took a branch to her face, but she came back with a nice gash below her eye. I wiped the wound clean and kissed her face bunches of times, and she was happy.

    Medical update: my back and leg pain is MUCH better, I’m trying to put back on the leg muscle that was lost from atrophy, MRI is scheduled for the 31st, and still hope to have surgery this summer.

    I also passed a research class and it looks like I’m still in the Nurse Practitioner program.

    Now I have no idea what I am to do next. Stay here? Move back to Rapid near school? Get a job? What of the Storm? A conundrum indeed. I must pray and trust, pray and trust.

    My friends whose home was to be our Refuge by Custer State Park have put it on the market. All is painted and packed up. I picked up 2/3 of the mountains of food stuffs I’ve brought them over the past year or so, and have some stored in one friend’s root cellar and some with the brother of the refuge owners. So instead of one location, the food is now in three different places, for what it’s worth. But I know we are still not out of the woods yet, and their house is not yet sold……..

    Well, tourist season is already here in Custer, SD, and the town is filling up with campers, motorcycles, and clean-shaven people….speaking strange dialects of American. 🙂

    God bless you all. Thank you for your prayers. Thanks for taking the time to read this.

    Liked by 8 people

    • Beckita says:

      Thanks so much for the update, Patrick. Praying for you as you discern next right steps. Right with you as we wait on the Lord. The Storm, from my view, has not gone away. The waters continue to become choppier in this country alone. Then, when I look around the world, I continue to see immense suffering, danger and uncertainty. Perhaps the best way to phrase our current state is: an uneasy peace. May Our Lady of Fatima, with the intercession of Sts. Francisco and Jacinta, continue to pray for us all.

      Liked by 8 people

    • Thanks for the update from the wild, Patrick! Sounds like the critters are keeping you on your toes. Hm. The mountain lion with a call to Matins in the night. The birds, Lauds. The sun, Prime. Bees, Terce… and so on. Nothing for it but to pray, though nothing wrong with letting out the occasional groan (I’ve even been known to rant from time to time). Trials and labor. More frequently, we sit there without the slightest clue. Sometimes we go loose and let go. Seems like that’s precisely where God wants us. In Good Hands. Blessed. Gosh, aren’t you glad He doesn’t leave us to ourselves?

      Liked by 6 people

      • Between you and me, MP, it’s not nearly as wild out here as I let on: when I take pictures of my tent, I take care to avoid shots of the power line that runs directly overhead, the neighbor’s barbed fence three feet behind the tent, the storage units a stone’s throw to the east, the dirt road twenty paces north, and the neighbor’s house one hundred yards to the west.

        I love your idea that nature is calling me to pray the Office, although I’d prefer it if they’d start with Terce and end at Vespers. Sorry, I get grouchy when I don’t get enough sleep. Thanks for seeing the positive, though, in my negative.

        Actually, the spring bird song (crows aside) is beautiful. I love hearing the robin’s single-tone chirp at sunset…reminds me of home after playing all day in the backyard — it’s the signal that it’s time to come inside. And at dusk, at the very last bit of light, a lone robin sits across the street in a pine and sings a wonderful solo. He’s always in the same tree. This bird is also the very first one to start the morning at the dimmest hint of light.

        Ah, I’m still in the Lord’s care, and if I ever do grumble, I’m quick to shake it off and thank Him for all he has given me!

        God bless, MP!

        Liked by 5 people

    • dianebelvs says:

      Thanks for the update Patrick. I pray for you often and I think I’d better add Miss Mimi to my prayers too. God Bless You.

      Liked by 5 people

    • PrayerPartner says:

      I an in awe of your courage and fortitude, your respect for nature, your unrestricted love for a little creature who can offer you nothing but love (but gives all her love) and through it all you exhibit such grace. May Our Lord and His Blessed Mother guide your every step.

      Liked by 6 people

    • Patrick, if you are young & strong I say, “Go for it.” In Eastern Oregon, we call it the “outback,” doctors are so scarce that the clinics are run by NP’s. They have prescriptive privileges as do NP’s in WA & CA. This may be your calling. Because of the doc shortage, the NP’s were “set up” so this may be an option in SD? Prayers!
      I confess that I’m glad to no longer be employed, but I was a psych RN. So glad to be retired and watching grandchildren.
      Blessings on your vocation, Patrick,
      katey in OR

      Liked by 5 people

      • Thank you, Katy.

        You chose a nursing path that I could not do. Psychiatric nursing is very tough and requires incredible patience. I bet you’ve got some fascinating stories to tell!

        If I finish this degree, it would be nice to work in a rural setting. The need in the outbacks of our country is very great, if not dire.

        God bless you, Katy. Prayers for you as well.

        Liked by 5 people

    • Doug says:

      Thanks for the update Patrick. We used to have outdoor cats, but they never lasted much longer than a year or two. We think it was either the coyotes here or the Fisher cats that did them in. So tell Mimi to be careful.

      Liked by 4 people

      • I will. She scared me badly around the time I heard that mountain lion scream for the first time. She slipped out at sunset, then at dusk she crossed under the neighbor’s barbed wire fence. This guy flies a “Don’t Tread on Me” flag and proudly states he’ll shoot trespassers on sight, so I could not jump his fence to retrieve her. I needed a flashlight to spot her, and eventually saw her two green eyes looking at me. The light annoyed her because it gave away her position and impaired her night vision. “Mimi! No! Get back here!” She knows the tone of voice. Then, almost defiantly, she went slowly up the rocks amid the pines without looking back and disappeared over the hill – in the very direction I heard the lion call.

        “Saint Francis of Assisi and Saint Gertrude of Nivelles, please protect Mimi and see her safely back home.”

        An hour later she returned, much to my relief. But she knew I was displeased before she left, and now she never crosses the fence and stays on the property, and I never let her out at past dinner. Smart girl.

        I lost a very dear cat to a coyote in Colorado, Mimi’s grandmother named Rudy. It was unavoidable. I actually ran into the beast in a nearby wash. This was the cat that discovered Baby four days earlier when she was an abandoned, wild kitten. Baby continued to come back for food every night, but Rudy did not. And I also lost Baby’s son, Tommy, too, to two foxes. How do I know? Because I had to slam on the brakes to avoid hitting them as they scurried across the street heading for the apartments. Tommy vanished that night.

        Cats are dear to me. They help ward off loneliness and provide warmth and calm (most of the time). Did I mention that I also taught Mimi how to wink? She uses it as a greeting and sometimes a thank you after tuna.

        God bless you, Doug.

        Liked by 7 people

        • Doug says:

          Pets are a gift (except maybe crows). I never thought that foxes would go after cats. I have seen one in my neighborhood. So it could be a fox that got my cats too. Lambzie insisted that any future cats are indoor cats. God bless you too Patrick!

          Liked by 2 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      Patrick, great update. A new day and a new challenge!! You are taking all in stride and Mimi too, it seems. You are in my prayers in your discernment. ❤

      Liked by 4 people

  19. Chris says:

    Happy feast day everyone. There are lots of of celebrations planned in many of our churches here. There was a 19th annual Mother’s Day Rosary Crusade for LIfe with mass and eucharistic adoration with our archbishop in New Orleans. I chose to attend the mass this morning at St. Jane de Chantal, where we had the honor of having a pilgrim stature and a blessing with the relics of little Francisco and Jacinta along with Eucharistic adoration. Tonight my husband and I will be attending Our Lady of Fatima 100th Anniversary Celebration rosary and concert with Kitty Cleveland at St. Peter’s Catholic church in Covington. Thinking Charlie would like to be there, he is such a fan of hers. Thank you Beckita for all you do and the help and love you have shown to all of us in Charlie’s time away. I am so very grateful for the support and strength of the prayers of all here and I am forever grateful for the miracles that have taken place in my life as a result of your prayers, particularly the physical healing of many relatives, friends and and others and for the healing of my family which has and is continuing even today. Praise Jesus and Our Blessed Lady of Fatima. Praying for all of us here to receive all the blessings our Mother will be pouring out to us today.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Beckita says:

      Beautiful, Chris. Thanks for sharing all of this. I just responded to Kitty’s request on FB, asking for prayer for all of you gathering this evening at her concert. Give her TNRS’ love and a hug if you get close enough to do so. Thanks, too, for your prayers… united with you and all here for one another and our world.

      Liked by 3 people

    • Doug says:

      Wonderful Chris! And you get a bing too! Another soul gets out……

      Liked by 2 people

  20. Thank-you Beckita, for this beautiful summary of events! I was looking and looking and this is the best – so THANK-YOU!
    I faithfully prayed both novenas for all here and all on my prayer list…please, is there an update from “deereverywhere?” I have held her and her husband particularly in my prayers.
    Here in Oregon there was a celebration at The Grotto of our Sorrowful Mother up in Portland, but we did not plan to go – the weather has been awful and it’s a long drive for me. My son & DIL had me(us) to Mothers day dinner yesterday which I offer in thanksgiving to Our Lady. Although converted to Baptist, they show great love, affection and respect toward me and do not disdain my services as gramma or my adherence to the Faith.
    We’ll be flying over to Lakewood, CO again near the end of this month and plan to attend Our Lady of Fatima Church there. That will be our first celebration of this centenary year and plan to go again in August.
    Happy 50th & 60th birthdays to those celebrating. I can truly say those were blessed years for me & pray they will be for you also.
    Also, Happy Mothers’ Day to all mothers here & many, many blessings. 🌼🌸🌻🌺🌷🌹💐
    Must begin Morning Prayer ~ you will all be remembered, as always. 💒🍞🍷
    God bless us, every one, katey
    ~Come to my aid, O Lord, that I may not be overwhelmed by the storm. 🙏🏼💒
    “…Hold fast to the hope that lies before us.” Heb6

    Liked by 5 people

  21. Please note a time change in the 81st Eucharistic Rosary Procession this Sunday, May 21st at Epiphany Church in Pittsburgh. Mass will be at 10 a.m. and the Eucharistic Rosary March will follow at 11 a.m.

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s