We Walk by Faith, Not by Sight

 

Please remember the announcement posted today: Charlie will be in Lake Charles, Louisiana Sunday for an informal visit. Lake CharlesThere will be a home gathering at 5009 E. St. Charles Ave, Lake Charles at 2 p.m. on Sunday that is open to any who would like to attend. For information or to reserve a spot, contact Mary at lovedbyhim1026@gmail.com.

 

 

[We press on in the Storm amidst all manner of personal trials. In his piece published on September 18th, Msgr. Charles Pope hits it out of the ballpark as he speaks to us and our times. (As ever, he allows this reprint of his work without endorsing the prophetic elements here.) I find Msgr.’s words both heartening and enlightening. I hope you do too. May we ever walk by faith even when we cannot see. BH] 

A Meditation on the Delay and Silence of God

I don’t know if you’ve noticed or not, but God doesn’t seem to be in a big hurry about most things. This has been a hard lesson for me to learn.

We live in a loud, fast-paced world, one of constantly “breaking news,” in which crisis and urgency are the predominant mode. Instant communication and quick responses are expected, even demanded.

At the national level, there is hardly any reporting at all by the media before there is a rush to analyze, comment, and demand a reaction and plan of action from public officials.

At the personal level, someone will often express irritation at not hearing back from me within the day, or even within minutes. “I sent you a text! Did you get it?” If I do not answer a text quickly enough I may get another one that simply says “Father …?” An email may begin with a subject like this: “** Second Attempt **” if the previous email went unanswered for even a day.

In many companies, voice mail has been discontinued because it’s “too slow.” Many younger people seldom answer their phones let alone initiate phone calls. Communication is more commonly accomplished through instant messages, texts, and tweets. This results in a clipped quality to conversations that limits thoughtful discussion.

Yes, we are in a big hurry. But back to my question: Have you noticed that God doesn’t seem to be in a big hurry? God could easily solve everything instantly with a mere snap of His fingers; one word and it would be fixed. He does not do this, however, and He has His reasons. Perhaps it is important for us to live some of our questions in order to appreciate their depths. Perhaps the problems we want solved are themselves part of a deeper solution that God is working to make us humbler, wiser, and /or stronger.

Beyond puzzling, God’s slow pace can also be dismaying. Why does God allow the wicked to inflict so much damage for so long? Why does He allow error and heresy to go unchecked? Why does He permit sinners to remain unpunished and uncorrected?

The Church too is often rather slow to respond or act. We will go on for decades, even centuries, pondering and reflecting while the world rushes forward at light speed into error, darkness, and confusion. We often want the Church to have quick answers and effective responses to all of this; we want the Church to turn on a dime but that’s like trying to turn an aircraft carrier around.

Though at times imponderable, God’s delay is sinless. The Church’s delay, however, may be admixed with sin, sloth, and resistance. This does not mean that all the delay of the Church is sinful. Especially in today’s world of quick, often rash reaction, there is still the need for careful, thoughtful, prayerful deliberation. Our faith doesn’t reduce easily to sound bites. The Gospel does not fit on a bumper sticker. The Church should not be reduced to a fire department, but she should keep her identity as a careful medical practice. The urgent should not eclipse the important.

Yes, all of this has been a hard lesson for me to learn. I am impatient by nature; I tap my foot incessantly in meetings, thinking, let’s get to work already! I am a bit like the impatient field hand in the Gospel (Mat 13:24), who wanted to tear out the weeds from amongst the wheat. The Lord cautioned against doing so because it might harm the wheat. He said that they should be allowed to grow together until the harvest; the day of judgement will come, but not yet.

Indeed, rash actions can cause harm, even if unintentionally. Quick or draconian measures to eliminate error and sin may harm the saints and ration the Spirit. Conflicts have their place. They can call the question and sharpen the distinction between the good and the wicked; darkness can allow the light to shine even more gloriously.

But Father, but Father! What about the many souls who are lost and confused in the silence while the Church delays, reflecting and pondering? I know, I know; I have no simple answer, except to point back to God. While the Church’s delay may be prudent or imprudent, in these hurried times of instant communication and demanded answers, God’s sinless delay and lengthy silences still shine before us and challenge our often-rash instincts.

God takes His time. The Jewish people were 400 years in slavery and 40 years in the desert. From then it was 1800 years to the Christ, who spent thirty of His thirty-three years in seclusion and silence.

Yes, for reasons of His own, God is not in a big hurry. For my part, I must learn this hard lesson and be careful to enter into the silence of God through prayer. Having prayed in that silence I must emerge to patiently, teaching and preaching the faith that God has revealed. I can do no more, but I can do no less.

Cardinal Robert Sarah’s words are a fitting conclusion to this hard lesson for us modern compulsives:

Silence is of capital importance because it enables the Church to walk in the footsteps of Jesus, imitating his thirty silent years of Nazareth….and his intimate dialogue with the Father in the solitude and silence of the desert….

Light makes no noise. If we want to approach this luminous source, we must assume an attitude of contemplation and silence….The true nature of the Church is not found in what she does but in what she testifies. Christ asked us to be light. He ordered us not to conquer the world, but to show men the way, the truth and the life.

I know well that God’s silence constantly runs into man’s impatience…[but] nowadays man fosters a kind of compulsive relationship with time. One day we will understand everything. Until then it is necessary to seek without making noise.  

Who can understand God?…As with all questions connected with God, there is a stage when the search can go no farther. The only thing to do is to raise our eyes, to stretch out our hands toward God, and to pray in silence while awaiting the dawn…. [Robert Cardinal Sarah, The Power of Silence, pp. 219-221]

About Beckita

Beckita, widow, mother and grandmother, lives in Missoula, Montana. After more than thirty years of service, she retired from two careers: elementary school educator and director of liturgical music ministry in a local parish. Serving the Catholic Church in many capacities since early childhood, she now provides care for a nearly 90 year old priest of Chinese origin and collaborates with him in evangelizing the Chinese people. For more than twenty-five years, she has welcomed words from heaven concerning these sobering times in which we live and, like so many, takes seriously Our Lord and Our Lady’s call to intercede for the return of souls to God. Responding to heaven’s call for prayer, for her, included making pilgrimages to shrines in Europe, Asia and South America. She says these travels, added to her years as a Peace Corps volunteer in West Africa in the mid-seventies, have expanded her heart to hold dear all peoples of the world. She is a longtime member of TNRS community and when she began reading Charlie’s posts, immediately, she found that his mission and message harmonize well with Church approved private revelation of our times. In September 2015, she accepted an invitation to become part of TNRS Answers Team. As events of the Storm evolved, last fall (2016), she accepted Charlie’s invitation to become managing editor of TNRS should he need to leave the site. With great gratitude to and for Charlie, founder of TNRS, and with great respect and admiration for the lifelong experiences and God-given gifts he brought to bear on his work at this site - she knows we all know he’s irreplaceable – still, she considers it a great privilege to serve the TNRS community.
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110 Responses to We Walk by Faith, Not by Sight

  1. Theresa McAvinney says:

    First, the €œfood.This is an excellent and €œtimely piece by Msgr. Charles Pope.

    Second, the request. Would you kindly give a calendar for FF to Carmen and Mrs. Lemiere (and probably Joanne, too) so that they are aware of when we will be using their rooms. Kris already knows.

    Great meeting last night. I’€™m still smiling!
    Talk to you later,
    Theresa

    Like

  2. Rose says:

    Great piece! Thanks for posting it Beckita.

    Liked by 4 people

  3. Doug says:

    Good article Becks. When I used to receive an email that makes me upset, I would fire back an emotional response right away later to regret many things I said. I have learned a few things over the years due to my mistakes. I now will write the response and save it in my draft box for a day or more. When I go back and read it a day later, I oft reword what I wrote or decide the issue was not that important and not worth dying for on that hill. I still have some drafts in my in box that have been sitting for months. I have to say though, it is nice to get my thoughts down even though I may not send it. It helps me ponder and process what my Christian response should be. I am slowly learning. Praise be to God!

    Liked by 9 people

    • Beckita says:

      This is wisdom, Doug. Thanks, yet again, for your witness… this time, for me anyway, to Love and Patience.

      Liked by 6 people

    • singingjuls says:

      I sure can relate to that Doug! I too have learned to write letters to loved ones when frustrated but don’t send them. Rereading them does give me a good perspective of what I am really feeling, and if it is really worth it to follow through and send it, or let go and let God. I am more apt not to send them. Our God is so merciful and is still working on this crazy gal with blond roots. I just hope along with the gray will come more wisdom. All in His time!

      Liked by 3 people

      • joanne1950 says:

        So, letters to loved ones….sometimes you should send them. Reading your comment sent me back @ 45 years to a letter my mother handed me after I said something (and I honestly can’t remember what I said) about the BVM that she did not like one iota. It was a 4 page admonishment that was justly handed to me. And it did reset my sails.

        Liked by 2 people

  4. billbad42 says:

    Wow! Talk about right between the eyes for me! I don’t know about anyone else here, though I suspect many are like me though they keep it close to the breast like I tend to do….. but I continue to battle the feeling that I “need” or “should” be doing something more to advance TNRS RIGHT NOW… I share so much from this site because I want to help be a source of hope for others in despair and want to try to be a Sherpa for those who could use it…. and I have this feeling, ever since being introduced to Charlie’s talk videos last year mostly (but even before then now that I think about it…), that in MY lifetime “something is going to happen” and “that I need to be a part of it”…. but this piece helps me to remember that though I can help while I am here to those I meet, know, and love… who I am I really? As the Cardinal states, I am meant to be light for others as a child of God – to represent Jesus when I can… to share Him! I am not Ironman, Superman, Batman, etc….. Yes, I want my children, family, and friends (all of you!) to all make it to Heaven…. but I’m not the one to get them there… God alone provides that opportunity through His power alone… if I die today, first I want to make sure I make it there! I can’t worry or be anxious about my kindergartener and what will happen while I am gone… that is why I pray every day that they be filled with the Holy Spirit and love and trust Jesus with all their heart! I try my best to help raise a family of future TNRS’ers…. and I can’t rush time… all I can do is live in the moment with patience and trust in the Lord’s grace and mercy…. and for those emails and voicemails… I will return them after I am done praying for the day 😉

    Thanks all for letting me ramble…. I got to the point at the end… I was just helping you practice patience too… God bless us all and grant us the virtue of Patience!

    Liked by 9 people

    • Beckita says:

      Absolutely beautiful, Bill! You’ve written an Epistle of the Storm and blessed are we who read your words. To living in the moment: Amen. To patience and trust in the Lord’s grace and mercy: Amen. To the primacy of prayer: Amen. Thank you so much.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Bill says:

      Bill you just advanced the TNRS. Your writing and wisdom touched me. I’m 70 with a kindergarten grandchild living under my roof. I pray for her conversion daily and some times I rush it, but at 5 years old I must be patient knowing and trusting that God will provide others to lead her to Him.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Mick says:

      Hey, Bill, feel free to “ramble” anytime; I find that you always have something valuable to say. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • joanne1950 says:

      Perhaps, Bill, Father Dolindo Ruotolo’s Surrender Novena will help you and your family in your journey. It is easily googled. I now carry it on my I-phone for easy access. My friend is disseminating it like wildfire to everyone she meets. The burdens are many of so many. It is a relief to hand them over to Him.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Linda says:

    Sharing… this is truth Beckita😇

    Liked by 4 people

  6. Frank says:

    I recently read Cardinal Sarah’s book “The Power of Silence — Against the Dictatorship of Noise”. I urge the TNRS community to also read it. What a profound reflection about encountering God in the depths of silence! Entering into silence is an act of humility because we have to let go of our desire to control our encounter with the Lord. I know I have a very difficult time entering into this silence. I love to praise and worship God in prayer. I delight in thanking him for His mercy, grace and healing. I can’t say I “love” intercessory prayer but I am faithful to it because I believe that’s one of the ways we participate in God’s love for others. But, in all this prayer, I am doing the talking. While I have always asked the Lord to let me hear His voice, I’ve never really entered into His silence. I don’t think there’s a technique for this; rather, it’s a grace. I pray that I will cooperate with this grace if the Lord grants it to me.

    Cardinal Sarah is a wise and holy man for whom I have the greatest admiration. May the Lord bless him abundantly.

    Liked by 10 people

    • sheralyn80 says:

      Frank, I have this book sitting on my bookshelf. You are motivating me to read it! Thanks in advance.🙂

      Liked by 3 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      Frank, that is good recommended reading. I almost half way done with the book and I am loving it. ❤

      Liked by 3 people

    • Doug says:

      Frank, St. Ignatius contemplation is one way to enter into silence. It can get pretty deep.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Beckita says:

      Amen, Frank. Thanks for witnessing to this book and its recommended style of prayer. It is a beautiful book, a true gem, and Charlie recommended it some time ago as well. I began reading it in the summer and it’s one of those books to read in what I call, pondering pieces.

      Many a spiritual teacher recommends a gradual approach to entering into the prayer of silence. Start small – even 5-10 minutes daily – and, gradually, build the minutes. I am ever astounded at how faithfulness to this practice brings graces beyond the time of actual silence. For me, when I do so in the morning, the whole day unfolds more harmoniously in ways that I attribute to what happened in the sacred silence. And that is so deep, I couldn’t even clearly articulate what it was that the Lord communicated to my soul.

      God bless you, Frank, and all of us and our families.

      Liked by 5 people

    • dianebelvs says:

      I am halfway through Cardinal Sarah’s book and it is indeed worth reading.

      Liked by 4 people

    • Kim Sevier says:

      I’m almost through it, too. It is rich in beautiful Instruction! So worth reading!

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Florine Ho Tai says:

    so true what you are saying – reminds me of St. James recommendation: Let patience have her perfect work, making you whole and entire, lacking nothing. (James 1:4)

    Liked by 5 people

    • Diane says:

      Hi Flo, its Diane. What a pleasure to see you here.—— I like to remember 2 Peter 8-10…But do not forget this one thing, dear friends: With the Lord a day is like a thousand years, and a thousand years are like a day. The Lord is not slow in keeping his promise, as some understand slowness. Instead he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to repentance.But the day of the Lord will come like a thief. The heavens will disappear with a roar; the elements will be destroyed by fire, and the earth and everything done in it will be laid bare. I try to remind myself that if he had come a blink of an eye earlier, I just might be the one perishing, so I relish this length of time before it all comes tumbling down it gives me a chance to get my armor on nice and snug. Shoulders back, it is now time to pay attention as to who we say we are and be who God created us to be for these times.Love. i do. Diane

      Liked by 4 people

  8. Frank says:

    Did my post about Cardinal Sarah get lost in the mists of the internet? I didn’t receive the usual “awaiting moderation” comment.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Mick says:

      Frank… no, your excellent comment about Cardinal Sarah didn’t get lost. It just took a bit for moderation to occur. All of the moderators have “day jobs” (mine being that of a homeschooling mommy), so sometimes we simply don’t get to a comment right away. 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

  9. jlynnbyrd says:

    I received this in my email today and have watched it several times. There really is so much richness in the blessings each day if we would be silent, take it all in, and then give it all back in gratitude to God and each other. ❤

    A Grateful Day – David Steindl-Rast – Gratefulness.org
    https://youtu.be/zSt7k_q_qRU via @YouTube

    Liked by 6 people

    • singingjuls says:

      THAT WAS BEAUTIFUL! Thanks for sharing it Jen!

      Like

        • jlynnbyrd says:

          Just today, I received Br. David’s (who lived and worked alongside Thomas Merton) interview with Oprah which aired on October 29th. He beautifully articulates how to weather a “Storm” as he grew up in Nazi occupied Austria as a youth.

          http://mailchi.mp/gratefulness/br-david-and-oprah-winfrey-interview-no-ads-in-full

          There is a transcript of the video available on the website too. Toward the end, Oprah quotes a passage from Br. David’s newest book:

          “Daily it becomes clearer to me. Gratitude is a celebration of love, just as love is the lived, ‘Yes,’ of joyful mutual belonging. Gratitude celebrates life with a joyful, ‘Yes,’ at every knot of the great network in which everything is connected to everything. As we live this ‘Yes’ with ever more conviction, love ripens ever more abundantly in the autumn sun of life. I now see it as my main task to simply allow this to happen, since we do not die from death, but from fully ripened love.” ❤

          Like

  10. Joe says:

    To any who may feel so inspired please keep my neighbor in your prayers. He was in a motorcycle accident and from what I’ve heard he will have to have his leg amputated. He has a young family with a new born child.

    Liked by 4 people

  11. MarieUrsula says:

    This is refreshing. Ahhhhh.

    One reason I don’t text is because I’m a Troglodyte. I explain this to people who try to text me. The other is because I get stressed out when bombarded with too many messages requiring a response. Arrrgh!

    Here in the silence of the wilds of Oregon, we have some time, if we will accept it, simply to ponder the ways of God.

    Liked by 6 people

  12. As the bearer of the flaming sword it is ever more difficult to keep it in place while Hell is unleashed upon the Earth, yet it must remain so for a moment longer. A time will come when this shall no longer be, yet for now let us hope & pray as we dutifully go about our daily tasks without reservation.

    Liked by 3 people

  13. jaykay says:

    “Perhaps the problems we want solved are themselves part of a deeper solution that God is working to make us humbler, wiser, and /or stronger.”

    Ooooh boy, did that strike home! On the (long) way into work today I was meditating, as is my wont – actually no, I was whining, let’s be honest about this – about how even though I’ve been blessed over the last (now almost) 40 years with constant employment I’ve never really found my proper “niche”, never got the job I *really* wanted/was *most suitable* for/would have *developed* me most blahdy-blah, whingey-whinge.

    At break time, I happened – as is my wont – to look up TNRS and – *blahhhmmm* – Msgr. Pope’s words hit me right broadside. Thank you, Monsignor. Thank you Beckita for posting them. And, most importantly, THANK YOU GOD for all that you have given me, and for your plans for me.

    Mostly, I now think, to give me a much-needed sense of true gratitude and humility. Can’t have one without the other!

    Liked by 6 people

    • Doug says:

      Yes Jaykay. And that true sense of gratitude and humility will be like a magnet to attract others to the faith. I am learning to. God bless you!

      By the way, how close are you to Ballykelly in N. Ireland?

      Liked by 1 person

      • jaykay says:

        It’s a common name, Doug! there’s one in Co. Derry which is about 80 miles away at least, and another on Co. Down which is about maybe 30-40 or so.

        Liked by 3 people

        • Doug says:

          Jaykay, It’s the one in Derry. One of our storm dinner members is going over there as acting President to help a new Catholic College off to a good start. It is called Newman College and will be modeled similarly to Ave Maria College.

          Liked by 2 people

        • jaykay says:

          I should explain that Ireland is pretty parochial! We go by what are called “townlands” – outside the actual towns, which by your standards are… pretty small. So “Ballykelly” is “Baile Uí Cheallaigh”, the townland (baile = bally) of the Kellys. And given that Kelly is a pretty common name, it could be anywhere. Although some names are still pretty area-specific e.g. the O’Connor name still indicates, in great part, an origin in Cork or Kerry. And so on. But that’s good! People should be close to their roots. In my own case, on my mother’s side, I live in an area where that part of the family have been, according to parish records, for at least 300 years. But since Catholic records didn’t survive much before that time – thank you, the “Reformation” – in actual fact much, much longer, as people didn’t move tend to move around a great deal back then. So I probably live in an area where my ancestors have been since… well, who knows? Ireland has been “settled” since about 9,000 B.C., give or take, archaeologically speaking. Lord, I feel old😄

          Liked by 4 people

          • Doug says:

            Fascinating Jaykay. There is a certain mystic about Ireland that attracts my wife and I.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Doug says:

            Mystique that is….

            Liked by 2 people

          • joanne1950 says:

            Great info about Ireland. I wonder about the Ireland of my grandmother – Walsh, County Galway, Tuam. Where has it gone? You mention the Reformation, but how about Henry VIII and the EU? Abortion in Ireland – just can’t imagine it on any level.

            Liked by 1 person

          • jaykay says:

            Hi joanne1950: I’m just back from a walking holiday in Scotland (Joe Crozier’s ancestral land) wherein I was blessedly removed from a lot of electronic communication… and blessedly also didn’t miss it one bit – Cardinal Sarah is so right about the power of silence! Anyway, as regards Henry VIII, of unhappy memory, he in actual fact WAS the “reformation”, or the wretched beginning of it, in these Isles. His successors unfortunately took it much further – he himself was actually Catholic, and died with full Catholic rites, albeit not in communion with Rome, having set himself up as “head” of the Church in England. Which was still the Church, if you get my drift, not the heretical body it very soon became under his son Edward VI and then Elizabeth. And so on. Since his rule didn’t yet cover a good part of Ireland we managed to hold on for a while, but Lizzy and Jimmy 1st (he of the King James Bible) managed to complete the conquest, and the consequent destruction of much of the true Church in Ireland. And the rest is (sad) history.

            As regards abortion – don’t despair of us. As I’ve posted hereabouts before, the pro-life movement here is strong, despite the war against it by the MSM. You’ll never hear that, of course, if you depend on mainstream “reporting”. It’s the same story as in your country. But we’re greatly heartened by the strength of YOUR pro-life movement! Last July we had the equivalent in your terms, pro-rata, of 3 million on the streets of the capital for our annual Rally for Life. Can you imagine that in Washington? Even the bought-and-paid-for MSM might for once give honest coverage!! I’m just thinking that if we could ever get David Daleiden over here to address our rally, we’d probably double the number.

            Then maybe we could give him political asylum… 😎

            Well, probably not. Let’s not get carried away. Our whole Establishment is fully in thrall to the NWO, after all. What a shame it is that we, who spent centuries resisting foreign domination, are now enslaved again. Soft conquest indeed. Still, we fight on.

            God bless all here. J.

            Liked by 3 people

  14. CHASEPRO123 says:

    Here’s what I’m going to post on his blog. Let me know if I should add anything.

    Charlie,

    I was wondering if you would give us your thoughts on the recent developments surrounding the Amoris Laetitia/Dubia situation.

    I do not ask about this in a “storm-chaser” spirit. It’s just…we’re most of us Catholic here, and this is pretty much the most controversial thing going on in the Church right now. You’ve got confusion and strife touching on everything from the Sacraments, to the beliefs and relationships between Bishops and Cardinals, to the intentions of the Holy Father himself. And there are new developments every week, it seems like. A few words would be greatly appreciated.

    You’ve have written about this topic a few times already, but I just wondered if you’d had any new insights now that two of the four Cardinals (Cardinal Meisner and Caffarra) have died. I am not sure how many readers here are familiar with the situation. To recap:

    To date, Pope Francis has not answered the concerns raised since the Dubia was made public, on September 19, 2016, and he continues to refuse an audience with any of its authors. Despite the Dubia being made known to him over a year ago, Pope Francis has not given a reason why he won’t address it. There is also the matter of timing. Only a few days ago, on September 19th, 2017, Pope Francis (or his publicity team) announced a plan to “expand the scope” of the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family. While this act alone is perplexing (what could be expanded upon? and why now, in the midst of all the Amoris Laetitia/Dubia confusion?), what’s even more peculiar is that this announcement was made exactly one year after the Dubia was made public. To the day.

    So, instead of answering the Dubia, Pope Francis waited exactly one year to announce a plan to incorporate contested aspects of Amoris Laetitia into the John Paul II Institute (which was founded by, of all people, one of the Dubia Cardinals- Cardinal Caffarra). Surely this is not a coincidence, or is it? I mean, what is going on here? The whole situation is seriously odd.

    All of this is forgetting the ambiguous language (and proper implementation) of Amoris Laetitia itself, as well as the equally muddled language of what the “new” JPII Institute aims to do: to have “a diversified and analytical approach” which cannot be “limited to pastoral and missionary practices” of the past, etc.

    Last November, in your “The Divine Symphony” post, you said: “The time will come when Pope Francis and Cardinal Burke become affectionate allies. This will be a sign to you. When it happens, you will know we are fully underway to Rescue.”

    But in the ten months since that post, the relationship between Cardinal Burke and Pope Francis seems as strained and chilled as ever. Just yesterday, an interview was posted by Catholic Outlook.org in which Cardinal Burke was asked about all this. His responses were reassuring, but you can still detect hints of anxiety and uncertainty. The interview can be found here, for all who are interested: https://catholicoutlook.org/exclusive-australian-interview-cardinal-burke/

    Lastly, I just want to make it clear: I will never abandon the Catholic Church. Ever. Even if things get so bad that I might want to. Pope Francis is not some Masonic-stooge or anti-pope or whatever; he’s our Holy Father. He’s the Vicar of Christ, the Head of the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church on Earth. We should all continue to pray for him and his intentions, because he seems to have good intentions in all that he does. He’s trying to reach people, to pull everyone back into the Faith. But at the same time, why not answer the Dubia Cardinals? Why not clear the air once and for all? Why fiddle with the Pope Saint John Paul II Institute in such chaotic and confusing times?

    The Church needs unity and clarity now more than ever, and yet Pope Francis continues to approach these problems in…well, befuddling ways. I was telling my brother (CHADPRO123) about all this the other night. I teach a Confirmation class for middle and high school students, and I told my brother that if half of my students went home and told their divorced-and-remarried parents that their teacher said they could now receive Communion, I’d be in serious trouble. The Priest or Deacon would probably sit me down and wonder what I’d been saying that led these students, and their parents, to commit sacrilege.

    And yet this, apparently, is what is happening with the actions (or inaction) of the Pope. It’s all quite disturbing. I’m not sure what to think because such a situation is, to my limited knowledge, unprecedented. You have confusion and ambiguity in matters of doctrine coming from the top down, which…in any other situation, a Catholic could just say “just listen to the Pope.” Now that does not seem to be the case.

    Also, again, I know that Pope Francis cannot change doctrine. But he can do what he seems to be doing now: making the whole issue of doctrine seem like a side issue to “new” problems facing married couples and families.

    Anyway, any seasoned insights on this subject from you (and anyone else here in the comment section) would be greatly appreciated.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Beckita says:

      Your concerns are duly noted, Chase, and surely shared by so many. Charlie is preparing to address issues of the Church in an upcoming podcast. I’ll be sure that Charlie and Chaz get to see your comment as they prepare for future podcasts.

      Honestly, in this house, we continue to come back to the thought that only in hindsight will we clearly understand all that has, is and will transpire. You’ve expressed a critical reminder: Remain in the Barque of Peter for the duration of this Storm. And, as we know, prayer changes things so onward we go, praying and doing penance for our Holy Mother the Church, trusting in Christ’s promise: the gates of hell will not prevail against her.

      Liked by 4 people

  15. gotoJoseph says:

    We walk by faith, and not by light, unless we are trying to read the signs of the times without squinting our eyes. 🙂 Here is a post that tries to tie many Marian apparitions, biblical and world events together, rather well i think. https://www.romancatholicman.com/leading-expert-catholic-eschatology-weighs-current-earthly-celestial-signs/ If nothing else, this should create an appropriate sense of urgency (if you need more) for always being spiritually prepared.

    Liked by 5 people

  16. This is profound. I am especially moved by the words of Cardinal Robert Sarah: “Light makes no noise. If we want to approach this luminous source, we must assume an attitude of contemplation and silence.” Excellent choice to share!

    Liked by 2 people

  17. MaryT says:

    Well, troubled heart here. What am I supposed to say to my 23 1/2 yr. old son when he walks up and receives communion at his grandfather’s funeral Mass (my Dad’s). He knows fully well that he shouldn’t have. I never said a word to him about it. Meanwhile he is busy living with his girlfriend and they are planning a 2018 marriage. Haven’t been in a church for years. Truly, I find it very very hard to be happy for them or myself. What is a Mother to do? Hard times here, hard heart.

    Liked by 2 people

    • calamity jane says:

      Praying for you dear MaryT……There have been so many of us in a similar circumstance. Truly it is heartbreaking. Remember Jesus rejected no one;in fact he sought out the lost and the sinners. His mercy is beyond our understanding – as is his love and patience. Enjoy and love what is good about your son and his girlfriend. Leave the rest in Jesus’s hands. Take your aching heart to Mary. She can love you into peace. Trust them and keep praying. love, one who understands.

      Liked by 6 people

    • jlynnbyrd says:

      MaryT, my son is about the same age. Could you tell him that receiving Communion outside a state of grace is sinful and suggest that he go to Confession?
      In my parish, all may approach the altar, however if we are not in a state of grace, not had our first Communion, or not Catholic we may cross our arms over our chests and instead receive a blessing.
      I chose to remain seated in the pews along with a hand full of others during my annulment. It felt right for me personally to admit that I was not worthy to approach the altar for communion and be a sign to others, in a sense, that sinners are welcomed by the Church to worship. I made spiritual communions daily at that time, which were a great grace for me. Just some thoughts. Blessings to you and yours. ❤ https://www.ewtn.com/Devotionals/prayers/blsac4.htm

      Liked by 4 people

    • Sean Sullivan says:

      I am not a theologian nor a religious.

      Mercy. Your description is of me, twenty plus years ago. I attended mass with my Grandmother, Mother in the same pew. I got up to receive, my Grandmother stated “Sit down, no you can’t [receive]” I sat down, looked at my Mother who motioned and stated “get up, you need Him the most”

      I obeyed my Mother and received the Eucharist. Twenty plus years later, I still contemplate this action, (including right now). Presently, I attend daily mass, recite at least four rosaries per day, Liturgy of the Hours, Divine Mercy Chaplet and an assortment of other prayers including the Angelus.

      Don’t worry about your son, keep praying for him. Mercy.

      Mercy trumps judgement.

      P.S. Yes, I have sought forgivness for receiving the Eucharist unworthily, though not for this specific incident, a much later one.

      Liked by 6 people

    • Doug says:

      I share your pain Mary!

      Liked by 3 people

    • Sean Sullivan says:

      Mary,
      On this September 23rd day I offered my prayers for your son’s conversion at a mass celebrating St. Padre Pio. Our celebrating Priest, went a step further and implored St. Padre Pio to intercede on our behalf, all the prayers in our Hearts to give them to God Almighty.
      Sean

      Liked by 5 people

    • Joe Crozier says:

      It’s a tough one Mary. My darling wee sister went ballistic at me at breakfast in the restaurant in Garabandal when I suggested she should not receive communion until she had been to confession. It only got worse as I tried to explain why. She went totally nuts at me much to the consternation of the others at breakfast. That was the end of our brother sister pilgrimage. As far as she was concerned it was no business of her iterfereing sanctimonious brother. Things have got better over the last couple of years but not totally. I still have to be very careful.

      Only a few weeks ago after the gospel that tells us if we do not correct our neighbour in sin we will be held accountable for their sin on the day of judgment I had to repeat the exercise in my own parish with friends who are Eucharistic Ministers and very good people. This time I had the advantage of just having listened to a very good homily on the gospel and I prayed hard for a better approach. It was stll very difficult and my efforts were far from perfect but the outcome was much better – I think – – at least they did not start screaming at me in church!

      One of the things I found interesting is that scripture tells us that unworthy reception not only harms the soul but also the body. It literally makes us sick.

      This time I began by ensuring I knew all the relevant facts. In general in approaching the topic I found that gentle inquiry was better than strong statements. It also helped to explain my motivation – to give proper consideration to God, to ensure the well being of all those involved in the scenario and to remind them that there is a proper way back. I did my best to be loving and non judgmental of the people while not compromising on the principle. I should have spoken to a priest first and asked for more advice.

      I hope this helps in some small way Mary.

      Liked by 5 people

    • Beckita says:

      Joining in prayer, Mary T, for you and for your son. It has always resonated strongly and deeply whenever Charlie has said the Storm is an instrument of rescue. Soon, and very soon, all will know that God *is* and many are they, I believe, who will remark as in this statement: “Here is a trustworthy saying that deserves full acceptance: Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners–of whom I am the worst.” (1 Timothy 1:15)

      Liked by 4 people

      • Beckita says:

        Mary, I also thought you might like to read a guest article on site. You can find it in the black nav bar at the top of the page and it’s entitled, “Converting Family and Friends”. Here’s a link: https://charliej373.wordpress.com/converting-family-and-friends/

        Liked by 1 person

      • MaryT says:

        Oh my thank you Beckita! Your response means so much to me!
        Please know that I have also been praying for you and your Mother (since the time I learned she was deceased). You two are always included in my Rosary and Divine Mercy Chaplet. I have sooooo many people to pray for that I now have to take my notebook full of names and place it in an Intention spot on my sorry little desk when I am praying. I feel certain that God knows my intentions for all and I run out of Rosary beads way before I am done with the Rosary! Onward forward to another whole Rosary or Divine Mercy Chaplet, which I am negligent in because I am too tired to continue on. God see’s and know’s all……
        I am so very thankful to all here, my own world here is in a state of kind of confusion what with family and the shape the world is in…
        One of the members here (CrewDog, I think) says GOD SAVE ALL HERE and I say, thank you, as I echo that!

        Liked by 5 people

        • Beckita says:

          Thank you so very much for your prayers, Mary. I get what you’re saying about so much and so many for whom to pray. I know we take nothing from our own intentions when we expand our love in prayer and include the many. You say it well: God sees and knows all. It is a great light in the darkness to consider TNRSers praying for one another. I’m grateful so many have responded to you. We really are in solidarity. Great hope can be chosen and grow as God unfolds His Plan. May all our children and grandchildren make a return to the Lord. ♥️

          Liked by 3 people

    • jj says:

      Charlie’s advice to me in a somewhat similar situation was “prayer, patience, penance, and reparations”. In doing those four things I found a lot of peace. The patience part is the hardest. I would suggest the Surrender Novena.

      Liked by 3 people

  18. Thank you and God bless

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Joe Crozier says:

    Thank you all who joined me in prayer that our Catholic PM, Bill English, would win this general election in New Zealand. He has indeed gained the most votes so far but because of proportional represention it looks as if we have a hung parliament with all the power residing in one MP who did not even win his seat. His name is Winston Peters and in the past has shown support for euthanasia. We still await late votes to be included in the final tally. Keep the prayers coming please.

    Liked by 3 people

  20. Beckita says:

    The first American martyr, Fr. Stanley Rother, was beatified today in Oklahoma City. What a TNRS intercessor he will be! Fr. Stan could not abandon his people. Ministering to the people in a southwestern Guatemala parish, violent murders began to be perpetrated on his parishioners. At the beginning of 1981, Father was warned that his name was on a death list. He returned to America to contemplate and discern his next right step. After a retreat, he said: “My people need me. I can’t stay away from them any longer.” His brother Tom said to him, upon hearing that Stanley wanted to return to Guatemala: “Why do you want to go back? They’re waiting on you and they’re gonna kill you.” Rother said: “Well, a shepherd cannot run from his flock.”

    After his murder, before his body was returned to Oklahoma for burial, the people in his parish, in Santiago Atitlán, wanted to take out his heart as they knew his heart belonged to them. At first, his parents resisted but were later persuaded to see the potent significance of this desire on the part of the beautiful Guatemalan people who revered their shepherd with their own hearts.

    Here is the Shrine inside the parish church in Guatemala. People are praying before Fr. Stan’s heart:

    Father Blessed Stan Rother, pray for us in this Storm that we remain faithful to God and faithful to those He entrusts to our care.

    Liked by 12 people

  21. I could never stand voice mails. /i’d go away from my desk for a 2 hour meeting, then come back to find 18 new messages stacked up waiting for me,

    Liked by 1 person

  22. thankful4mercy says:

    Please pray for a dear friend, her husband and their daughte in their great loss. . Our dear friend’s daughter took her life last night. So my friend and husband and their daughter are without a daughter/sister today. Please pray For her to be with Jesus and the Blessed Mother , healed and free asap.

    Like

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